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The Morehouse clarion. [volume] (Bastrop, La.) 1874-1904, August 30, 1895, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86053659/1895-08-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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Library
Jlaton Rouge
La.
DEVOTED TO POLITICS, HOME INTERESTS ANL THE JW^TEBIAL. DEVELOPMENT OF THE COUNTRY.
OL. XXI.
BASTROP, LA., FRIDA
6PJST 30, 1895,
À
PROFESSIONAL < 1 A Ii PS
jambs I«i3sr.y.~. "• » Nii "
BUSSE Y k NAFF,
^ t T0RNEYS>T LAW,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
Will practice before the Courts, *f
Moreh-.nsc parish ami before tue Supreme
md »'«'fV-ral Courts in Monroe. \J il at
tend tn Ldaiiii.ês in State ami u&U
Mates Ljs.rd 0flious. ^ .
TOÏÏÏN Jr.,
ATTOïtNl'A" AT LAW.
Ea,strop, Loui»im> t.
\\ T iU ii,:.clice iti t'a Courts of M° T «:
- ti ' j-i nM^jMt r ' ! r' l ' l -i^.iPW ..tfmfij
ïïnïldim»™ Feb 1(1 '1)4.
• - EOBEiir'Tvi iï;f sr one T ~
Attorn. y «& Counselor At Law,
P. ij-villc, La.
Will [irr-'V "' *-■> tie rmrislies of North
Louisiana, en.i la the Supreme and Fod
« i;.i » o'T^s of «ha Suite.
j. p. .■' lAniSO .v, ..ii, k. M a P ison.
jïïAIïjSON ,'v MADISON.
^ ttorneys and Counselors at Law,
Ua strop, Louis i-uin.
'ill practice in the parishes of Nortl
jmsiaini, und in t'j- Supreme and Feil
al Courts of the State.
ATTOiJNKY AT LAW,
GASTHOF, LA.
Will attend ai! L;. Courts of 1'iiiou
parish, when desired
Special attention given to ell matters
put in hi.3 charge. Sept. 21, '94.
c. y.'\< tos 1 l.. i: HALL.
NL vi i u*i i.v HaLLI,
Attorneys und Counselors at Lav .
c m; trop, Louisiana,.
W.T. ^ËKKÎNS, .»î.'ïh
Physician & Surgeon,
Bastrop, Louisiana.
BSf" Ofiicit at 1 iii-ph: aud Pollard's 1/;
v '•••.'• ncc at the Kms'viler house
I
j
I

JLee J >reisbach, AI . U>.
i'l yjiriaa & Surgeon.
Iffslo
service to the
adjatteut coin
rKH
î ther of ! :ie
• '5.
!-,N
IsLL IJS S.
W ( i uf? < n
1 ILlJiKG,
\L
R'l/<
o.'i
riassical£
r. n. I
(.'Hi'
( Formerly
r-jwt'iciis,
Î -j.8 ;u.ti <
prnry at «
5>horlhand • ■ 1 • ;
Bearding S* . I- utf
annual st-ssio'i ixgiu:
oft Application.
tiv-ndohl, M r« ( :.
fi.'i N. O . La.
(,'MliUa tiibltJ iîuiiti
r< ; h Ci .iesH al, Lit
('■•n i;t< ; ■ Courbes,
'"n'irül
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L".:t Ct.lieeiuii Street.
• Crl. : • •. J a
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(.].:}> t< J 1 St;!i< i>l ],! i ; i (,is for
ïi»:,iin- l'îiiv. i'.ity other c»Ltges,
' y • ""m.i-c.t'iin 'ndT'ha
c . 1 Kur. !.. I-. (>.; I'i'itt 1.
A i.iü'liLU Aumbcr oî P arde.s Will lie
'y :: n. ::l S"îMI) VOTi CATAT OGl'E.
vu:
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■»' sVltrm. u'd tP «
iciorüöv er"
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r>ült
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itcs,
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mm —'or—
AEKANSA CITÏ,
LITTLE HOCH,
ST. LOI IS,
AND ALL POINTS
--'NORTH EAST and WEST,
«. iu ' ougli pullman
Sleeping - Car Service
north to 8*\ löt7i&
Through Fnilman
Sieeping ^ Cafil
south to new orleans,
r * .:ci. >,»aucotio:is at l i ti«é
IfOfîC with "Pullman Sleeping Cars
or Kansas City, and all points in
and Colorado.
^ it, C. TOWNKENî),
\i. Puas. Agent, |
A ST.I.OI IS MÔ;-'
S. T. Mo rehead,
BASTROP, I.A.
^ealel-s
0ml
K.J.
'/- 'I , v< ? rjfr~kC : \
\/ ^'vVi
.... T~"-rA
feSf , M» v'teJ®
On* -■ tm,
everything to be kept
class Jewelry Stole.
Watches,
\V8
■SST^
ocks
0 40,
Jewelry,
'-•O
Spectacles
and
M
Hi I v£ ware.
fact
first
tine
Repah'in
ne om rast^rajg ' é ' VCTTi :
Morses & Mules
If you de
sire YV"11
broken Driving Horses we have constant
ly on hand an excellent lot from -S40 lip
G-entlomen's Fiiie Itoadstera and
Saddle Horso3
AL WA YS IX STOCK.
COTTON AND SUGAR MULES,
Planters can saVe moUe v by getting
prices fiom us before purchasing else
where. Sbecial Inducements in car load
lots. Write for prices aud save money.
Kansas (Jif. y Saie Stables,
Sparks Bros. & Flood, Props,
yc to 202 Drvaddes St. New Orleans,Lai
Nov, S0='94.
P IT J J j O r r OKES3
( Is woman,8 safe and reliable friead.
lielieves monthly pains, cures nervous^
ness aud hysteria and restores to perfect
health. Sold by druggists and dealers
for $1 a bottle. Pamphlet mailed on ap
plication. If yon can't get it from your
druggist, send .Si to the proprietor and
he will send to you prepaid by express.
Charles F. Kisley, w.-.olesale druggist, 02
CcrtlandtSt., New York. 4.3 '<15
UM
D.C.
•st
$1000.08
GIVEN AW AY TO I NVENTORS.
$150.00 cverymorlh (riven away to any or.evv'io ap.
plies through 113 for tfic most meritorious Date:: t during
the month preceding. *'
Wo secure tho best patents for our clients,
jind the object of this ofStr is to cacourage inventors to
k;eptrack of their bright ideas. A* the same tixuc we
wish to impress upon the public the (act that
it's the simple, trivial inventions
that yield fortunes,
- jt tc Cir-wlrAlow" whicÎ! can br £&iiSy slid up
and down without breaking the passenger's back,
sauce-pan," "collar-button," "nut-lock," "bottle!
Äopper," and • thousand other tittli things dut most
any one can find a way of improvingi «htfti» '
mvClitiohs are the Odes thai bring Urreit IM«
author. Try te think of something to tn«M.
rr is not so hard as rr seems.
Patents taken oui through«« i
-" Wlt ft m, 1 g^^ 'p at i
iwhich L» the Dest newsptper published in Aiaerica
Te interests of inventors. We iurnûh a year's sub
scription to this journal, free of cost, to all our clients.
Y.. also cdver:ise,<iT.cofcost, the invention çâcfc rr.onth
w'i-wfc yv'ns ù'i< $150 priz?, a;ri hundreds of {hcusands
cf coi» rtt * tSe " National Rccoi-kr," containing a
sir en oi ihe wmr.er; ar.ci a ûci nf.).;Is.iijvejti«n#.
w-i'üLe scatte:cJ thrau^hor.t tlie Ui.Ue» 1 '?• rates aitiocg
r; ; itr,!iiL3 and i^anufrxturcrs, thus b*irgiiig to Ù«ir
uücr ;«*on the merits cf the i::\ entio t. ^
AU cornmuracations revalued strict!/ conCdccUal.
iidJrcss
JOHN WEDDER8URN & CO.,
JjoJsciiora of American end Foreign Patents,
618 P Street. N. VV..
Fiox p, o■ •. Washington, D. C.
Hf/irtnee—cdXarcft~.fifafer. IVriitJurout
SO-fa^eyp.LI'..
s
i
j Caveats , and Trade - Marks obtained , and alt Pat -j
^ent business conducted for moderate F ees, c
JOuh O ffice is O pposite U. S. patent O ffice?
j and wc can secure pat ? nt ia less time than those j
5 remote from Washington . j
j Send model , drawing or photo ., with descrip - i
* tioa . Wc advise , k patentable or not , free ofj
t cnarfre . Our fee aot due tiil patent is secured .
5 A P amphlet, "flow to Obtain Patents,'' withj
I cost of same in the U. S. ar.d foreign countries S
(sent free. Address,
C.A.SNOW&OO.
# Opp. P atcnt Orricc, W ashington, D. C.
SäfP« &
ce
»j
by; ■<
CA
6-y
fifcuuty
Yet liow often tlie rhnrm of feat'irp« Is
marred or destroyed l>.v an Imperfect com pit xi 'ju,
In tills trying climate , it is absolutely
protcct the delicate skhi from -" hl lrrluit ' 0u
and climatic tutu»««- j
"GAMELLINE7
tho celftbrated California l» eantif ! or will be found
a n icleal article for tho toilet . By itf use the clear ,
healthful complexion of youth Is preserved , tho
skin becoming smooth and of velvety toxtnr a . and
ladles of mature years will be charmed witli its
Cooling , soothing and agreeable effects .
a SiijczfÄtion , Call npoil your drugging and
in pîac e of tlio article to which you are aeenstomed ,
secure a package of cnnt('!sni(>. it# 1 :! 1 and con -
sider the commend* t* * r . ®f l\.i ti . k! ien Terry , Jane
iludiug and other artists of world wide fame ; note
the unqualified endorsement of celebrated physi -
cians aud chemists . use it ticcording to directions
and compare résulta .
Cmuelliiie is Invaluable , In proven ting or remo -
ving the disagreeable tftecis of sun burn , poison
ivy , etc .
Prepared In liquid form iri pure white and dell -
en : e tïesb color , exquisite!v berfwmed . and In pow «
der in white, brouetu » aod flesh ixuor .
frMt $0 CéÉU pêr Bottle or Safe.
r Oq 8 ALS BY ALL ORUQ0f8t&
The Misshiff Linie .
We're the link between makers
aud users of Household Furniture
whöfcwle prices guaranteed. We
sell for the world's largest factories,
Send for catalogue. Postage 6 cents.
| American Furniture Agency, Galena,
lvansas.
.f
ni
f£» <s|* <i
first
tine
$
?
m
il
y G
t b
.u
x
<4.
That' s Avliat wo wait you' to do.
eav
Û meet your Mend.
% see them to the depot fdFyou, in short feel
our parcels,
liei
*iO
wil I
free to command our a£ivntion for any con
t.*
'A
y
c icva'V -jfcH.. »44 j. G V*
de
YV"11
and
load
SS
This month we begin l^u)ve the bala
of our summer stock to one side to make
g| room for about $40,000 fill aud winter stock
H now coming in. Don't jbelieve we are loth
I 1° part with our summer stuff, its buying
dollars for dimes. Seaci us y our orders
g for anything from our 18 depart
ig ments, we promise ttLplease and suit you
or money back if \ ou -Siy so.
Sow aijoatSoa Pi'atrille? ITtll vs'®cr 60 "oalssatS3-4oeatsoash.
II
$
IIS
tv)
SI
% i*
\fi
***
: 'k
: '» v
V
(^0
^55.
'V
to
GEANT AND DAVIS
BANCROFTS JLITERAlvi' ASSO
CIATE T RACES IT OUT.
new light on . tha Simpson Faro -
—Jly «f-P«mu,viTaaU - The S *—a
Son Character Apparent In
Both Men .
(_Ct)p|"right, 1H0S
bv 15 icheller
L»a«Lciltr.)
Johnson
Many good peo|(K-, ,v rll PC:?<1
and lntcie.-ted in geiifiilc gies of
great nie;) do not know tisat Gen.
Ulysses Siinpson Grant andJeffcr
ison Davis were relatives, having a
common ancestor ia the tliird gen
eration batk.
This was a matter of common
f.pport in some p::rtj of the west
ern army uring the civil wai', and
after the war many s'jldiers epoke
of it. Since then the question of
kinship between the great conquer
or and the great conquered has
lapsed into a matter of nothing
more than family 1 istory, interest
ing, however, to those who trace
out great consequences in general
history from the lives and acts o<
individuals.
I bad always regarded thf rumor
of the Gl' int-DiVi* relationship as
a mere liction or a passing fancy
until a f«vr weeks ago, I hftd occa«
tion to turn the leaves of some old
family records, which, by mere
accident, ghowad me some definite
statements. Yet un claim will be
made in thi? article concerning the
idea expressed in ihe caption, con
sequently there will be nothing
Iitircj to ]M uvt) ur tiisprcn-u. A
few unpretentious extracts, wel
vouched for. will euable any one,
either partially or impartially.
,v«.» nis own deductions.
Without hesitation or apology,
I will try, first, fairly to tracc the
three preceding generations of
Gen. Grant on his mother's side.
His right name was Ulysses Simp
son Grant. A book entitled "An
cestry of Gen. Grant," by Edward
Chauncy Marshall, published in
1869, is tbo authentic family histo
ry, according to Col Frederick
Dent Grant, novr commissioner of
police for New York City.
From thia aod otbtr books aud
documents m mf poMetaion* it ap
pears that Oe»< Gratft's motkwr
was Mi«s Hannah Simpson* daugh
ter of John Srmpson and grand
daughter of William Simpson,
of Bucks county, Pa.
An extract from a pr'vate letter
written by Gen. Graut's fatter»
Jesse Root Grant, is sufficient tes
timony lo the high character and
inherent merit of the Simpsons
and te their origin. The 4***« of
trausmit
is tak
the lelto* has >.ot
ted. The pa t r.-ierrc/f
on from page U,i of Vtie '^.ncostry
m F fi»» >> ls;i «e .1
nb )l
of G 011. (irant,
•Uiss (Hall!)
•lovvi
utgom
tweu ly
r,
»ectabla
r strv for
Sunp»on was
the second ul third
child of John .Simpsonj
born and brought up ujf'i
try countr , p« ausy ]r
miU- /*»••li»i
Simpson was a h J
farmer i>f AliiericaTJ
several generationsg^ône of tho
family l'onneetions \vere ever as
puams fcr fame or |iolitical noto
rieîy, but were moreTgolicitous n-i
lo their standing in tegard to in
tegrity, veracity and ipdependeuce
The family had remoived to Ohio
a few years previously, and settled
in Clermont county,t
An .ther letter fromÉthe same
source to the New Yefw Ledger
"d was
"At t ia tune of marriage
(June 24.1821), Mrs. Grant was
an unpretending girl*' haudsome
but not vain. She hadjpj-eviousiy
joined the Methodist Ctfureh; and
1 can truthfully say tllat it has
uevcr had a more devfoted and
consistent member. Hjfer steadi
ness and strength of character
have been the stay of thfc family
through life. She was always
careful,and ffiost watchful over
her children; but never austere,
aod not opposed to theit ftee par'
ticipation in innocent \ amuse
ments."
The icflucncc and inherited
traits of Gen. Grant's nipt her u-)
on hu character, have hteon told
so many times that theyVeed no
reiteration here. 11 onl'M^iaimn
to fciiowydie !nw "i _
cxf-AJÜ r v i t h ps ( in -stud r#a vises,
in ancestral composit tut, as a
chemist might say.
"Tho Life of John Davis" is
the logbook by which ever3' real
Pennsylvania Davis swetfr. The
manuscript for it was prepaied
from the old documents in posses
sion of various branches of the
family,covering a period ->f nea -
ly two hundred yara. The col
lection and arrangement ^if these
documents for print r jqJtred odd
moments for a number of yft'ar.»
and the work was done aod pnb
lished for private circulation, in
lööß.by Gen. W. W. Davis,
now liviog nt Doyleeton, ^a.
Gen. Davis was an ofScer in
the Mexican war,Brigadier Gener
al m the U non army of %e civil
war,later Governor of Nov Mexi
co f and Uni ed States commission
er to tho 1S78 Paris exjiosition.
His militar ,civil and liteu-ry rec
ords constitate him an authority
on the cubji ct here discussed. On
page 30 of the "Life of John
Davis" «re the statements:
"John Davis married Aun
Si 1 pson, daughter of William
Simp.-on, 011 June 20. 1833,
" Wi IliamJjmipson was a sol
dier of the Rwrrtruitm. Wo havo
110 record or his service, an I can
j not say When, no- how long he
served in the Continental
Born 2U 173? h« « , ;.nry
Drau? rnrmijfiatcd from the North
of Ireland between 1748 and 1750,
and settled 111 Buckingham town
ship, Bucks county, Pennsylvania.
He made application to purchase
100 acrcs of land Jan, 15, 17(56,
and the deed wai executed by John
Penn. May 23, 13Ü7. He married
Nancy Hinos,of New Britain, was
the father of two sons and two
daughters—John and Matthew,and
Ann and Mary. Matthew removed
to near Z incsvilie, O., in 1810;
John lived and died in the couu
army.
{
The foregoing records being accepted "n accurate 01 O" nciit 1/
en as they can be made, the fortoiciug table will represent, the /<-
laiionship between these remarkable, men :
Win. Simpson*
Joan.
Matthew,
Mary,
Ann,
wife of
John Davis.
Hannah )
wife of j U.
Jessie Grant )
>S Y . Grant
Samuel,
father of
Jefferson Davis.
^,ë OÎI l£i
Davis.
1816
ty; Ann married John
William Simpson died in
aged *Mitv-fuUr. * > ~
He,,. 0«»f. moth«
from the Bucks couaty Simp.,0 :1."
i„.
« R " c . TToT»t
• f , t| , . . ....
rn Gen. Davis statement is very
slight. Montgomery county was
a part of Philadelphia until 1784.
The difference between Mont
uiity— H&
'liUrr n'wL
u • ,. " . -, t n,
Both join the present <;ity of Iml-i
, , , ., , ' ,
adelphia tn the west and north,
, ,. . ,
ami tlie entire temtory wheio tin-1
, r. , " .
early Davises and binpsons oved
i tvithin a radius of about forty
ro les from the present Public
Building in Philadelphia.
Thus Gen, Grant's great-grand
father was William Simpson, who
v as father of John Simpson, who
w is father of Mrs. Grant. Tin
Roots also married with the
Grants in Oinc r and the present
and preceding gen. ation of Roots
claim a first eotfsînship with the
Ohio Davises.
In answer to a letter of fti^uiry
on these points, Gen. Davis has
written :
"Doyèeston, Pa., July 30, 1895,
"My good cousin—Yours at
! i..o:l and contents noted.
"Do L -know anything about
John Simpson?' My father's
mother was Ann Simpson, of
Buckingham township, this county
a daughter of William, who was a
Revolutionary soldier, und ho had
a son named John. 1 have often
heard my father say th;d (ion,
Grant was a cousin of his. Grant
was also related to the Houghs of
[ Iiave
ifonn; I.
cousins.
this county, who are our relatives.
! You came from the same ancestry,
i ' ; .ludge Root did not belong to
j this bailiwick.
j "Regarding the conversation 1
j had with Jefferson Davis while lie
: was Secretary of War, I know
lothnig more than
1 , 1
old you. (..-î: ;• talK was?
j le ".iiougiit we wove
<TOO(i-by.
00 "W. . il . D avis."
^fr WntlUnfftoP-'""^ 3 * New 7t>rk.''
Daring Jefferson Davi-' last ill
ness he was prevailed upon by his
friends to dictate a short st de
! ment of his ancestry, and though
very feeble, he made a short dic
tation. His first statement was:
"Three brothers came to Ameri
ca from Wales in the early part
of the eighteenth century. They
settled at Philadelphia." Then
he meagerly traced his lineage
back through Samuel Davis, his
father. The life of Jefferson
Davis has been ably written by his
wife, Mrs. Vanna J. Davis. The
history of Philadelphia Davises
can be read by any one sufficient
ly interested. Tho names of David
Davisjftnd of the innumerable law
yers, physicians and literary men,
are easily traced. Through John
Davis,n appears, William Simp
son was great-grandfather of
Jefferson Davis.as well as of Cm.
Grant, thus making these men
direct second cousins.
John Davis crossed the Del
aware twice with Washington,
took care of LafaveUe who*, he
was wounded,and for soma weeks
entertained James Monroe,after
I
j WH! ( ^ President
Though both the Grant and the
tacters aro sui ccaeris.
<>r the Simpsons and >of
t,JDavis e
{ tue uiuu
many other good people coursed
and courses through the veins of
each. There are mere than 500
descendants in ths United States
at the present time who are about
equally related to both Gen. Grant
and Jefferson Davis.
Aud,however,though there may
have been some chance of enor
in tracing the exact relation of
these two great men, a few obser
vations on the similarity of their
characters may not be out of place.
' T ' je writer of this was too young
I even to see the last battle of the
: civil war,and never met either of
,
1 lh« mon V ev,on, v.bn t ,t appoar»
j hat be » related to be b nee.
laying a side furtlH yyjyjtffe-lfather
couiparifton will be at
1 *• '
I ' The curtain has been drawn he
1
; tween this generation and the
j times m which Gen. Grant and
i Jefferson Davis lived- and fought.
. .
The o-.io was s(»idier-statesma,. ;
, , ,, ,
i the other statesman-soldier, both
I came from a common parentage
„ . . ,, ..'
in Great Britain, hor live gener
atioiis their mutual ancestors liv
ed under American uifluen 'es — ai
most in tlie same localities, pro
gressing westward and southward.
Their forefathers were fellow-col
orrai subjects of Great Britain,
then close comrades in Washing
ton's army,also in tho war of 1812,
and the sons in tho Mexican war.
While Gen. Grant was conquering
the Spaniards m the ancient Aztec
couatry. Jefferson Day is was in
stituting sucessful plans for the
conduct of the War Department
in the new Territories, afterward
becoming Secretary of War,
Both came from obscurity, but
for generations the same stream
of genius in national affairs flowed
through the ancestral veins of
both until,divided in twain by ths
Roüüca! condition of tho country,
i with then? pro m hi nerd tb
: the two branches t'a
cataracts, whii h da
each other until the >
ery w.is .washed out.
!,
od 1:1 I ! 1 1 ! j home
cpo'dment. !l is
i in f "
(<1 11 -
ie he
Mon
;t his
a-ived
. personal
I ter of recoid i'iat the arsny
i cers who guarded Davis win
! w is imprisoned ;>t Fortress
roe wen j entirely surjinscd ;
personality. Their preeou
uotioh-.' of ii ; s disposition were
' Oir.plc;(Sly reversed. 1 nstcad of
1 he lirr-eator,tiiey round a calm,
-■ni', man of tii" great est forti.
tude in the face ' f the greatest
' ai unity that evm' ():>fell an
Ame. lean citizen Tins state
ment is well attested. When this
•.tas discovered, Horace G re; l'y,
foremost of Davis' former foes
signed the bond for his release.
W hen Davis"died.in 1881),the Xew
York Sun said, "A great soul has
passed."
Through all tha publie career
of each there vvcre shown tenaci
ty,hruinesj aud resolution, even
te stubborness. Grant never re
pented tlie merciless -.'laughter of
Union Soldiers m 1L0 great, bat
tles: Davis never asked forgive
ness for what he had done. They
both looked iifon the great losses
as a national calamity,from which
a national blessing has come -—to'
the black man,to commerce, to all
concerned,bringing happiness to
One sleeps in almost tho cx
in almost
ill.
tie me North.tho other
the extre ie South.
The era of tlie civil war and all
discussion of it has closed as a
national matter. Tho new N-nfli
and the new South are now prac
t ic«» 11;.' a 'id ihdisv .dubly one,closer
in unit\n than over before. Verily
they novV know that they are
brothers of the sa.ne blood, bone,
br--"<-riV'fHid brain. Four wars
.- irJ ^mJÊÊÊÊÊÈ^»^.^.
W.-vV TI; V( ! TO V D .< y , s ,
DEMANDS OF SiLVEF.ITES,
They Asli 3Ior« For Sîlrer Tli"n ii sjj Eve*
lïeoa Gntn'.vd to Gold.
Odo cf the claims meile by Ibo advo
cates of silver is that tha government
should treat both metals alike. How
does the government treat gold? For
every #3.3 grains of pure bunion de
posited in the mint the owner receives
a gold dollar weighing 25. S graina and
nine-tenths line. The government stamp
adds nothing to tho value of the metal.
It giniply certifies to that valne aud
pntc tho motal in a form convenient for
use. Everywhere in the world gold thns
coined is worth £1. If yon go to Eu -
rope, tho littlo piece of gold is worth
$1. If your house burns down, the little
lump cf gold that; was worth $1 pro
viens to the fire will be worth at any
jewe 1er '« any wl tero.
Tlie advocates of free Éiilver do not
w-"nt silver treated this way. Ob, no!
They ask for more. They ask that the
owner of silver bullion be permitted to
take ifc to the mint and have the govern
ment stamp G 71}( grains, with tho
necessary alloy, as a dollar of equal
legal tender with tho gold dollar TThr.n
today the value of tho bullion in tho
dollar is wortli only 53 cents. They ask
that the government stamp, its fiat, to
the extent of 47 cents, shall be put on
every 53 cents' worth of sHver they tako
to tho mint. Say the honso burns again.
Tho pioco of silver worth $1 the night
before becauso of the stump only is only
worth 53 cents when taken *o the
eler.
D' îï'f yon see that the silver people
are asking i ore from the government
fofWivep- tii n was ever granted by any
government in the world for gold? 'ÖWT
metal stampf ! $1 becansc of its value
tho world over; tho other stamped
$1, r.ud worth but 53 cents anywhere.
If we are to have fiat money, why not
hove it all flat, and not 47 cents fiat?
If we are to have fiat money, lot it be
p&per. But the ailver people claim that
if tlie government passes a free coinage'
of silver bill silver will immediate
ly jump in price from liow being worth
53 cents for 371 >4 grains to 100 cents
for tho samo amount.. Do yen believe
it? Some people are almost willing to
believe that the moon is made of Rieen
cheeso.—Humboldt ('iVnn. ) Messenger.
Hi!
Awnrdea
Honors— World
•ïïTïF? -
Fair.
M
m
î rmm
T? ?
mwmm
>1 rj &ÏRF:d m
r<ç
MOST PERFECT MAD2.
A pure Gt ape Cream of Tarbi Pcwdt. f
jf«T! Aitimonia, Alum or any other adwdt?!
AO YEARS THE' STANDARD.

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