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The Morehouse clarion. [volume] (Bastrop, La.) 1874-1904, June 11, 1880, Image 1

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'devoted to politics, agriculture, home interests, and the material development of the country.
VOL. VI.
B ASTROP, LOUISIANA, FRIDAY JUNE 11, 1880
NO 29.
Hotelimtse Clarion.
PII I V LISHED EVERY FRIDAY.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTIONS.
One year, in advance §2
Six months "
Three months "
1 00
75
~ ADVERTISING RATES.
"gpäce. I 1 mo I 3 mos | 6 mos | 1 year.
1 square.
M squares.
4 squares.
4 column
$ column.
1 column.
$3 00
5 00
8 50
10 00
20 00
40 00
$6 50
9 50
15 00
18 00
40 00
60 00
$9 00
15 00
23 00
30 00
50 00
90 00
$10 00
20 00
30 00
40 00
70 00
125 00
Transient advertisements will be in
serted at the rate of 1 50 per square of
ten lines for the first insertion, and 7»
centB for each subséquent insertion.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
Frank Vaughan,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Will practice in the Courts of More
house and West Carroll. Special atten
tion to the collection of clainls by suit
before the Magistrate's Courts.
0. C. *HORGrJlJ\",
attorney at law,
MONROE, La.
Will {'practice in State and Federal
Courts. aprilll-y
SJlMSOJT l-EPl',
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Office—South-east corner 'of Public
Square.
Will practice in the courts of the
14th Judicial District composed of
the parishes of Morehouse, Ouachita and
Richland, and in the Supreme Court at
Monroe. julyl9-y
JAS. BUSSEY..». H.H. NAFF
Bussey is
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Will practice in the courts eî the Sixth
Judicial District, composed of the parish» s
ot' Morehouse and West Carroll, and
n the Supreme Court at Monroe; also in
the Federal Courts.
Office—East side of public square;
C. NEWTON ... - WM.T. HALL
.v-ewton ;y stall,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Wili practice in the courts of the 6th
Judicial District, composed of the par
ishes of Morehouse, and West Carroll
and also in the parishes of Richland,
Ouachita,, Union, Franklin, Catahoula,
andJickson, and iu tha Supreme Court
at Monroe, Louisiana.
Dil. F. C. GR^SIT,
BASTROP, LA.
Offers his professiodal seivices to the
eople of Bastrop and vicinity. Can be
found at his residence, or at the drug store
of Dr. A. L. Bussey, when not profes
onally engaged. feb9-y
Geo. B. JUarable, JTI. D
BASTROP, la.
I hereby tender my professional Services
to the people of Bastrop and Morehouse
parish. When not professionally engaged,
can be found at my residenco on«» mile
eas oitown at night, and at the Drug
Store of Dr. A. L. Bussey during the day
feb9-y
8. BTJ^lTT ,
ORAL SURGEON,
Offers to the public his professional
experience of thirty years in the above
speciality for the treatment of all dis
eases peculiar to the month and preser
vation of its natural oreans, the teeth.
Charges for all dental services graded
by quality and character desired, to suit
the times. For dental substitutes, from
$15, $60. $75, $100, §200, up to Buatt's
celebrated improved gold plate, §350 for
full sets, recommended as healthy, and
to perform the functions of mastication
satisfactorily as to kind selected.
Without previous arrangements, cash
is invariably expected.
Moved to new office, near the Baptist
Church.
Dentistry.
IN ALL ITS BRANCHES, BY
DE. M. J. MAShENGILL.
Gold fillings from $2 to $5; silver fill
ings from $1 to $3; full upper and lower
set artificial teeth $40. Extracting teeth
a] speciality. Having had my office
newly fitted up, I wtll take pleasure in
serving all persons wishing work in my
line.
. COME AND SEE,
Mr. A. CURTIS is offering his best
brick for TEN DOLLARS PER THOU
SAND. Now ie the best time to repair
jour side-walks and under-pin your
hauses. Call and examine the brick.
A. CURTIS.
@111111 m
. , • : , J -*-1 •• Î' i.
. . '• J' . " '■ , ■
CASH vs. CREDIT.
ITS. CASH T lEÏ^T GETS THE
LO WEST? PMOT!
ITS THIS HOUSE THAT FIGURES THE LOWEST
Du
m
There is no spread-eagle style about us. but any one who- wants Close, Cash, bids
on his orders, willmiss it if he does not give us a chance to figure on them. Our
prices will indicate who and what we are and what we can do for those who have
money. Call and see us and we will show you some figures that will convince you
that it , ...
PAYS TO BUY FOB CASH
STAPLE DRY GOODS.
Calicoes, from 7 to 10 cents; bleached cotton from 7 to 10; Londale and other cam
bric, 12}c
DRESS GOODS.
American lawns, 10 to 12i cents per yjtfd ; Union lawns, 20 to 25 cents per yard;
pnro linen lawns 25 to 30 cents per yard: Lace buntings, 20 cents per yard; white
[liquet—a laige and beautiful assortment.
HOSIERY ! HOSIERY !
Large stock of all kinds of ladies, children's and gents hose. Ladies embroidered
Balbriggans, 50 cents; Fancy striped hose, 12i to 50 cents ; children's fancy hose
from 8 to 25 per pair.
HAMBURG EDGINGS AND INSERTINGS.
FROM FOUR CENTS UP.
A large and beautifal stock of this goods on hand.
OEHLBER & GOLDMAN,
' ' Successors to B. Silbernagel. Sr.
LUMBER Î
LUMBER!
BILLS FILLED
ON SHOT NOTICE
AT PRICES TO
SUIT THE TIMES !
Cypress a Speciality,
AND AS CHEAP AS PINE.
Mill six miles West, of Bastrop. Free
Ferry at Magnolia place. ,
WT K. HENÛER80N.
Lehman Bros., ' Lehman, Dhrr & Co.,
New York. Montgomery, Ala.
Lehman, Abraham & Co,
COTTON FACTORS
! .. :,•! um < ; .
—AND—
Commission. Merchants,
Cor. Gravier & Baronne Ste.,
£. Lehman, } -, , ,
M. Lehman, } NEW ORLEANS, La.
H. Abraham \
' ,ov; \ "i
W. A. PEALE,
COTTON FACTOR
—"-AXD •;>
Commission Merchant
No. 52 Union Sfc.j
NEW ORLEANS, Louisiana, a
§. W. MWUM»
[successor TO rawlins & mübhell,]
COTTON FACTOR AND
* . . t
Commission Merchant
No. 45 Union St.,
NEW ORLEANS.
A FATAL HABIT.
Irresolution is a fatal habit •
it is not vicious in itself, but it
leads to vice, creeping upon its
victims with a fatal facility, the
penalty of which many a fine
heart has paid at the scaffold.
The idler, the spendthrift, ihe
epicurean-and the drunkard are
among the victims. Perhaps its
effects appear in the most hide
ous form« He knows that the
goblet he is about to drain is
poison, yet he swallows it. He
knows, for the example of thou
sands has painted it in glaring
colors, that it will deaden all his
faculties, take the strength from
his limbs and the happiness
from his Jiêart, oppress him with
disease and hurry his progress
io a dishonored grave, yet he
drains it. How beautiful, on the
contrary, is the power of resolu
tion, enabling the one who pos
sesses it to pass through perils
and dangers, trials and tempta
tions 1- Avoid the contraction of
the'hSbit'of irresolution. Strive
against to the end.
The red Church, twenty-five
miles above .New Orleans, in St*
Charles parish, is one of the old
est frame buildings in the United
States, and (or one hundred
years haä been a land-mark to
travelérs on the liver.
li two negatives equal one af
firmative, it, follows that the girl
who says "no" twice, means "yes'
once.-^[Picàyùne.
Russia must^be a great coun
try for hard colis. Almost every
one's name ends with a "koff."
DOBS THE WOULD MISS ANY ONE.
Not long. The best and most
useful of us will soon be forgot
ten. Those who to-day are fill
ing a large place in the world's
regard will pass away from the
remembrance of men iu a few
months, or at farthest, in a few
years after the grave has closed
upon their remains. We are
shedding tears above a new made
grave and wildly crying out in
our grief that cur loss is irrepar.
able. Yet in a short time the
tendrils of lovb have entwined
around other supports, and we
nu longer miss the one who has
gone. So passes the world. But
there are those to whom a loss
is beyond repair. There are
men from whose memories no
woman's smile can chase recol
lections of the sweet face that
has given up all its beauty at
Death's icy touch. There are
women whose plighted faith ex
tends beyond the grave, and
drives away gas profane those
who would entice them from a
worship of their buried loves.
Such loyalty however is hidden
away from the public gaze. The
world sweeps on beside and
around them ard cares not to
look in upon this unobtrudiug
grief. It carves a line and rears
a stone over the dead and has
tens away to offer homage to the
living. It cries out weepingly
•' Le Roy est mort "—but with the
next breath ^exclaims joyously,
Vim Le Roy."
Hand in Hand|at the Golden „Gates.
[Oscaloosa Herald.]
A touching incident occurred
in the deaths of the aged people,
Mr. and Mrs. Dickson, last week.
For convenience iu attendance
during their illness they were
placed in separate bed-rooms.
The heads of the beds were
placed against a thin partition,
which, having an open door, per
mitted the two old people to
converse, though not able to see
each other. The night before
the husband died his wife heard
him groaning and was very anx
ious to be with him, but was un
able to arise. Soon she was in
formed that he was dying, and
in order to be near him the beds
were moved so as to brir-g them
parallel with the partition, the
heads opposite the door. This
done the fond wife reached out
her hand, grasped her husband
by the hand, and held it during
his last moments. Thus death
found thsm, as fifty-one years
before the marriage ceremony
left them, joined hand in hand.
It was a simple aud affectionate
token of the love of a long life,
and the day following the wife,
too, folded her arms in the sleep
of death.
We AH Have It Now.
Spring fever. How it settles
down on us. The rays of the
sun come to us at just the right
slant, warming our system into a
delicious desire for repose; the
soil, easily yielding to the press
ure Of our foot, frost all out of it
and the summer's heat not hav
ing baked it into hardness,
tempts us to stroll; the green,
cheery appearance of the short
blades of young grass is so rest
ful to the eye; to be inside four
walls is such a bore when the
birds are striking up their over
ture to nature's divine opera of
summer, that we feel as though
wo should like to lean against
the side of a fence, pull our hat
over our eyes, and whittle and
stretch and yawn alt day long.
O, the spriug fever is the laziest,
nicest disease ever invented by
man, and medicine, thank hea
veu ! can't cure it.—[New Haven
Register.
DIDN'T BELIEVE IN 'EM.
"You've got a telephonejhere,
haven't you?" asked a citizen, as
he yesterday entered an office on
Grisold street in a seemingly big
hurry.
"Yes," was the reply:'
"Well,I never believed in 'cm
to any great extent but I want
to order some coal from a yard
up the river."
The owner of the office pro
ceeded to "call," and when he
got the coal dealers he said:
"Mr. Blank is here, and he
wants to know if you have any
soft coal?"
"Yea—500 tond," was the an
swer.
"Well, he wants you to send
him up a ton."
"We'll see him blowed first!
He has owed us a bill for over
two years!"
"Yum!" "muttered the man as
he stepped back.
"Did they say the'y send it?'
asked the other.
"N—o, not exactly."
"What did they say?"
"I—I didn't catch it very well.
Let me repeat." Picking up the
trumpet again, he stood with it
to his ear and asked:
"Did you say you'd send it?"
"Not by a blamed sight! came
the response.
"Well," asked the man as a
painful pause ensued.
"Well," replied the operator,
'this line isn't working very well
this morning, and you'd better
go to the office, four doors be
low. The dealers seem to hear
me well enough, but I don't get
hold of their answer plainly.
The other instrument is prob
ably working all right."
"But I shan't bother any one
else," growled the man. "As I
said before, I never did believe
in 'em to any great extent, and
now I've lost what little faith I
had, Much obliged—good day."
If his ear had been at the
trumphet his iaith would have
been as big as a mountain.—[De
troit Free Press.
Billings' Philosophy.
This comio wise man says in
the New York Weekly: "A man
will work harder to counterfet a
dollar than he will to earn two—
sich is human natur.
The Bible is a lively book;
there is no fastidious morality
in it. It tells us to "watch and
pray," and we all ov us, old fel
lows, hav found out that the man
who keeps both eyes open can
make his way in this world, with
a moderate amount of prayer.
Tbare is no quicker nor more
final way to use a man up than
to stand one side and let him
hav biz own way.
The reason whi mankind make
so many blunders is bekauz they
attak things just az a ram duz,
with all their fury, and both eyes
shut.
Kross yung ones should be
treated with a slipper to-day and
kamly iu tho distance.
If a mau haz got no faith, i
would iike to kno what his reason
iz good for.
Moral swuashun iz a good
thing to kfiptivate lambs with,
but iz good ior nothing on mules,
only to festoon the klub with.
If a man ever gits to be honest
he haz to git it az he duz hiz
bred, by the swett of his brow.
The man who would abuse a
cow, or defile a spring ov water,
iz az low down in the skale ov
humanity az he kan git without
knocking tho bottom out.
Genius kreates. Tallent im
mitates.
Every time a man truly repents
he is born agin, but there iz lots
ov people who repent every nigbt
regular so to be reddy for aktivo
bizziness to-morrow.
There iz plenty of folks who
repent ov their sins on the same
principles they pay borrowed
money, not bekause they are any
moro honest, but for the purpose
of gitting another loan.
The best to reprove a phool iz
when he is in a red-hot pashuu,
but should let a man of sense
cool off before yu offer to ap
proach him, and then the chances
are that he will reprove himself.
COLORED JUSTICE.
Several day ago a white man
was arrainged before a colored
justice, down the country, on
charges of killing a man and
stealing a mule.
"Well," said the jtostice, "de
facks in dis case shell be weighed
wid carefulness, an' ef I hangs
yer taint üo fault of mine."
"Judge, you have no jurisdic
tion only to examine me,"
"Dat sorter work 'longs ter
der raiguler justice, but yer see
I'se been put on as a special. A
special hez de right ter make a
mouf at Supreme Court ef he
chuses ter."
"Do the best for me you can,
judge."
"Dat's what I'se guine to do,
I'se got two kinds of law in dis
court, de Arkansas an' de Texas
law. I generally gins a man de
right to Choose fur hisself. Now
what law does yer want; de Texas
or de Arkansaw?"
"I believe I'll take the Arkan
sas."
"Wall, in dat case, I'll dismiss
yer for stealin' de mule—"
"Thank you, judge."
"An' hang yer fur killin' do
man—"
"I believe, judge, that I'll take
the Texas."
"Wall, in dat case I'll dismiss
yer fer killin' de man—"
"You have a good heart,
judge:"
"And haog yer fer stealin' do
mule. I'll just take the 'caison
hear ter remark, dat de only dif
ference 'tween de two laws iz de
way yer state de case,"—[Little
Rock (Ark.) Gazette.
A lady in this State demon
strated to her satisfaction that
spring chickens cannot be hatch
ed from alligator eggs. The ven
erable hen was much ^tonished
at the extraordinary result of
her labors as tho lady was.

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