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Nevada national. [volume] (Grass Valley, Calif.) 1858-186?, January 08, 1859, Image 1

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* "■***« hiu,rciuam i**«» uiti»t m>
w Vjout, ntiu oo oktt, uu>w>u
TERMS:
ForaaejMt. (Inn4f*n».) $4,00
Jfcr »l« month*, (in idtuci, ) ....... 8,00
For then* month*,..'. 1,00
■»**• copter, Ibcte
PRICE OF ADVERTISING.
■Mh «<l««re ofTliirteeo Lim ««t Insertion. »1 40
“ tffnrtlon 1.00
Opposition to
IMPOSITION.
We are determined to nil our
ENTIRE STOCK OF
CLOTHING,
Cheaper than
Any Establishment of the kind
t IN THIS PLACE.
Our stock eontiiU of t very i»rf« mmOrmiiI o#
HEAVY WINTER CLOTHING:
The bent stock of
DRESS & MINERS BOOTS
/ever seen in this piece. Also, e good selection of
INDIA RUBBER GOODS. BLANKETS,
Hats, and Gentlemen's
®oobi.
We will fire the public a chance, once more, of
dressing up in fine stvle for a trifle. Call uext door
to the CSClfrRJL 1IAKKKT.
J. com A into.
GEO A. LOVEGRAVE,
Newspaper and AdrcrtiMiig Agent,
N*». fi". J Street, Sacramento.
Afeal for the ••Cra-*' Valley Telegraph." end
California Mining Journal. '' mot the nonntai*
per* generally, for which Advertisement* will »
•rived end indsert* et the lnsp»s rates.
GRASS VALLEY BOOT AND
SHOE STORE.
BERNARD HARRAGAN.
Main Street. Greaa Valley.
In the Uutiding next ibuiv Cheap John'".
• tiwteua Wtfk .Unde e t; drr.
••*- All kind* •*’ Kepnii iuii done et the short
eat u lice and Warranted to give Satisfaction *11
1 inportHKt to Teamsters and the
PUBLIC GENERALLY
X. H. IUASAV
respectfully inform !«•» H*1 C»st-.»ner» and
U the r«bti<- that lie ha* |r*rtttaw*"tl\ laraV-d hi"
CAUKlAGt SUOP ON MILL STRFET.
Adjotatag Mr Oimpbell’a Smith's Shop.
1'kare heia u- a prepared to Manufacture and R*|>ui
t'trri«iie' and Wagons of every description, in ««•
bee* workmanlike mawoer. and ii|*»r the must ree*on
'I* terms. Cd* All von warranted.
sr* • 'arriagea Pamte 1 sod Vamidiel
Ur aw Valley. Oct. |.y Ifi.VS 4 tf
X9ft & OTEET, ‘
Dualm iu
Grocerie-, T rovisions,
Liquors, M inriV Tools, tVc.,
AT T1IK
lr*. Fra.., *-*.rr e.-aoi Klnrr.
Corner of Will and Nvtit .Sirs. Giu.-m l’a 1 !py.
If LYES. IVAN ft LEE, FLOUR.
LIQUORS, RUTTER. PORK.
COFFER. U1IW. HAM.
TEAS. Moi.1S.SEs,
SUGARS. PICK ELS,
1UC(K\. FISH.
PRESERVED FRUITS. RRANDV FRUITS
Beat*, Wthr*. Clsthing; (mikrn,
Weedi'O A- Tin Ware*
•Yir The Subscriber* wimiM take this ti.-thed tn re
lurn thanks to the.-friend* and the putdl* generally
fbr past favnr* and would re*|s ctlully solicit.« con
tinuance «»f their i«tn*nnire 1hev have n»»w on hand
end intend* m keep <-*<t»Mnntly in store, as
Largr ami fen* rnf asnorittimi of tirurrrits
Provision*. $*/*., n* mu hr f'otttitl
in Vrtt*» l r ai!ry.
KINO. ft OTIIET.
Grass Valley. August 29, 1857.
DR ROSENBAUM'S
Stomach Bitters!
r.»« ins cr*K or
Dyrprprik Imligef lion, Constipation, I.oh
off Appetitu, or any Billioua Complaint
arising from a morbid action of the
Stomach or Bowels.
All of these disease* you w.JI *i»on he relieved of
by the uae of these Bitier* as per directions on the
bottle*. This greet anti dispeptlc 1* the remit of
profound and elaborate study of one of the moat
celebrated physicians of the pre*ent century, in the
accomplishment of which he has freelv expended
both time and money, f do m»t hesitate to affirm
that where Dr. Kesenheutn * Stomach Hitte ere
••ad a case of Fever and Ague cannot occur It
h» the • • \ "••iist* in
the Medical FsfoDy. and i* now prescribed by nine
’enths of the I'hyaieian* of the land Try them—
**•*1 them— «® y° ur ••■•tltutloa, ami go your way
dyspeptic’—take these Stomach Bitters
hi I lieu* *—try one of these Bottles, and
be relieved at ©pee
Are yet* annoyed by indigestion or consumption?
—remove the cause by the free use ot these Bitters.
Have you fever and ague*->cure and prevent thi*
eao«titutioo destroying disease by the free use of
tb«M Bitten. rKErAREI)BT
ROSENBAUM,
•F* Manufacturer and Proprietor, South
front Street, Philadelphia.
n. a. jacobm. * C"..
Agents for the Pacific Coast
jgp K. W. Rryweed Sola Agent for Grass
Talley- **-6m
Dr, Rosenbaum’s
BITTEIIS.
HTYWOOD eel* Agent for Gra
84-la
IN' to a h o K a U cma l
VOL 1.
Neruda Advertisements.
County Surveyor’s Office.
COURT HOI MIC, NEVADA
JOHN L. GAMBLE. I f J OSTFOM,
County Surveyor. / ( Deputy.
AU. PERSONS ore hereby cautioned against em
ploying other Surveyor* thou eucli as wiy be
deputized from this < fficv
Extract frvm the Lavn uj f'alijor+ia.
.Cn.vf 20. Sec 3.—No aorvwy or re survey hereof
ter made by any pernon except the County aurveyor
or hi* deputy aha 1 1 be eonaidered legal eridence in
anv Court within tliia atate. JOHN I. (lAllBIJ..
2 tf County Surveyor.
I WILLIAMSON,
rll.I. attend to aalea in anr part of the County of
Real Katate or i'eraonal Property.
OFFICE—Commercial and Pine atreet Nevada
Nevada, Nov. 12. l&5R._nl« tf
W. F AxnriLsoN W. H. Maktix.
andkmion a Martin,
ATTORNEYS*COUNSELLORS
AT LAW.
OFFICE—In Wwu.mi?*’ Brttnixu. corner of Coro
mercial and Pine *tre<ttx. Nrv.it>.*, Cal.
tv in . W • t > b BBMIti
DISTRICT ATTORNEY.
IIKXHV MKRKDtTn.] [THOMAS F. HAWLEY.
.11 K R i: DITII A- II A tv 1,1V,
ATTORNEYS * COUNSELLORS at LAW
OFFICE- In KI,H k Knnx’n Brink Ruildin*, cor
uor nf Finn A Rroad Sli., Xcvnli*. 8
£US$$ ft
Harrington & Patterson,
Oil IjiiSt; and favorably known on I>i*d atreet.
i > haw removed amt o|*en«-.| tin* Hurd billiard Sa
loon to be found in the mount; n- in the ne«v
BRM h HI ILUING, COR.BKOAD \ PIXE STS.
nPIWITF. KIDD k KNoX S !*!’!! DING. NEVADA
They hereby tender an invitntion to all Hour old
patri-u* aiidfrieii •* t<» pay them fre'j-1*- it visit*. and
they hereby pt.-t*.. ttieiimelve« t*» give a« good eat
i*f«eii«.n i« formerly.
The Saloon will to* f tm *a**ed with new and mag
nlncent OII.I.IlBD T tDMIN, aud evetv
apfieiH'nge complete.
T1IK It I It i* fitted up in the flneat atyle.
and Mupplied with the ch« •*»•*•» I aud most coatly
l.l-junr* and llgnre.
Nevada. \»»v. 13. D.’t — nlfl tf
MfllTII. !t1ASMN A JlrCONXKlX,
Attorneys; at Law.
il\ VF. lour ittil ttiein*elvea for practice in the
Matricf and Suprenm
C r SMITH*?' IV MaHI.IN Gft»«« Valley.
J(*11.V IL MeCOX N til L. Nev ada.
June l*t. Dw*._34 tt
NOTICE.
'PIIE undersigned hare thi* *.*« formed a lav To
1 partnership under the firm and style of Dibble
\ I~iri»ing
itinm.f \ Lansing
Sept. 15, ISM
NEW CLOTHING
STORE!
TIIK t'MIERMCNED ha* ju«t opened
hi* new ami «piendid Store on the
COR.MAIN & MILL STs.,
Where he i* ready now. to offer to the citizen* of
Otnan Valley and vicinity, ttie following named ar
ticle!, al a low price. Ax
A FINE STOCK OF
READY MARE
CLOTHING,
BOOTS & SHOES.
HATS, CAPS, TRUNKS,
an HITS. It HAM Ills. (IfiOVKM,
INDIA RUBBER GOODS,
And a full acftor'inent nf
BOVM’ GAR.MKNTK.
Citizen* of »Sra«* Valley and vicinity, will pUaae
call and examine hi* new Stock
Cw«MMte made of lh< beat ninIcrinlitn<1
the luira atjlea
41*o Wnrrnaalrd i.ood Fit*.
B. NATHAN
Grave Valley. Nov 13. 1858.—n1A-8m
Empire Restaurant,
.llaia Wired, Graaa Vnllry.
Cor of Chureh St.—two doora above the Poat Office.
Where he ha* juat fitted up, ami furniahed in good
style n building for hi* especial accomedation, and
where he in prepared to provide—
MEALS AT ALL HOURS,
may be bad to order. • .
OYSTER*. In .or .tile, ■
SOUP8, of all varieties, ,
GAME.
8AU8AG0,
fish
EGGff,
PUDDING*.
VEGETABLES, he he
In fnet, the very bfat of everything, in the beat n
style’ and
ON THE MOST REASONABLE IE RMS
Having fitted up the above e*taltli»hment. with th«
design of carrying on a permanent buainaaa, I have
adopted the maxim of “ live and lei Dive," and in
tend to furnish my customer* with anything the
market affords, and ahall in no caae charge more tha
a mera living price. 1
Confidently believing that visitors to our vintage
can no where find equal accommodations for the a me
money, I invite all to giee me e call, and see for
theme Fee*
14*
J R fTARK
GRASS VALLEY, CALIFORNIA, SATURDAY, JANUARY 8, 1859.
[For tb« National.)
The Philnanphy af ifappiaeaa
Did 70a ev»r travel a long, monotonous
road, btside wbicb there were no object* to
relieve the eye, or inspire the mind—no for
est*. no rounded hill*, no quiet dale*. »‘o
mountains, leaping brooks or roaring creeks
—nothing all the while spread out bernre
the tired vision, save a dull and barren plain
ns far as the eye could reach ?
The jocund music of the happy bird Tails
not upon your ear. while the silence of soli
tmle, desolation and death, reign supreme. —
The inanimate and gloomy picture reflect*
its dark sba dee upon tbe quick tablets of
your own soul, and overwhelms it with de
pression and despair. Wc sprang from the
dust; we are the creatures of tbe world; and
our happiness bangs from the ten thousand
circumstances, and combination of circum
stances. that go to make it up. as the blush
ing fruit from the tender stem. We are the
children of the land in wbicb wc dwell, and
look to it for our happiness and support, as
an infant to tbe smiles and carcases of a lov
ing mother. Our enjoyment is never separ
ated from tbe objects that surround us in the
material world. The landscape outstreeb
log. tbe sky above, the sun. the moon, and
stars, the heavens mottled with a thousand
glorious hues, (bat gorgeously brighten the
trncts of illimitable space, tbe air, the chan
ging seasons—fresh and joyous spring, hope
ful summer, fruitful autumn, ard tbe daath
of winter—all make their strong impres
sions upon tbe human mind, and bare much
to do ib measuring tbe sum of human hsppi
pitics*.
Again at some period of your life have Job
not traveled a delightful road? I'oca not
some morning by tbe transcendental beauties
it unfolded to your view remain stamped on
She deligblA page of memory, w ith all the
charming truthfulness of reality? It was
mid spring. The warm moist earth seemed
to pour out vigor, and beauty, and life, into
the vegetable world around you, while bath
ed ill a flood of light that poured down from
the morning sun. each modest flower, each
blushing rose, each leaf, each gorgeous bloom
attracted light and hue. and fragrance, from
heaven, to attach to this lower world, and
for a time, to bless man with all the charms
and transports of the ethereal world. At
every step new ol»i*-cU break upon your
view, and new charms inspire your soul. It is
one continued scene or variety, life, beauty
and glory. The nimble squirrel skips along
the foot of an eld elm, another chatters a*
ntong its soft luxurious folittge, wtiite down
its trunk sir* ants the honeysuckle loaded
with flowers mid fragrance. The stately
oak, the noble walnut, tbe smooth maple,
w ith its leaves whispering ttic gentle accents
of th ‘ spirit laud, lbe litid and Ibe proud old
hickory, meet our view in succession, and
ibe 'hick clustering undergrowth intersper
sed among them, give perfection to the scene,
enlivened by tbe varied songs of numerous
birds.
The gieen slope* meet in the babbling
brocks, and the vertlanl bills shout with joy.
Evert step unfolds new delight*, every sen
sation is pleasure, every thought is inspired,
and every emotion ot'rs our hearts w ith lien
venly rapture. Thu«. at such a time, and
tinder such circumstances, inti.tie.) with al'
the sentiment* of a cherub, freeol -ill intper
fictions, and endowed with a hoiv rapturous
love for all that is divine, exalted, resplen
dent, infinite, pure, ethereal, and beatific.
tn«n becomes nn angel, temporarily, nnd sin
less as before the fall.
Thus it is with the journey through lift. —
There is evety grade of happiness, from the
man who is low, debased, and groveling, in
to whose insensate heart, scarce ever shiues
a single ray of pleasure, to the noble, sensi
tive, comprehensive mortal, Into whose ca
pacious. aspiring, and uplifted soul is reflec
ted tbe joys of angel*, and the apprehensina
and sublime rationality of God himself.
Happiness is not a negative, a dull nnd
nameless state. It i* one essentially of ac
tivity, and implies an exalted impression of
pleasure upon the faculties of the soul.—
Pleasure alone is an inferior state, and is
enjoyed in some degreoby the lowest of the
Human species.
The happiness of life, is in pfoportioo to
the exaltation of delightful impressions, and
tbeir duration. We are happy in proportion
as our knowledge is extended, as «re delight
in and subject onr minds to noble thoughts
and exalted impressions; and our sonls are
dark, miserable, and wretched, as tbev are
benighted by ignorance, shut out from the
bright lights of truth and knowledge, and
moved by low and degraded emotions. The
mind is to happiness what tbe eyes are to
the objects of tbe physical world. The blind
cannot see. neither can tbe stolid, debased,
uncultured man perceive those oolite and
glorious things; through the spiritual sense,
that fill the soul with rapture.
Happiness consists in the love of tbe refin
ed, tbe good, tbe exalted, tbe sublime, and
beautiful. It is in tbe power of every man
to expand, and widen the area of his happi
ness by cultivating a knowledge of, sot) a
love for tbe virtuous. tbc spiritual. and tbc
refined. Shut out that from your aoul which
ia ignoble and degrading, and let tin mind
dwell only upon that which ia pure ancon
laminated. and bcrutiful. and your pathway
through life will l»e slrown with tlowera of
joy. The whole earth below, and heavens
above, are all full of beauty, sublimity and
glory.
Let us appreciate the world around us* as
intellectual and immortal beings, and our
aoul*, resplendent with tbe glories of God
himself, will emit in bliss, ecstatic and un
ceasing.
Uev. Theo. Clapp, having attended a fash
ionable party in if. Orleans makes the fol
lodirtft natural and beautiful reflections:—
“1 spent an hour or more in this cheerful
circle, where al! things to the eye and ear
were refined, orderly, and decorous. The
hesrls of that company were visible o-ily to
the Omniscient One. I shall refer to the iin
pretsions made on my mjpil by their ex ter.
nnl nppearanee. llefore me stood the young
and happy, upon w hose fates and fortunes
the sombre shadows ol adversity hud not yet
gatls rcd; their mimla wire bright and buoy
ant,their steps elustic their iare opeutd to
the melody of sound, their eyes radiant " ilh
pleasure. As 1 was meditating upon those
comely brows, flushed with the bloom or ear
ly life; the fair forms of fvminiue grace and
loveliness; the dignified, uccutn piisbed man
nets uf those more ndvanced in years ; the
music j sprightly conversation, wit, love,
gaycty anil joyousness which characterised
the whole scene,—a sweet, profound, unwon
ted perception of God's goodness captivated
my soul. Such intense feelings of piety I had
never before experienced, I said to myself
“It Inr* pleaded God ‘to make mau a little
lower titan the angels, and to crown li.m
with glory and honor.' Ilh ia so beautiful
here, what v II be not become In that future
stale,where our loftiest ideals and to-tual at.
tainm-ots both will regularly advance inn
progression that ia infinite !” I was wrapt
in delightful visions of a spiritual world.—
This thought look complete possesion of my
mind. God is too good not to prov ide for
us something nobler, better, greater, more
permanent, and more satisfying than the
transitory possessions and pleasures of time.
Csn lie pee,sent to us tbc 'chalice of existence,
and then tlnsh it from our lips just as we be
gin fo taste its joys ? Is not his infinite love
a pledge that be will never treat us so cru
elly? Would a kind parent promise his chil
dren favors which he never iuteded to bestow
on them ? Can God awaken irrepressible
dr-tres of continued, unending happiness,
only to lie crushed out and disappointed for
evu ? Nothing in mathematics is more cer
taiu than tbe doctrine thut the inherent, cs
si-ufial desires of our moral nature will be
compb-tely grstilied. Can they lie, if death
is an eternal sleep
Portrait or Libit. Maikt, -Lieut. Maury
who is delivering two lectures in tbc wes
tern cities on' "Tbe Atlantic Telegraph.’’
and '■ The lleplhe and Wonders of the Sea.’
is thus depictured by the Cincinnati Cons
ole rcial :
Lieut. Maury is a square, frigate-built,
trimlegged gentleman, live feel eight and u
bull, ball in his right spur, heavy timbered,
with a bold prow, und ohviou-Iy intended
for deep sea cruising. l-y the log be was
fifty-two January lu-t past, but. were it not
for a bald crown, he would not seem sufli
aicntly weather beaten in hulk to justify a
suspicion of that age. by nearly hall a score.
Everything about him is square, except his
ideas, which are round and solid as a tw enty
four pound ball. His head is solid and
square ; his face is solid and square ; his
front forehead is solid and square ; his frame
well knit and square ; aud bis presence im
presses a very decided and determined no
tion ol squareness and solidity. His eyes
„nre a bright blue, like the ocean in moderate
soundings ; wide apart and canopied by bis
brows. His hair is dark brown and strong
on the sides and back of his head—none
from the forehead to the crown—the smooth,
shiny surface being a belt of calm between
trade winds. Features flexible, like anneal
ihI metal, playing anon with quiet humor, ns
if he loved a sailor s yarn. .Manner sell pos
sessed. but a little curt ; sharp voice, some
what husky ; vocal organs apparently im
paired by loss of teeth : delivery rapid, and
utterance gem rally clear, but occasionally
marred tty indistinctness ; and sc think he
is a little ton studied in manner for a gen
tleman of his world renowned attainments
and ability.
Dctxwa dFTiTK SrKivlsiiii' Eastkrn Cut.
—The merchant ship Eastern City was burn
ed in August last, on her way from Liver
pool to Melbourne. Tbc description of the
accident is Host thrilling, and the suspense
which the passengers, COO in nnrnber, suffer
ed, truly overwhelming. She was on tire
several days, the flames being smothered in
the hulk, by the exclusion of air. At tbe
Inst moment, just before the flames burst out
of the ill-fated vessel, a sail appeared on the
distant horizuu.aml nearing them at last, res
cued hundreds of human beings from a fear
ful death.
The great principle of being happy in this
world Is not be alfeok-d at small thing*.
Pjovxan CorRTsmr*.—[From a speech by
J. I). Taylor at a Pioneer celebration in
Ohio.]—One subject always interesting to
Pioneers hail been omitted by the speakers—
Pioneer Courtahipa; He could apeak from
experience of the happy times when boy«
and (firla uacd to “ set up ” together, when
courting was done Sunday nights, and
epm king was enjoyed in the only family
room of the log cabin, blankets the only
partitions, and the curtains nround the bed
of the old folks. About H the children
would clinili the ladder to their bunks, close
under the shake roof and in an hour more
father and mother would retire behind the
blankets leaving the "sparkers" sitting at
opposite corners of a capacious stick chirn
ncy fireplace. Soon the fire wonid n»e<l a
little fixing with the wooden shovel or pok
er. and in resumiug seats, somehow chairs
would manifest unusual attraction for clos
er contiguity. If chilly must sit close to
gether to keep warm ; If dark to keep the
tioars o(T! Of what was then whispered Mr
T. was mum. but when the first hearty smack
broke the cabin stillnes, the gentle breath
ing behind the blankets was o f lon iuterufiled
by u slight hacking cough.
When a s'.rapping boy. Ik 1 fell head over
heels in love with n girl of the rent Ply
mouth Itock stamp. She lived twenty miles
away, and he went to sec her regularly eve
ry fourth Sunday night. He won the lass,
longed to marry her, but as the course of
true love never did run smooth, her mother
objected. He however kept on courting un
til! he got to love everything oil the bid
man’s farm. At last love and perseverance
were rewarded, and the wedding day was
fixed. The new country was sickly anil he
often found himself feeling his pulse as the
day of days grew near, in a tremor lest the
shakes should be added to the fever which
was consuming him.
Kindly got mnrricd without accident,
moved to bis log cabin nud went to house
keeping. Klection soon come on, went to
the polls, was asked if he w as of age and
didn't vote! MrsT. was also annoyed about
it and when election next cume round, that
very morning she presented him with.a little
counterpart of himself. The news reached
the town meeting before him and nobody
now objected to his voting.
New Mods: nr Satmo Gout.—The Cals'
veras Chronicle states that nearly all the
quarts. mills at Angels and Altavillc have
adopted a new mode of caving the gold, or
rather have gone hark to first principles.—
They have tin own away all the shaking ta
llies. blankets, Ac., and adopted the Chilean
bowl or “ Itatea ” which is made of cast
iron, about four feet in diameter, with a con
cave of six inches in the centre from the lev.
el of the sides. A rim three inches in height
extends around the basin, only ienving suffi
cient apace to discharge the water and crush
ed rock. This bowl is hung by throe irou
rods, attached to the rim. and coming to the
centre at tbc top. On the under side of the
bowl is n pivot to which is attached a crank
giving the bowl a rolling motion of three
inches from the centre, keeping everything
perfectly loos? and tentlir* to settle all hea
vy particles to the bottom and centre, and
amalgamate the gold with the quicksilver.—
These bow ls, when iu rapid motion, have nl
most the same movement as the old fashion
ed Chilean bowl when worki d by hand. —-
The invention is by a gentleman of the
Chrystal mill.
The Rev. Tbco. Clapp, tor thirty live years
a clergyman of New Orleuns, in a hook late
ly written by him says: -During the last
two years of my collegiate course, ami the
three devoted to the study of theology, I ne
ver failed, in all sorts of weather, to walk at
least five miles a day, besides spending an
hour in sawing wood, working in a garden,
ot some other labor equally active and invi
gorating. Proper diet, exercise, sleep, and
cleanliness nr - the immutable conditions not
only of physical, but of spiritual health. - ’
Rev. Mr. Clapp's experience fiirni-hcs a
strong argument as to the vast importance
of physical training, lie occupies a high
rank among the original, bold and popular
nu-n of thr times, is nearly seventy years of
ige, and possesses a vigor of hotly, and a vi
vidity, elasticity and glowing freshness of
intellect truly remarkable.
There ia not as much difference in the sa
lubrity of localities as many persons suppose.
Within the period often years tnere sre pro
bably more deaths in Roston from consump
tion than there are In Sew Orleans from yel
low fever.
We undetstand that the snm of sixty dol
lars was raised at tbc M. C. Church, on last
Sunday, for the purpose of as«isting in tb<
repair of the Hough As Ready cl ur*h
The Comissioner of Indian Affairs «tates
that the whole number of iudinns within our
limits is estimsted at 300,000.
The whole number of tribes amt seuirate
bands ia 17
M:t t II I KATIORAC.
JOIl PRINTING OFFICE,
MAIN* STREET. CIUI9S VALIEV
Wo Hat** in cnnti*>cti«»n with tl»c N
NiwirAPn Fjh«hpmi:>t. a JUR ilKM'E. c»MbW
of oifcutin* •»orjr dewcriplioN "f J**b Work oucn
Rn>n»w rAKpit, Cum i.(m. Hasmim*,
Dim. Ilium, Pmthui. I-a» Bu*m.
Ball Ticket*, rwor.RAWwi*.
Hooka and PAwrHT.m. Etc., which will he e*ecn
tnl with noatneM and dispatch. on rfiooBibl* term
NO. 24.
sir- The following lift of Cause* awe acf
for trial on the District Calendar >—
January I Oth. 1859—
The People v». Francis Carter.
January 13th —
771- Sami Johnson ra Gen W. Kidd et at
780—Wm A Dane vs McFarland 4 Pegg
* January itlh—
823 Ja“ M. <lark vs Char W. Elves.
012 Davis l.arhnmn vs It fi Burmeietcr.
January 15th --
906—C. K. lint.tiling vs Kinpira Quartz
Mining Co.
920— Isabella Walker vs John Walker.
Jannary 17tb—
328—Daniel A. Hirli vs llnmlct Davisetal
924—Ed. McLaughlin « t al vs Nelson Ev
ans et al.
930—Wm E. Tisdale ct al vs Daniel Me-
Crown ct al.
January ISth—
732 —Wm II. Orr vs Chas I.. Price.
937—Edward* Si Hrady vs C. K. Ilntaling
945—Daniel Snyder vs Stephen Venard.
cl a).
January |9th—
917 C Heckman. Adnt.of Getldes. deac'd
vs Win. McKay.
930— J C llirdseye 4 Co. vs E It Johnson.
9C9—Frye 4 Hunter vs A W liilcy ct al.
January 20th—
(149—1)4 ft f.achaian vs Joseph Clark.
930—Jams* llinne viLC Me Keeby ct al
9fiC— llarnard Rogers vs I.C McKceSy ct a I
January 22nd—
Sj3-ffm A Gray et als vs Johnson 4
Onyle.
January 24th—
957—People vs Flcurey. I.cnhart et ais.
963—Jules Fricot ct als vs M Atwood et a!
1000—D 4 It l.nchman V9 Von Poelnitz ct
al3.
January 25th—
967— Wm Lewis et al vs Abel Lowe ct al
972—I) F Itatehelder vs IT S Gregory.
973 Andrew Mcrrytnan vs Thus Mulligan
Jan 26th—
984—Joseph Woodworth vs Geo Dawson
986—Israel Crawford vs ltrown 4 Crume.
January 27tb—
988—John Rrunnegan vs Amos T Laird
et als>
January 20th—
705—Lord Houseman and wife vs John
Crawford Jr.
1007— Given*. Heirst ct al vs Ltioham. York
et als.
January 31*1—
159- J I! Roberts 4 Co vs J S. Landekcr.
A lloston Post Poet slipped down on
n piece of orange peel, in the stVeet. and
then goes into tbc romance of the thing as
follows:—
It ripened by the river hanks,
Where- mask and moonlight aiding—
Dons Whiskerandos play sad pranks.
Dark Donnas serenading.
By Moorish maiden it was plucked.
Who broke some hearts, they say—then
By Saxon sweetheart it was sucked.
Who threw the peel away. then.
How little thought the London lair
Or dark eyed girl of Seville.
That / should reel upon that peel.
And find my proper level.
Mki.tixo a Fikck or Sroas.—If you bold
a piece of Sugar in a spoon at the top of
your lea. it will melt quicker than if drop
ped to tbc bottom. The reason is. as the tea
becomes sweetened it falls to the bottom by
it* own speciflc gravity, and fresh portions
of the unaweetend are brought in contact
with the lump of sugar till all is dissolved.
jew The great chess players in Europe
are ail *iek. Ilarrwitz was forced to throw
up bis coutest with Morphy after the fifth
game, ami unw Staunton excuses himself
from uu cling Morphy on the score of ill
health.
Tiii:*I’ov.'kb of Etotqi'RNce,—It is stated
that the Rev. Geo Trask, of Fitchburg lec
tured so powerfully in Webster, a short time
since, against the use of tobacco, that a large
number of bis audience went home and
burned their cigars—holding one eud of
them in their mouths
The gold mines at Tike's Peak are still at
tracting considerable attention. Experienced
men who bare explored the country esteem
the mines rich and extensive. There are
about 1500 persons in the mining region, and
several towns are springing up. It will re
main for fit lure experience to determine the
exterrt and richness of places.
A negro was shot in the bead, in Phila
dtlphia. aifcl b* fully recortred, whileWhe
*' u imbeded ia the brain. Another
we believe, is not on record

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