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The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1907-1939, October 27, 1908, Image 4

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V
PAGK FOUR.
TIIE RICHMOND PALLADIUM AND SUN-TELEGRA31, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1908.
TOE RICHMOND PALLADIUM
AND SUN-TLEGRAM.
mUiui4 And owned by the PALLA
ZjUM PRINTING CO. Issued 7
; Ail etch wtek, rnltt(i
and Sunday mornln.
'Office Corner North 9th and A street.
Horn Phone 1121. Bell 21.
RICHMOND. INDIANA.
Kadolpk O. Leede Muiclnf Editor.
Charles M. Mr(u-BileM MaMftr.
O. Own Kito- Mcwi Editor.
BCBSCRIPTION TERMS.
Ib Richmond $5.00 per year (In ad
vance) or 10c per week.
MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS.
On year. In advance I5 00
Six months, in advance.;.......... 2-60
One month. In advance
RURAL, ROUTES.
On year, tn advance 'J-22
Six months, tn advance 1
On month. In advance 25
Address changed as flften as desired:
both new and old addresses must be
trivon.
"-rlbers will please remit with
which should b riven for a
i! term: nanio will not be enter
d uii.Ii payment Is received.
"Entered at Richmond. Indiana, post
office as second class mall matter.
REPUBLICAN TICKET.
NATIONAL TICKET.
For President
WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT
of Ohio.
Tor Vlce-Presldsnt
JAMBS 8. SHERMAN
of New York.
TATE.
Governor
JAMES B. WATSON.
-Lieutenant Governor
FREMONT C. GOODWINB.
. -Secretary of State
FRED A. SIMS.
Auditor of State
JOHN C. BILLHEIMER.
-Treasurer of State
OSCAR HADLET.
Attorney General
JAMES BINGHAM.
State Superintendent
? LAWRENCE McTURNAN.
8tate Statistician.
J. L. PEETZ.
Judge of Supreme Court
QDINCY A. MTERS.
Judge of Appellate Court
DAVID MTERS.
-Reporter of 8upreme Court-
GEORGE W. SELF.
DI8TRICT.
-Congress
WILLIAM O. BARNARD.
COUNTY.
Joint Representative
ALONZO M. GARDNER.
Representative
WALTER S. RATLIFF.
.. ' Circuit Judge
HENRY C. FOX.
Prosecuting Attorney
CHAS. L. LADD.
Treasurer
ALBERT ALBERTSON.
Sheriff
LINUS P. MEREDITH.
Coroner ,
DR. A. L. BRAMKAMP.
Surveyor
ROBERT A. HOWARD.
Recorder
WILL J. ROBBINS.
Commissioner Eastern DIst-
HOMER FARLOW.
Commissioner Middle Dist
BARNEY H. LINDERMAN.
Commissioner Western Dist
ROBERT N. BEESON.
WAYNE TOWNSHIP.
Trustee
JAMES H. HOWARTH.
-Assessor
CHARLES E. POTTER.
ABUSING THE CIVIL SERVICE.
Many charges have been brought
against Mr. Roosevelt for what has
been called presidential dictation. It
has been said that he used his power'
for the nomination! and election of Mr.
Taft In order to do this he would
have to violate his civil service reform
convictions.
A Richmond man, Mr. W. D. Foulke,
stands high in the councils of the Civil
Service Reform League. This league
has Investigated the actions of every
president in regard to hla civil service
actions. Before the campaign started
Mr. Foulke went to the headquarters of
the reform league and asked If there
was any truth in the charges made
against Roosevelt. There was absolute
ly no truth found in the statement that
Roosevelt had used his influence in the
civil service for Taft.
Lucius B. Swift, of Indianapolis,
comes forward with a full statement
of the civil service in politics which
shows up the falsity of the charges
against Roosevelt in regard to Taft.
"The attempt that has been made for
many months and is still being made
to hurt President Roosevelt in the
good opinion of the people and to dls
3 credit Mr. Taft because part cf the fed
eral place holders work In politics for
Taft is not creditable to those who are
making it. The federal service has two
divisions. One Is the classified serv
ice, which Is covered by the merit sys
tem and now embraces' 190,000 places.
Over the head of every occupant of
these places hangs an ax, and if he
meddles in politics the ax falls and off
comes his head. This fact is never
mentioned by Mr. Bryan and Mr. Kern
and the haters of President Roosevelt
find Mr. Taft. Originally every place
holder was active in politics, and this
continued even after the adoption of
the merit system. Mr. Cleveland had a
rule of modified activity which he did
not enforce. He dismissed a republi
can and a democrat for violating that
rule, and then reinstated the democrat
left the republican out. When Mr.
Roosevelt became president the at
tempt to keep the entire service out
of politics had broken down. He took
a frank and open stand. No man in
the 190,000 places in the classified ser
vice should meddle in politics, but the
rest were left free to do so. I do not
believe that any federal place holder
should work in politics, and President
Roosevelt does not believe in. it, but
in his Judgment he carried the reform
as far as it could be carried at the
time. Considering the stupendous gain
which has been made, due more to
Roosevelt than to any other one In
fluence, no reformer who is not an in
grate will turn against him for this de
cision. The rest will come In good time
and eventually measures requiring
congressional action will be taken
whereby the entire service will In ef
fect be classified.
"It is true that a largo number of
members of the unclassified service
have worked in politics this year, but
they have been left entire freedom as
to whom they shall work for. The
charge that they have been "ordered"
to work either before or since the nom
inations for any particular man, or
that they have been used by President
Roosevelt in behalf of any man, or that
their freedom to work for any particu
lar man has' been in the slightest de
gree abridged or that they have been
in the least degree censured or would
have run the least danger of losing
their places for working for a man not
In favor with the president Is absolute
ly without foundation. They have
worked and now work, as they have al
ways worked. They have worked no
more than they have always worked,
and every man woh has been familiar
with the civil service or knows any
thing at all about It knows this to be
true."
But Mr. Swift does not stop here.
What would Bryan do?
What about Lamb and Taggart?
Says Mr.. Swift:
"Mr. Bryan Is silent as to what, if
elected, he proposes to do with the
classified civil service, which now em
braces 100,000 places. This part of the
service is covered by the merit. sys
tem. In 1896 and again in 1900 Mr.
Bryani boldly declared for the destruc
tion of that system. I gather from his
speeches that he has never been wrong
In any position he has taken on any
public question free trade, tariff re
form, free silver, public ownership of
railroads, and of course the merit sys
tem. If he has ever frankly confess
ed that he was mistaken on any ques
tion I have been unable to discover it.
Is he ready to confess that he was mis
taken in proposing to destroy the mer
it sytem in 1896 and in 1900? It Is not
an answer to say that the present Bry
an platform proposes to enforce the
law. That was In bothplatforms upon
which Cleveland was elected, and in
his first administration, thanks to his
party leaders the law went to the dogs
and when he enforced it in his second
administration his party kicked him
out and went over to Bryan. Cleve
land was a friend of the law. The rec
ord is that Bryan is its declared ene
my. "The history of civil service reform
bristles with examples of how the law
may be killed in administration. The
Gormans and the Voorheeses have
been succeeded by the Taggarta and
the Lambs, mortal enemies of the mer
it system, and these are the men who
are at the elbow of Mr. Bryan and who
have his ear today. Mr. Taft's record
needs no correction. In season and
out of season, openly and without re
servation, he has always been the out
spoken friend of the law. We know
what he will do. President Roosevelt
has done more for the merit system
than all other presidents together, and
Mr. Tint will continue this along with
the other Roosevelt policies. The
merit system now extends into every
corner of Indiana, and of the whole
country It has proved itself the most
democratic method of distributing pub
lic that has ever been- devised, and its
good economic results aro beyond ques
tion. It has opened a vast field of em
ployment which may be obtained with
out sacrifice of manhood before some
big or little political boss. Voters
who believe in this system and who
want to see it maintained can not af
ford to vote to place it under control
of its open enemies."
And Marshall says: "To the victor
belongs the spoils."
WARNINGS.
If there is anyone who believes that
the cold standard is a good thing, or
that it must be maintained, I warn
him not to vote for me, because !
promise him that it will not be main
tained in this country any longer than
I am able to get rid of It.
W. J. Bryan, at Knoxvllle, Tenn,
Oct. 5, 1896.
I notice that I am described by some
as a conservative. I am more radical
than I was In 1896 and have nothing
to withdraw on economic questions
which have been under discussion.
W. J. Bryan, sjfcondon, England, July
12, 1906.
Here are two unequivocal state
ments from Mr. Bryan. One In 1896
the other in 1906.
What is the logical Inference? That
Bryan is just as radical as ever. He
himself says so. He said it two years
ago. Not only was this on his return
from his world tour, but it was but a
few days before he uttered his views
about governmental ownership of rail
roads. That showed him as he really
is. A radical of radicals "with noth
ing to withdraw on economic ques
tions which have been under discus
sion." And yet these are the economic
questions which unsettled the whole
business world by mere contemplation
and dread of them. A debased cur
rency, a tariff for revenue only, and
governmental ownership of railroads!
Yet two years later, in this year of
our Lord 1908 comes this same Mr.
Bryan and poses for the matured man,
whose continental tour has sobered
him to such an extent that he refused
to put any of these exploded theories
into the platform which he himself
was the author of.
Be that as it may, no one can fail to
see the wavering course and the zlg
zag path that Bryan has followed. Mr.
Bryan himself has given the warning
that no one should vote for him who
did not want them put in effect. Shall
we believe Bryan's words, or shall we
think he is only talking for votes.
If he is merely talking without
meaning It, what sort of man is that
for the presidency.
If he means it, it means that he,
who has been twice repudiated, should
be defeated this year as before, as
the advocator of the most dangerous '
and Insidious perils which have ever
been advanced in the history of the
United States.
Take warning!
' Bryan himself has given it
If he is not sincere, what right has
he for your vote.
Take warning!
The Bryan of 1908 Is the Bryan of
1896," with nothing to withdraw on
economic questions which have been
under discussion."
Fores on the Piano.
It has been calculated that a min
imum pressure of the finger of one
quarter of a pound Is needed to sound
a note on the piano and that at times
a force of five pounds is thrown on a
single key to produce a single effect.
Chopin's last study in O minor has a
passage taking two minutes five sec- j
onds to play that requires a total pres
sure estimated at three full tons. Lon
don Standard.
Scott's Emulsion
does all it does by virtue
of one thing Power its
power to create power.
As fire turns water to
steam SO Scott's Emulsion
transforms thin, impure
blood into pure, rich blood,
giving nourishment and
vital energy to every
organ, every tissue and
every muscle.
Sen this MTvertiMOmt tosctber wftk same of
paper In which it appears, your ad Ji an ana four
ecata to cover pmtmr. aad we win send yea a
Vcmpteis Handy Atlas of the World." s
SCOTT t BOWNE. 409 learl Sweat New Task
PROUD OF HIS RECORD
A WOMAN LINGUIST.
Miss Elizabeth Colton Spsaks
Six
Languages Fluently.
Ktos Elizabeth S. Colton, a New
England girl, has just returned from
India with the reputation of being the
greatest woman linguist in the world.
Before going to India she was a stu
dent In the classes of the leading ori
entalists of the University of Berlin,
and before that she learned all that
Harvard and Yale had to give of in
struction in the languages of the east.
Her early education was musical.
modern languages being taken up as so j
many tools in her musical education. I
But her family objected to her chosen i
career of a concert singer, and to con-'
sole herself she took up the study of
oriental languages. j
Miss Colton first took up Semitic '
tongues and graduated with certificates
from the American Institute of Sacred
Literature in Hebrew, Arabic and As
syrian.' Then for two years she read
classical Arabic and Assyrian inscrlp- j
tlons with Professor Sanders of Tale
university. Four ye.rs . ago she. en
lerd Rtdtllffe coll(Lge a a BPeclal,Btu
dent and because there ere no class
es in the woman's college suited to her
needs recited with the men at Harvard
In Arabic, Pall and Sanskrit classes.
In an Interview rbe Is quoted as say
ing: "I have studied fifty-four languages
carefully and fifteen critically. Six I
speak fluently, if you will. I took con
versation lessons at Benares In San
skrit, bat no one could speak Sanskrit
with less than twelve years of practice.
"There are very many more lan
guages whose literature I read with
ease, whose script I have learned to
write and in which I could make my
self understood. But to speak fluently
Is quite another thing. I did receive
calls in Persian and entertained a
prince at afternoon tea In that lan
guage while I was at Peshawar. But
It would be absurd to claim that I can
speak Persian as well as Italian or
French or Oerman or the others of
which I really am mistress."
Tuesday.
The Ladies Aid society of the
South Eighth Street Friends church
will meet this afternoon at 1:30
o'clock at the church.
Wednesday.
The Woman's Home society of the
riiM ax. m. vuuivu win uieet lata a.i-;
ternoon at the home of Mrs. Frank
Bell, 17 North Twentieth street at 2:30
o'clock. j
The Epworth league of the First M.
E. church will have a Hallowe'en so
cial at the home of Miss Bessie Lint
ner on North Twenty-first street
Thursday.
Prayer meeting and Bible study at
the Fifth Street M. E. church tonight
at 7:30.
"'he church council of the First En
glish Lutheran church will meet to
night at 7 o'clock.
Mid week services will be held at
7:30 at the First English Lutheran
church.
Men's Union of the First English
Lutheran church will meet at 8:15 to
night Friday.
The ladies of the First English Lu
theran church will serve supper this
evening and have an apron sale. All
are cordially Invited.
Saturday.
The Ways and Means society of the
Fifth Street M. E. church will give a
Hallowe'en supper in the second room
from Fourth street The public Is in
vited. - MASONIC CALENDAR.
Wednesday Evening, Oct 23 Called
meeting of Webb lodge. No. 24, F. ft
A. M.. Fellowcraft degree.
Foley's Honey and Tar cures
coughs quickly, strengthens the lungs
and expels colds. Get the genuine in
yellow package. A. O. Luken ft Co.
Ir- :
1 rrh I olrtrKii" I
j vuui Vaitiiuai j
Heart to Heart
Talks.
By EDWIN A. NYE.
Copy rth t. 1908. by Edwin A. Nye.
GIVE YOUR. BOY HIS CHANCE.
Take care lest you handicap your
son.
THERE'S A MAN INSIDE OF HIM
if you can get the man out of him.
Now. manhood la made-rml. hut
effective process! by putting flesh and memorable event will surely tend to
6Dlrlt ud asralnst sham corners and.cement the bonds of friendship and
up
over fearful hurdles.
Naturally you feel as If you would
like to shield your child from the hard
ships your boyhood knew. But that Is
dangerous to the boy. Tou are likely
to coddle and weaken him.
Perhaps you let the chap sleep lats
of mornings and his mother keeps the
breakfast warm for him after the
others have eaten. And he comes
downstairs to find fault with his food
and talks saucy. Look out! You are
pampering the boy. You are pad
ding things in order to save him dis
comfort He spends money he does
cot earn. An estate Is being accumu
late for him.
All of which may be fatherly.
But very unwise.
Because you take away his chance
to make a man. If be 1s to grow man
liness he must strive against odds. He
cannot learn to swim without going
into the water.
You want to save him from suffer
ing? But suffering perfects character.
If your boy Is to know the worth of
a dollar he must earn It If he Is to
know the thrill of success he must
win it
And mark this
No man can get Into touch with
those who strive who himself does not
struggle. Lacking struggle, be will
lack sympathy. And without personal
touch and sympathy with others your
boy can never be a man among men.
You know that the world will give
bo man room who doesn't climb up to
get it Yet you keep your boy from
climbing becanse, perforce, he must
bll-ter his hands on the rounds.
"Hard lines" for your boy 1
Even so. It Is hard lines for you,
for me, for all of us. And we get self
reliance and the fiber of strength by
overcoming. Your boy Is no exception
to the hard rule.
Please remember this:
Your sun fa made of the same sort
of putty of which 'you are made. You
were molded into the shape of success
WHILE THE PUTTY WAS SOFT.
Let the boy be molded NOW. When
the material hardens It Is too late to
try to mold it .
Give your boy his chance.
r
Ood mm
THANKS TENDERED
10 THE PRESIDENT
Japanese Emperor Sends Word
Of Appreciation to
Roosevelt.
TAKAHIRA TAKES MESSAGE.
THOUGHT THAT MUCH HAS BEEN
DONE TOWARD MAKING JAPA
NESE AND AMERICANS GREAT
ER FRIENDS.
Washington. Oct. 27. "I suppose
heaven helps us to join our hands
firmly," said Japanese Ambassador
Korgor Takahlra with emotion, as he
discussed the visit of the American
fleet to Japan, which has just come
to au end. Ambassador Takahira had
a short while before returnins from
the White House, where he was the
guest of President Roosevelt at lun
cheon, and to whom he delivered a
message of thanks from the Japanese
emperor for that which the president
sent as the fleet departed. The Baron
personally thanked the president for
having sent the fleet to Japanese wat
ers, and said its visit had furthered to
a great degree-the feeling of friendli
ness held by the Japanese for the peo
ple of the United States. Mrs. Roose
velt was present at the luncheon.
The following is the text of the
message from the emperor which Am
bassador Takahira conveyed to Presi
dent Roosevelt:
"To the President of the United
States of America: I thank you most
sincerely for your very kind message
which the American ambassador de
livered to me upon the departure of
the American fleet from our shores.
I was highly gratified to learn that
the reception accorded to the fleet
was so satisfactory and agreeable to
you and to the people of the United
States. I desire to express my appre
ciation of your kindness in accepting
the invitation of my government for
the fleet to visit Japan, since by that
I was afforded an opportunity to tes
tify anew to you my high regard and
esteem, and my subjects were enabled
to give fresh proof of their sincere at
tachment for your countrymen, and I
am very happy to believe that the
good neighborhood between our two
countries. I remain your good friend,
Mutsuhito."
Sailors Cheer.
On Board the United States Battle
Ship Louisiana, at Sea, By Wireless to
Yokohama, Oct 27. The American
j battleship fleet half of .lt bound for
Amoy and the other half for the
Philippines, dropped its Japanese es
cort, consisting of the Katori, the
Tsukuba and a ecouF, at 10:30 o'clock
yesterday morning.
The Japanese admiral signaled, 1
"Oood-by; pleasant vojVge, and Rear
Admiral Sperry replied, "Thank you."'
As the Japanese fleet fore abeam
the crews of each American ship gave ,
three lusty cheers.
Very 8imple.
The mathematical professor became
engaged to a charming girl, and one
day they made an excursion into the
country with several friends. The girl
picked a daisy and, looking roguishly
at ber fiance, began to pull off the pet
als, saying, "He loves me not; he loves
me."
"That is needless trouble you are
giving yourself." said the professor.
"You should count up the petals of the
flower, and If the total is an nneveu
number the answer will be In the neg
ative; if an even number, in the affirm
ative." Catarrh Cannot Be Cured
with LOCAL APPLICATIONS, as they
cannot reach the seat of the disease.
Catarrh Is a blood or constitutional
disease, and In order to cure It you
must take internal remedies. Hall's
Catarrh Cure is taken internally, and
acts directly on the blood and mucous
surfaces. Hall's Catarrh Cure Is not a
quack medicine. It was prescribed by
one of the best physicians In this coun
try for years and is a regular prescrip
tion. It is composed of the best tonics
known, combined, with the best blood
purifiers, acting- directly on the muc
ous surfaces. The perfect combina
tion of the two Ingredients is what
produces such wonderful results In
curing Catarrh. Send tor testimonials
F.J. CHENEY & CO.. Props., Toledo, O
Sold by Drug-grists, price 75c
Take Hall's Family Pills for consti
pation. rv?
m BIMM L,
THE
Elderly Pcoplo
tjolpcd Froo
The last years of life are the sweet
est, and yet the most difficult to pro
long. It is then that the greatest care
is exercised in maintaining bodily
health. But the chief care should al
ways be with regard to the food you
eat and whether you are digesting it
properly. You should not allow your
self to become constipated.
No doubt you nave tried salts and
cathartic pills, purgative tablets, etc. and
have come to the conclusion that they are
violent tn action and do but temporary
I rood. Listen, then, to the voice cf ex
1 perience with regard to a wonderful andl
! tnild laxative. Dr. Caldwell's Syrup Pep
sin, it is not new, only we are trying
. lo find new friends for it.
A. A. Felts, of Johnston City. III., suf
fered from stomach trouble for si years
and found hla cure in Dr. Caldwell
Syrup rer'n. Hit wife usee It too wit
success. We could name hundreds of
others. Some hoard of It first through,
neighbors or friends; others through the
doctor s ofer to sead any sufferer frora a
stomach, liver or bowel complaint a free
ample bottle for trial, without charge.
If you will send your name and address
be wiU send you a trial bottle direct t
your home. If It proves itself as he
claims then continue the treatment by
buylnsr a 60-cei.t or $1 bottle of your
druggist, as all of them sell It. Old people,
like children, should look for purity, and
It Is well to mention that the purity of
this remedy Is vouched for with the U. S.
government. Also, though a free bottle
Is sent to prove its merits, results are
always guaranteed from the regular
bottles bought of druggists, who wlu re
fund your money if It does not satisfy
you. Bend at least for the free test bottle
today.
ir there u anything about
your ailment that you don't
understand, or if you want
any medical advice, .write
to the doctor, and he will
answer yon fully. There Is
no charge for this service.
The address Is Dr. W. B.
Caldwell. 601 Caldwell bid,
Montlcello. 1U.
John Was Wise.
MYou are not going to stay in town
late tonight, are you, JobuT"
"Not very late, dearest. I have to
help put a man through the third de
gree at the lodge. I'll come straight
borne as soon as It's over."
(Kindly, but firmly) "If you can re
peat the password, 'Six slim slick sap
lings, distinctly when you come home
from the lodge, hn, the servant will
admit you. and if you can't you needn't
ring. You'll stay outside all night, my
dear.
John came home early.-' Illustrated
Bits.
Woman Interrupts Political Speaker.
A well dressed woman Interrupted
a political speaker recently by contin
ually coughing. If she had taken Fo
ley's Honey and Tar it would have
cured her cough quickly and expelled
the cold from her system. The genu
ine Foley's Honey and Tar contains
no opiates and is in a yellow package.
Refuse substitutes. A. G. Luken &
Co.
K rrl ami 7or Indigestion.
Relieves sour stomach,
palpitation of the heart Digests what you eat
Pay Less
This Season
If you've decided on paying 12."
or $28 for your Fall Suit let m.
show you what he offer this season
Fall Suits worth as
high as $28 at
$18, $20, $22
Undoubtedly the best line ever dis
played at so low a price.
KRONE
The Tailor
12 N. Ninth St
New Corn
at
OMER G. WHELAH
Feed and Seed Store
S3 Sontb Ctb St.
Plume 1(79
Public scales for weighing.
II
YEBY HIGHEST QUALITY
i r i i i't ui
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