OCR Interpretation


The Morehouse clarion. [volume] (Bastrop, La.) 1874-1904, March 25, 1881, Image 1

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86053659/1881-03-25/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for


\
>
devoted fo P olitics, agriculture, home interests, and the material development of the country.
VOL. VII.
R A S TROP, LOUISIANA, FRIDAY MARCH 25,1881
NO 1&
ocelwMe (Slariun.
PUBLISHED EVEEY " FRIDAY.
TISRHS OF SUBSCRIPTIONS.
One year, in advance *2
Six months ' 1 rr
Three months " 70
ADVERTISING BATES.
Space. I 1 œo | 3 mos | 6 mos U year.
1 square,
it squares
4 squares.
Ï column
i column.
1 column.
I 4H 00
5 00
1 8 50
I 10 00
20 00
40 00
$6 50
9 50
15 00
18 00
40 00
60 00
$9 00
15 00
23 00
30 00
50 00
90 00
$10 00
20 00
30 00
40 00
70 00
185 00
Transient advertisements will be in
serted afe the rate of 1 50 per square of
ten lines for the first insertion, and 75
cents lor each subsequent insertion.
professional cards.
n. c. «noRGAJv,
attorney at law,
MONROE, La.
Will f practice in State and Federal
Courts. aprilll-y
Frank Vaughan,
attorney at law,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Will practice in the Courts of More
house and West Carroll. Special atten
tion to the collection of claims by toil
before the Magistrate's Courts.
sjtmsojt le v t\
at torney at law,
Bastrop, Louisiana. ,
Office—South-east corner .of Public
Square.
Will practice in the courts of the
14th Judicial District composed of
thtj parishes of Morehouse, Ouaehitaand
liUbluikl, aucliu the Supreme Court at
Monroe.- julyl9-y
JA*. BUSSEY ......H.H. NAFF
ilussr.y tf JITaiTy |f§ ;
I I ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Will practice in the çourts ot the Sixth
Judicial District, composed of the parisbog
of M »rehouse and West Carroll, and
n fclie Supreme Court at Monroe; also in
tiie Federal Courts.
Office— East side of public square;
1
C. NEWTON WM.T. HALL
• j JTcvcton Sf Halt,
' attorneys at law,
.'.'"is" Bastrop, Louisiana.
Wili practice in the courts of the 6th
Judicial District, composed of the par
ishes of Morehouse, and West Carroll
atA also in the parishes of Bichland,
Gnwbiru, Union, Franklin, Catahoula,
«jsd Jackson, and in tha Supreme Court
if Monroe, Louisiana.
or. r. c. cfiwr,
BASTROP, LA.
Offers his pryfessiodal seivices to the
eople of Bastrop and vicinity. Can be
found at his residence, or at the drug store
oi Dr. À. L. Bussey, when not profes
onally engaged. feb9-y
XXR- S. 0?- BUATT,
; DENTAL SUBORN,
Offers his professional experience of
thirty years in the above speciality, for
the treatment of all diseases peculiar to
t|ie month and preservation of its nat
oral organs, the teeth.
Office near the Baptist Church, Bas
trop, La.
I
itenli.rty.
.Dentistry
DR. M. J. MASSENGILL,
DENTIST.
Gold filliaas
from $2 to $5;
silver fillings,
, from tl to »3;
, full upper and
rlower set arti
'■ ficial teeth $40;
Calls will meet
with prompt
attention.
jGPBraneh offices at Farmer ville and
Qak Ridge, La.
HOME HOTEL,
BA8TR0F, LOUISIANA.
This house has been newly furnished
I fitted up in comfortable style under
) supervision of
M Wi COCK,
L is now open to the traveling publie
I supplied with the best the market
Terms moderate.
humoid develop - rœ row.
Ü
2
£3
Pi
<
13
au

u
O^LY
TH
PAD
t»r
V s "
ÔïfEÉ TonrBACK ACHE.
And all diseases of the Kidneys, Bladder
and Urinary Organs by wearing the
Improved Excelsior Kidney Pad,
It is a Marvel of Healing and Belief.
SIMPLE, SENSIBLE, DIBECT, PAIN
LESS. POWEBFUL.
It CUBES where all else fails. A
REVELATION and REVOLUTION in
Medicine. Absorption or direct appli
cation, as opposed to unsatisfactory in
ternal medicines. Send for our treatise
on Kidney troubles, sent free. Sold by
druggists, or sent by mail on receipt of
price, $2. Address,
The "Only" Long Pad Co.,
Williams Block, Detroit, Mich.
This is theOriginal and Genuine Kid
ney Pad. Ask for it and take no other.
Qwa by ABSORPTION (Nature's way )
'S 1 ' LUNG DISEASE8 ' * *
THEO AT DISEASES,
BREATHINQTrBQUBLES,
■?. It DBIVES INTO the system curative
agents and healing medicines.
It DBA WS FBOM the disaased parts
the poisons* that cause death.
THOUSANDS Testify to its virtues.
, Too Can be Believed and Cured.
Don't despair until von have tried
this sensible, easily applied and BADI
CALLY EFFECTUA U rfemedy.
Sold by Druggists, or sent by mail on
receipt, of PBICE $2.00, by
The "Only" Lung Pad Co..
Williams Block, Detroit, Mich.
Send for Testimonials and our book,
'Three Millions a>Year." Sent free.
At Wholesale in New Orleans by I.L. LYONS,Wholesale Druggist
J*. WMBROWÜT'S
Eclipse Livery and Sale Stable,
bastrop, louisiana,
w
o
co
Q œ
Q bd
W «Î
CO
eu
v
o
W
CD
CO
FURS BERKSHIRE SWIWE.
BONTA NO.1 at the Head of my heard aud my'sof.-B, LADY PHILPOT and
MOREHOUSE BËàUTY, received first sweepstak prize at Monticelio, Ark. AO
froih imported and registered stock.
ALSO BBEEEER OF
GENUINE IMPORTED JERSEY CATTLE*
WITH t e David," OF BELLEVUE, AT THE HEAD OF MY HERD.
Younn Stock for Sale at Reasonable Rates,
par SATISFACTION GIVEN. J. WM. BBOWN.
PRACTICAL BOOK-KEEPING,
NO TEXT BOOKS.
Over 25 vears a Practical Accoontaot, Endowed by all tie
PROMINENT MERCHANTS OF LOUISVILLE. Send stamps
for circulars and specimens of Penmanship.
BEN 0. WEAVER, Principal.
H. S. DeSOLLAR , Secretary. marché
yyif
Billiard Saloon !
Finely Furnished,
Choice Wines, Whiskies, Ci
gars, Lager Beer, Cham
pagne, Etc., Etc.
Bastrop, Louisiana*
EXCELSIOR HOTEL,
OAK RIDGE, LOUISIANA,
OPENED BY J. WM. DAVIS.
Commercial travelers and the travel
ing public will always find first-class
accommodations at this house. jlySO
Charles «Tinkler,
LOCK AND GUNSMITH,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Will repair guns and pistols on «bort
notice. Satisfectsoa guaranteed.
M. J, PURCELL,
-WITH
J. I. ADAMS & Co
WHOXiESAIE
gbochbs,
Nos 43, 45 and 47 Peters St.,
NEW ORLEANS.
1 AAA BUSHELS Cotton Seed
IvWp flr planting purposes at 50c.
per bushel for sale by
DIXON MOOBE.
Wor4» of Wisdom
When a friend corrects a fault in
yon, he does you the greatest act
of friendship.
Favors of every kind are doubled
when they are. speedily conferred.
Aman may suffer without sin
ning, he Cftnpot'sin without suffer
ing
' Bagged clothing cannot debase
a man as much as a frayed reputa*
tion.
It is not life to live for one's self
alone. Let us help one another.
People's intentions can only be
decided from their conduct.
It is to be doubted whether he
Wffl ever find the way to heaven
who desires to get thither alone.
Poverty often deprives a man of
spirit and virtue. It is hard for an
empty bag to stand upright.
It is with you as with plants ;
from the first fruits they bear w e
learn what may be expected in
"future.
Envy is a passion so full of cow
ardice and sham that nobody ever
had the confidence to own its pos
session.
The very afflictions of our earthly
pilgrimages are prestiges of our fu
ture glory, and shadows indicate
the sun.
Be courteous to alj, but intimate
with few ; and let those few be well
tried before you give them your
confidence.
Q * Pafcellto Tiefen* Hugo.
P aris , Feb. 26.—Mr. Parnell has
sent the following letter to Victor
r# 0:
fixusTRiocs S ik —The nobility of
h§art, the deep sympathy with hu
man suffering and the exertions in
f£fcor of oppressed nationalities
which have distinguished you
throughout life, encourage me to
invoke your powerful advocacy in
defence of the suffering Irish peo
ple. The question is not a secta
rian question. In its present aspect
it is a purely social question. Ii
thfeause of five millions of wo:
ing men struggling for a
fof the right to life by their labor
in their own land, against a small
ant' privileged class, foreign in their
orijfin, foreign in their aspirations,
and supported in their injustice
aatr tyranny by the armed Iforce bf
a fpreign nation. What have been
the results of the domination of
this class ! They are written in
the history of recurring f«nines,
decimating generation after gener
ation.
No human words can paint the
miseries and sufferings which have
been witnessed even by the young
est among us. Millions have been
driven from their homes in despair.
Hundreds of thousands have perish
ed miserably of hunger in a land
teaming with food. Half of our pop
ulation exist constantly on the verge
of famine, while ten thousand land«
lords, many of whom have never
seen Ireland, riot in extravagance
and luxury on the confiscated pro
duct of the people's labor, It is
against the system which has pro
duced the evils that we struggle.
It is to put an end once and fqr
evv to this detestable state^of so
cmy that we appeal to con
science of all good men, without
distinction of creed, of party or of
nationality, to . aid us in shaming
the Government of England to do
justice, to our people.
To you, honored sir, who have
known how to awaken the sympa»
tßy of mankind for "Les Misera
bles," we feel that we shall not
appeal in vain when we ask that
your voice shall be raised in behalf
Of a brave but unfortunate nation
Accept, illustrious sir, the aesur,
an ces of my high esteem.
c HARLES S tûaiçt b AKSMX.
a. GBEAT KIND WSECKED.
pitiable condition of poor ds
mented justice clifford.
;
e
in
of
As I drove down the avenue after
Garfield had been declared duly
elected, I saw at the window of the
National Hotel a man's face; a
pale face, with strong jaws, shaven
cheeks and smoothly parted hair.
The window was closed and fastened
and there he sat, who had four
years ago been one'of the noted
Electoral Commission—his memory
gone, his fine mind so feeble that
he is not able to dictate his resig
nation. He is kept a prisoner in
his room, watched over by thé
dearest wife that ever a man-had.
They say she is so changed that
her friends would not know her,
she has aged soJ[fast since this
affliction has fallen on] her brilliant
husband..
A few days . ago 'the". invalid es
caped from ' the care of his nurse
and wandered out through the
halls of the hotel, looking pitifully
into faces that he did not remem
ber, although they were the faces
of old friends. He was going to
court, he said, when one of them
detained him, and led him back
without resistance into his room
and there he sits, occupied with
vagaries, while the endless crowd
surges ^through the streets, dream
ing, who shall aver know what ?
the while a new leader comes to
the'Presidency ; a new race of
, /giants possess the land in which he
was an honored and marked public
man, filling a great place in the
nation's history but yesterday.—
[Washington Correspondence Cin
cinnati Commercial. ^
The following stinging letter we
clip from the Claiborne Guardian.
The writer evidently means what he
says, and we think if Lanier will
read it he will find that at least one
man in the fifth district has a de
cidedly bad opinion of
Lanier read the letter,
him. Let
crawl into
, Somewhere in Louisiana :
Sir—Through the courtesy of
Gen. J. Floyd King, our presënt
M. C., I am in possession of print
his
notice of yoâr contest fc#
his
notice of yoâr contest fc#
seàt, in which yoù »sert th# fofrf ti
lowing, namely: That the regis
tered vote of this parish stands,
Republicans 1280, and Democrats
1877; and that Gen. King received
in last election 1368 votes, and only
160 for yourself. And you fürther
assert, "or expect to prove," that
Gen. King did not receive 1368
votes on the 2d day of November,
1880, and that by means of vio
lence, intimidation, murder and
fraud, the Republican vote j of
Claiborne-parish was "crushed and
suppressed" This portion of your
proposition, or, more properly,
your allégation, has been branded
as a damnable falsehood and sent
to the • world as suc£ in public
print, by the commissioners and
clerks of election,
Why I now stoop so low as to
give you a puny notice before the
public is, that you say you "expect
prove fraud in the rescistratioi
ylttere i\ the parish of
Do you not know that you
when you wrote that? Can it or
does it not teaçh the world that you
know how to Uet and so willing to
do it ? That mercenary ends, not
honor, Jpompts it ? Now remem
ber, that wherever justice reigns,
or Honor hold» sway, you must and
will ever stand as a dirty and filthy
satire on the handiwork of a good,
just God. Yes ; you say you "ex
pect t<? prove fraud in the registra
tion of this parish." If you have
fbf
to
but
ia
of
an
his
ber
in
was
els
money enough you may obtain
some one to so perjure himself. If
you succeed, yours as WeH as his
freedom is an outrage to dungeon-^
bars a3 well as a shame to the uni-,
form and most leaky cell in this op
any other State penitentiary.
Shame, shame ou you. To con
template you is, that your make-up
was but the scurvy offerings, or
slimy discards, from the sloughing
scabs of a diseased skunk. I re
gret it. I handle you thus tenderly
feeling that you stand heaven-dis
carded, by earth shamed, while a
big wide hell shudders to kqow it
must afford room for so contempti*
ble a shape. Could the Devil listed
to prayer, I would earnestly plead
that you might not be flung in that
beyond of beyonds, yèa, in that
midnightTof beyonds, but wqul4
so elevate you, or promote you,
that you might at least become a
disfigured spittoon in His realms
for the reception of the most stinks
ing spittle of the filthiest diseased
of the damned.
I have waited patiently for you
to correct your falsehood touching
the registration of this parish, but
as you have not to this date, now I
so. The registration^ofthe parish
of Claiborne for the year 1880, was
fair, perfect and complete,* and no
man can honestly deny it.
H. C. MITCHELL,
Assessor a nd Registrar for Clair
borne parish.
Presidents and Tiel? Faith.
A Washington letter says a^,. x
Presidents were, with one /
tion, men who respected Chjgg.
ity. Washington and Gai
however, were the only ones %.
were church comminuioflBtg. Adaa
married a clergyman's daughtc
(Abigail Smith), but he did not ac
cept her views. He was inr'
to Unitarianism, which, in hi
was becoming very pre*
Massaehusetts. Jeffergc -,
a believer in ChristianifcöHj
delity.
^Liquors
3re Çroo
After Tom Paine hacK 4 *
ti
ten the "Age of Reason," Jc
son invited him to return to .
ica, which was understood
direct r§@ognitio| and accep
fbf his opinions. Infidelity,
was so pshionable that in po
lite society it was rather eccentric
to avow different opinions, Madi"
son, while a student at Princeton
college, was of a religious turn,
but it wore off under the care of of-»
flee. His eajly religious connec?
tions • were Presbyterian. Monroe
ia said to have favored Episcopacy.
John Quinoy Adams was inclined to
Unitarianism. Jackson was a Meth*
odist, and died in the communion
of that church. Van Buren was
brought up in the Reformed Dutch
Church, but afterward became in^ v
clined to Episcopacy. Harrison
favored the Methodist. Tyler waa
an Episcopalian. Polk was bap»
tized by a Methodist preacher after
his term of office had expired,
Taylor favored Episcopacy. Filir
more attended the Unitarian
Church. Frank Pierce was a mem»
ber of the Congregationalist Society
in Conpord, though not » pompu*
meant* Buchanan was a Prea^«*
rian. Lincoln attended Gurley's
Church as often as he could, but
was not a member, though his ra*
ligious convictions were deep,
Grant's predilections are well
known, and so are Garfield's,-^
Exchange.
200 papers Buist's seed just re*
ceived direct from Philadelphia,
consisting of every kind of seed
known to Gardeners, A few hush
els onion sets, both red ium T white.
Call at once and be supplid.
J. S. HANDY.

xml | txt