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The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1907-1939, December 12, 1908, Image 1

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Writes Insurance cf all kinds.
$.100 down rest on payments..
Phone 1318
WESTCOTT HOTEL CIGAR ANO
DO YOUR TRADIN(TNOW,H0-
ONLY 10 MORE SHOPPING DAYS UNTIL CHRISTMAS.
T
MOOT) PAIXAIIXTM
ANT) STTX-TPTAM.
VOL. XXXIV. NO. 34.
RICHMOND, IND., SATURDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 12, 11M8.
SINGLE COPY, 2 CENTS.
TT7'
Hd
BIG
PREPARES TO MAKE
CONGRESS
SQUIRM
WITH IT REPLY
Big Stick Overhauled and Con
gress May Think It Is Hand
ling a Warm Mexican
Tamale.
PRESIDENT ITCHING FOR
STILL ANOTHER FRAY
Would Teach Solons on Capi
tol Hill a Good Lesson in
Few Remaining Months of
Administration.
Washington, D. C, Dec. 12. Presi
dent Roosevelt is getting ready for
ftny emergency that may arise in con
nection with the congress' action in
appointing a committee to report what
action, if any, that body should take
Jn reference to objectionable words
used In the president's message of last
Tuesday. When Roosevelt heard of
the lower house's action yesterday af
ternoon he immediately began to
Cmear on the war paint.
The "big stick" was hauled out of
the closet and many of the knots
hich have been worn smooth by fre
Quent use were subjected to treatment
by the executive whittling knife, so
that when the weapon falls the impact
svlll be palpable to a painful degress
by those upon whom it descends.
Teddy Itches For Fray.
To tell the truth "Teddy" is actually
Itching for a genuine, old-fashioned
tussle with the solons on Capitol Hill,
evidently on the theory that he needs
R little more practice before tackling
the untamed things he encounters
next year in the African jungle.
For let no one imagine that Roose
velt intends to go voluntarily or be
rhoved into an eclipse against his will
, ,wtn the final quarter of the last .year of
bis administration.
It was by a unanimous vote that the
bouse adopted the resolution, although
there was no unseemly demonstration.
The members seemed to be impressed
with the solemnity of the proceeding,
the like of which has not been wit
nessed for 68 years; and on the last'
occasion John Quincy AdamB, the ex
president, who was rounding owt his
career as a member of the house, play
ed the same role that Mr. James B.
Perkins did in presenting the resolu
tion for the appointment of a commit
tee. Possibly the stillness and order
liness could be attributed in part to a
ubcutlcular quiver of apprehension
Jest the bogy man from the white
liouso suddenly might burst into the
Chamber and start a 6tampede.
: Roosevelt Quick to Act.
The tremulous sigh of relief follow-
f ng the adoption of the Perkins reso
lutions had scarcely died away when
the president began to get busy. He
sent for John E. Wilkie, chief of the
secret service, whom he directed to
prepare some data for use in the im
mediate future. The chief will get to
gether a mass of information pertain
ing to the operation of the service, in
x?rder to enable the president to dem
onstrate, if possible, that there was
Come . Justification for the earnest
though not exactly recherche manner
in which he discussed the secret ser
vice matter in his message. It is evi
dently the president's purpose to en
deavor to show that he was proceed
ing upon the. right principle in trans
ferring these men to the various de
partments, and that that was the only
way in which irregularities could be
detected to a certainty.
There is no doubt that he expects to
Jiand back to congress something as
tot as a Mexican tamale. The pres
ence of Speaker Cannon at the execu
tive offices about the time Chief Wil
kie was there was responsible for a
report, evidently authentic, that the
president has asked him to call for the
purpose of discussing the contemplat
ed rebuke from congress. It is signifi
cant that no one in authority at the
white house nor the speaker himself
denied that this was the snbject of
their conversation. What the' presi
dent said to "Uncle Joe" must be left
to the imagination for the time being,
although it is intimated that he assur
ed the speaker he was ready for a
tight or a frolic.
STATE OFFICIALS
TO VISIT DRUIDS
Entertainment for Them
Monday's Meeting.
at
At a meeting of the Druids next
Monday evening a number of the state
officials will be entertained. Among
those that are expected to be present
ire Henry Dittmer, of Anderson, noble
rand arch; G. M. Geider, of Indianap
olis, grand feecretary; Henry Schroed
rr, grand trustee and Harry Aring,
Jieputy noble grand Arch, the last two
peine residents of this city. -
BATTLESHIP GEORGIA
HAS SMALLPOX ABOARD
Vessel Arrives at
Ceylon.
Colombo,
Colombo. Ceylon, Dec. 12. The Unit
ed States battle ship Georgia arrived
today with a case of smallpox on
board. The ship is in one day in ad
vance of the remainder of the fleet.
ROOSEVELT AND ,
TAFT CONFER
Matters Relative to Next Ad
ministration Are Gone
Over.
TAFT'S PROBABLE CABINET
WEST AND NORTHWEST DESIRE
PLACES IN DIPLOMATIC SERV
ICEROOT CONFERS WITH
PRESIDENT-ELECT TODAY.
Washington, D. C, Dec. 12. Presi
dent Roosevelt and President-elect
William H. Taft had an extended con
ference last night at the White House.
Many matters relative to the present
and next administration were discuss
ed, not the least important of which
was a general talk regarding the Taft
cabinet.
The conference began after 10
o'clock, at the conclusion of a dinner
at the home of Assistant Secretary of
the Treasury and Mrs. Winthrop, at
tended by Mr. and Mrs. Taft. Before
the conference Mr. Taft announced
that it would be entirely an executive
ession, and that he should decline to
give any details whatever, aside from
the advance announcement that he
should talk over many important mat
ters with the president.
- Expect Talk With : Root. " "
Besides consulting with President
Roosevelt regarding various men who
may be available for cabinet positions
Taft today expected to have a confer
ence with Secretary Root.
During an interview between Mr.
Taft and Senator Aldrich the result of
the work of the monetary commission
was thoroughly gone over. Senator
Aldrich. it was learned, is a thorough
believer in the efficacy of the commis
sion, and is an enthusiastic advocate of
legislation which hall place into per
manent law, some of the" recommenda
tions which are to be made.
- Many After Cabinet Seats.
; Cabinet recommendations are being
made to the president-elect by many
callers, the northwest and the Pacific
coast being especially desirous of pre
ferment. The northwest wants repre
sentation in the diplomatic service.
LONG TRIAL LIKELY
Unless Keller, Alleged Murder
er, Pleads Guilty, Week
May Be Taken.
OTHER CASES POSTPONED.
Beginning with the Keller murder
case, there will be sessions of the
Wayne circuit court from Monday un
til the second Saturday following, with
the exception of Christmas day. It is
probable that if Sherman Keller per
sists in contesting the charge of first
degree murder placed against him,
the trial will require the greater part
of the week. Keller has retained
counel. Other important cases, which
have been docketed for trial and had to
be continued, will be called. The
court will attempt to get the docket as
nearly free from all cases as possible
by the time the January term opens.
Wild Ride on
Ira Swisher Rides Long Distance Clinging to Pullman as
Train Travels Through Storm. 50 Miles an Hour.
Loraine, O., Dec. 12. Locked on
the outside of a Pullman sleeper and
having but a narrow edge of step on
which to cling while the B. & O. flyer
cut the storm at the rate of 50 miles
an hour. Manager Ira Swisher, of
North Bros. Stock company at the Ma
jestic this week, had about as thrill
ing a ride Sunday night as might be
depicted in one of his shows on the
stage. At least he is thankful to be
in little old Loraine, well and alive,
even If the white still persists in
clinging to portions of his face, the
region of his unusually smiling mouth,
for Instance.
Manager Swisher, as is his invaria
ble custom, went to the baggage sec-
itioa of the train last night at Tiffin
CATHELL SPEAKER
AT BHr BANQUET
Richmond Man Touches Upon
Life of Lincoln at Feast
Of Indiana Society.
M'CUTCHEON TOASTMASTER
CREAM OF HOOSIER TALENT IN
LITERATURE REPRESENTED IN
ANNUAL SESSION ABOUT BAN
QUET BOARD LAST NIGHT.
"What are we of Indiana going to
do to honor the approaching centen
nial in memory of Abraham Lincoln?"
asked the Rev. J. Everist Cat hell, of
this city, at Chicago, last night. He
was speaking before the members of
the Indiana Society of Chicago. His
remarks turned the minds of his hear
ers from jest and gayety to serious
ness in response to the toast "A State
less Citizen of the Republic." He de
clared himself to be stateless, having
been born in the District of Columbia,
and reminded his hearers that Abra
ham Lincoln, also, was stateless.
The men assembled about the ban
quet tables represented the cream of
Hoosier talent in literature. Numbered
in the gathering, also, were bankers,
manufacturers - and merchants who
claim Indiana as the state of their na
tivity. Dr. Cathell is an ardent dis
cipleof Lincoln and probably is better
acquainted with the history of the
martyred president than any man ia
this section of the country.
In response to the toast Dr. Cathell
said:
"All that Abraham Lincoln ever
learned, for the most part, he got on
and from the soil of Indiana. There
he prepared himself for that leader
ship which has brought his memory
imperishable fame. There should be
a Lincoln schoolhouse in every city,
village and hamlet in Indiana. This
much Indiana should do to honor his
memory, and she should lead the
states in the observance of his anni
versary." -
A Chicago dispatch says of the ban
quet: -
Indiana invaded Chicago last night
and acquired by annexation for the
nonce that portion of the city which is
occupied by the Auditorium Annex. ho
tel, in general, and in particular that
part of the hotel which is designated
as the gold ballroom.
At least, annexation was declared by
the 300 members of the Indiana Socie
ty of Chicago, who still acknowledge
allegiance to the Hoosier state, at the
occasion of the fourth annual ban
quet of the society.
Of the good things eatable there was
plenty, of the good things convivial
there was nearly as much, but of good
things expressible there was most, and
these from George Ade, on the eve of
a trip abroad: Meredith Nicholson,
well-known authors; from Addison C.
Harris, former ambassador to Austria,
and from the Rev. J. Everist Cathell,
just "from Indiana."
Of things observable the chief was
a handsome de luxe menue and pro
gram, with drawings by Christy from
the literary works of Indiana authors
and novelists, the plates for which
were broken when the edition of 350
was run off.
It was President Joseph H. Defrees
who opened the program of speaking
and the feast of wit and humor and
oratory and stor ytelling began with
the Introduction of George Barr Mc
Cutcheon as toastmaster. The novel
ist met with a hearty round of ap
plause, and then with sober face and
mirthless mien proceeded to encourage
his fellow Hoosiers to apoplectic
laughter.
OUT OF QUARANTINE.
The family of B. A. Kennepohl, of
South Sixth street, has been released
from quarantine. A little daughter of
Harry Kennepohl had been iM with
scarlet fever.
PUGILIST DIVORCED.
Chicago, III., Dec. 12. John L. Sul
livan, champion pugilist, was today
granted a divorce from Annie Sullivan
his wife.
Step of Flyer
to see that the company's props were
properly loaded Into the cars. He lin
gered a little too long and had but
time to grab the handle of a sleeper
as it sped past him. With the train
gathering momentum at every in
stance, too late to drop off, he found
the door locked.- For eight miles he
pounded on the door without gaining
any response, the steep banks of deep
cuts in the road just grazing him.
One bridge he just saw in time to
squeeze up against the door and keep
from being swept into the river be
low. His poundings were at last
heard by members of the company
and he was released from his perilous
position, a wet and bedraggled speci
men of humanity, but a.fery thankful
on at tbat
v. (
GERMAN SHIP
GOES AGROUND
May Be Gotten Off New York
Sand Bar.
New York, Dec. 12. The German
Steamship Harburg with a crew of
forty men and a cargo of five thous
and tons of pipe clay, ran aground on
the sandbar off Belt port, Long Island,
this morning. The ship may be safe
ly gotten off, if a storm don't break
out. A dense fog prevails and work
Id hampered.
POLITICS MAY
ENTER IH FIGHT
County Local Option Fight to
Present Unusual Sit
uation. REVENGE IS SOUGHT.
CLAIMED BY SOME REPUBLICANS
THAT TEMPERANCE WORKERS
FAILED TO KEEP THEIR PLEDG
ES LAST ELECTION.
Those who are behind the move
ment to drive the saloons out of the
county are greatly alarmed over the
prospects of the movement, principal
ly because of the attitude taken by a
large number of republicans. Every
effort has been made by the county
local option workers to keep politics
out of the campaign against the sa
loons but this now appears to be a
hopeless task.
"We lined up wilh the temperance
people this fall and were defeated at
the polls because many of the temper
ance voters who promised us their
support turned us down and voted the
prohibition ticket. They turned us
down now we will turn them down
and vote wet," is what many staunch
republicans throughout the county are
saying. This is where politics is
creeping iuto the' anti-saloon tarn
paign. To these disgruntled republicans the
mention of the Indiana Anti-Saloon
league has about the same effect a
red flag has on a bull. They say that
the league promised to deliver the
temperance vote if a county local op
tion plank was embodied in the repub
lican platform. They say the republi
can party carried out its agreement
but the league failed to produce the
strength it claimed to have and Mar
shall was elected governor.
Situation in Franklin Tp.
A well known young republican of
Franklin township was in the city last
evening. He stated that the drys
would carry the township in the event
of an election but that they would
only have a small majority. He said
many republicans would vote wet be
cause of the feeling against the tem
perance people.
"No petition has been circulated in
Franklin township asking that a coun
ty local option election be held. Sev
eral of the temperance people in
Franklin township have attended tem
perance meetings in Richmond but
that is the only sign of interest dis
played in the campaign so far," re
marked the man referred to. He is
known as a liberal. Temperance peo
ple in Franklin township state that
that township has always been dry
and it will give a large temperance
majority.
III JW YORK
Body of One Found in Room
With Throat Cut From
Ear to Ear.
NO CLUE TO IDENTITY.
THE SECOND VICTIM WAS FOUND
ON STREET CAR TRACKS, BODY
EVIDENTLY HAVING BEEN
PLACED THERE AFTER CRIME.
New York, Dec. 12. Two mysterious
murders, both victims being young
women, are baffling the police today.
In a padlocked room at 337 East Elev
enth street, a pretty girl was discover
ed this morning. with her throat; cut
from ear to ear. The police are seek
ing a man who rented the apartment
and lived as man and wife with the
victim for a month, but disappeared
two weeks ago. At this time it is sup
posed the murder was committed.
Handsome gowns and dianionds were
Included In her wardrobe, but nothing
assists in the identification. '
The second victim was discovered in
a horribly mutilated condition on the
Third avenue street car tracks, where
the body had evidently been placed
after the crime was committed. The
body shows evidence of refinement,
but the remains are as yet anidenti-
WOMBT
MORDERED
T OF DEATH
AT LAST CAPTORED
Chicago Butcjher Boy Wrote
Blackmailing Letters, Us
ing Threat of Death.
'DID IT JUST FOR FUN."
WILLIAM J. POLLARD ROBBED
CEMETERY OF BONES TO BE
SENT WITH LETTERS IS THE
YOUNG MAN BRIGHT?
Chicago, 111., Dec. 12.-William J.
Pollard, a butcher boy of Evanston,
last night confessed the authorship of
(he mysterious "Knights of the White
Death" letters which have been re
ceived by five prominent Chicagoans at
intervals during the last four ninths.
The confession was obtained by
Chief Postoffice Inspector James E.
Stuart, who made the arrest with the
aid of the Evanston police after two
weeks of personal work on the case.
Pollard said he got human bones and
coffin handles and other trimmings
from old graves at Calvary cemetery,
where his father was sexton for twen
ty years. These he attached to the
letters, which in each case demanded
large sums of money on pain of death.
He alone, he declared was "The
Knights of the White Death." He
never had .breathed a word of his plot
to a living soul.
He Just Wants to Annoy Police.
The boy claimed his only object In
writing the letters was to start trouble
for the police, get his name in the
newspapers, and prove he had a cun
ning mind something which many of
his friends appear to have disputed.
He had no knowledge of or enmity
against the persons to whom he ad
dressed the letters. Never, he said,
did he receive a cent of money, or ex
pect to. It was all a joke.
The postoffice officials do not con
sider it a joke, although they have not
decided what disposition to make of
the young man. He is 22 years old
He was traced through his handwrit
ing, after a long search by Inspector
Stuart, through the north side and
Evanston public schools..., He gained
his letter writing Idea from wading
one of Conan Doyle's stories and mod
eled his letters from a series of sto
ries about the "Red Hand," which ap
peared in a Chicago morning newspa
per.
Boy Names His Victims.
He confessed writing letters to these
persons:
The Rev. D. P. Roberts. pastor of
Quinn chapel, demanding that $.KX be
placed in the entrance to the public
vault at Oakland cemetery, or death
would follow.
The Rev. A. C. Dixon, pastor of Moo
dy church, demanding that $1,000 be
placed at the entrance to the church
or the church would be blown up.
Dr. Adolph Gehrmann. 3816 Ellis av
enue, demanding that $500 be placed in
a cigaT box and put in the confessional
at St. Jariath's Roman Catholic
church. Falling to do this. Dr.
Gehrmann, his mother and father were
to be killed and their home destroyed.
This letter was written on Sept. 29, the
day after Dr. Gehrmann killed Louis
Louterbach, a burglar.
Assistant Chief of Police Herman F.
Schuettler, demanding that $700 be left
in the confessional of St. Ambrose's
Roman Catholic church, or a bomb
would end the assistant chiefs life.
The Rev. William O. Waters, rector
of Grace Episcopal church, demand
ing that $500 be placed In the middle
of the bridge over the Lincoln park
lagoon. Otherwise Dr. Waters was to
be killed and his church made unsafe.
IS
Man Convicted of Rifling-Mail
Sacks Sent to Fort
Leavenworth.
BROTHER OF C. B. HUNT
Four years of hard labor at the fed
eral prison at Ft. Leavenworth, Kan.,
is the fate of a former resident of
Richmond and Franklin township, this
county, Daniel B. Hunt, who is a
brother of Clayton B. Hunt and an un
cle of Lester Hunt, of this city.
Theoffense committed by Hunt was
the rifling of mail sacks and taking
money from letters, which crimes he
committed while employed in the
postoffice at Hammond, Ind.
He was arrested about two months
ago and Thursday of this week he was
arraigned in the federal court at In
dianapolis. Hunt entered a plea of
guilty and was promptly sentenced to
a long term in the Ft. Leavenworth
prison. "
Hunt was well known in this city
and in Franklin township, and had
many friends, who were shocked to
learn of his acts and the terrible pun
ishment meted out to him. He left
this county several years ago, but last
fall attended a family reunion held in
Franklin township. It is not known
how much money he obtained by steal-J
ng from the malls. -
NIGH
WAYNE
COU TIAII
REBELS ROUTED BY
PERSIAN TROOPS
v
Insurrection Culminates in a
Battle Today.
Odessa, Dec. 12. The insurrection
movement throughout Persia, culmi
nated in a battle with loyalists today.
The rebels were put to rout with
many killed and wounded.
I
INSURGENTS PLAN
TO REVISE RULES
Congressmen Meet in Secret
And Appoint Committee to
Draft Changes.
NOTHING AGAINST CANNON
ALTHOUGH IT WAS CONCENSUS
OF OPINION THAT PRESENT
SYSTEM SHOULD BE CHANGED,
UNCLE JOE ESCAPED LASHING.
Washington. Dec. 12. The fight for
a revision of the rules of the house of
representatives was inaugurated last
night at a meeting of the so-called
"Inurgents." attended by 25 republican
representatives.
Representative Hepburn, of Iowa,
presided, and was authorized to name
committee of five, with himself
chairman, to draft the proposed
amendments to the rules and report to
the organization on Tuesday night.
The "Insurgents met In the inter
state and foreign commerce committee
room about S o'clock, and were en
gaged In considering the various sug
gestions for more than two hours.
Those interested in the movement
have been proceeding quietly with
itheir plans, with the apparent uurnose
of increasing their numbers suffi
ciently to be able to control the situa
tion by joining the democrats In a
fight on the rules.
Claim of Insurgents.
The "insurgents" claim that in the
present congress they need but 27 re
publicans to join the democrats in or
der to bring about a change in the
rules, while In the Sixty-first con
gress, they say, they will need but 21
republican members.
While several of those present at the
"insurgent" meeting are for Cannon
for speaker, they made it plain that
they greatly desire a change in the
rules. m
"There were no expressions except
those of friendly feelings to the speak
er," said Mr. Hepburn, after the meet
Ing. "No one said anything against
Mr. Cannon." He said the general
feeling was that if under the rules the
house must have a despotic leader
there was no one they, would rather
have than "Uncle Joe."
To Regulate Rules. ,
The election in like manner of a
committee on committees, to perform
duties similar to a similar body in the
enate, also has been proposed by the
leaders in the movement. Another
plan proposed is to set two Thursday's
apart each month for the considera
tion of bills on the house calendar and
the remaining Thursdays for the con
sideration of measures on the union
calendar.
None of those at the meeting would
state whether it was intended to bring
the matter to an issue in the present
session of congress or not until after
the new congress is convened. No In
diana congressmen were at the meet
ing.
SANTA CLAUS'
MAIL PROBLEM
Disposition Not Determined
.By Meyer.
Washington, Dec. 12. Postmaster
General Meyer, has not decided wheth
er he will issue an order similar to the
one he issued on Dec 13, last, which
provides that letters addressed unmis
takably to "Santa Claus" may be deliv
ered to any regularly organized char
itable society. The postmaster gen
eral has received numerous communi
cations both for and against the reis
suance of the order and is now giving
consideration to them before taking
any definite action.
THE WEATHER PROPHET.
INDIANA Fair Saturday night and
Sunday; moderate temperature;
west winds shifting to southwest
; and increasing.
OHIO Fair Saturday night' and Sun
day; moderate temperature; fresh
west wind becoming variable.
REPUBLICANS IN
HOUSE WILL NOT
'I IDLE
Democrats Will Be Kept on
Alert or They Will Find They
Will Lose Out on Many
Propositions.
BETTER POLITICS
PLAYED BY G. 0. P. MEN
Party, However, Can Do But
Little on Election of Speak
er and Senate More
Judgeships Planned. .
By Special State Correspondent.
Indianapolis. Doc. 12. Announce
ment was made today that the republi-
can members of the house of repre
sentatives will hold a conference in
this city on Wednesday, December, 23.
It will be the
purpose of this
meeting to talk
over plans for
the coming ses
sion of the leg
islature and to
outline the pol
icy to be pursu
ed by the minor
ity side of the
houe.
Of course, the
republicans in
the house, as
far as numbers Ellis Stories.
is concerned, will amount to about as
much as the democratic minority in
the senate. But there are some good
fighters among them and they will at
least be able to keep the democrats
from getting sleepy during the ses
sions.' It Is a notable' fact, and has al
ways been, that the generalship of the
republicans In the legislature has been
better than that of the democrats. It
seems that the republican members
are more keen to grasp a situation
and to work a trick to their own ad
vantage than are the democratic mem
bers. In other word6. the repubicans
play better politics. This is the rea
son why It is pointed out that unless
the democratic majority keeps its best
eye open, it will find itself shoved in
a hole a dozen times a day.
There is little, in fact, practically
nothing, the republicans can do on the
important questions of who shall be
speaker or who shall be United States
senator. All they can do Is to vote
for the losing candidate, and there is
not much consolation In that.
The call was Issued by Luraan K.
Babcock, representative from La
Grange and Steuben counties. Bab
cock is- private "secretary to Governor
Hanly.
Mayors' "Love Feast,"
- The meeting of mayors of Indiana
cities, which has been called by Mayor
Becker, of Hammond, for the fifteenth
of this month in this city, will probab
ly be a love feast more than anything
else. The call states that the pur
pose is to start a movement for the
repeal .of that part of the cities and
towns law which prevents a mayor
from being elected to succeed himself.
As the law now stand a mayor servett
a term of four years and cannot be
re-elected for a succeeding term,
though he be again elected after a
four years wait.
Many of the mayors of the cities
in the state are of the opinion that
they should not be bound up in this
manner. ' They argue that they are
just as competent to fill the office at
the end of four years as they were at "
the start, and that they should be
allowed to hold the office another
term If they can be elected. They are.
satisfied to hold on if they have th
chance.
It is expected that when they come
together here next week the mayors
will all take kindly to the proposition
and line up for such an amendment to
the law.
Halleck May Start Something.
Senator Abe Halleck, of Rensselaer,
has up his sleeve a bill which he says
he will introduce that will probably
raise a lot of smoke. Halleck wants
each county to have Its own circuit
court judge. But he would not have
any judge serve in the county in which
he resides. This would make it neces
sary for a judge to leave home and
remain away in another county during
all the time be was holding court.
But, Halleck argues, it would fix
things so that no one could say that
any judge was prejudiced or biased
because of local conditions.
Halleck's plan would create about
twenty-five more judgeships in th
state and while many of the counties
affected will surely favor the passage
of such a bill in order to get a court
of his own. there will be raised the
cry of extravagance, and this may
hurt the bills chances. But Halleck
says he will push it, just the same.
REMAII
v
i

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