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The Morehouse clarion. [volume] (Bastrop, La.) 1874-1904, May 28, 1880, Image 1

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DEVOTED TO POLITICS, AGRICULTURE, INTERESTS, .AND THE MATERIAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE COUNTRY.
VOL. VI.
BASTROP, LOUISIANA, FRIDAY MAY 28, 1880
NO 27.
^lotfhoMSe station.
published every friday.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTIONS.
One year, in advance -
Six months "
Three months " 1
»,
advertising rates.
Space. 11 «a» I Bmaa| 6mos ! 1 year.
1 gqoare.
ä squares.
4 squares.
4 colnmn
I colttmn.
1 colnmn.
43 00
5 00
8 50
10 00
20 00
40 00
|6 50
9 ßO
15 00
18 00
40 00
60 00
$9 00
15 00
23 00
30 00
50 00
90 00
$10 00
90 00
30 00
40 00
io 00
125 00
Transieöt advertisements will be in
serted at the rate of 1 50 per square of
ten lines for the first insertion, and 75
centB for each subsequent insertion.
professional cards.
Frank Vaughau,
attorney at law,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Will practice in the Courts of More
house and West Carroll. Special atten
tion to the collection of claims by suit
before the Magistrate's Courts.
n. c. jnoRGJur,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
MONROE, La.
Will {practice in State and Federal
Courts. aprilll-y
sjtJtMsojr Lürr,
attorney at law,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Office—South-east corner of Public
Square.
Will practice in the courts of the
14th Judicial District composed of
the parishes of Morehouse, Ouachita and
Richland, and in the Supreme Conrt at
Monroe. julyl9-y
/AS. BOSSEflr H.H. NAFF
B usscy tf JTalT,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Will practice in the courts ot the Sixth
Judicial District, composed of the parish» s
of Morehouse and West Carroll, and
n the Supreme Court at Monroe; also in
the Federal Courts.
Office—East side of public square;
C. NEWTON WM.I. HALL
JTewton if Hall,
attorneys at law,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Will practice in the courts of the 6tb
Judicial District, composed of the par
ishes of Morehonse, and West Carroll
and also in the parishes of Richland,
Oaaohita, Union, Franklin, Catahoula,
trad Jackson, and in tha Supreme Court
at Monroe, Louisiana.
j9ie.jp. c. Guar,
BASTROP, LA.
Offers his prufessiodal sei vices to the
eople of Bastrop and vicinity. Can be
found at his residence, or at the drng store
oi Dr. A. L. Bussey, when not profes
onally engaged. feb9-y
Geo. b . JUarable, Jft. 0
BASTROP, LA.
I hereby tender my professional services
io the people of Bastrop and Morehouse
parish. When not professionally engaged,
can be found at my residenco one mile
oftown at night, and at the Drug
Store of Dr. A. L. Bossey during the day
reb9-y ^
BUÀTTj
öp.
ORAL SURGEON,
Offers to the public his professional
experience of thirty years in the above
speciality for the treatment of all dis
eases peculiar to the mouth and preser
vation of its natural organs, the teeth.
Charges for all dental services graded
by quality and character desired, to snit
the times. For dental substitute», from
$15, $60. $75, $100, $200, up to Buatt's
celebrated improved gold plate, $350 for
full sets, recommended as healthy, and
to perform the functions of mastication
satisfactorily as to kind selected.
. Without previous arrangements, cash
u invariably expected.
Moved to new office, near the Baptist
Church.
Dentistry.
® all rrs branches, by
DR. M. J. MAShENGILL.
. Ott fillings from $2 to $5; silver fill
i«? 9 . m *3» foil upper and lower
artificial teeth $40. Extracting teeth
*» ■peciality. Having had mv office
*®*Jy fitted up, I wfll take pleasure in
wrvlng all persons wishing work in my
COME AND SEE,
tiœR »pair
g" «de-walks and under-pin yoor
^■s. Call &ad amalna th e hriokT
A CÜRTI*.
vs oiusüiT
XTS CASH TH-A.T GETS THE
5b
ITS THIS HOUSE THAT FIGURES THE LOWEST
■ . 'p. : , ; , <
There is nospread-eagle style about us. but any one who wants Close, Cash, bids
on bis orders, will miss it if he does not give us a chance to figure on them. Our
prices will indicate who and what we are and what we can do for those who have
money. Call and see us and we will show yon some figures that will convince you
that it
PAYS TO BUY FOR CASH
STAPLE DRY GOODS.
Calicoes, from 7 to 10 cents; bleached cotton from 7 to 10; Londale and other cam
bric, 124c
DRESS GOODS.
American lawns, 19 to 12£ cents pei yard ; Union lawns, 20 to 25 cents per yard,
pure linen lawns 25 to 30 cents per yard; Lace buntings, 20 cents per yard; white
piquet—a large and beautiful assortment.
HOSIERY! HOSIERY!
Large stock of all lands of ladies, children's and gents hose. Ladies embroidered
Balbriggans, 50 cents; Fancy striped hose, 124 to 50 cents ; children's fancy hose
from 8 to 25 per pair.
HAMBURG EDGINGS AND INSERTINGS.
FROM FOUR CENTS UP. À large and beautiful stock of this gOods on hand
OERLBER & GOLDMAN,
Successors to B. Silbernagel. Sr.
LUMBER !
LUMBER !
BILLS FILLED :
ON SHOT NOTICE
AT PRICES TO
SUIT THE TIMES !
Cypress a Speciality,
and as cheap as pine.
Mill six miles West of Bastrop. Free
Ferry at Magnolia place.
WT K. HENDER80N.
Lehman Bros..
New York.
Lehman, Durr & Co.,
Montgomery, Ala.
Lehman, Abraham & Co,
COTTON FACTORS
—AND—
Commission Merchants,
Cor. Gravier 6c Baronne Sts.,
E. Lehman, )
M. Lehman, > NEW ORLEANS, L a
H. Abraham j
W. A. PEALE,
cotton factor
Commission Merchant
No. 52 Union St.,
NEW ORLEANS, Louisiana.
[scccmsob to bawlïk8 k mch8kll,]
COTTON FACTOR AND
Commission Merchant
f ;)i ?v "< • •
No. 45 Union St.,
KiWDSLlAH*.
Avoyelles parish is just now in
a stàte of excitement o?er the
di covered guilt of Rev. F. K.
Quay, the pastor of St. Joseph's
Catholic Church in ^Marksville.
Charges have been made against
the reverend rascal bj theinten
ded victims of his indecent as
sanlts, and,.be was found guilty
of the grossest immorality and
publicly denounced. He admit
ted hisjguilt^and was allowed to
depart in peace: The MarksviUe
Bulletin gives the following de
scription of his personal appear
8" ce; "He is an. animal of the
hugheet type, over six feet high,
weighs about 250 pounds, large
features, grey ejes, large head
of po werful mouldy and is about
forty-five years old. He speaks
French with the Canadian pro
nunciation, and English with a
decidedly French accent. He is
a villian of the déepest dye, a
dangerous impostor, and as bad
a man as disgraces the earth.
Pass him around and give him a
wide berth."
Says the Nashville American:
-Unless Seymour can be nomi
nated the obvious way to com
pose New York is to take a man
not involved in the bitterness of
of New York politics."
A rich man who is troubled to
know what to do with his money
should try the experiment of
leaving it to a young man who
has been brought up to think be
if too good to. work.
The ; Boeton Poet says the way
to retain yöur footing when a
goat charge« is to tit down!
be revived and
- «11 n t
FOR THE LADIES.
Langueduc is the popular lace
for trimming white muslins.
Hoods are to
wraps.
Worth is exercising his genius
just now in creating Spanish cos
tames.
Rich and substantial fabrics
are necessary when plain suits
are preferred.
Bow-and-arrow combs in sil
ver and pearl or gold and crys
tals are worn.
Gathered ruffles, made very
narrow and double of the silk,
are on Paris dresses.
Somebody earned $3000 by
embroidering the blue silk panels
for a New York drawing room.
Pleated skirts forming double
kilts are very fashionable for
foulards and for thin wool
dresses.
Pretty three-cornered fichus of
Pompadour muslin, edged with
lace will be worn with light
dresses.
Coat-sleeves ot dresses are
made very high on the shoulders,
and stand upward like men's
coat sleeves.
Parisian dresses of to-day glit
ter exceedingly; and seqains, as
well as gem-like beads, appear
on many.
Gay cotton dresses are quite
as effective as those of foulard
and form part of outfits for New
port and Saratoga.
The great novelty in summer
underskirts is made of the new
Canton suitings in gay stripes,
which suggest awnings.
Shawls with solid centers and
embroidered borders are being
utilized fox the long coats and
surtouts now in fashion.
Stars of silver and gold that
decorate the linings of some par
asols give them a comical like
ness to the ceilings of some
churche?.
Spanish lace will be the fash
ionable net for polonaises in the
summer, and will be worn with
dresses of pale gray, heliotrope
or ecru silk.
The principal objection to the
decorated parasols is that if you
have them it seems wasteful not
to carry them, and the populace
will stare.
Black and yellow gauze, ar
ranged so as to suggest the
stripes on a wasp's back, is the
last dressmaker's device. It
would make an angel look ugly.
French papers say that jewelry
is very little worn; but that will
not discourage the women who
bought dollar lockets a few years
ago and are determined to wear
them out.
A fireman on a Minnesota
railroad engine climbed out on
the pilot, at the risk of his life,
and rescued a man who was ly
ing on the track—a man of straw,
which mi8cheivous boys had
placed there.
"Virtue commands respect."
But Virtue doesn't stand on the
street corners and lubricate the
sidewalk with tobacco juice.
When we say that a painting
is horribly executed, do we mean
that it is badly bong ?
CAPT. KIDD'S GOLD.
[Atlantic City Review.]
During the stillness of the
night a couple of men were en
gaged last week in searching
Sufbng tne nuis oT Jtuii s ureeS
and vicinity, less than a mile be
low-tbe excursion houses, for the
hidden treasure which tradition
says Capt. Kidd, many, many
years ago, secreted there. They
boarded for a week with Mr.
Johnson, residing in the lower
part of the city. They held their
own counsel, and the object of
their visit was a mystery even to
the family with whom they were
living. They would say, on leav
ing the house in the evening,
that they would not return till
early dawn, and for four nights
were absent. Their mission prob
ably would never have been dis
covered had it uot happened
that a cow-boy happened in that
locality about 5 o'clock in the
morning. They made no exca
vatious, as did a man by the
name of Wescott, about seven
teen years since, but were hunt
ing for a landmark and a pecu
liar tree which the story writer,
Lewis, had in one of his New
York newspaper novels describ
ed as being located on this
beach.
The writer, of course, had no
idea that such landmarks realiy
were in existence, but, under
standing the old traditions about
buried treasures on the Jersey
beaches, happened by mere
chance to weave the name of
Absecon Beach into the thread
of his story. This is not the first
instance that men have searched
on this island for gold. In Dr.
Reed's "History of Atlantic Ci
ty" are several allusions to the
traditions about this bilden
body. In this history is the fol
lowing paragraph. "Nearly a
hundred years ago strangers vis
ited the place to dig for the
buried treasures of the old free
booter, and marks of these or
more recent excavations are still
visible. Some oame with the
conviction that it was enchanted
treasure, and they would fret the
sides of knolls with their rude
spades at night in silence, be
lieving that if they should strike
an iron-pot or canvass bag of
gold and a sound escaped from
their lips it would go clinking
and clanking down into deep
chasms under the earth."
The Atlanta Constitution
thinks that there is a bright out
look for our cotton planters in
the almost complete failure of
the cotton crop in China. China
is a long way off, but an acci
dent like this always affects the
prices of cotton in European
markets. The Chinese require
several million bales of cotton
for home use every year, If the
home crop fails they make up the
deficiency from India, and the
Indian export to England falls
off, and American cotton, as a
consequence, goes up in price;
"Don't be afraid," said a snob
to a German laborer ; "sit down
and make yourself my equal."
"I vould haff to blow my prains
out," was the reply of the Teu
ton.
"Humph !" said a young gen
tleman, at a play with a young
lady, "I could play the lover bet
ter than that myself." "I would
like to see you try," was the
naive reply'
A Sad Accident
In the afternoon of last Thurs
day, Mr. J. T. Swan left town in
company with Mr. Bumpuss to
return home. WK î I a «îrïwincr
tnrougn tne woods this side the
Phillips' gin bouse, a large tree
fell across his bnggy, striking the
unfortunate gentleman on the
head, crushing in the skull and
breaking his neck. Death was
instantaneous. Mr. Bumpuss,
was on horse back, and behind
Mr. Swan's buggy, saw the tree
falling, and oalled out to Mr.
Swan. But the latter was doomed
and before he could strike his
horse the tree was on him. The
buggy was completely demol
ished.
The death of this estimable
gentleman and useful citizen will
leave vacant a place in our com
munity hard to fill again. Mr.
Swan numbered his friends by
the hundred, and many a poor
man will miss the kind hand so
steaily stretched forth to help
him in his hour of neèd. The
deceased, we believe, had never
been married. His only relatives*
in this parish that we know of are
bis brother Mr. A. l. Swan, and
his niece Mrs. A. l. Smith of
Ouachita City.—[Monroe Bulle
tin. »
Circumstantial Evidence.
About forty years ago a gentle
was tried and convicted upon
circumstantial evidence of the
murder of his niece. She was
heard to exclaim! "Don't kill
me!" and that instant a pistol or
fowling-piece was filed off. Upon
these circumstances the gentle
man was convioted and executed
Near twelve months, pfter, the
neice who had eloped, aprived in
England, and hearing of the af
fair, elucidated the whole trans
act on. It appeared that she
had formed an attachment for a
person of whom her uncle disap
proved. When walking in the
the fields, he was earnestly dis
suading her from the connection,
when sue replied that she was re
solved to have him, or it would
be her death, and therefore said,
"Don't kill me, uncle—don't kill
me!" At the moment she uttered
these words a fowling-piece wad
discharged by a sportsman in a
neighboring field. The same
night she eleoped from her
uncle's house, and the combina
tion of the 8Qspicious circum
stances occasioned his ignomi
nous death.
Texas is a vast empire in itself
having an area of 3^5,000 square
miles. It extends through nearly
10 degrees of latitude and over 13
degrees of longitude. It has 60,
000 more square miles than the
German Empire, 70,000 more
than France, and is more than
twice as large as Great Britain.
Love never enters the Chinese
stories. The hero is always a
chap who made his ducats in
America by laundry we rk, and
the heroine is a girl who wants
revenge on him because he killed
her oat.
The sum of $4000 has
raised for a public monument to
Senator Morton of Indiana,
which is to be erected at Indi
anapolis.
The Grand Jury recently in
session at Rayville, found thirty
five true tolls,

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