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The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1907-1939, April 04, 1908, Image 1

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THE RICHMOND PAIXAMXTM
AND SUN-TELEGRAM.
VOL. XXXIII. NO. 49.
STRONG PROTEST
AGAINST GENERAL
ROAD BUILDING
KICJI3IOND, IND., SATUKDAY EVENING, APRIL I, 1008.
SINGLE COPY, 2 CENTS.
BRYAN SLAPPED
BY POPULISTS
IN CONVENTION
ANARCHISTS PARADE
STREETS OF ROME
INDIANA SYSTEM
OF SCHOOLS IS
WRONG IT IS SAID
LEACH WILL BE
POBLIC PRINTER
ADAIR DOES NOT
COUNTENANCE THE
TACTICS OF PARTY
INSULAR CONVENTION
MET TODAY
Troops Guarded Against an
Outbreak.
Taft Condemned and Bryan
Endorsed.
Dissatisfaction Over Last
Road Law Is Apparent All
Over State and Wayne
County Is No Exception.
COL. WILEY SAYS THAT
EPIDEMIC MUST STOP.
Several Townships Are Pre
paring Petitions for Roads,
But Some of These Will Be
Fought.
"There's only ona thing to do and
that, is to stop it right now befoie, it
poos any farther, said Col. C. W.
Wiley, of the board of county commis
sioners this morning in speaking of
the township road building that is lap
idly becoming general in this county.
!Viley mad' the remark when told a
number of other townships beside
"Washington and Wayne, contemplate
the presentation of petitions for reads.
The petition of Washington township
will be carried to the circuit court for
settlement and as this the initial ef
fort, has begun to meet with such
Strong opposition it is probable the
rither petitions, either presented or in
Ftate of preparation will meet with
.Strong resist ence.
Petition in Center.
The latest road news comes from
Center township. A petition for a
joad is now being circulated and at
llie same time the opponents of the
juoposilion are circulating a renion
istrance. There has been no remon
strance presented against either the
Washington or Wayne township roads.
The Washington township road was
the fir.st to b? sprung in (he county
and the time had elapsed before the
residents of the township who do not
favor the road awoke to what it would
Jiiean to them in the way of additional
tax to defray the cost of construction.
They became busy later, however, and,
will contest the matter through the
courts. No remonstrance has been
presented against the construction of
South L street in this city by the
township. Inasmuch as the cast of
this road will not be nearly so large
hs that in Washington township and
the fact that the tax valuation of
"Wayne township is t-o high, the one
road will not mean much of an addi
tional expense to the taxpayers. A
half dozen roads, some of which might
prove more expensive would add ma
terially to the tax rate.
Will Not Submit.
Some of the Center township tax
payers, claim they are not going to
submit to the proposition. They as
pert they do uot care so much for the
construction of one or two roads
where they are needed badly, but
there is general fear of the precedent.
The law is such that a three mile road
rmiat be built upon the petition of a
certain number of property owners of
the township, unless remonstrated
ftgainet and the remonstrance is up
tield by the commissioners.
Commissioner Wiley was in Ran
Bolph county yesterday and took oc
casion to investigate the road build
ing epidemic that has been experienc
ed there. He declared the majority
Of the tax payers are strongly oppos
ed to the law as it now exists. The
flame feeling is evident in Wells. Madi
son, Bartholomew and a number of
other counties of the state. Mr. Wiley
Ss of the opiuion that protest will be
po general throughout the state hat
the next, legislature will repeal the
law or amend it so as to limit the num
ber of petitions in a township and re
move other objectionable features.
A peculiar situation has developed
in Bartholomew county as the result
of the law. One of the principal
ptreets of Columbus, the county seat,
extends a little distance beyond the
city limits and into the township. A
petition was presented to improve This
road under the township law. The
portion that extended through Colum
bus was paved with brick. The entire
townRhip had to bear the cost.
Bids to be Opened.
The bids for the construction of the
NVashington township road in this
county will be opened by the commis
sioners at their first regular session
of the term Monday. . telephone
message was received this morning
from a contractor at Columbus, I ml.,
f tatlng he would come to the city and
present a bid. The contract will be
fcwarded, although no work will begin
Until after the circuit court has ruled.
WOMEN WILL SPEAK.
Mrs. F. W. Stephens and Miss Met
calf who attended the National Mis
sionary Convention in Pittsburg. Pa..
recently, will give an account of the
Same at South Eighth Street Friends'
church, Sunday at four o'clock, un
der the auspices of the Woman's For
eign Missionary Society of Whitewa
ter Quarterly meeting. Everyone in
terested in missions cordially invited.
Rome. April 4. -Ten thousand strik
ers, bearing- red flags made up a pa
rade which marched to the cemetei to
day to decorate the graves of theiir fel
lows, who were shot by soldiers. Thurs
day. Whole regiments lined the
streets to see that anarchists made no
further demonstration.
wouldIreeThe
arch assassin
Council Desires Pardon for Or
chard. j Boise. Idaho, April 1. The counsel
tor Jiarry urcnaru uas peuuoueu me
governor to pardon him.
BURGLARS ATE GOOD MEAL.
Then Raided Hastings Home Near
Cambridge City.
Cambridge City, Ind., April 1. Un
known men visited the home of Elias
Hastings on Capital Hill during the!
absence of the family. After enjoy
ing a copious meal and spending the
night, in one of the bed rooms, the ma
rauders left, taking with them a suit, oi
clothes and a gold watch. Who the
unbidden guests at the Hastings home
were, is a mystery.
JUDGE RULES IH
CAMPFIELD CASE
Decision Rendered in
Court in Favor
Harsh.
Circuit
of
APPEAL HAS BEEN TAKEN.
ATTORNEY RUPE ALLEGES EVI
DENCE IS NOT SUFFICIENT TO
SUSTAIN THE RULING AND
ACTS ACCORDINGLY.
Alleging the evidence was not suffi-
Icient to sustain the judgment, John L.
Rupe, attorney for Edwin M. Camp
field, defendant in the case of Harsh
vs. Campfield, this morning took an
appeal to the apellate court from the
decision of Special Judge StudyT The
case was presented for argument in
the circuit court this morning and
Judge Study held for the plaintiff.
The defendant was ordered to pav a
note in favor of the plaintiff for $1M4.
91 and interest at 6 per cent since Jan
uary 1 of this year. The suit was
brought originally by Abraham Harsh
to secure payment Hor coal delivered
by him to the defendant as owner of
the Colonial block in this city. Special
memorandum will be prepared for the
clerk by Mr. Rupe. The request tor a
new trial and appeal was made after
Judge Study had overruled the motion
of the defendant's counsel for an ar
rest of judgment.
The evidence showed Campfield had
tendered a check in payment for the
coal bill to Mr. Harsh, but when it
was presented to the bank, it was pro
tested and marked "No funds." Mr.
Harsh alleged he had sold the coal up
on order and it had been delivered to
the Colonial building. The case has
been long in litigation and it was nec
essary to submit a list of interrogat
ories, enter a plea of abatement and
attend to a number of other details.
When the case finally came to an is
sue today it took hut a few minutes
for tho hearing.
Before announcing his decision
Judge Study directed Ray Shiveley,
attorney jr the plaintiff, to surrend
er the check given by Mr. Campfield
and held by him as evidence to the
plaintiff. The court, held, the check
had to be tendered to the defendant,
before judgment, could he allowed.
The court stated, also, there was some
doubt as to the construction of the
complaint. He asserted the check was
proof of liability and ought to be sub
mitted as such.
In presenting his plea on the motion
to arrest the judgment. Mr. Rupe pro
tested against the complaint and al
leged it was not prepared in the prop
er manner. The court rendered his
decision more on the question of the
justice of the claim, than the techni
calities of the law governing the con
tingency. CONFIDENCE MEN NABBED.
New York. April 4. Detectives to
day arrested two confidence men
among the passengers aboard the
Cunard liner Caronia. They had in
tow, Evan E. Jones, a wealthy mer
chant of Newark. O.. a passenger on
the vessel. They endeavored to have
Jones cash an alleged draft for $S79.
THE WEATHER PROPHET.
OHIO AND INDIANA Fair Sunday,
with rising temperature.
Teachers Attending Northern
Indiana Association Meet
ings Left, Believing in the
Words of Speakers.
GILES IS NEW PPRESIDENT
OF THE PEDAGOGUES.
Following His Election Today,
Probably the Best Teach
ers' Session Ever Held,
Came to a Close.
Indianapolis, April I. After electing
J. T. Gib s of Marion, president for the
ensuing year and the appointment of
a committee to consider the question
of merging the Northern and South
ern Associations into one state organ
ization, the Northern Indiana Teach
ers' Association adjourned at noon to
day. The meeting in many ways was
a remarkable one. The attendance was
larger than at any previous gathering
of the association. Each day, Tonilin
son Hall was filled beyond its seating
capacity.. The association was ad
dressed by three of America's greatest
educators, and the country's foremost
scholar, President Charles X. Eliot of
Harvard University. The meeting will
long be remembered, too, for the radi
cal changes that were advocated in
Indiana's grade and secondary schools.
Among these changes was the estab
lishment of a tutorial system whereby
all pupils behind in their work should
receive individual coaching: the es
tablishment of trade schools in all
cities, and important alterations in
the high school course.
System Is Wrong.
Among iho leaders and in the rank
and 1ile of the vast, throng which dis
persed from the capital city today,
there was the feeling that somehow
the Indiana system is wrong in some
of its fundamental principles, and
there was a spirit of uncertainty as to
wherein lies the remedy. The most
advanced ground was taken by An
drew W. West, Dean of Princeton
University who spoke on the "Tutor
ial System in Secondary Education."
He declared that the present methods
are a good example of the "lock-step"
system where too little attention is
paid to the individual and too much
to the classes. He advocated fbe plan
of releasing bright pupils from some
of the duties of the classes and mak
ing them tutors of the dull children.
In thirty days under this plan a great
change would be noticed. Every boy
and girl, he declared, should be saved
to the nation and this was possible on
ly by individual teaching. Today
thousands leave the school and drift
away into the various avenues of life,
undeveloped and marred because they
have been lost sight of as personali
ties. So long as this condition exists
the parents of the state are not get
ting full returns for the money they
expend.
Many Non-Essentions.
The speaker also stated that there
is too much teaching of non-essentials
and too many fads introduced into the
schools. Nothing should be taught
but the fundamentals and these
should be taught well. The school is
no place for fads. Teachers should
have an ideal and not depart from it.
"There is only one ideal for the
teacher," he declared. "It is He who
taught, with authority, who spoke as
man never spake before."
The applause which followed Dean
West's address showed that the teach
ers had swung far toward his way of
thinking. It was only momentary,
however, for following him came
President Eliot, who pointed out that
Dr. West himself was wrong in certain
great, fundamentals.
President Eliot was introduced by
President Wood and the whole as
sembly arose and greeted him with
applause and the waving of handker
chiefs. His address was masterful and
clearly reasoned and wonderful in its
grasp of the educational situation as
it exists in America today.
President Eliot spoke on "The Ele
ments of a Liberal Education." He is
himself the greatest living example
of the education winch he advocates.
Marred by a birt'i mark which makes
his appearance anything but pleasing,
he set about when young to overcome
every difficulty, and succeed as an
educated man in the fullest sense of
the word. Today he is known as the
foremost American scholar and "a
leader and counselor of leaders of pub
lic opinion."
"The elements of a liberal educa
tion." said President Eliot, "is not
knowledge of any subject. It is not
skill of any kind. It is not being just
gentlemen and ladies, for I have
known liberally educated men who
had not cleanliness, who had not prop
er regard for others, who had not good
manners. No, a liberal education is a
state of mind. A liberally educated
man will have an inquiring mind, a
love tof beauty, truth and all things
noble. Neither does it belong to a
small minority, there are thousands in
factory and mine who have a liberal
education."
Like Dean West. President Eliot de
clared that the secondary schools are
too much conducted on the class sys-
(Continued on Page Twuj
Succeeds Chas. S. Stillings,
Suspended.
Washington, D. C, April 4. - John S.
Leach has been selected for public j
printer, to succeed Chas. S. Stillings.
who resigned after being suspended,
leach is the foreman of the govern
ment printing office in Manilla. He
comes from Illinois.
GUESTS ESCAPED IN
THEIR NIGHT CLOTHING
Fire Destroyed Meadville, Pa.,
Hotel.
Meadville, Pa.. April 4. Fire de
stroyed the Lafayette Hotel and ad
joining business blocks this morning
Over a hundred guests had narrow es
capes, many getting out in only their
night clothing. The loss is estimated
at $100,000.
BLISS DENIES
CONTRIBUTION STORY
Says Half Million Was
Given in 1896.
Not
New York. April 4. Cornelius N.
Bliss, treasurer of the national repub
lican committee, today denied the as
sertion made yesterday in the investi
gation of the Metropolitan Street Rail
way company that half a million was
contributed toward the electioa of
McKinley.
RUSH D. MILLER
LAID TO LAST REST
Funeral Services Conducted
This Afternoon Were Im
pressive. WAS LARGELY ATTENDED.
MEN HIGH UP IN RAILROAD CIR
CLES HERE TO PAY THEIR RE
SPECTS TO MAN WITH WHOM
THEY WERE ASSOCIATED.
The funeral of Rush D. Miller took
place this afternoon from the home of
his father. John F. Miller, on North
Tenth street. The services were at
tended by a large number of prominent
j railroad men from various parts of
j the country and many other friends of
j the deceased. The impressive services
i were conducted by the Rev. Mr. D. C.
j Huntington, rector of St. Paul's Epis
copal church. The burial at Earlham
was private.
Rush Denton Miller was born in
Richmond December 29, 187. He
had been ill only two weeks and his
death resulted from an operation per
formed because of a liver disease. He
is survived by a widow and one son,
John F. Miller, Jr., aged 11 years.
Mr. Miller had resided in St. Louis
since !!.'. when he went there to ac
cept a position as superintendent of
the Wabash railroad terminal at the
world's fair grounds. Later he be
came associated with the Rock Island
system and in 10o."i, he accepted the po
sition of superintendent of the St. Lou
is terminal of the Chicago and Eastern
Ulionis railroad, which position he oc
cupied at the time of his death.
Mr. Miller was a member of the Cen
tral association of Railway officials,
which body is composed of one repre
sentative from every railroad in the
United States. Among the railroad
men who attended the funeral today
was a delegation of the St. Ixuis divis
ion of the Central association. Mr.
Miller had a thorough knowledge of
the railroad business and was a mem
ber of a family whose men have for
years been prominent in railroad cir
cles. His father. Col. Miller, before
retiring from active work, filled the
positions of general superintendent of
the southwest system lines of the
Pennsylvania railroad, and vice presi
dent of the Cleveland. Akron & Colum-
; bus railroad. Harry I. Miller, brother
j of the deceased, is now president of the
Chicago & Eastern Illinois railroad.
Mr. Miller leaves one sister. Mrs. H.
J C. Starr of this city. The following
! is a list of the railroad officials who at
tended the funeral:
J. J. Turner, second vice president.
Pennsylvania lines, Pittsburg, Pa.
W. J. Jackson, general manager. C.
& E. I. railway. Chicago.
J. S. Ford, auditor. C. & E, I. railway,
Chicago.
E. H. Seneff. general attorney. C. &
E. I. railway. Chicago.
J. O. Crockett, general superintend-
tCe&tiaued on Page Two.)
i Has Shocked Old Time Demo
crats by Kicking Over the
Traces and Leading Repub
lican Vote in the House.
AGAINST FILIBUSTER
OF J. SHARP WILLIAMS.
Says He Was Elected by the
People and Will Serve Them
As Congressmen Should Re-
gardless of Politics.
Washington. April -I.- Representa
tive Adair of Indiana has shocked the
straight -laced democrats of the house
and caused a sensation by kicking out
of the party traces and refusing to join
in the filibuster which John Sharp
Williams, the democratic leader, has
inaugurated for the purpose of putting
the republican party "in a hole."
Mr. Adair's attitude has given rise to
much comment. Republican members
praised his independence, while old
time sticklers for party regularity on
the democratic side looked at him
askance and ventured the opinion that
he is a peculiar sort of a democrat.
The democratic filibuster may go on
all the remainder of the session, but.
Adair will not. be a party to it. He
has organized a little filibuster of his
own. and as long as leader Williams
ties up the business of the house Adair
will vote with the republicans to untie
it.
Adair's position is all the more inter
esting from the fact that his name is
now first on the roll, and on every one
of the numerous roll calls he led the re
publican vote of the house in opposi
tion to the democrats, much to the cha
grin of some of his colleagues Ordi
narily Representative Acheson's name
is called first, but AcTicson Is out of
Ihe city, and that places Adair's name
at the top of the roll. This makes a
democrat leading the roll of republican
votes.
Adair Defines Position.
In explanation of his attitude Mr.
Adair said: "In parting company with
my democratic associates during the
filibuster that is now going on I feel
that I am keeping faith with the people
who elected me to congress. During
my campaign last, year I assured my
audiences that if I were elected to con
gress I would represent all the people,
regardless of politics. I love my party
a great deal, but I love the people
more, and, as I view my duty as a
congressman. I am here to help enact
legislation that will be of advantage to
all the people I represent. I shall not
be led away from, my conception of
duty by any political leadership.
"The republicans in congress, being
in the majority, are responsible for leg
islation. I am in favor of giving
them every opportunity to work out
good legislation, and I am opposed to
putting obstacles in their way. I want
them to have every possible opportu
nity, and then if they fail to give the
country relief the blame will be right
fully upon them. I shall vote gladly
for all bills- that I believe to be in the
interest of the people, whether they
emanate from a democratic or from a
republican source. I do not believe in
consuming the time of the house mere
ly in tearing down or building up any
political party. According to my idea
of duty. I am not here as the represen
tative of any political party, but of the
people who elected me. and I shall gov
ern myself accordingly."
ATE PART
OF HIS MASTER
Remains of Ohio Farmer Were
Found Mutilated.
Plain City. O., April 4. Frank
OTIarra, a farmer, was found dead in
his barn last night. Death probably
was due to heart disease. A shepherd
dog had attacked the body and torn
clothing off. terribly mutilated and de
voured a portion of the body.
ROOSEVELT HAS
NO PLANS YET
Actions As Private Citizen Not
Decided.
Washington. April 4. President
Rcosevelt, according to a statement
made at the White House has conclud
ed no plans to govern himself when he
once more becomes a private citizen.
The Telephone is a Willing servant to bring
your Classified Ads to the Palladium office with the
least bother to you. Either Phone112I Automatic,
21 Old.
Manila. P. !.. April L The insular
democratic convention iiero today, do
nated one resolution condemning thb
administration of Taft as governor
general. This debate lasted six hours.
Six delegates and six alternates were
selected to attend the national demo
cratic convention at IVnver. Bryan
was endorsed. The platform was eou
ser alive.
BROKE LEG GETTING
OUT OF BED
Aged Woman Met With Bad
Accident.
Mrs. Jane Price, an aged woman re
siding at ST Ft. Wayne avenue, was j
severely injured at her home this:
morning and was removed to the Reid j
Memorial hospital for treatment. Mrs. j
Price had been confined to her bed
for some time. Today she attempted
to get out of bed and in so doing fell
upon the floor, fracturing her leg near
the thigh.
FYE BOUND OVER
TO CIRCUIT COURT
Man Accused of Assault Not
Given a Preliminary
Hearing.
BAILEY IS CONFIDENT.
THINKS SINCE INVESTIGATION
HE HAS MADE NO MISTAKE IN
ARRESTING MAN AS EVIDENCE
POINTS TOWARD HIM.
This morning Clayton Fye. who is
held on suspicion of being the man
who brutally assaulted Miss Katherine
McKone last Monday night, was bound
over to the circuit court under bond of
S.oo. Fye has not yet been arraigned
J as ho wishes his preliminary hearing
postponed until his father arrives here
from his home in Portland. Ind. Pros-
ecutor Jessup is now engaged in mak
ing a thorough investigation of the
case.
Chief Bailey is almost certain that
Fye is ihe man who made the aiuault.
Miss McKone describes her assailant
as a man of medium weight and stat-
ure and says that he wore a heavy.
black beard, probably of three or four
days' growth. In conversation with
Chief Bailey yesterday, Fye stated that
last Saturday night he was close sha
ven at the Becker barber shop, so that
it would have been impossible for him
to have bad a heavy growth of beard
on Monday night. He also stated that
at the time the assault was made,
eight o'clock, he was playing pool in
the Miller saloon on Main street.
Chief Bailey went to the Beclcer bar
ber shop and the Miller saloon after
Fye had made these statements. At
the former place he was informed that
Fye had a shaving mug at the shop and
that he had been shaved ihere a week
ago last Saturday, but he was not in
the shop last Saturday. At the Miller
saloon Bailey was informed that Fye
had been in the saloon before supper,
but that he was not seen around the
place Saturday evening. Bailey's
opinion is that Fye was lieing to
him. Miss McKone and four people
who saw her assailant, positively iden
tify Eye as the man. John Long.
Fye's employer, stoutly defends him.
He states that Fye has always been a
quiet, inoffensive man: that he has
never been in any trouble and that he
never associated with women or
thought anything about, them.
No charge has yet been filed against
Fye. He is held on suspicion. Prose
cutor Jessup will not file a charg"
against him until he has made a thor
ough investigation of the ca!e. If he
is of the opinion that Fye was the
man who made the assault, he will
rither charge him with assault and
battery, or assault and battery with in
tent to commit a felon v.
BURNED SCHOOL.
Marietta. O.. April 4. Bloodhounds
have been rushed here from Mounds
ville, W. Va.. to be put on the trail of
incendiaries who burned the Central
school of Warren township last night.
The school building was located on
one side of the township and two fac
tion's were created on that account.
National Body Failed to Give
The Nebraskan Any Support
Whatever and Thomas E.
Watson Was Nominated.
SEVERAL CLASHES
MARKED GATHERING.
The Question of Fusion With
Democratic and Republican
Parties Was a Subject of
Much Dispute.
THE TICKET.
PRESIDENT.
Thomas E. Watson of Georgia.
VICE PRESIDENT.
Samuel W. Williams of Indiana.
St. Iouis, Mo.. April 4. William J.
Itryan was repudiated by the pui!st9
in national convention. The delegates
proceeded to nominate Thomas K.
Watson of Georgia for president and
Samuel W. Willii'nis of Vincemies, In
diana, for vice president against ih
protest of the Nebraska delegation.
As a result the Nebraska and Minne
sota delegations bolted the conven
tion. Fusion was scorned in the climax of
the platform, which toads as follows:
"That never again will the pirty. by
the siren songsand false promises of
designing politicians, be tempted to
change its course or be again drawn
on the treacherous rocks of fusion."
The platform advocates the right h
of labor, denounces the democratic
party and demands that the govern
ment issue all money.
The convention produced several
clashes between the delegates.
George A. Honnecker of New Jer
sey was elected permanent chairman.
Mr. Honnecker attacked tho courts,
of the country, under whose rulings
he declared many gross in just ices had
been committed. He attacked tho
democratic party for the conduct of
President Cleveland in th railroad,
strike of 1!M and the republican parly
for the sending of troops to Idaho dur
ing the miners' strike.
Demands of the Platform.
The platform adopted is principally!
as follows: t
The issuing of money Is a function
of government and should not be del
egated to corporation or individual..
The constitution gives to congress j
alone the power to Issue money and'
regulate the value thereof.
We demand that postal saving-
banks be instituted for the savins" f
the neoole.
The public domain is a scrtd heri
tage of all the people and should h
held for home steads for the people.
Alien ownership should be forbidden,
land lands iow held by aliens or by
corporations which hav violated th
conditions of their grants should bo
i restored to the public domain.
To prevent unjust discrimination
and monopoly the government should
own and control the railroads.
We demand the taxation of monop
oly privileges while they remain in
private hands.
Believe in Labor Unions.
i
We believe in the right of thos
who labor to organize for their mutual
protection and benefit, and pledge the
tf forts of the People's party to pre
serve this right inviolate.
We favor the enactment of legisla-'
tion looking to the Improvement of
conditions of the wage earners. We
demand the abolition of the child labor
in factories and mines and the sup
pressing of sweatshops. .
I We demand the enactment of an em
ployers' liability bill within consti
tutional bounds.
We declare against the continuation
of the criminal carelessness of tfce op-;
eration of mines through which thou- '
sands of miners have lot their live to '
increase the dividends of stockholders,
and demand the immediate adoption of
precautionary mca.su res to prevent a
repetition of such horrible catastro
phes. Fa,-men Are Congratulated.
W congratulate the farmers of the
oountry upon the marvelous growth of
their splendid organization and the
good already accomplished through
them, bringing higher prices for farm i
products and better conditions gener
ally for those engaged in argicultoral
pursuits.
We condemn all unwarranted as
sumption of authority of thfe inferior j
federal courts in annuling by injunc- j
tion, the laws of the several states and
tJerefore demand of congress such leg
islation as shall inhibit such usurpa
tion and restricting- to .the supreme ,
court of the United States alone the ex- j
ercise of this great power. J
We are opposed to all gambling In
futures.
We present to all people the forego
ing declaration of principles and poll-
e'es, as our deep, earnest and abiding j
conviction, and now before the coun- j
try and in the-name of the great moral
but eternal power in th universe that '
makes for right thinking, and. right liv- j

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