OCR Interpretation


The Morehouse clarion. [volume] (Bastrop, La.) 1874-1904, September 16, 1881, Image 1

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86053659/1881-09-16/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

AWI
m
DEVOTED TO POLITICS, AGRICULTURE, HOME INTERESTS, AND THE MATERIAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE COUNTRY.
VOL. VII.
BASTROP, LOUISIANA, FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 16, 1881
NO 43.
fKutelioMSe Elation.
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTIONS.
One year, in advance - #2 00
gis months " 1 00
I'liree mouths " 75
ADVERTISING KATES.
Space. I 1 mo | 3 mos | 6 mos | 1 year.
1 iquare.
g squares
4 squares.
4 column
I column.
1 column.
00
5 00
8 50
10 00
20 00
40 00
$6 50
9 50
15 00
18 00
40 00
60 00
|9 00
15 00
23 00
30 00
50 00
90 00
$10 00
20 00
30 (»0
40 00
70 00
125 00
Transient advertisements will be in
serted at the rate of 1 50 per square of
ten lines for the first insertion, and 75
cents for each subsequent insertion.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS. '
p. TODD R. B. TODD, JR.
TODD tf TODD.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Vfill practice in the Courts of More
house, Iiichland, and West Carroll,
and in the Supreme Court at Monroe.
K. B. 1 odd, Jr., Notary Public for
the parish of Morehouse.
aprillô
if. C.
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
MONROE, La.
Will practice in State and Federa
Courts. aprilll-y
Frttnle faugltan,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Baatrop, Louisiana.
Will practice in the Courts of More
noase and West Carroll. Special atten
tiou to the collection of claims by suit
before the Magistrate's Courts.
sjijfisojr iJErr,
ATTORNEY AT LA W,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Office—South-oast corner of Public
Square.
Will practice in the courts of the
14th Judicial District composed of
the parishes of Morehouse, Ouachita and
K'chland, and in tbo Supreme Court at
lionroe. july!9-y
J AS. BUSSE Y H.H. KAFF
Btissey Sf JVatt ,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Will practice in the courts ot the Sixth
Judicial District, composed of the parishes
•f Morehouse and West Carroll, and
n the Supreme Court at Monroe; also in
the Federal Courts.
Office—East side ot public square;
C. NEWTON WM. T. I1ALL
JVetvton if Halt,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Wili practice in the courts of the 6th
Judicial District, composed of the par
ishes of Morehouse, and West Carroll
and also in the parishes of Richland,
Ouachita, Union, Franklin, Catahoula,
*nd Jackson, and in tha Supreme Court
tt Monroe, Louisiana.
DR. If. £. PUG MI,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
BASTROP, LA.
Having permantly located in Bastrop,
offers his professional services to the peo
£le of this town and vicinity. He will
b found at his office, South of the publ ic
square at all hours when not engaged in
the duties of his profession. And will
be ready, night or day, to respond
promptly to the calls of the people.
DR. F. C. GRAY,
BASTROP, la.
Offers his professiodal sei vices to the
eople of Bastrop and vicinity. Can be
Found at his residence, or at the drug store
of Dr. A. L. Bussey, when not profes
onally engaged. feb9-y
DB« S. 3?- BITATT,
DENTAL SURGEON,
Offers his professional experience of
thirty years in the above speciality, for
the treatment of all diseases peculiar to
the mouth and preservation of it$ oat
oral organs, the .teeth.
Gffice near the Baptist Church, Bas
trop, La.
Dmtiaty Dentistry
DR. M. J. MASSENGILL,
IDENTIST ■
Gold fillines
from $2 to $5;
silver fillings,
. from $1 to $3;
l (nil upper and
Slower set arti
! ficial teeth $4";
' < alis will meet
with prompt
- —jy ■ attention.
^Branch offices at Farm« »ill* and
Gh. IF. TISDALE,
CABINET MAKER AMD
UNDERTAKER,
Bastrop, La.
Always on hand Hermetic and other
Burial Caskets, and coffin trimming.
Ail kinds of Furniture manufactured
and repaired on short notice and at liv
ing rates.
Miss CARRIE WHITE.
a
Fashionable Dressmaker
AND MILLINER,
In the ROSS BUILDING,
Corner Franklin & Jefferson Sts.
I have experience and taste that can
not fail to please the most fastidious.
Charges reasonable and satisfactory,
aprilt-y
Shattuck & Hoffman,
FACTORS AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
18 CARONDELET STREET,
new orleans.
MORTGAGE LOANS;
We are prepared to arrange loans of
mon^y, in such snmsas can be safely se
cured by First Morgages on first-class
Plantations and Crops, and to renew a
part of the amount from year to year, at
the borrower's option especially if it in
to improvethe property—the remainder
to be paid out of the proceeds of the
crop to be shipped to us, and re-lent the
next season if desired.
For further information apply to
DAVID TODD, Bastrop La.
HOME HOTEL,
BASTKor, L ouisiana.
This house has been newly furnished
and fitted up in comfortable style under
the snpervisiou of
Mri
3VCC W. COOK,
and is now o; en to the traveling public
Table suppliea with the best the market
affords Terms moderate.
Lehman Bros., Lehman, Dim & Co
New York. Mont. ^m ry.Ai
Lehman, Abraham & Co,
COTTON FACTORS
—AND—
Commission Merchants,
Cor. Gravier & Baronne Sts.,
E. Lehman, J
M. Lehman, I NEW ORLEANS, La.
H. Abraham )
S, w. RÂWUHS,
f8UCCKSSOR Ï0 RAWLINS & MCRßELL,]
COTTON FACTOR AND
Commission merchant
No. 45 Union St.,
NEW ORLKANS.
John Chaffe & Sons,
Cotton Factors,
AND GENERAL
Commission merchants,
NO. 59 UNION STREET,
new orleans.
Charles Winkler,
lock and gunsmith,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Will repair guns and pistols on short
notice. Satisf action guaranteed.
ICE CBÊÂÏAT
Jones' Restaurant,
15 CENTS PF.E SAUCER FULL.
Order« from any part of the parish
enptly filled.
H offenste! u's War Story.
[N. O. Times ]
"Herman," said Hoffenstein as
he folded up a letter which he had
finished reading, 4 'I haf shust
heard from my old frent Simon
Grumbach, und he dells me he vill
come to to New Orleans in de Vin
ter, und veil he comes ve vill dalk
uv de dime ven ve vas in de var to
gedder."
"Vas you in de var, Misder Hoff
enstern?" inquired Herman, some
what surprised.
"Veil, I dink so. I vas mit de
army for ofer four years. I sold
clothing to de soldiers, und de ex
berience vat I haf vould make your
hand sdand up. I vas at Vicksburg
ven all uf de hard vighting vas done
dere, und somedimes I vanted to
vight myself, but vfle I vould be
vighting de soldiers vould sdeal my
cloding you know und I had to
keep away. If I lif a dousand
years I don't can forget de hard
dimes vot I hat at Vicksburg. I
dinks von dime dot I will die mit
sdarvation I vas so hungry. De
only kind uv bread vot you could
get dere vas vot de beople called
corn dodgers und a gouple uf days
afder de corn dodgers vas made
dey vould get so hard you don't
can mash dem mit an ax, and all
uf de soldiers tear dere deet avay
eading dem, shust de same as a
biece uf sand baper. De corn
dodgers vas so hard, Herman, dot
a leetle vile before Vickspurg sur
rendered, de balls for de cannons
vas all gone, und de sheneral gif
orders to shoot de corn-dodgers at
de Yankees. My gi-r-acious ofer
a aousand uf de Yankees vas killed
mit de corn-dodgers vile dey vas
charging de breast-vorks. Ten de
YanKees come in Vickspurg und
see us mit de corn-dodgers dey vent
to Sheneral Grant und dell him dot
de tam rebels vas so hungry dey
vas eading rocks. De soldiers vas
dead all aboud de town, und von
nighd I vent in a vare house to
sleep und I saw von uf dem on a
bile uf sdraw shust like he vas
sleep und I says to myself dot I
vill sell dot man a bair uf bouts
before morning. I lays down vere
he vas, and I asks him if he don't
want a gouple of undershirts, but
he don't say nodiug. If dere is
anyding vat vill vake up a soldier
vas to dell you got some viskey,
and I dells him dot, but he don't
say noding, and somehow I begin
to dremble shust like I had a chill.
Dere vas some matches in my
bocket und I lights von, Yat you
dink de first ding vat I see vas dot
soldier's eyes vide open looking
at me, und he vas dead. My
g-r-acious ! I shumped up in de
dark so sgared dot I forgets vere
de door vas, und I comes near kill
ing myself mit de side uf de house.
It vas de most derrible exberience
vat I haf mit de army.
A nice looking old lady with a
snow-lace a"bout her bead sat ir
a car the other day, and drew up
her skirls nervously, lest the cat
aract o! tobacco juice that was
pouring from the mouths of loaf"
ers should deluge them. "Con
ductor," she asked timidly, when
he came iu, "isn 't it against the
rules to spit on the floor of the
car ?" "No, ma'am," replied the
gallant conductor; "spit where
ever jou like."
A few days ago in Point Cou
pee parish a crowd of negroes
assaulted five white men and
killed one and wounded another.
The negroes fired a bnndred
shots with the above results.
Some of the negroes bave been
apprehended.
THE COTTON BOOM IN THE SOUTH.
LHartford (Conn.) Post.]
The old dream of Southern
factories manafaotoring cotton
goods in the centre of the cotton
growing country is in a fair w »y
of reilization. For the last ten
years tbe progress in this direc
tion h8s been very striking and
no» in most of the cotton-grow
ing States the new industry is
fairly started, and in some it
has attained considerable dimen
sions. In Georgia, for instance,
a single factory, started five
years ago, with a capital of
$200,000, has grown to a corpo
ration with live factories, a capi
tal of $1,250,000, and is paying
twenty per cent. Similar devel
opment is reported at different
points in the State, and in a
number of instances the giowth
has been a huudred per cent, or
more within two or three years.
So in other Southern States the
same thing has gone on until
cotton-mills are found in consid
erable numbers, almost all doing
a thriving business, and most of
them leading to the establish
ment of others in the vicinity.
The advantages of southern mills
are too plain to need much de
scription. The cost of trans
porting the cotton North fur
manufacture is about thirteen
per cent, oi the price for it, and
most of tbis is saved to Southern
mills. The cost of living is less
at the South, and there are all
the incidental advantages which
attend the working of a staple
article near the place of its pro
duction. In this case, tod, there
is the special stimulas wbiob
comes from a success in a new
field. The novelty of the thing
bas not worn off, and is attrac
tive in itself.
An Irishman, finding his cash
at low ebb, resolved to adopt
"the road" as a professional
meanH of refreshing the ex
chequer ; and having provided
himself with a huge horse-pistol,
proceeded forthwith to the con
ventional "lonely common," and
lay in wait, The no lees conven
tional "farmer returning from
the market with a bag of mon
ey," of course, soon appeared, to
whom came Pat with the regula
tion highwayman offer of choice,
"Your money or yonr life!" a re
mark fortified by the simulta
neous exhibition oi the firearm
in the usual way. The farmer,
who was a Quaker, essayed to
temporize "I would not have thee
gtain thy soul with sin, friend ;
and didst thou rob me of my
gold, it would be theft ; and
didst thou kill me, it would be
murder- But hold ! a bargain
is no sin, but a commerce be
tween two honest men. I w i'l
give thee this bag of gold for the
pistol 'which tboa boldest at
mine ear." The unsuspecting
amateur Macheatb, yielding, per
haps, to the Quaker's logic and
solicitude for his spiritual wel
fare, made the exabange without
a moment's hesitation. "Now,
friend," cried the wily Ephraim,
leveling the weapon, "give me
back ray gold," or I'll blow thy
brains out!" "Blaze away thin,
darlint!" said Pat. "Saretherb's
Diver a drop of powthet in it!"
The result was a sold Quaker,
The following advertisement
appeared recently in a New York
paper: "Wanted—Experienced
bauds on Ladies' Waists." Five
hundred young men had applied
j*t last aooount»;
A New Joke of Twain's.
An old settler came into tba
office this morning with a joke
on Mark Twain, which has never
been in print before. At one
time in his life. Mark essayed
journalism in Keokuk, aud he
bought an old band press, and
Went to wotk to eulighten the
natives. The late Judge Clag
gett, of the*Cons initi'.-m, otime
along, a tramp jour, looking for
work. He stopped at Mark's
shop, and walking in, found
Mark nuder tbe press with a
wr neb, all covered with oil and
printer's ink, struggling with tbe
impression. He asked Mark
where the proprietor was, and
Mark, lookiug at him from
around the legs of the press, an
swered that he was out. Then
Mark wanted to know why be
asked. Claggett said that he
was a printer and wanted a job.
Mark looked him all over, and
asked him where be got bis good
clothes. Claggett replied that
he was just ont of his appren
ticeship, and bis old boss made
him a present of them. Mork
shock his head sadly, and re
plied: "You take proper good
care of them, young man, for as
long as you stay at the business
>ou will never have another so
good." Claggett settled down
by Mark, and eventually bought
the Constitution, and ran it until
the day of his death, but be al
ways remembered what Mark
told him, for it was true. That
pair of garments was tbe best he
ever had.—[Peoria Journal.
v *»■ —* —■
James G. Fair is worth $42,
000,000. And the whole $42,000,
000 of it, my dear boy, can't
make him as happy as you are
with the dew of youth in your
heart when you hold the hand
of the girl you love, anl walk
with her in a path that is only
wide enough for one, with the
rnstliDg branches whispering
above your bead, so happy you
cannot speak with anything but
your eyes. If you envy him,
Telemancus, if you, with your
brown bands and your bright
young face, with tbe downju&t
shading your lip, with not a gray
hair in your bead or gnawing
care in your heart, with the
morning son shining on your up
turned face, with the velvet tnrf
under your feet and the bine
heavens above your bead, with
the blood coursing through yonr
veins like wine, with fifty or sixty
years of life before you, with
mirage after mirage of bright
dreams and beantiful illusions
and pleasant .vanities making the
landscape beautiful about you;
if you envy this man his $42,000,
000, and his spectacles, and his
wrinkles, you are a fool, my boy;
and you are scattering ashes on
tbe roses that grow in the morn
ing. There is lightness in your
step, my sou, and color in your
blood, and dreams in your heart,
aud all the love and beauty and
freshness of the sunrise tbe $42,
000,000 cannot bay, and don't
you forget it.— [New York Sun.
A chicken belonging to a far
mer of Bloomington, Iowa, raised
itself upon its little feet, flopped
its wings and crowed like an old
roostei the second day after its
birth, and has done so daily ever
since.
A small shark was recently
cangbt in Bed Biver, so the
j&arksville Review reports.
LAKETAHOE.
The Tahoe Tattler says tlmfc
there are a great many erroneous
ideas extant relative to this lake,
and announces that it will make
it » spécial part of its business
to correct them and give the
real.facts concerning it regard
ing climatology, geology, boat
ing, etc. It is situated 6,220 feet
abov4 the sea, is &2 mites long
from uonh to south 12^ miles
wide, the greatest contour being
a parallelogram. Tbe greatest
measured depth that we bave
good authority for is 1,506 feet.
The 'emptiature never goes be
low 39 degrees Fahrenheit and
in summer never above 60, unless
it be near the shore in some
sheltered cove or where a stream
of suu-uarmed water runs into
it. At a depth of 500 feet the tem
perature never changes, being
39^ deg. This fact accounts for
another—that of drowned per
sons never rising—the water be
ing so cold that no gases are
generated, hence the body in
time simply goes to pieces from
tbe action of tbe water. It is as
buoyant ad any other pure water
at the same latitude, there being
no appreciable difference in the
readings of tbe hymdrometer,
hence the statement that wood
does not float for any time, per
sons can not swim and the like
fallacies.' The air being very
light at this elevation above tbe
level of the sea, exercise of any
kind, either on land or water,
cannnot be so long continued as
in lower and heaver atmospheres.
KILL OB CUBE.
A physician being summoned
to attend a miser's wife in ber
last illness declined to continue
bis visits unless be bad some
legal guarantee for payment, as
be knew by experience, the slip
pery character of the husband
uhere pecuniary obligations were
concerned. The miser thereupon
drew up a document, formally
promising, after haggling over
the amouat, that be would pay
to Dr, So-and-so the sum of ,
"if he cores my wife." "Stop,"
said the doctor. "I cannot un
dertake to do that. I will treat
her to tbe best of my ability, but
she is very ill, and I fear she
will not recovei." So the sen
tence was altered to, "For attend
ance upon my wife, kill or care,"
the paper signed and delivered
over to the pbysioian. His skill
was unavailing, and tbe patient
died; bat when the bill came in,
the widower quit tly repudiated
the debt in toto. In vain wäs it
represented to him that the doe
tor held bis legal acknowledge
ment; so the latter sued him for
tha amount in perfeet cohfidence
of gaining the day. Tbe miser
did not dispute the circumstan
ces in court, but îequested to
see the document, which he then
read aloud with great delibera
tion, "And did you cure my
wife, sir?" he asked, glancing
over his spectacles at the plain
tiff. "No; that was impossible;"
"Did you kill her ?" Yerdiet for
the Refendant. Dootor sold.—
Cumber's Journal.
"Where would we be without
women ?" aeks an Ottumwa man.
It is hard to determine just
which way the majority would
drift, but some men we know of
would be out of debt and out of
trouble, and a good many more
oct at tbe seat of their breeches.

xml | txt