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The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1907-1939, December 13, 1908, SECTION TWO, Image 14

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86058226/1908-12-13/ed-1/seq-14/

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THE RICHMOND PAIXADIUM AN:
1 Fo Co FREEDGEM Q0 1 1
. i i 5
a
Men's $30 and $28 Overcoats For
These Overcoats are all this Season's Styles, light, heavy
weight for both dress or out of doors, come in blacks or
novelties, to close out during Closing Out Sale, for
en's $25 and $22.50 Overcoats
At great Closing Out Sale prices, all the newest novelties,
Blacks, etc., latest fashion. To think of it, the lot for
only, each .
mm
en's $20 and $18 Overcoats For
High Grade Men's Overcoats, this season's latest styles and
patterns, the long box or semi-fitting coat at closing out
prices for only ...
$023
TDK U ft
We are going out of the ready-made suit and overcoa
high grade Tailor Made Suits and Overcoats, in connectic
present stock of ready-mades, and in order to do so we wi
Regardless of cost, at unheard of price reductions, every sc
such well known makes as Stein-Bloch, L. Adler & Bro., VI
and this means we will sell clothing at the lowest prices
Yes, think of it! Thirty days to sell this $15,000 stock. So
& MJL of-TOO
And get a Winter Suit or Overcoat for prices you never be
nnd fnma nrinnpoi1 fg not ttio nrontoct lrkttiinrr vnlnoc -rrJ
nor oe disappointed. Glance over these prices
mm
WH
MEN
TELLS
SHUHCHURCHES
Claimed Reforms Are Needed
In Aristocratic Con
gregations.
HINT AT "UNDESIRABLES."
HYPOCRITES CAUSE OF MANY
MEN STAYING FROM HOUSE OF
GOD FACES OF POOR ARE
GROUND BY MANY.
Chicago, 111., Dec, 12. Too much, at
tention to ' nonreliglous problems,
wrong methods la handling boys in
the Sunday school, wrong financial
system, materialistic ideals and reten
tion of unfit members were among the
causes given for the absence of men
from the churches by the Rev. John A.
Earl at the Belden Avenue Baptist
church. He spoke on "Is the Church
Effeminate?"
He said:
"Is the church effeminate? This
question Is called out by the fact that
in the Protestant churches of the Unit
ed States there are 13,000,000 women
and only several million men.
"As I see it the church will have to
reform most radically In some things
before men will be captured In large
numbers.
Architecturally Defective.
"Most churches are architecturally
defective. Art glass, gothic arch,
caulted ceiling, cathedral style, were
all right for a day when God was sup
posed to be shut up within four walls
and worshipped only In that place one
day in seven. , But in this practical
age, when the body Is as- sacred as the
soul, utility must be the first and last
consideration in church building.
"Most churches are financially em
barrassed. By failure to educate the
membership in giving and by poor
business administration the men who
are able to pay are burdened unneces
sarily. Thi3, of course, has a tenden
cy to keep men out o fthe church.
"Some churches are socially frigid.
There has been much Improvement
here during the last few years, but
there is still room for better things
on this line.
Social Warmth Required.
"A few churches in their hysteria to
catch men have gone to extremes in
providing smokers and permitting
smoking while the minister preaches
and the vaudeville choir sings. No
self-respecting man requires any such
sacrifice of reverence in order to pro
mote social fellowship. Social
warmth crowing out of spiritual sin
cerity and honest desire to help peo
ple are all that is required of any
church.
"How far the weakness and the phil
osophizing and the doubts of the mod
ern pulpit have to do with the atti
tude of men toVard the church, I am
not able to say. One of my corre
spondents is frank enough to say, how
ever, 'There is too much philosophy
and not enough gospel in the pulpit
message.' '
Manly Teacher Needed.
"It Is far more likely that the lack
of male members in the church is
traceable to the teaching of the Sun
day school rather than to the preach
ing of the pulpit. Give the boys man
ly teachers with resourcefulness and
tact and spiritual power and they will
hold the boys and win them to Christ
and the church.
"Another thing that has its effect in
keeping men out of the church Is the
fact that some men are retained in the
church when they ought to be cast
out. What respect can a man of the
world have for the church when it re
tains in membership and often honors
the men who grind the faces of the
poor and in greed violate every prin
ciple of Jesus Christ?
Charges Against Society.
"There are three charges to be laid
at the door of society for the absence
of men in church life, and these
charges lie in the region of education
.ideals and morals.
"If the average girl in the house
were allowed the same liberty and
placed under the same moral stand
ards as the boy it Is likely that she
would not be found in the church In
any larger proportion than the boy?
We throw around our daughters every
safeguard and the boys are allowed to
run the streets and sow their wild
oats unsparingly. Thus the boy is lost
to the Sunday school and lost to the
church, while the girl, educated to be
modest and religious and virtuous, is
kept within thfe fold. ,
Blame Put on Saloons.
"If the church could have the 600,
000 male drunkards sobered and saved
and baptized into fellowship, and the
thousands of men in our penitentiar
ies added to the number of men al
ready in the churches and the multi
tudes of males who are found tonight
in saloons, gambling joints and flesh
markets, the balance of the sexes
would soon be eiual in the member
ship of the church. So long as the
200,000 saloons of the United States
are permitted to debauch and crimin
alize thousands of our boys and men
every year, the church will suffer for
the want of masculinity in its mem
bership." Draws Lesson From Gem.
Dr. Frank Gunsaulus drew a lesson
from the Cullinan diamond in his ser
mon at the Central church in the Auditorium-
i
"It took ages and ages to make this
diamond, he 6aid. "God cannot him
self make a great character In one
generation. We are prone to expect
by some sudden movement we can
generate an American, but it must
come, like the diamond, by development."
UNKNOWN MILLIONAIRE
. LEA VES $10,500,000 ESTA TE
London, Dec. 12. The romance of
commerce and Its occasional great re
ward are exemplized in a striking de
gree in the life story of John Stefano
vitch Schilizzi, the "unknown" city
millionaire, who died on Oct. 13, a- the
age of 68 and left a fortune of $10,500,
000. Mr. Schilizzi for a time assisted his
father, who had a prosperous business
as general merchant at Constantino
ple, and then came to London to join
bis uncle, who traded as Schilizzi &
Co., and did a large trade in exporting
Manchester goods to the East. When
the uncle retired John Schilizzi. with
his brothers, Demetrius and Paul, took
over the business.
Their trade soon rapidly expanded,
branch houses being opened in Man
chester and Calcutta. Twenty-fivo
years ago the firm of Schilizzi Bros.,
was one of the best known in the city
and shortly afterward the three broth
ers having made ample fortunes, de
cided to, retire.
Demetrius, who was a bachelor, went
to live in Paris.- He was generous to
his fellow countrymen and built a
6tately Greek church in mat city.
When he died fourteen years ago he
left $0,000,000 to his brother John,
who also inherited another $5,000,000
on the death of his brother Paul.
John Stefanovitch Schilizzi, who was
married and bad a son and daughter,
continued to reside in this country,
having a town house at yi Cromwell
road and a country house at Hasle
mere, Surrey.
After his retirement he still kept an
office in the 6ity and up to a few days
before his death came into the city ev
ery morning, but he never stayed be
yond lunch time. As he neither spec
ulated on the stock exchange nor took
part In the business life of the city, he
was practically unknown to the pres
ent generation of city men..
Mr. Schilizzi's old time associates in
the city, who knew of the large lega
cies which he had received, and of his
own wealth, so far rrom being sur
prised at the amount of his fortune, ex
pected that it would have been greater
than has proved to be the case. But
Mr. Schlizzi probably alone knew of
the extent of his benefactions.
Apart from minor gifts, he has left
his wealth in equal shares to his wid
ow and his two children, a son and a
daughter.
Men's $15.00 Overcoats For
This line of $15 Overcoats have no superiors, made by the
best clothing makers in the country. Come in Plain Black
or Novelties, closing out prices are .
BANDIT
IS
WOUNDED
Attempt to Slay Notorious
Chief Who Kidnapped
Miss Stone.
PEASANTS HIS VASSALS.
Sofia, Dec. 12. An attempt was
made to assassinate Sandansky yester
day in Salonika. The Bulgarian chief
was seriously wounded.
This is an act of vengeance on the
part of the Sarafoff party who have
not forgotten the murder of their lead
er by Eandansky's agents.
The most famous revolutionary lead
er of Bulgaria in Macedonia, San dan s
ky's most famous exploit in Europe
was his kidnapping Miss Stone, the
American missionary In 1903, hold
ing for ransom.
It was his lieutenant Panitza, who
shot Boris SarafofT. Sandanskys or
ganization is rightly credited with that
assassination; Panitza was merely the
agent. Sandansky controlled the Ser
res district of Macedonia, and his rule
was so firmly established that the rival
organization could not enter there. He
has now adopted the Young Turkey
Idea, and is hand In glove with the
party.
All along tha frontier he has estab
lished a complicated network of out
posts and points with hundreds of reg
ularly paid agents and adherents. The
pay of these agents is by no means
nominal, the "deputy chief at Zed
jene, for example, receiving $15 a
month, a respectable Income in a prim
itive Balkan village. Two districts
alone of Sandansky's "realm" have an
annual budget of over $20,000. )
The question naturally arises. Where
does all this money come from? The
answer is, from the Macedonian peas
ants themselves, who are quite will-,
ing to pay an annual tribute to the
revolutionary leader in return for his
protection against their enemies, the
Turkish authorities and bandits alike, j
Sandansky guarantees the lives and
property of the villagers, avenges their
wrongs, administers a kind of military j
justice, and even provides for the edu-j
cation of the children. The peasants, !
on their side, yield him the implicit
obedience of medieval vassals to their
lord.
Why H Hustled.
"So you're looking for a Job, Itas
tus?" "Tas, sah. Tou see, I'm done ma'ried
a gal who am an ahtist at da tub and
makes good wages."
"And you want her to quit work?"
"Oh, no. sun. Tisn dat. but I'a
feared Ah'l git classed 'mongst dem j
Idle rich cf Ah doan' hustle. Phila
delphia Ledger.
Stella la she a souvenir fiend? Bella ;
Dreadful: The last dinner she at-t
tended sh carried away the cook.
Excbaaf.
Ellen's $12.50 Overcoats For
This great Sale gives every man an opportunity to purchase
high grade Overcoats for prices next to nothing. See
these Bargains at closing out prices, at only
Men's $10.00 Overcoats
We are going to close 'em out, the whole lot, including Blacks
and Novelties, heavy weights, your choice of any one
of this lot for
Men's $8.00 Overcoats
A good substantial Overcoat, will keep you warm, and think
of it the price every one of the lot is worth more than
the original price. They all go for only
F.
THE MEW
O
c
c
918 Main Street
i

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