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Baton Rouge tri-weekly gazette & comet. [volume] (Baton Rouge, La.) 1865-18??, July 20, 1865, Morning, Image 2

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18 PUBLISHED TRIWEEKLY,
Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays.
J. C."CHAER0TTI, T. ï Ï HATCH, G J. PIKE.
T. B. R. HATCH,
Editor.
BATON KtMKiE:
THURSDAY,::::::::::::::::JULY 20, 1865.
IW W« are under obligations to
the Adams Express Company for
their courtesy in forwarding and de
livering to us late files of the Mont
gomery (Ala.) Mail.
i.—► ——
ty Dr. M. Estes is announced
in the Shreveport News as a candi
date for Secretary of State for Loui
siana.
HP Gen. N.P.Banks has gone
to practicing law in New Orleans.
He was "sworn in" before one of
the District Courts the other day.
municipal organization.
BATON ROUGE ONCE MORE INVESTED WITH
A MAYOR AND BOARD OP SELECTMEN.
We are rejoiced at the action ta
ken by Gov. Wells , in the appoint
ment of a Mayor for our city. The
application was made some time
since, in the shape of a petition
signed by numerous citizens and
endorsed approvingly by Maj.Gen.
Hebron , of this post, and subse
quently by his successor, in com
mand here, Maj. Gen. Lawler.
The appointee, J ordan H olt , Esq.,
is one of our oldest citizens, emi
nently qualified for the position, and
we know of no one whose appoint
ment could have elicited more gen
eral satisfaction. Of an honest, firm
and capable character, we feel con
fident lie will prove ijiimself well
adapted to a just aud impartial dis
charge of the duties he has been
called to assume. While we are
assured he will meet with the ear
nest co-operation of our military au
thorities in promoting the good or
der and welfare of our city, we
would not let slip the opportunity
earnestly to impress upon the minds
of all true, law-abiding citizens, the
importance and necessity of also
lending their most cordial co-opera
tion to such an end.
Mayor Holt , has been sworn into
office and is now therefore, de jure,
as well as de facto, Mayor of the
city of Baton Rouge. Entrusted
■with the power of appointing a
Board of Selectmen, he has also
called around him the requisite num
ber of trustworthy and capable
gentlemen to fill said positions.—
These gentlemen are also among
our oldest and best citizcns, who
have hitherto distinguished them
selves in the faithful and honest dis
charge of public duties, and we are
free to say, that better appoint
ments could not have been made.
For a list of their names we refer
our readers to the first official pro
ceedings of the new board, which
we publish elsewhere.
Gradually, but surely and safely,
an we trust, our city has once more
launched out on the great highroad
of municipal government. Bright
and unchecked be its career to the
god of a restored prosperty.
Gone to Mexico .—Late advices
front Texas say that the following
Confederate officers left San Antonio
for Mexico, via Eugle Pass, on the
20th ult.: Gens. E. Kirby Smith,
Magruder, Price and Shelby, also the
following civilians : Gov. Allen aud
Ex-Gov. Moore, of Louisiana. They
were escorted by about three hundred
men, well armed and provisioned for
six months. Gens. UiudiBau and
Bee, also Gov. Murrah, had lef't ß ev *
eral days previous. These gentle-'
men, including their escort, all go to
Mexico as emigrants ; they have
arms, but these are to be used.in self
defense against Indians and robbers.
They do not intend to join either
party on reaching Mexican territory.
Home will pass through Mexico to
other points, and some intend to set
tle iu Mexico and become permanent
citizens. The entire party have
transportation and supplies for six
months.
Head Work and Hand Work«
The principle of action is one
which can never become dormant
in the minds of a great people
Action of the heart, action of the
brain, action of the muscles—are
essential pre-requisites to the health
ful organization of the body politic,
as much so as in the proper devel
opment of the moral and physical
powers of man. Tbis self-evident
axiom is firmly grounded in nature s
laws and sustained by the logic of
events. No man or set of men can
venture to ignore it without incur
ring the consequences which follow
fast in the paths of a degrading
inferiority.
This concurrence of known laws
with the experience and examples
of the past being conceded, fur
nishes ample data on which to base
a few practical suggestions touching
the necessities of the hour.
The people of the South have
suffered severely and lost heavily
from the war, yet they still retain
much of their former energy, which
cannot fail of being stimulated into
healthy action by the circumstances
ol necessity. "There's life in the
old land yet," and what we h;|ve to
see to is, that the energies wt pos
sess may be directed into proper
channels whose sources begin at the
fountain-head of wisdom, prudence
and intelligence and whose currents
run into the clear and open sea of
prosperity aud contentment.
Old homes are to be refitted and
new ones secured and built up. Im
provements of almost every descrip
tion are needed to place us once
more in the van of progress. He
who causes two blades of grass to
grow where ouly one grew before,
is to that extent a benefactor of his
species. Education not of the in
tellect alone, but of the heart, to
inluse goodness as well as smartness
into the rising generation, is one of
the paramount duties which con
cerns us all. Let us have good
schools and plenty of them in the
bauds of none but good moral men
and women. Let us leave politics
in the future more to statesmen than
to tricksters, and let us see that we
are not deceived any more by that
spurious sort of statesmanship which
works for self -aggrandizement to the
injury and destruction of the body
politic. Trust no man for any posi
tion of honor or profit, who cannot
show clean hands and a clean heart
—undefiled by the impress of dis
honor, injustice or oppression to
wards his fellow-man. We may then
hope for the enactment unrighteous
laws administered and executed by
honest men. Every one should
strive to do his part in the great
work of recovery, and what is
more, to improve upon the old
patterns as they existed before the
war. Men of wealth, who have
succeeded not only in preserving
their former means, but who, in
numerous instances, have grown
richer from speculations indulged in
during the war, owe it to the people
to manifest more interest than has
hitherto characterized them in help
ing to benefit the less fortunate and
to promote the general welfare of the
South. Many of those men were
previous to the war an absolute
drawback to the country. With all
their wealth, they lacked public
spirit, and lived only for the sake of
miserly gain. No wonder that our
communities were kept so long in the
backgrouud of enterprise with such
sordid and grasping speculators bat.
tening on the very life-blood of the
people and never launching forth a
single dollar to help, the poor indus
trious man along or give a for
ward motion to the wheels of
pf/'Ures«. Such dead-Weights are a
reproach to society and are unworthy
of those bountiC «?hich the Almighty
has placed within their groveling
grasp. In what shining contrast
does that man appear, who, having
the talents and good fortune to amass
wealth, is always ready to lend a
helping hand to the meritorious and
needy aad to foster and encourage a
spirit of liberal enterprise among a
people. Such a man deserves to bo
rich. His expansive mind, his open
heart and generous hand quicken
his whole life into blissful activity,
doing and receiving good. We long
to behold an increase of men of this
stamp, that they may constitute the
rule and not the exception among us.
Meanwhile, to all who have to
commence life anew, and whose sole
capital is summed up in intelligence,
labor and industry, we would say
never despair ! You can accomplish
wonders by putting into action the
natural powers with which the Crea
tor has endowed you. A few years of
honest toil, and you will have over
come obstacles which at first seemed
insurmountable. Keeping steadily
in view a high rectitude of purpose
in every effort to subserve private as
well as public good,
"Let ug be up and doing,
With a soul for every rate,
Still achieving—»till puriulng,
Learn to labor and to wait."
Effect of the Amnesty Excep
tions on Southerners in France.
The Paris correspondent of the New
York Herald writes on the 13th of
J une :
The withdrawal of belligerent
rights and the amnesty proclama
tion of the President, the text of
which has now been published here,
has been for the past few days the
principal topic of discussion among
those interested in American affairs.
Frenchmen generally, even those who
have professed through the whole
war to be our friends, consider the
exclusions too large and sweeping ;
and Southerners, who were preparing
to return to the United States, have
beeu thrown into a great state of
consternation. All the excluded
classes are represented here. These
gentlemen appear to be considerably
humbled ana depressed, and say but
little. Most of them, however, as
sert that they will not make personal
application for pardon, but that they
will go to Mexico and offer their
services to Maximilian. Most of the
Southerners included in the amnesty
here are preparing to return, and are
daily walking up to the legation and
taking the prescribed oath with as
good a grace as possible. As a gen
eral ride the Southerners acknowl
edge the rebellion finished forever,
aud seem disposed to enter in good
faith into their new relations with
onr government. The most malig
nant and unscrupulous revilers of the
government and country and people
here are Northern traitors—a few
men who, from the beginning of the
war to the present, have been loud
and foul-mouthed in their treasona
ble language whenever and wherever
they could obtain a hearing.
A ccent .—At a trial in the Court
of King's Bench between certain
publishing Tweedledums and Twee
dledees, as to an alleged piracy of
an arrangement of "The Old En
glish Gentleman." T. Cooke, was
subpoenaed as a witness. On cross
examination by Sir'James Scarlett,
that learned counsel rather flippant
ly said :
"Now, Sir, you say the two melo
dies are the same, bat different.—
What do you mean, Sir ?"
Tom promptly answered: "I said
that the notes in the two copies were
alike, but with a different accent.,'
Sir James : "What is a musical
accent?"
Cooke : "My terms are a guinae
a lesson, Sir." [A loud laugh ]
Sir.Tames (rather ruffied): "Don't
mind your terms here. I ask you
what, is a musical accent ? Can you
see it ?"
Cooke : "No."
Sir James : "Can you feel it?"
Cooke : "A musician can." [Great
laughter .J
Sir James (very angrily): "Now
pray, Sir, don't beat about the bush
but tell his lordship and the jury,
who are supposed to know nothing
about it, the meaning of what you
call accent."
Cooke : "Accent in music is a
stress laid on a particular note—as
you would lay a stress on any given
word—for the purpose of being bet
ter understood. If I were to say
you are an ass, it would rest on ass,
but were I to say you are an ass, it
rests on you, Sir James,"
Reiterated shouts of laughter by
the whole court, iu which the bench
joined, followed this repartee. Sil
ence being obtained Lord Denman,
the judge, with much seeming grav
ity, accosted the chop fallen coun
sel :
"Are you satisfied, Sir James?"
Sir James, deep red as he natur
ally was, had become Scarlett in
more than name, and in a great huff,
said, ''The witness may go down."
BY TELEGRAPH.
Sew York Dates of the 15th*
Large Purchase of Government
Bonds on Foreign Account.
The Seven-Thirties Nearly all Cone
Gold Closed in New York on
the 15th at 112 5-*.
Serions Railroad Accident in
Alabama.
Five Penons Rilled and Several Wounded
The Successor of Mr. Batterton.
MOBILE COTTON MARKET.
[From the New Orlcam Timm, 18th inat.]
N ew Y oek , July 15.—Four millions of
Government bond» were purchased on for
eign account thin week.
The seven-thirty loun will be all taken
by the beginning of August, and it is ex
pected that the next loan will bo 6 per
cent, gold fivo-twenties or ten-forties.
Gold closed to-day at 142%.
Five-twenties sold for one hundred and
five and three-quarters.
Sterling Exchange one hundred and nine
with light demand. Coin market closed
active. Call loans five par cent, on the
dollar, and unchanged.
M obile , July 17, 11 r. m.— Last Friday
evening, near Fort Doposit, two traius
collided and five negroes wero killed.
Several passengers were bruised.
Both engineers were injured and three
cars were smashed.
Sales of cotton to-day amounted to three
hundred bales. Middling sold at 42c.
Good demand, but little offering.
FROM VICK8BURO.
The SuceeMor of Mr. II a tier ton«
V ickbbubo , July 17.— Mr, Patridge will
probably continue the publication of the
Herald, vice Mr. Batterton, who was acci
dentally killed on Friday last.
A special dispatch to the Mobile Newt
says that Col. Batterton died at Jackson,
Mis»., on the 15th, from'the effects of a
gunshot wound accidentally received in a
pistol gallery.
T he L arokst . R un on R ecord.
Recently, at the billiard roum of
Charles J. Cuyler, was made the
largest run of billiards ever recorded.
It was played by Mr. Frederick Gr.
Britton, a fine amateur player of this
city. He commenced a friendly
game with another gentleman, and,
after making a run of thirty-five
points, got the two red balls in the
corner, and made the unprecedented
number of seven thousand seven
hundred and fifteeu points. The
largest run heretofore recorded was
six thousand one hundred and fifty
points. It was made by à gentle
man in Louisville, Kentucky, a few
weeks ago. The run made yester
day by Mr. Britton was upon a full
carom table and occupied four hours
and twenty-five minutes. The balls
were out of their position in the
corner six times during the play,
but, by the expert manipulation of
the player, were brought back.
There was not a " foul " stroke made
in the run, and the counting only
ceased by the balls becoming "froze."
This remarkable run shows extraor
dinary nerve and the utmost delicacy
of touch in striking the balls.— Cleve
land Herald.
• ♦ > —
OSsir A few days ago, Lieut. Geo.
Scott completed his seventy-moth
year, aod in honor of the event, the
distinguished chieftain was serenaded
by a number of his friends and admi
rers at his summer residence, Cozzens'
West Point. They could not get a
speech out of him, however.
: o-..».--.
OFFICIAL.
Proceedings of the Board of Selectmen
—or tbk —
CITY OF BATON ItOUftE.
Baton Rouse, L a ., July 18th, 1865.
Pursuant to notice from Jordan Holt,
Esq., appointed Provisional Mayor of the
City of Baton Bouge, by his Excellency J.
Madison Wells, Governor of the State of
Louisiana—until such time as an election
can be held according to law—the follow
ing gentlemen met at 5 o'clock, r. m., oii
the day above written :
Joseph Larguier, S. M. Hart, L. L. Lay
cock, D. C. Montan and A. Delaroderio.
A. M. Dunn, Esq., was in attendance as
legal adviser.
Joseph Larguier, S. M. Hart and A.
Delaroderio were appointed Selectmen,
from Ward No. 1, and L. L. Laycock.D.
C. Montan and H. K. Montcith, from Ward
No. 2. All present, exoept H. B. Mon
teith, and signifying their willingness to
accept the appointment» were qualified by
taking the prescribed oath of office. The
following resolutions were adopted :
1 tt, Resolved. That th» Board of Selectmen hav
ing met under the authority of the Governor of
the State of Louisiana, hail with emotion» of pride
and pleasure the restoration of civil authority for
the government of Rouge, an Ineorporated
institution.
2d, Revolted . That Inasmuch a« the public in
terest requires the presence of the military au
thorities in our midst, It is desirable there should
be a perfect coûperatlàn between the civil »od
military authorities for purpose« of harmony and
good will, and ou the part of the cici/.en» of Baton
/couge this Board deems it right and proper tn
communicate to the Major General and Brigadier
General, Commanding the Post, their entire cen
fidance in tnem as officers aud to solicit their co
eperation in the general police ol the city.
;sd, Resolved. That these resolution« be commu
nicated to Major General Lawler and Brigadier
General Fonda.
The Meeting then-adjgurnod to 5 o'clock
on Monday «Veiling next.
JORDAN HOLT, Mayor.
G eorge A. P«*, Sec'y pro tern.
FINANCIAL.
K aw Orusabb , Monday Kvenlag, July 17.
Gold—Market quiet, at 146}^(3H47.
«liver—tn good demand atl31^®133, regu
lar counter-rates. One «aie of American halves
was mid« at 186.
Rank Mate—Market very dull. Louisiana
state quoted at 56@5S and up to 60c. Bank of
Loui i.nia, Büfni (To.
Exchange—Market depressed ; check« on New
York, 1 per cent discount.
COMMERCIAL.
Cotton—Ordinary, 82®34e; flood Ordinary,
Low Middling, 4Äf£*le.; Middling, 46®
Me.
Louisiana Sugar—Strictly Good Fair to
Volly fair, lSJf (not refilled); etrlctly Kully Fair
to Prime, 14% ; Yellow Clarified, 17.S^®17
Flour—Oood Extra. at |9 16®$« 26 ; Choice
Extra, (retail) $10 26©10 60.
DIED:
In this city, on Wednesday morning, the ISth
instant, JOHN KOHLER, aged *27 yearn.
In the city of Mew Orleans, on the 6th initant,
RORKKT M„ ion Of Mr. James Ikvihu , of tliia city,
agertwo year« and six month«.
LOST.—The flies of the Baton Rouge
Advocate, for the years 1860,18fil and to May
1862. Also, the DAY BOOK and JOURNAL BOOK,
containing office accounts for the latter period.
It If believed the above books were taken charge
of by tome friend of the proprietors for safs.
keeping.
By returning them to the undersigned at Ool.
Malta's old stanif, the favor will be both appre
ciated and rewarded.
julylfMH .1. Ä. TAÏI.OR.
To Rent.
A COMMODIOUS "Cottage House," |S9j
plruHKnVy nitu'itKt, cortalnlng 4 roomxJBSil
and kitchen, newly plastered and painted, with a
plentiful supply of pure «Istern and well water.
Possession given immediately.
ALSO,
AVERY desirable "Cottage House,
contalnln" 3 room» and kitchen, Ac.,»*
withan excellent well of wnter. Possession given
on the 1st of August next. Apply to
julylS JAMES MCVAY«
LOST,
ON Levee street, in this city, on Friday
morning, the Tth instant, a NOTK, drawn by
Jacob Simon, in favor of Kmlle Gassie and en
dorsed by C. K. Little, payable on the 20th day ol
July, 1865, for the «um of
THREE HUNDRED HOLLAHS.
AU persons are warned against tradlrtgfor said
NOTE, as payment for the same has been stopped,
except to the undersigned.
julyll-3t-pd EMILE GASSIE.
A T
BEAL 'S :
60 Barrel« Single Kxtra FLOOR.
10 .. mr88 BORK.
1 Hogshead Extra SUGAR.
X Gross P. ft M. YEAST POWDERS.
Just arrived atid for sale at moderate prices.
at *3 50 per sack.
A T BEAL'S—Coaree Liverpool SALT
!l oBly £8 60 per bag.
bricks for sale.
iAA AA/k BRICKS for sale, in We«t Baton
LU' ',UUU Rouge, on tbemost rea»onal>le term».
For particular«, apply to
J. C. STAFFORD,
ju!yll~nt Law office, Third street.
WOOD ! WOÖÜj ! WÔÔBTî !
ORDERS FOR CORD WOOD (well Rea
soned). left at the Gazette and Cornet Office,"
will meet with prompt attention. juneS
~îï\ DOLLARS REWARD:
IjiORTHRfcK KEYS OF AN IRON SAFE,
attached to a wt«el ring, that wnre
ixi August, 1862, in this city,' It d«»
live red at this office. juuel7-2m-pd
N. 0. ADVERTISEMENTS.
.VOTICE.
1MIE undersigned have renewed their
former Partnership, and will transact busi
ness under the name of STEVENS ft SEYMOUR,
at their old stand, Nos. 9B, and 9$ üommon St.,
opposite the Oity Hotel.
E. R. HTEVEN8.
Per W. B, Sevmodr.
W. E. SEYMOUR.
Nkw Ohl bans , July X, 1868. jyl8
PA P £ R, lä TAT I ON ER Y
FANCY GOOD S .
Wa rehou sf, Nos . 'Jfi and 98 Common St.
WE are now receiving by almost every
arrival a large stock of
POINTING,
writing and
WRAPPING PAPER,
PAPKR BAGS,
blank books,
STATIONERY of all kinds,
And FANCY GOODS.
Received per steamer Evening Star and «hip
Freedom—
44 cases CAP and LETTER PAPEK.
40 reams COTTON SAMPLING PAPER.
10 cases SCHOOL SLATES.
200 dozen WEBSTER'S SPELLING BOOKS.
150,000 PAPER BAGS,all sizes, from X '0 20 lh
COMBS,
NEEDLES,
PINS,
TOOTH BRUSHES,
And a general a«fiortment of
FANCY GOODS.
For sale at reduced prices.
STEVENS & SEYMOUR,
July 18 and 9S Common street.
i. 3. WARBEN. T. W. CRAWFORD.
WARREN & CRAWFORD,
(Successors to Warren, Ciillmore & Co.,)
COTTON FACTORS
—AND—
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No. 29 CARONDKLET STREET,
julyll-6ni* SfKW «Ht-KAIV'SI, LA.
SPECIAL NOTICE S.
J\ otiee !
Batoji Bou.e, La ., June 28th, 1865.
/GEORGE A. PIKE, is fully authorized
'I and empowered to act tor me and in my »tead.
In ail business matter« in which 1 have an inter,
est in Baton Rouge.
ju!yl-3U WM, S. PIKE.
Jidvances!... Jidvaneen! !
I WILL MAKE LIBERAL CAS!! ADVANCES ON
COTTON CONSIGNED TO MY FRIENDS,
UOWKR, GARDNER & IIAUK1SON.
julyl-lm WILLIAM BOGEL.
J. C. STAFJFOttD,
ATTORNEY AT J.AW,
OFFICE ON LA URKL STREUT,
BATON UOI UK, LA.
WILL practice in the Parishes of East
Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge and East
Feliciana. jul>4-0m*
JYOTICE.
HPHE Tax-payers of the Parish of East
A Baton Rouge, are hereby notified that I have
deposited the assessment roll fr.r the year I fill.'l, iu
the Parish Recorder'« Office, at the Court House,
in order that a ny peraon aggrieved by such assets,
ment, may appeal and have the stune corrected,
if found incorrect.
juiyl-4ts JAIUEgH,KKN!«eOt,
Asaesnor.
Raton Rowye, June SOfA, 1S05,
JYOTICE!
THE Tax-payers of the Partnli of East
Baton Kouge, are hereby uotiiied, that un
less the State Taies due by them for the year«
1901-2, are paid within the next thirty (In)-«,
I shall proceed to collect the same according to
law. KD. COIISI.MARO,
Julyl-4U Sheriff and State Tax Collector.
GKOCERY
—AMD—
PROVISION HOUSE,
PLANTATION SUPPLIES.
« » «
E. R. BECK WITH,
raiRD ST., CORNER OF LA HR El.,
baton rouge, la.
CONSTANTLY ON HAND EVERY VARIETY OF
PLANTATION HVrPLIKS.
tqr Plauters and others would dn well to call
before purchasing elsewhere.
Cotton bought at lilghrat murket rate*.
julyC-Smo».
A. BLUM,
DKALRK IN
DRY GOODS, GROCERIES,
PROVISIONS,
And Plantat ion Supplies Gcuerally.
ALSO,
CROCKERY, TIN, WOOD & WILLOW WARR
Store, Cor. Africa and St. Napoleon St: 1 .,
BATON ROUGE, IjA.
X^ETERMINED to keep a full and well
I ' selected stock of articles such as g# to make
up a first-rate variety store, A. BLUM hopes to
merit and receive an increased amount af pat
ronage. lie respectfully invite« hi« old customern
and the public at large, to continue their calls as
u-ux., assuring them of his determination to
please and satiafy them in every particular.
july6-tf
VICTOR'S
PIE S TA.XJ^-A-3NT r r
THE PUBLIC ARE,
here by respectfully In
formed that they can be accommodated with
Board, at the above Restaurant, aitvated on Lafa
yette «treet, at the rate ol'$N |»«!r week. This
will include two meals a day. Every attention
and care will he given to the comfort of guetta.
Payment must I» made weekly.
julyS-tf VICTOR CAI.VA Y «AC.
BUTTER,
At only 40 cents.
JUST received 250 pounds New May
BUTTER, which is offered at ouly 40 cent«
tt>., retail.
julyfl JOSHUA REAL,
Oats, Sugar Cured Jolcs,
RUMP PORK AND BUTTER.
A SMALL supply of the above-named
article» juat «tored and for «ale at moderate
price« by
julyö JOSHUA BKA I..
JAMES MeVAY,
HARDWARE MERCHANT
and dealer ix
Agricultural ImpleuiciitK,
WINDOW ÖHADE8,
W A V V PAPRK, ETC.
CULLS refipectl'ully the attention of the
I public to his large and excellent atock of good«
pertaining to hi» line of merchandise. He be
speaks a liberal share of public patronage.
Store on Third street, oppo«ite the building of
the Louisiana State Bank. julyl
I. O. O. I\
UK Regular Weekly Mtotiug of
. DE SOTO LOLKJK, No. 7, I. Q.: -y*lp jlpi
O. P., is held at their Hall, on Mala
'«treet, nearly apposite the Sumter House, every
THUttdI>AY EVtNINQ.at half-piut 7 o'clock.

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