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The Chicago whip. (Chicago, Ill.) 1919-19??, October 01, 1921, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86056950/1921-10-01/ed-1/seq-6/

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Vaudeville and
Movie Review.
DAVE PEYTON
Compotcr. Mucicimn, Critic
THE AVENUE
Bonne and Freeman arc real big
time act, rioted oil the bill at tire
Avenue Theatre on Monday night.
gopd five act bill is presented to the
general satisfaction of all. and the
good pictures are appreciated.
THE MONOGRAM
Mkgnolia Brown, Dick & Dick, and
two other first class acts make up a
fine show here for the present week.
Louis Austin is the pianist leader.
“SECRET DFTHE HILLS”
At the Vendome I heatre, Sunday,
Oct. 2. Featuring Antonio Mdvcno. I
A picture that will keep you on the i
edge of tlie scat—containing a golden
romance—a world of hcart-inten st—
moments that thrill—a continuity of
action—reaching an unexpected cli
max.
“WILD OATS"
The States Theatre, 35th and State,!
has secured the picture which has had
such a sensational run at Barbee’s!
Loop Theatre and which has caused 1
such a sensation. The picture deals;
with social problems which are usually
not discussed much less shown upon i
the screen, and, therefore, the manage- j
ment will pursue the same policy as :
Barbee’s, showing to men only at one
performance and women only at
another performance. Advertisement
op this page shows time of each per
formance. ,
With the Actors.
The old time Darkies Quartette will
leave next week, to begin their long
prepared route.
Frank Montgomery and Co., in
Hello 1921. ate at the Howard The
atre. Washington, !). C, for two
-weeks. This, their second week, they
are packing ’em out nightly.
Model Thompson's left hand is
much mutilated. He had an alterca
tion with ‘‘Footes'’ the general utility
man for Quin tar d Miller’s Broadway
Gossip Co. Thompson came out the
victor, and beat the case in court.
.The Famous Dunbar Players, for
merly the Lafayette Players, will
open at the Grand on Monday, Oct. d.
The 'coming to this house by these
players is much heralded, as the
'Grand has always been the logical
home for the local fans, it being built
for them in the beginning. “The
Spider,” a strong and gripping drama,
will he the first presentation by these
now famous players. Leading the
east will he Andrew Bishop and Cleo
Desmond, assisted by Susie Sutton,
Alice Gorgas; Elizabeth Williams. J.
Lawrence Critier, (Joncl Monogas,
Chas. Ray and all the old favorites.
Don't forget the opening, Mondav,
Oct. d, 1921.
Glenn and Jenkins are headlining on
the Orphcum Time, stopping pro
ceedings everywhere they appear.
Moss and Frye were callers at the
writer’s office last week, while ap
pearing at the Palace Theatre in Chi
cago.
Chas. S. Gilpin, doing the stellar
role in “The Emperor Jones,” has
reached the high water mark in the
world of drama, lie has taken Chi
cago by storm and judging from the
great daily press notices Mr. Gilpin
and his Provincctown Players will run
way into the winter months at the
Playhouse Theatre,
Avenue Theatre Beautiful
31st St. and Indiana Ave.
6nip \ /~'rT'Q Continuous 7:00 to 11:30 J\ M.
1*1 H x ^ ^ Matinees Sat. anil Sun. 2:30 1’. M.
of Vaudeville and Pictures 25c-35c ind. war tax~No higher
New Monogram Theater
3451 State Street, Corner 35th
The Home of Colored Vaudeville
Always a pleasing show for ladies and gentlemen
SUNSET CAFE
313 E. 35th St.
NOW OPEN
THE WONDER SPOT OF THE SOUTH SIDE
BEAUTIFUL—GORGEOUS—ELABORATE
Entertainment and Dancing
Dave Peyton’s CJeff Club Orchestra
ALWAYS COOL. MODERN REFRIGERATION SYSTEM
FOX & RIFAS EARL WALKER
Proprietors Manager
'
i . ^
Mildred Bryant Jones
THE SINGER
The fact that an individual has a
i speaking voice of pleasing quality
does to a certain extent indicate that
| a pleasing singing voice may be de
i \ eloped. It does not oi necessity fol
low, however, that every person who
| is not stricken with dumbness is jus
i tilled in devoting the time and energy
| of many years in attempting to be
! come a public singer. Usually, if a
good teacher is chosen no great
length of study is required to ascer
tain. with a reasonable amount of
definiteness, whether or not one
“possesses” the vocal organs to make
the sounds come right,—and if the
teacher is an honest, conscientious
one, there will lie no effort on his
part to encourage false hopes in the
student. Be it understood that it is
a praiseworthy line of procedure to
train to tire fullest extent whatever
voice one has received. Correct
training will benefit any voice and it
is the duty which everyone owes—
both to himself and to those with
whom he comes in contact—that bis
voice should happen to be pleasant
and well modulated so as not to “get
on the nerves” of his hearers. Also
it is most commendable that all per
sons learn to sing to whatever extent
is reasonably possible. The amount
of pure benefit and enjoyment de
rived from singing cannot well lie
overestimated. The object of this
article is then to call attention merely
to the fact that the ability to sing
without giving offence does not by
any means* increase the ability to pre
sent one’s self to the public in con
cert or recital.
Unce upon a tune it was a rare
thing for singers to appear in concert
unless possessed of extraordinary
voice and in that golden time concert
goers were rarely disappointed in the
music to which they listened. Now,
however, things have changed be
cause in the mad rush for fame (?)
and public commendation, music >tu
dents so seldom stop to ascertain
whether or not they possess good
voices and have had sufficient training
to warrant public appearance. A
voice does not of necessity have to be
a Jarge one in order to give pleasure
but there must be a voice and the
best results possible should be at
tained with it before the public is in
vited to bear it.
The piano recital of Pansy Shaw
at the Appomattox Club, will be given
on the afternoon of October 30th.
1021. instead of October 10, as was
stated last week.
Eleanor Morman Gaines, soprano,
assisted by Marie Brooks, pianist,
gave a recital at Walters A. M. E.
Church on Monday evening. Sept. 26.
Mrs. Gaines ha- a voice of natural
sweetness and with continued training
much may be accomplished with it.
It is a wonderful tiling to possess a
voice with possibilities and in this,
Mrs. Gaines is fortunate. She is to1
be commended for the study and pres
entation of an excellent list of songs.
Thu writer was only privileged to I
hear the middle group and regrets
that she could not hear the Saint-1
Seans number #hich must have been
admirably suited to the type of voice
possessed. Miss Brooks played the
Lechctisky Intermezzo with accuracy
and power—giving evidence of her
command of the piano. / A violinist
whose name ya> not heard played one
number. He possessed a good tone
and a good instrument, two things
which go well together.
GRAND OPENING OF DRAMA
1-MONDAY NIGHT, OCT. 3rd
*
4
The Dunbar Players
Formerly of The Lafayette Players
— IN
ANDREW ONE OF NEW YORK'S GREATEST MASTER PLAYS CLEO
BISHOP DESMOND
“THE SPIDER”
THRILLS — ACTION — SUSPENSE
-THE CAST INCLUDES
J. LAWRENCE CRINN —CHAS. MOORE —LIONEL MONOGAN SUSIE SUTTON
CHAS. OLDEN — ARTHUR RAY — ISABELLE JACKSON ALICE GORGAS
and many others of the old favorites
f
Slums. 1^P ^ || 1 H ■* Mi W F
Sunday and tillfill II IVlfcfilllEl Saturday. 2:30 P. M.
Holidays Supper --
Show at 6 P.M. State St. at 31st St. Make your season
Evening Show 9 P. M. reservations early.
_ PHONE: VICTORY 4629 ___
MUSICIANS' NOTES
Mr. Karl Walker, popular manager
i of the Sunset Cafe, is much pleased,
with hi-> new orchestra. judging from
the big broad smiles he exhibits every
night. The orchestra are all tnem
i'hii s of The Chicago Clth Club.
(ieo. A„ Smith has joined hands with
Dave Peyton in the promotion of the
Chicago CleJt Cluk Many prospec
tive contracts are about to he signed
and it looks like a bus} winter for
the local musicians?
Mr. Bert Hall, lessee of the Locals’
j Billiard Hall, has installed new life :
i in the enterprise, by modernizing the
-ystem that had .previously prevailed.
1 Mr. Hall is a capable musician, and is
the proud possessor of many creative
ideas.
It is rumored about tli town that j
Mr. I Cigar has tendered notice to two i
)t his crack musician**.
Will Washington and his orchestra
will open the new Winter Garden
Cabaret at 4300 S. State St. Saturday.
Oct.' 1 will he the grand opening.
Cook’s Band at the Lincoln Gat
den on East 31st St., has made good,
ami the folks arc all screaming the
neat society jazz that these hoys let
loose from their horns.
Clarence Black’s Orchestra is a fea
ture at The Pickford Theatre on Last
35tli St.
Billy Butler’s big brother is now a)
member of our local, mining here
from Detroit. He is twice the size of
Hilly, and heats the sheepshcad to a
finish.
The Byron Bros. Saxo Band played
Detroit last week and will continue
on the Butterfield time. They will
play Chicago week of Oct. 26.
“Shuffle Along” is doing a great
business at the 63rd St Music Hall
and it looks like a long winter run for
this, the greatest negro show since I
Williams and Walker days.
Jew Jordon. Creamer and Layton,
will open their Ebony Knight pro
duction this week. .All of the eastern
critics say it is a winner judging from
the dies-, rehearsals.
Irvin C. Miller’s “Put and Takr”
Co. has made good on Broadway and
will no doubt make a long winter run.
SPECIAL SALE!
You Can Get That Record Success
“DOWN HOME BLUES” !
' Black Swan Record) t
500 in Stock Get it Now!
“I’m Lonesome, Nobody Cares For Me” ,
By Richard. M. Jones
(U. S. Player Roll !
Played by Clarence Jones. 1
Don’t faii to get there Two Hits! 1
Get Them While They Last I j
RICHARD M.JONES;
MUSIC STORE
444 East 39th Street <
Douglas 418
BUY
“BLACK SWAN
RECORDS”
Direct From
YERGAN’S
MUSIC HOUSE
55 East 31st Street
CHICAGO, ILL.
Dance at the Home of
Courtesy and
Deportment
DANCING
Every Friday Night
«
Special Confetti Party
This Friday Night
September 23rd
| UNITY HALL
! 3140 Indiana Avenue
: ELGAR'S
: Famous Orchestra

BOBBIE HARDING
Flocr Manager

\ Admission, 35c
GRAND OPENS FALL
SEASON WITH GRAMA
The Grand Theatre has detdded to
give the Chicago theatre goers the
thing that they have been clamoring
lor—--first class drama. Since the
close of the Avenue and the departure
of The Lafayette Players* a great
number of people have been insisting
on their return. Andrew Bishop and
Cleo Diamond head the cast yi the
opening play next Monday.
The play is of the detective order
of drama, and the plot is on which
would have done credit to Sir A.
Conan Doyle in the days when he was
turning out some of the very best of
hi- "Sherlock Holmes" masterpieces.
The play is of unusual construction
and nothing short of the most en
thralling interest could have held the
attention of the audience through the
succession of episodes in which the
curtain is dropped many times to de
note the passage of time.
The scene opens with a Japanese
valet outside the door of the apart
ments of "The Spider,” who, in this
case, happens to he a New York
rounder who spreads his web for the ]
entanglement of the opposite sex. i
The valet sees the glimmer of light j
in the apartments, hears a shot fired, i
followed by a shriek and then dark- I
nc-s falls upon the stage, and the j
rial mystery begins.
In the following scene, "The Spi* !
ili r" i > seen lying dead upon the (loor '
of his apartment, and the police ar
rive at the conclusion that murder
has been done. There arc rose petals ,
hi the floor and parts of a letter
which contain the impression made by jl
a woman’s hoot heel. The detective ||
finally brings to the grill, a woman |
who has been in the apartment whenlt
1 - • was heard. She start? foil
make a confession of "just what hap-l
pined ” Instead of telling her story, I
the cenes leading up to tin supposed |
killing are pictured on the stage.
The climax is unuual. and hardly I
what the audience ex| ■ ;
Chas. Gilpin
Mr- C. Clifford Johnson was the
hostess at a dinner party tendered to I
Mr. t Ini' Gilpin, the actor who is the |
-tar of "Kmflcror Jones" playing at
a loop theatre. The affair was held at I
liic Vincennes Hotel on Thursday,
Sept. 23. Among those present were
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Mills, Mrs. C. I
Johnson, Chas, Gilpin, and Richard j
Taylor.
SOMETHING NEW!
THE LINCOLN GARDENS
450 EAST 31st STREET (Formerly The Royal Garden#>
You MUST hear Cook s Rivereiew Orchestra, direct from Rivereiew Park.
First appearance on the Southside. Refined Entertainment. Dancing. Largest
and best Dancing Floor on Southsidc. Admission TRFF on Monday and
Friday Nights. First Class Restaurant in Connection. BUD REDD. Mgr.
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sept. 29th, 30th, & Oct. 1st
The Old Nest
Rupert Hughes' Heart-Gripping Story of Hothe
Vendome Theatre == State and 31st Sts.
EAT AT THE
Plaza Lunch Room
322 E. 35th St.j near Calumet
Best Food, Quickest Service and Most Reasonable Prlres
ON SOUTH SIDE
NICK CH A Til AS. PROP.
ENTERTAINER CAFE
SOME
JAZZ BAND
THE BEST ENTERTAINMENT IN THE CITY
SPECIAL FEATURES
Souvenir Matinee Every Tuesday Efternoon, 3 to 7 P. M.
Weekly Feature Contests—Entertainer Cafe.
INDIANA AVENUE AND 35th STREET
STATES THEATRE
3507 S. STATE STREET
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday
October 3rd, 4th and 5th ,
The Greatest Sensation That Ever Struck Chicago!
i
" Direct from 5 months record breaking
run at Barbee's Loop Theatre
For Mother |Mj ■ gm y For Father
Daughter M INI I INI MpB ■' Son
* < '7 ■
On account of the delicate subject and scenes, men
and women will not be admitted together
and No Children under I 6 admitted
FOR WOMEN SHOWS
Starting Time for Men: 6:30, 8:00, 9:30 and 11 p. m.
WILD OATS
FOR MEN SSHOWS
Starting Time for Women: 2:00, 3:30 and 5:00 p. m.
Augmented Orchestra at Each Showing

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