OCR Interpretation


The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1907-1939, July 18, 1908, Image 1

Image and text provided by Indiana State Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86058226/1908-07-18/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

ONB PA
LiJLtJJWJL yj J.VJL
AND SUN-TELEGRAM.
VOL. XXXIII. NO. 154.
RICII3IONI, IND., SATURDAY EVENING, JULY 18. lOOS.
SINGLE COPY, 2 CENTS.
THE BICE
M
ELEVATED TRAIN TARR&RT DIM flSFIl
LOCAL
NEW YORK WOMAN'S
- DEATH MYSTERIOUS
BIG BROKERAGE
CANOE OVERTURNS;
MINISTER DROWlS
FIRM FAILS
i rinn nrr minifn
m AS THE SAME OLD
OPTION WOULD
WORK WONDERS
WILY "PLUTO TOM"
Two-year-old Child Plays with
Gun Which Kills Mother.
Cameron, Currie & Company
Goes to Wall.
The Rev. Artemus J. Haynes'j
Eight People, Severely, But
Body Found Today.
Not Fatally Hurt.
REFUSES TO SPEAK
HIS VIEWS ON THE
NEGRO QUESTION
William Jennings Bryan Will
Not State Whether Ideas
Held by Him in 1906 Are
Those of Today.
COUNTY
Only Eleven Counties Would
Remain Wet in TWO YearS '
If the Law Were Enforced,
Says Shumaker.
WAYNE IS NAMED
AMONG THE DRYS.
(This County Would Be Among
The Forty-four Other Coun
ties Which Would Abolish
The Saloon.
Indianapolis, Ind., July IS. Believ
ing that the state will be carried for
j county local option, as advocated by
ithe Republicans, E. S. Shumaker, su
perintendent of the Indiana Anti-Sa-iloon
League, yesterday completed an
estimate of the probable effect of
'such a statute. He predicts that at
ithe end of two years use of the coun
jty local option law not more than elev
!en counties out of the ninety-two will
(remain wet. The eleven he mentions
are as follows: Marlon, Lake, Laporte,
iSt Joseph, Allen, Vigo, Clark, Floyd,
! Dubois, Vanderburg and Posey. Mr.
iShumaker's statement continues:
' "In forty-four counties of the state
our voters are at present disfran
chised upon the liquor question. They
are: Adams, Bartholomew, Benton,
Carroll, Daviess, Decatur, Dekalb,
Elkhart, Fayette, Gibson, Greene,
Hamilton, Hancock, Harrison, Hen
dricks, Huntington, Howard, Jackson,
Jasper, Jefferson, Jennings, Knox,
Lawrence, Marshall, Martin, Miami,
Montgomery, Newton, Noble, Parke,
Porter, Putnam, Randolph, Rush, Shel
by, Spencer, Starke, Switzerland, Tip
ton, Wabash, Warrick, Wayne and
Whitley.
"These counties have 357,693 people,
according to the last census, living in
wet territory and they have a total of
953 saloons. In some of these counties j
the majority of people living in dry
territory Is overwhelming as, for exam
jple, Jasper, where the voting popula
tion In dry territory outnumbers those
' in wet territory, twenty-five to1 one.
I believe beyond a doubt that the sa
loon will be banished from every one
of these counties by the enactment of
a county unit local option law. '
"In addition, the following counties
would also likely go dry because of the
fact that the temperance sentiment is
bo steadily on the Increase and be-
V cause of the additional fact that al
ready the number of voters living in
dry territory Is almost, if not quite,
equal to those living in wet Cass,
.Dearborn, Delaware, Fountain, Frank
ilin. Grant, Madison, Ohio, Perry, Tlp
jpecanoe and Vermillion eleven in all.
In this list of counties the population
living in wet territory, according to
the last census, was 213,897. They
have about 6S4 saloons.
; "Thus a total of 571,571 people, liv
ing In wet territory and having at
least 1,637 saloons in their midst,
would very probably go dry under a
county local option law. Add to that
number 1,608,912 people already liv
ing in dry territory and we would then
i have 2,180,484 people living in terrl
! tory free from the curse of the liquor
traffic.
"Under such a law a person could
start from Indianapolis over the Van
dalia and would not pnss through a
saloon town until reaching the city of
Terre Haute. Going south on the
Pennsylvania, not a saloon town would
be reached until Jeffersonville. Going
'east on the Pennsylvania one would
have to cross the state line Into Ohio
before finding a wet goods emporium
Going northwest over the Big Four"
the traveler would have to pass be
' yond Lafayette and on beyond the
state line into Illinois some distance
before finding a place where intoxi
cating liquors would be served. Going
north over the Lake Erie & Western,
not until Laporte would be reached
would a wet town be passed." -
SHOOTS DRUNKEN
HUSBAND IN HEART
Then Woman Takes Carbolic
Acid.
New York, July 18. Mrs. Sarah
Clock shot and instantly killed her
husband, and then took carbolic acid
and died today. Her husband cam'e
home drunk and quarreled, and then
went to sleep. His wife crept up and
shot him In the heart.
WORK COMPLETED.
South First Street Improvement Took
Much Time.
The work of macadamizing South
First street and building the cement
. curbs, gutters and sidewalks has
about been completed. This has been
extremely hard work owing to the fact
that a greater part of the roadway
had to be blasted. Work on the im
j jprojeraenta started last fall.,-
New York, July 18. The police are
trvinz to solve the mysterious death
of Mrs. Samuel Friedlan, the wife of a
real estate dealer who was found with
a bullet in her brain at her home,
while her two year old son was sitting
beside her playing with the revolver.
It is undecided whether the woman
committed suicide or was accidentally
shot by the child while playing with
the revolver.
LAWN FAMILY
HAS NARROW ESCAPE
While Returning Home, Horse
Scares at Motorcycle
And Runs Away.
DID NOT GIVE ASSISTANCE.
MAN DRIVING MACHINE STOPPED
AT FARM HOUSE AND SENT
BACK AID, BUT HE ESCAPED BE
FORE NAME WAS ASCERTAINED.
After informing Mr. and Mrs. Laugh
lin and their daughter, that he would
hurry to a telephone and notify a phy
sician of their plight, an unknown
motorcyclist threw on his high speed
and left the scene of the accident in
which the members of the Laughlin
family had just been hurled from their
rig as the result of the fright of their
horse at the passing motor cycle
Their escape from fatal injury is re
garded as remarkable. Mr. Laughlin
was hurled rorwara over tne aasn
and under the horse's feet. His wife
and daughter were percipitated to the
side of the road. The horse ran away
and the vehicle passed over Mr.
Laughlin's body. The horse became
stalled in a mudhole a short distance
away and remained there two hours,
or until released.
The Laughlin family occupies the
Comer property south of the city near
the Draper dairy on the Straightline
pike. They were returning home
from the city yesterday afternoon and
a motor cyclist attempted to pass
their rig. The road is narrow and the
exhaust valve on the machine was
emitting its "pop-pop" with all its
capability. The horse frightened and
the rig skidded to the ditch and the
occupants were thrown headlong from
their seats. Mr. Laughlin, who was
driving, was hurled forward beneath
the horse's feet. Mrs. Laughlin and
daughter were thrown to the side of
the road. Mr. Laughlin was injured,
sustaining a number of cuts and bruis
es and a sprained knee. The mother
and daughter were bruised and
scratched about the head and should
ers. The horse was terrified and began
kicking fiercely. The front of the bug
gy was kicked into splinters and the
harness and shafts broken, so that the
horse freed itself and dashed madly
down the road. It plunged into a soft
spot and sunk so deeply it was not
extricated for two hours when the com
bined efforts of eight men proved suf
ficient to release It.
When he saw the predicament of
the Laughllns the operator of the mo
tor cycle notified them he would pro
ceed to the nearest house, summon
aid which he did but did not return
to the scene of the accident. In their
excitement the members of the family
had not ascertained the cyclist's name
nor the number of his machine. The
police may investigate the case.
EPWORTH LEAGUE
SE'SSION IN RICHMOND
Probable That They Will
Held Here.
Be
Rev. R. J. Wade will go to Winona
Lake next week and will work for the
biennial meeting of the Indiana State
Epworth league to be held in connec
tion with the Richmond Chautauqua
next year. This is a big meeting and
the directors of the local Chautauqua
are hopeful that the Rev. Wade will
be able to convince the leaders of the
advantages of holding the meeting in
Richmond. If the meeting is held here
next year the Chautauqua will be two
weeks long instead of ten days.
In speaking about the matter Rev.
Wade said: "The prospects for secur
ing the meeting here next year are ex
cellent,
THE WEATHER PROPHET.
OHIO Showers Saturday night and
diminishing west to northwest
winds; Sunday fair and cooler.
INDIANA Fair and cooler Saturday
night and Sunday; diminishing
northwest winds.
Detroit, Mich., July 18. With Jiabil
ities at a half million in excess of as
sets, Cameron, Currie and Company,
the biggest brokerage firm in Michi
gan, failed today. It was a member
of the New York and Boston stock ex
changes. A receiver has been appoint
ed. Loose management is alleged
against one member of the firm. Many
banks and investors are involved.
UCREASED RATES
HOW NECESSARY
James J. Hill Tells Why Great
Public Carriers Will Have
' To Take Such Step.
PROSPERITY AT STAKE.
MILLIONS HAVE TO BE SPENT BY
ROADS FOR ROLLING STOCK, IF
BUSINESS OF COUNTRY IS
PROPERLY CARED FOR.
New York, July 18. "Railroad rates
must be advanced or the country will
stop. If railroads do not secure an
advance in freight rates they will be
unable to expend the $600,000,000 or
so a year for new rolling stock and fa
cilities, without which they go behind.
"The loss of $(500,000,000 will be a
loss to the manufacturers. The produ
cer of raw material will feel it; so will
the farmer who supplies the food; the
lumberman who supplies the lumber;
the mechanic, the laborer. It will be
felt by the people generally.
"This $t00,0()0,0iO of direct expendi
ture by the railroads Is enormous if
followed in all its ramifications.
Compared to it a moderate advance in
rates is a mere bagatelle.,
The interests of the railroads and
the manufacturers and the people are
closely related. If the railroads are to
decay all else will decay with them."
These are the views expressed by
James J. Hill when Interviewed on his
return from a three weeks' fishing
trip to Canada.
Continuing, Mr. Hill said:
"There is no alternative but to raise
rates. The credit of the railroads has
been seriously impaired. The way to
enhance credit is to increase rates.
No Cut in Wages.
"Wages should not be cut. Efficient
labor is essential to successful opera
tion. Railroad employes have peculiar
responsibilities. They have to meet a
hard tesW. They should ge fair recom
pense. Lxf. wages 10 per cent. The
man who got $15 last week gets $13.50
this week. It is the differenec between
meat and no meat.
"Freight rates in this country are
low beyond comparison. Receiving
but one-half and even one-third of the
Tate received in European countries,
the wages paid railroad employes here
average 100 per cent higher than those
paid in Europe.
ASSASSINATED TODAY
Great Sensation Caused by the
Deed.
Salonlca, Turkey, July IS. General
Osman Pasha, commander of the Tux
kish army at Monastir, was assassin
ated in the barracks today by an offi
cer of "Young Turkey" an insurgent
government. The killing caused
great sensation as Osman had pro
claimed an amnesty to all Turkish of
ficers engaged in the recent mutiny.
PAPER TRUST TO
FEEL "BIG STICK"
Attorney
General Consults
Roosevelt.
Oyster Bay, July 18. Attorney Gen
eral Bonaparte conferred with Presi
dent Roosevelt today in regard to the
proceedings asainst the 'alleged paper
trust. The discussion was of some
length and it is claimed prosecution
will be the outgrowth of today's meet
ing. TO CONNECT WITH PARK.
The board of public works will ex
tend the right to" the proprietor of the
Hawkins swimming pond to build a
pathway connecting the pond and
Glen Miller park. This pathway will
be illuminated In the evening by elec
tric lights, and the pond will practi
cally, be a pact of Glaa MUlp .
TURKISH
CUMMANDER
APPEAL TO FARMERS
FOR CAMPAIGN FUNDS.
Assertion That Party Will Not
Take Funds from Corpora
tions Is Reiterated by Bryan
And Kern.
Lincoln, Neb., July 18. Reminded
that while the Brownsville controver
sy was in its most heated stage he
commended President Roosevelt edi
torially for drumming out of the Uni
ted States army the colored battalion,
some of whose members were accused
of shooting up the town, William J.
Bryan qualified his declaration that he
had not discussed the incident and re
called that he had on the date above
indicated penned a eulogy of the pres
ident for his conduct.
Mr. Bryan explained that he had
meant to be understood as merely say
ing that he had not discussed the mat
ter with any negro delegation, adding:
"I now remember that in 1906 be
fore the real inquiry began, there ap
peared In the Commoner an article
that if the facts were as stated in the
newspapers the president was abso
lutely Justified in the policy he had
followed.
I did not intend to mislead anybody,
but inasmuch as I do not regard the
Brownsville case an issue in this cam
paign, I sought to convey the sugges
tion that I had not discussed it re
cently with anybody. To be sure
have been asked by negroes who have
called upon me to express myself.
Some of them have talked a great deal
to me about it.
He Just Listened.
I have listened. When they got
through I would say, in order that
they might not repeat anything erron
eously from me: 'You are saying that,
not I."
"Perhaps they have gone away with
the impression that I fully agreed with
what they said, though I may not have
answered. That may explain the re
ported statement from Bishop Wal
ters that I assured a negro delegation
that 1 regarded lloosevelt s action as
unujust, and that I would recognize
negroes in appointments to office.
The candidate declined to talk about
the matter further, maintaining that
the Brownsville case Is not a cam
palgn issue and that he will not dis
cuss as Issues other than those which
are Included in the Denver platform.
Mr. Bryan refused to say whether
or not the views expressed by him in
the 19W editorial quoted are held by
him today. Instead he appeared to be
far more absorbed in the possible ef
fect of an appeael for campaign funds
issued by him and Mr. Kern an his
running mate, addressed to the farm
ers of the United States. Here it is:
First Campaign Appeal.
The flr6t appeal for campaign con
tributions by the democratic candi
dates for the presidency and vice pres
idency was made yesterday. In a for
mal message directed to the farmers ot
the country, Messrs. Bryan and Kern
urge them to contribute according to
their means, and In other ways assist
In restoring democracy to power. The
appeals is as follows:
"To the Farmers of the United States:
"The first contribution made to the
democratic campaign fund this year,
so far as we know was made by an
Iowa farmer. Just before the Denver
convention met, this man, who mod
estly prefers not to have his name
mentioned, journeyed more than 100
miles to Lincoln with his contribution
of $100, which he left with Mr. Bryan
to be given to the committee when or
ganized for the campaign.
"It is very appropriate that this
Erst contribution should come from
that great body of our population
known as agriculturists; the farmer
has nothing to gain by privilege and
favoritism; his hope Is in the appli
cation of the doctrine of equal rights
to all and special privileges to none.
He has been the victim of all special
legislation and has suffered from the
control of politics by the great preda
tory corporations.
And They Are Able.
"Now that the democratic party has
announced its determination not to ac
cept contributions from corporations,
cot to accept excessive contributions
even from individuals, to publish all
contributions when over a resaonable
minimum, it ought to be able to secure
a sufficient sum from its citizens who
ask from the government nothing but
protection to their rights and consid
eration for the general welfare. There
are hundreds of thousands of farmers
who are abundantly able to contribute
to the campaign fund. There are thou
sands who could give $100 apiece with
out feeling It; there's tens of thous-
ISoctiSMd on Pago TiraJ,
Boston. Mass., July IS. Rev. Arte
mus J. Haynes, aged 41, one of the
most brilliant preachers of New Eng
land, was found drowned at Harwich,
today. The accident occurred" while
he was fishing, his canoe overturning.
He lived at New Haven and had a
summer cottage near Cape Cod.
BUSY SESSION
FOR WEST SIDERS
Many Questions Concerning
Public Improvement Be
fore Association.
WANT ANOTHER PATROLMAN
POINTED OUT THAT WEST RICH
MOND IS NOW PRACTICALLY
UNPROTECTED MANY NEEDS
DISCUSSED.
The need of another policeman, the
trimming of shade trees, the demand
for a new hose house, the restoration
of the name National Road for Na
tional avenue, and the enlargement of
the Baxter school grounds were sub
jects for "discussion at the meeting of
the West Richmond Improvement As
sociation last evening.
One of the members of the associa
tion in speaking about the great need
of a policeman on the West Side asked
"How is it the city council claims it
gives us people in this part of Rich
mond ample protection from the law
breakers, when there is only one po
liceman to cover both Fairview and.
West Richmond? A crook or a safe
blower could do all the damage he
would want to and the police would
never be the wiser until the person
robbed arrived home or awoke the
next morning and telephoned his mis
fortune to police headquarters. The
police would then get busy and try tol
find the culprit, but chances are they
wouldn't succeed. It was to discuss
this question that the meeting was
called. West Slders expect to have
their demand heeded.
Prof. N. C. Heironlmus and A. M.
Gardner were appointed as a commit
tee to draw up resolutions of sym
pathy on the death of Alpheus G.
Compton, who was buried yesterday
morning, and who was one of the most !
Influential workers of the association.
The question of the hose house was
brought up again and the West Siders
stated that they did not care where
the new building waa situated on the
West Side and would leave the matter
of the choosing of the site to the offi
cials, as they would know where to
place the building to get the best fire
protection to both Fair View and West
Richmond.
Prof. N. C. Helronimus made a very
earnest plea for more ground at the
Baxter school. He stated that the
people of West Richmond felt slighted
on account of the play grounds being
on this side of the river so that they
don't get very much benefit from
them. He hopes to convince the school
board and city officials that there
should be more room for the children
to play at the Baxter building.
The association appreciates the fact
that the police department is taking
up the question of the trimming of
shade trees. In many places on the
West Side the trees are very low.
The indignation of every member of
the club was aroused when the ques
tion was brought up concerning the
National road. One of the members,
who became very indignant said that
"any old street could be called an ave
nue, but none could be the National
road. It is thought that the name of
National avenue will be changed to
National road if possible.
TWO MEN KILLED;
TEH ABE I
Men Meet Death in Chicago
Steel Mills.
Chicago. July j. Two men were
killed and ten others were seriously
injured by an explosion of hot metal
in the blast furnace cf the Wisconsin
Steel mills, South Chicago today. The
accident occurred while the furnace
was being tapped. . Several of the in
jured taken to the hospital, may die.
PICNIC SUNDAY.
lola Lodge, K. of P. Will
Outing.
Take an
lola lodge, Knights of Pythias, will
picnic tomorrow at the Stephen Kuth
farm, east of the city. It Is expected
that there will be a large number of.
Knight .enjoy, the outing. . " "
Chicago, July IS. Eight persons
were severely injured, although not
fatally, when a motor car on the
South Side elevated railroad leaped
over the bumpers at the sub-end struc
ture into Stony Island ave., this morn
ing. The motorman lost control of the
swiftly running train.
KNOWS IDENTITY
OF THE MURDERER
Man Who Killed Hazel Drew
Will Probably Be Brought
To Justice Soon.
DIST. ATTORNEY SPEAKS.
CERTAIN LINKS CONNECTING THE
EVIDENCE ARE YET TO BE
FOUND HE CLAIMS THE GIRL
LIKED TO TRAVEL.
Troy, N. Y.. July 18. District Attor
ney O'Brien today announced that he
is now certain of the identity Of the
person who murdered Hazel Drew and
that the murderer still lives in the
vicinity and the arrest will be made
as soon as certain links of evidence
are supplied. The inquest has been
postponed in order not to frustrate the
efforts of the detectives who are now
probing the case.
The district attorney is not satisfied
with the information in hand and
wants to make further investigation
Hazel apparently has a propensity
for traveling. She had made several
trips to New York. Boston and Provi
dence. Her brother, Joseph Drew, who
lives in this city says, that after the
Eastern trip in April she wrote her
mother telling her what a good time
she had had.
Hazel was ill for two weeks last win
ter at the home of her uncle. William
iayior. ner Drotner, Joseph, says
that no physician was called and he
does not know the nature of the girl's
Illness. As soon as she had recover
ed she obtained employment at the
home of Prof. Carey, where -she re
mained until a few days before her
murder.
mat nazei naa very little money
with her at the time of her death, pro-
oably not more than the five-cent
piece that was found in the finger tin
of one of her gloves. Is the opinion
of the authorities. They have asrer-
tained that she owed ?30 to a dress -
maker and that on the night of Julyhay of his being a candidate.
o sne pam mis aeot, arter having bor-
the amount W
STATE RECEIVES
GOOD INTEREST
Hanly Pleased With Public De
pository Law.
Indianapolis, July 18. After a meet -
ing of the state board of finance. Gov.
tianiy announced that the state Is
receiving $33,000 a year Interest from
its funds under the application of the
public depository law enacted by the
last legislature.
"Thls is undoubtedly worse while,
from a money point of view alone."
said the governor. "This is almost
enough to pay the expenses of the ex-
ecutive and treasury departments and
is a long step from
vogue three years ago.'
me Bsiem in
CHANGE IN TIME.
Band Concerts at the Glen to Be Held
Earlier.
The board of public works has de
cided that, beginning tomorrow, all
Sunday band concerts at Glen Miller
park will start at 3:30 in the afternoon
instead of 4 o'clock. These concerts
have been attracting hndreds of peo
ple to the park every Sunday. An ex
cellent program has been arranged
for tomorrow.
MRS. SMITH DEAD.
Word has been received here of the
death of Mrs. Dorc3s M. Smith, the
widow of the Rev. John F. Smith, who
was pastor of the First Presbyterian
church of this city from 1S5S to 1S53
and who died in 1864. Mrs. Smith
died at her home in Franklin, Ind., at
the age of eighty-six years.
CASE 0FJSMALLP0X.
Again there Is smallpox In this vicin
ity. Hiram Hoover of Spring Grove Is
the patient. He If employed by Adams
Express Compacf and hew he came in
contact with the disease Is not known,
21, Jamlly-haa-icea Quarantined,
i Claimed That While He Was in
Denver Pushing Indiana:
Man's Candidacy, He Then
Looked to Senate.
SHIVELY WILL OPPOSE
FRENCK LICK KING.
Thirteenth District Man Is
Thought to. Be on the Inside
Track If Democrats Should
Happen to Win.
Indianapolis. July 18. Announce-,
ment of the withdrawal of Benjamin
F. Shively, of South Bend, from the
race for the democratic nomination
for congress In the Thirteenth district
was followed by the report that he
proposed to become an active candi
date for the seat In the United States
senate now held by James A. Hemen-
way, republican of Booneville. If the
democrats secure control of the Indi
ana legislature, which event Is consid
ered unlikely in Indianapolis.
Shively has been regarded as &'
possibility for the senate and it was
thought that he might make the race
against John Worth Kern, vice-presidential
nominee, who aspired to the
position held by Hemenway.
Before Kern's departure for Denver
he told his friends that he waa ambi
tious to be elected to the senate and
ihat he didn't want the nomination for
vice president. It was conceded by
most of the democratic workers that
Kern had the inside track in the sen
atorial contest should the democrats
carry the legislature.
But with Kern out of the running
for the senate it is said that Shively
feels that he has next call for the hon-.
or. He made one unsuccessful race
for governor in 1896, when Bryan
headed the ticket and for several
years he was known as the leading
Bryanite of Indiana. He received the
complimentary vote of his party for
the senate four years ago.
Although .Kern is out of the running
as a senatorial candidate. It was said
that Shively will not have a clear
field. Thomas TaggarL acting chair
man of the democratic national com
mittee, may enter the running.
A story is going the rounds to the
effect that Taggart was not wholly
unselfish In managing Kern's candl-;
dacy for the vice presidency. He Is
very fond of Kern personally. They
have been close friends as well as po
Utical allies for many years, but It is
reported that Taggart himself aspires
to the senate and that he felt that
with Kern on the ticket for vice nreai.
1 dent there would be nothing In th'
Smooth Mr. TaggarL
KJn "
wrn h uunseii, ii is saia, laggarc
pushed him forward skillfully at Den
ver for second place on the national
ticket There are no ties of friendship;
now to hinder him from running for
the senate and it will be surprising If
i he doesn't get Into the running If his
party is successful In November.
In the meantime. It is said, he will
amble along quietly as a receptive
candidate, always near enough to the
course to Jump In and make a race;
without much preparation.
It is very probable, however, that
Taggart's ambition to go to the senate
! will be bidden as far as possible until
! the campaign gets well under war. as
there is an element In the party that
might not line up for the ticket If his!
candidacy should be announced at thU
time.
It has been rumored now and then
during the last three years that Tag-
gait aspired to represent his state In
the senate, but he never said anything
for publication on the matter. He has
succeeded In business, and is bow rat-'
ed as one of the wealthiest men In
i inuiana, ins iaitmu! follower ur
that no one Is more entitled to recog
nition than he, as he has given time
and money to the party In Indiana dur
ing the last 20 years.
TO BEGIN CAMPAIGN
AT BRYAN'S DOOR
Prohibitionists Start August
10th at Lincoln.
Columbus, Ohio, July 18. Disregard-
' InS the amenities cf national politics,'
j the campaign cf the Prohibitionists
will be begun at the home of William
J- Bryan on August 10. Eugene W.
Chafin, the Presidential nominee of the
party will personally sound the key-
note at Lincoln where he will speak ta
Nebraska twice a day for four days.
CLASS0F SIX.
A class of six will be taken In Mon
day evening by the Modern Woodmen.
The Woodmen of Centerrille, Cam-
j bridge City and Hagerstown have been
j Invited to attend. There will be a
luncheon served.

xml | txt