OCR Interpretation


Jeffersonian Republican. [volume] (Stroudsburg, Pa.) 1840-1853, July 24, 1840, Image 4

Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86053954/1840-07-24/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

A GLORIOUS RECORD ! ! !
let -all read the folhming testimonials
of Harrison's worth.
Geivcral fhuTi-son lias done
more for Ivis tjomitry with less
com pen salion for itrtlmnahy man
living. President Madison.
ESTIMATE OF HARRISON BY THE
W1NESSES OF HIS DEEDS.
The following tribute of praise
was paid to General Harrison in
1811, by It of the officers who
fought under his banner at the
battle of Tippecanoe :
"Should our country again re
quire our services to oppose a civ
:iized or savage foe, we should
march under General Harrison
with the most perfect confidence
of victory and fame.'
.loel (rook
11. B.Burton.
Josiah Sneeling,
O. G Burton,
C. Fuller,
G. Gooding,
Nathan Adams,
A. Hawkins,
11. Burchstead, J. D. Foster,
Hosea Blood.
To the Senate and House of Rep
resentatives of the United States.
1 lay before Congress, two let
ters received from Govcrror Har
rison of the Indiana Territory, re
porting the partichiars and the is-
Silt Ul l 1 1 V Aj)VUiiitm uuu.i liu
command, notice oi winch was ta
ken in my communication of No
vember 5.
While it is deeply lamented
that so many lives have been lost
in the action which took phvce on
the 7tli ultimo, Congress will see
with satisfaction the dauntless
spirit and fortitude displayed by
every description of the troops en
gaged, as well as their collected
firmness which distinguished
their commander on every trying
occasion requiring the utmost ex
ertion of valor and discipline.
James Monroe.
Washington, Bee.
18, 1811.
The Richmond Enquirer, now
now next to the Globe, high in
the confidence of the administra
tion, said-:
4 General Harrisons letter tells
us everything we wish to know a-
bo lit the officers, except himself,
lie does itistice to every oue but
Harrison and the world must
therefore do justice to the man
who is too modest to do justice to
himself."
GEN. WAYNES ENDORSEMENT.
general Anthony Wayne in
a letter to lie Secretary of War
giving an official account of this
sanguinary Indian Battle in 1792,
said :
"My faithful and gaZlant Lieu
tenant HARRISON rendered me
most essential service by commu
nicating my orders in every direc
tion, and hy his conduct and bra
very exciting the troops to press
for victory."
James Madison, in a special
message to Congress in 1811, con
cerning the battleof Tippecanoe
said :
Wliile it is deeply lamented
that so many valuable lives have
been lost in the action which took
place on the 7th ultimo, Congress
will see with satisfaction the
dauntless spirit of fortitude victo
riously displayed by every des
cription of troops engaged, as well
ihe collected firmness which disr
, ikyishvd their Commander, on'
an tecasidn requiring tlvb utmost
'v . rtffpns 6f valor aud&sHpline,"
BR AffDRJESTJES'S VJEGETAIS&E -VNE.-VEI&SA1L
PItS. .;.
Cleanse aisd Purify the Body.
The application of the, principal of PURGA
TION being allowed to be one of the greatest
utility in the cure and prevention of disease, it
is of the utmost consequence to as certatn what
medicine is capable of producing the eflect de
sired, in the easiest, ai.d at the same time, in
the mostKjfl'ectual manner, It has no longer
tocontend with the blind prejudices of the
public ; it is only with 'tlhosc lew who are still
determined to be " killed according to -rule,"
like the people of old, " who would :have" a
" King to reign over them." But, thanks to
the circulation of -newspapers- thanks to the
general -diffusion of knowledge, which enables
nineteen twentieths of the PEOPLE to read
and judge for themselves now we no longer
believe in swallowing that d eadly mineral,
Mercury professing to cure, but uuiversallylea
ving us in a worse condition after its use.
We no longer believe in the absurd notion
that Inflaniations of any kind can be cured by
abstracting our life OUR BLOOD, it is now
understood that an Inflammation is a wise ordi
nance of Nature a signal that she requires the
assistance of purgative medicine to ease her
of the oppressive burden, which she proves by
the high fever and the strong pulse, is wanted
to be removed. In other words, the body calls
for a VEGETABLE CLEANSING.
Brandreth's Vegetable Universal Pills require
skill in their administration ; the printed direc
tions only have to be observed and they des
cribe the just proportion of the dose to the
magnitude of the disease to be cured.
Let all persons read the following opinion of
a gentleman who well knows the quality of
these Pills -:
BRANDRETH'S PILLS.
Tliis "medicine is cknowleged to be one of
the most valuable over discovered, as a Purifi
er of the Blood and Fluids. It is superior to
Sarsaparilla, whether as sudorific or alterative.
It stands infinitely before all the preparations
or combinations of Mercury. Its Purgative
powers alone are ot incalculable value ; lor
those Pills may be taken daily, FOR ANY
PERIOD, and instead of weakening by the
cathartic effect, they add strength, by taking
away the cause of weakness. There is no
good Mercury does, which these Pills do not
likewise; but they tiave none of the miserable
effects ofthat Deadly Specific. The TEETH
'ate not injured; the BONES and -LIMBS are
not paralyzed no; but in the stead of these dis
tressing symptoms, new life and vigor is ani
mate and evident in every movement of the bo
dy. BRANDRETHS PILLS are indeed a
Universal Rfjiedy for they cure opposite dis
eases ; thev cure INFLAMMATORY and
CHRONIC -RHEUMATISM ! They cure
DIABETES & STR ANGUARY ! TEey cure
DYSENTARY and CONSTITUTIONAL
COSTIVENESS ! They will cure all these
apparently opposite diseases, because they
Cleanse and Purify the Blood ; provided
however, Nature is not beyond all Human As
sistance. For years this medicine has been be
fore the public in the United States ; wherev
er it has been introduced, it has superseded all
other remedies.
DR. BRANDRETHS OFFICE in New
York is 241, Bjoadway. In Philadelphia,
No. 8, North Third Street.
25 cents per box with directions "
Druggists,never made Agents.
TjjfTJeware of Counterfeits.
Each of Dr. Brandreth's Agents has an -en
graved certificate, dated within the twelve months
next preceding. These certificates are renew
ed regularly; therefore when over twelve
mon'hs old they no longer guarantee the genu
ineness of the medicine.
Remember Druggists are never made A
gents. Certificates of agency are held by the fol
lowing persons who are constituted agents for
the sale of BRANDRETHS YEG1TABLE
UNIVERSAL PILLS. Purchased them on
ly in Monroe and Pita counties.
At Milford, JOHN H. BRODHEAD.
" Stroudsburgh, RICHARD S. STAPLES.
" Dutottsburg, LUKE BRODHEAD.
New Marketville, TROXEL & SCHOCH
" Dingsman's Frry, A. STOLL & Co.
" Bushkill, PETERS & LABAR.
Remember if you purchase of any other per
sou or persons m Monroe and Pike Counties
vou will be sure to obtain a Counterfeit.
B. BRANDRETH. M.D.
June 26, 1840.ly.
i
. LADIES' COMAPMON. .
-New Volume commenced icth the May Number
JL HE Ladies' Companion, established in May,
1834 a popular and iu'ghn esteemed magazine of
General Literature and the Fine Arts; embellish
with gorgeous and costly engravings on steel, and
the Quarterly fashions ; aid also with Fashiona
ble and popular Music, arranged for the Piano
Forte, and Guitar.
Since the publication of the number for Novem
ber, the demand for the Ladies' Companion has
been unprecedented and beyond the most sanguine
anticipations. At the commencement of the vol
ume an additional number of copies were printed,
which was considered at the time adequate to sa
tisfy all the orders which might be received, and
leave a considerable number on hand for subse
quent calls. The publisher is more than gratified
in stating that the whole of an edition of six thou
sand, live hundred copies, was completely exhaus
ted before the issuing of the third number of the
volume; and, consequently, was compelled to
reprint a second edition of two thousand copies,
making the circulation of the Ladies' Companion
eight thousand five hundred, at the termination of
the tenth volume. In consequence of this great
and unparalleled increase of new subscribers, he
has determined to commence the new volume for
the ensuing year with thirteen thousand : hoping
that he will thus be enabled to supply all the de
mands for the Ladies' Companion, as well as those
-disappointed in commencing wTith the tenth vol
ume. The proprietor feels grateful for that en
couragement which has been so lavishly bestowed
upon his magazine, and at the same time he begs
to assure the readers of the Indies' Companion,
that it is determined resolution to meet it with a
corresponding liberality to merit its continuance.
The work appears in beautiful new type, printed
on the finest paper ; smoothly pressed, and neatly
stitched in a handsome cover.
The Ladies' Companion contains a larger quan
tity of reading than any other magazine issued in
in this country, and its subscription price is only
three dollars a year, while the great combination
of talent secured for the coming year will render
it unequalled by any other periodical.
Splendid isteelkng ravings, prepared by Mr. A.
Dick, ornament the work one of which accompa
nies each number. These plates are entirely new,
and are --engraved at a heavy expense by one of the
best arstists in America, 'expressly ior the maga
zine. Ihe designs are selected with a view of in
teresting the general reader, and enhancing the
value of the work, for its superior pictorai embel
lishments. It is with pride the proprietor announ
ces that the Ladies' Companion is the only maga
zine published, in which new and elegant steel
plates appear regularly. Those accompanying
other monthly periodicals, are generally first worn
out in annuals. In addition to the engravings
mentioned, a correct plate of the Quarterly Fash.,
10ns for Laaies4 will appear in the June, Septem
ber, December, and March numbers, independent
of the usual embellishment. It is the determina
tion of the proprietor, that these fashion plates
shall appear in a style hitherto unknown. It lite
rary character will undergo no change, as it will
remain under the charge of the same Editors as
heretofore. Articles from the pens of the most
distinguished writers, will appear in the forthcom
ing numbers, among which may be enumerated the
following: Mrs. Holland, imma u. JtLmbury,
Lvdia H. Sigoumey, trances b. Osgood,
. TABLE OF THE RATES OF TOLLS
ON Til K -
BLAWARE AND HUDSON' CANAL,.
STTiie first column "shows the Kates where the Riifes'aTid Reglflions are
Complied with The second, the Lesml Tolls.
CAUSING AND FULLING.
The Carding and Fulling business, will be car
ried on by the subscriber at the above named stand
and he would be pleased to receive the patronage
oi Ins old customers and the pubhek generally,
1 he price oi wool carding will be 4 cents cash or
cei.ts trust per pound. Wool or cloth will be at
ken away and returned when fiinshed at J. D. &
U. .Marvin's store, Stroudsburg, on Saturday of
every week, where those indebted to the late firm,
can meet the subscriber and settle their accounts.
John A. Dimmich.
Bushkill, June 1st.
DISSOLUTION.
TZr)8 Copartnership hejetofore "existing be
tween the subscribers under the name& firm
of Sanford and Dimtnic;, is this day by mutual
consent dissolved. All those haviner claims against
said firm,, are, requested to call and receive their
pay ; and all those indebted to said firm can set
tle their accounts with either of the subscribers
until the first day of September next.
ORllIN SANFORD,
JOHN DlMMlCK.
. Bushkill June 1st 1840,
EUet, Caroline Orne, eba Smith, Mrs. Harring
ton, Ann S. Stevens, Miss Hannah F. Gould, Ma
ry Ann Browne, 'Charlotte Cushman, Mary Emily
Jackson, Henry W. Herbert, author of 'Cromwell,'
&c. Professor J 11 Ingraham, author ot Uurton,
'Capt. Kidd,' &c, Professor H V Longfellow,
author of ' Outre Mer,' Wm E Burton, Chief Jus
tice Mellen, John Neal, Park Benjamin, Grenville
Mellen.N C Brooks, A M, George P Morris, Ro
bert Hamilton, Isaac C Pray, Wm Comstock, Hi
ram B Dennis, Rev J H Clinch, James Brooks,
Albert Pike, F A Burivage, Henry F Harrington,
together with several others, with whom negotia
tions are pending, lhey will hercaiter be an
nounced.
Mrs. Ann S. Stephens,
William W Snoivden, Editors.
Hairy F. Harrington, j
The Musical Department of the Ladies' Compa
nion has ever commanded a large share of atten
tion, and has been looked upon with no little in
terest by its readers, and more especially the La
dies, whom the publisher is anxious to please. It
will continue to be a subject oi more than usual
care to him, and to the Professor under whose su
pervision it is placed, to make that portion of the
magazine deserving of the countenance of every
lover of music.
Tae Work in General. Of every department an
-equally careful supervision will be strictly exer
cised by the Editors, and all appropriate expendi
tures will be liberally bestowed, as it is the de
sign of the publisher, with the aid of his contribu
tors and the advice of his friends to make the La
dies Companion distinguished for the beauty and
accuracy of its typography, the variety and high
tone of its literary articles, the quality and value
of its music, and the unequal splendor oi its pic
toral embellishments, and the accuracy of its quar
terly fashions. The proprietor pledges himself to
use all honorable means to maintainthe superiori
ty which the Ladies' Companion has obtained.
For five years he has steadily pursued a course of
improvement, and he flatters himself that his pre
sent facilities are such as to give the work eminent
vantages over' ah other publications.
From the foregoing it will be perceived that the
Ladies' Companion embraces every department
within the range oi JJelles-JLettres and the jj ine
Arts: and no exertions or expense will be deemed
too great to m render the work equal to any other
extant. The flattering and general testimonials
of nearly every contemporary journal in the United
States, and in fact, many on the other side of the
Atlantic, have strongly asserted the undeniable
claims of the Ladies' Companion to the support of
the public generally. Tire is no work that give'
Us readers such a great return for their mojioy.
Terms Three Dollars a year in advance, or Foi
, Dollars during the year.
No subscription received for less than a year.
Letters must he post paid, otherwise the postagt
is deducted, and credit given only for the balance
Address WM. SNOWDEN,
109 Fulton street. New York.
Articles, per ton, per mile.
Merchandize, Sugar, Molasses, and
Liquors,
Flour, Meal, Grain, Salted Provi-
sions, Pot and Pearl Ashes.
Gypsum,
Salt,
Hay in bundles, pressed,
Hydraulic Cement, going towards
tide water on the capacity of boat
carrying it,
Do. do. Stone unburn t on the capa
city of boa. carrying it,
Hydraulic cement going from tide
water,
Ground Tanner's Bark,
Unground do. do.
Iron Castings. , ,
Iron up the canal,
Do. down the canal,
Pig Iron up the canal,
Cotton, bales or bags,
Hides (not to exceed $.2 10 for any
distance) per ton, per mile, ;.
Common Brick, Stone, Lime, Sand,
Potter's Clay, Ashes & Iron Ore,
Brick and Fire Stone,
Anthracite Coal down the canal,
per ton, per mile,
Do. do. up the canal on the capaci
ty of the boat carrying it, per ton
per mile.
Charcoal (not to exceed $1 50 for
any distance,
Marble, Mill, and other manufactu
ring stones,
Hoop poles, in boats,
Fence Posts and Rails, in floats,
per ton, per mile,
Hoop poles, split or shaved in boats,
Lath, split or sawed, in boats,
Staves and Heading, sawed or man
ufactured, in boats,
Do. do. rived or split in boats (not
to exceed L dollar per ton for any
distance,) per ton, per mile,
Stavea and Heading in rafts,
Hoop Pole, posts, rails and lath in
rafts,
Manufactured wood for the first 25
miles (thence 2 1-2 cents, but not
to exceed Si 75 for any distance
on canal,)
Materials for making crates for
Glassware per ton, per mile,
TIMBER IN BOATS.
per 100 eft. per mile.
Pine and plain maple, for the first
25 miles (thence 1 1-2 cents per
mile, but not to exceed $ 1 for any
distance,)
Hemlock, for first 25 miles, (theece
1 cent, but not exceed S ,75 for
any distance,)
Oak and Ash, for the first 25 miles,
(thence 1 1-2 cent per mile, but
Cts.
2
1 1-2
2 1-2
1
11-2
2
11-2
3
3
o
2
3
ts.
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
21-2, 4
1
1 1-
11-2
8
3
11-2
1
2'l-2
1
3 9-10
1 l-O
4
11-2
2
4
4
Qts1.
4
4
11
not ro exceed $150 foi any dis
tance,)
Ci.:.. 'iv ' i
mu i imuer.
Maple, Cherrv, White wood- and all
uniuer not enumerated, (but not ,
to exceed Sbfny distance,). "
TIMBER IN' SAETS.
per 100 c.feet per mile-
Hemlock
Pine, .
Ship Timber,
All timber not enumerated,
BOARDS, PLANK OR SCAXTI.IXG IX
BOATS.
pcrlOOOfl. board measure, per mile.
Pine, plain maple, and bass wood '
for for first 25 miles, (thence ly
cent per mile, but not to exceed
Si for any distance.)
Hemlock for first 25 miles (thence
1 cent per mile, but not to ex
ceed 75 cents for any distance,)
Cherry and white wood, but not to
exceed bl 75 for any distance.
Curled and specked maple, but not
to exceed 52 ior any distance.
A.sh,"oak,and all timbernot enumer
ated, for first 25 miles, thence 1
1-2 cent per mile, but not to ex
ceed $1 25 for any distance,
BOARDS, PLANK OR SCANTLING RAFTS.
per 1000 ft. b. m. per mile.
Pine, plain Maple and Bass wood,
Hemlock,
Oak, ash, and all not enumerated,
SHINGLE IN BOATS.
per 1000 j)er mile.
Pine, for the first 25 miles, (thence
3 mills per mile for remaining
distance.
Hemlock, for first 25 miles (thence
2 mills per mile for remaining
distance,
SHINGLE IN RAFTS.
per 1000 per mile.
Pine or Hemlock,
WOOD IN BOATS.
per cord per mile.
Cord wood, from one to ten miles,
(and ior every additional mile 1
cent per cord, but not to exceed
50 cents per cord for any distance
on the canal.
Articles not enumerated going from
tide water per ton, ,
Articles going towards tide water,
Pleasure boats, on the capacity of
the boat,
MILEAGE ON BOATS, LADEN OR EMPTY
per mile on the boat.
Going towards tide water,
Coming from tide water,
4
13-4
13-4
Cts
4
4
31-
3
4
1
4-
4
4
4
0-10
5-10
8-10
8-10
8-10
8-10
4
4
N. B. When toll is charged per ton 0n th& capacity of the Boat, no adcl-
ional charge will be made for mileage on said boat.
Wlio3esalc aaid Retail
CABINET WARE,
PTOSIS subscriber respectfully informs the citi
.1. zens of Stroudsburff and the public generally,
that he has taken the shop recently occupied by
James Palmer, on Elizabeth street, nearly opposite
the Stroudsburg House, in this Borough, where
he intends carrying on the Cabinet Making busi
ness in all its various branches.
He shall keep constantly on hand or make to or
der all kinds of fourniture :
Sideboards, Bureaus, Sofas, Centre
taMes, ISrealtfast and Imiiig Tables,
Wash Stands, Bedsteads, &c. &c.
together with every other article usually kept at
such establishments : all of which he will sell at
the Easton prices.
As his materials will be of the best quality, and
all articles manufactured at his establishment will
be done by first rate workmen, he confidently as
sures the public that his endeavors to render gen
eral satisfaction will not be unrewarded.
He respectfully invites the public to call "and ex
amine his stock before purchasing elsewhere.
Chairs, Settees, &c. will be kept constantly on
hand and lor sale.
CHARLES CAREY.
Stroudsburg, Jan. 15, 1840.
sTOB WORK '
J Bf allkirids: nealty ,. execjited x at
this -Office. vv r . -
CAUTION.
thereby forbid, all persons trusting my wife
Dorothy . orianacco.unt what over as I will j ay
no debts of her?contracting after this date
Stroud tsp: June 5 1840
Lorenzo '3tumpp:
Notice to Boatman.
Y 0 HIE Delaware and Hudson Canal Comnanvl
JL will pay the following freight for transporting
uoai lrom lionesdaie to llondout, on their cana,
the ensuing season, viz :
Running Company's boats with an
agreement to purchase and paymg
$10 each trip on said boat, and
making not less than 16 trips with
said boat during tho season. Si 40 per ton.
Itunnmg lompany'3 boats with an
agreement to purchase and paying
$10, each trip on said boat and ma
king a trip in ten days or less, $1 40 do.
Running Company's boats with an
"agreement to purchase and paying
610 each trip on said boat, and ma
king a trip in 11 days, $1-35 do.
Running Company's boats with an
agreement to purchase and paying
$10 each trip on said boat, and oyer
11 days making atrip, $1 30 do.
Individuals running tbeir own boats in the coal
business will be paid the . same freight as company
boats.
Application for boats can bo made to the Collec-
tors ano superintendents on me une oi canal.
R. F, LORD, Engineer
UJhoe-t Del. & Jiud. ua. Uo
MarchOth, 1840,
HORSE BILLS
Printed at this. QiTipe Avitb iieat
ness arid despatch:.
TEW DOIiIiARS
REWARD.
Was lost on Thursday, the 21st inst. be,
tween Stroudsburg and John Brown's Tannery,
a large fair grain Calf Skin Pocket Book, coii-
taming one ibu bill on the liJaston Bank, oik
S3 bill on the Goshen bank, one note of ham
against John Brown for one hundred dollar
payable one day after dato, and dated 23d o'
March, 1840, and ono note of hand again.
Samuel Bogart for twenty dollars, dated M
9th, 1838. Any person finding said pockc
book and returning it to the subscriber ;
John Brown's, shall receive tho above itu,i'.
MICHAEL BROW.N, Jr
Smithfield, May 22, 1840.. 3i
NOTICE
AH persons are hereby cautioned a ; it - ; t
chasing either of the above noiesv(Ywt, . i. f k
son, as said nutes were obtained urn- v;.
JOHN BROW ;N,
SAMUEL BOUAii.
May 27. 1840.
" .TIMOTHY SEED,
For sale by the subscriber,
WM. EASTBURK
fctrnwlshurfir, oh. 14. 1840.
Enquire n'f
Juno 10. 1810.
FOR RATR.
vuiusui uou, m lots to suit ruumni
HENRY, JORDAN& C
PAINTING & GLAZING.
rip II IS Subscriber respectfully informs the pub
X lie, that he is prepared to execute all kinds ot
Plain & Orsiamci&fal Fainting,
at his shop nearly opposite the store of William
Jbastburn, where all orders in his line will be thank
fully received and punctually attended to.
JAMES PALMER.
Stroudsburg, Jan. 15, 1839.
Paper Hanging',
In all its various branches will be punctually
attended to.
J. P.
Dissolution.
THE Co-partnership heretofore existing be
tween the subscribers trading under the firm
of STOLL & BRODHEAD, is this day dissolved
by mutual consent- 1 he business of the late firm
will be settled by either of the subscribers, cither
being duly authorized to settle the same.
ALBERT S. STOLL,
JOHN II. BRODHEAD.
All persons indobted to the firm of Stoll & Brod:
head are particularly requested to make settle,
ment on or before the first day of April next.
AiiliEKT S. STOLL,
JOHN H. BRCADHE.
r

xml | txt