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The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1907-1939, January 27, 1909, Image 4

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PAGE FOUR.
THE 'RICHMOND 'PALLADIUM AND SUN-TELEGRAM, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1909
The Richmond Palladium
and Sin-Telegram
Published and owned by the PALLA
DIUM PRINTING CO. Issued 1 v
days each week, evenings
and Sunday morning.
Off lee Corner North 9th and A utreeta.
Home Phone 1121.
HICHMONP. INDIANA.
Itsdoteh G. Leeds BfaactBS Editor.
Charles M. Meraraa BasUseas Msssetr.
O. Own Kaha Bfews Editor.
SUBSCRIPTION TERMS.
In Richmond 15.00 per year (In ad
vance) or 10c per week.
MAIL. SUBSCRIPTIONS.
One year. In ndvanee ....... 95.04
Six months,. In advance .......... 2.0
One month. In advance .44
RURAL. ROUTES.
One year. In advance ............$2.00
Six months, In advance 1-23
One month. In advance 25
Address changed as often as desired;
both new and old addresses must be
given.
Subscribers will pleane remit w!th
order, which thouM given for a
specified term; name will r.ot oe enter
ed until payment is received.
Entered at Richmond. Indiana, post
office as second class mall matter.
COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS.
The educational bill before the
state legislature is in some measure
the work of local men in educational
circles. The object of it Is of course
to raise the standard of our schools.
No part of our school system in this
state is more dependent on the quali
fications of the man than is the coun
ty division under the county superin
tendent. This bill to raise the stan
dard of the man at the head of the
county schools is good in many re
spects and picks out the flaw under
which our school system has labored
for many years.
Subjoined is an editorial which we
reprint from a recent Issue of the In
dianapolis News, which covers the sit
uation thoroughly:
The bill drawn by the Btate board
of education and the County Super
intendents' association providing for
higher qualifications for county super
intendents and for three years' exper
ience in teaching school is before the
legislature. The bill alary 'Lablishes
a graduated system of salaries, based
on the population of the counties. At
present a common school license is
the only qualification prescribed by
law. . This is no guaranty that the
county superintendent has any know
ledge of high school subjects, yet he
Is a supervisor of high schools as well
as of elementary schools. The pres
ent law gives him the duty of licens
ing high school teachers without de
manding proof that he has sufficient
scholarship to grade their manu
scripts. In Marion county, e, g., their
are thirteen high schools outside In
dianapolis, most of which are com
. missioned or certified. 1 Outlining the
course of study, selecting text-books,
and supervising the teaching of these
schools are in the hands of the coun
ty superintendent. Surely he should
be required to show in advance of tak
ing the office that he has adequate
knowledge and professional training
to perform such duties. Two years
ago the general assembly increased
the requirements for teaching. The
present legislature would take a for
ward step in raising the standard for
county superintendents.
By the present law all county super
intendents receive the same rate of
pay $4.50 a day for each day they are
actually employed. The superinten
dent of Ohio county, with thirty teach
ers, receives the same rate of com
pensation as the superintendent of a
county with 200 teachers. This rate
may be adequate in the smaller coun
ties. But in the larger counties, at
least where practically all the time
of the officer must be given to his
official duties, it is hardly possible to
engage the services of a fit man for
such pay. At any rate, it is no more
reasonable to pay: all county superin
tendents, whatever their responsibilit
ies, at the same rftte than.it would be
to pay all principals of high schools
In the state at the same rate. Either
the state should fix salaries on a rea
sonable graduated basis or empower
the county authorities to fix the rate
of pay. . : "
FORUM OFTHE PEOPLE
A Word'to the Editor:
The voters and women of Richmond
have been warned not to permit them
selves ' to be stampeded into lending
their support to driving out the law
abiding, well regulated saloons and
driving in law violating blind tigers,
etc. v';. 7"
Permit me to give you my experience
In this line. As a brother editor I
know you will accord me the courtesy
of a few inches of space In your val
uable paper.
It is a matter of history and common
knowledge over the state of Indiana
that the saloons in Boone, Adams
county, were not closed without a ter
rific battle and fierce fight. After the
"dry'" had won a permanent victory
over the legalised saloons, blind tigers
and joints flourished until February,
1907,. when the blind tiger law was
enacted. As soon as that law was in
force , we took steps to clean house,
ind it did not take the county sheriff,
nor a prosecuting attorney, nor a po
liceman to do It. - I swore out the
search warrant myself and had it
served on a man who was a constable,
ind who had himself been running a
blind tiger for a long time, until the
jourt finally gave him a $10O fine and
i 30 day Jail sentence on two cases
Uch at one clip. I instructed the
'Squire before whom I swore out the:
search warrant to serve it on this mau
because I was afraid he would inter
fere with the raid and cause trouble,
and so I thought the best way to get
rid of him was to make him help.
When the 'Squire read the paper to
him there was just one of three things
left for him to do. He had to take his
choice from serving or resigning his
office, or forcing impeachment pro
ceedings. He weighed the matter for
a long time and finally chose to serve.
He appointed two of his friends as
deputies-and , thought they - would go
through the motions and make a sham
search without finding anything. But
I went with the fellows and compelled
them to open every box and cupboard
and cooler, made them break into the
storage room against . their protests,
and the men who had no more thought
of making a real raid than of Jumping
to the moon, helped to carry out one
keg of whisky, thirty bottles of rum
and brandy, two jugs of wine, twenty
gallons and thirteen pints of hop
cream made by the Marion brewing
company, and 48I bottles of the Gross
er brand Toledo beer.
What can be done in Berne can be
done elsewhere. That stock of wet
goods was poured out into the street,
and Berne has since then been a prac
tically dry town, as dry as you can
make them with wet towns surround
ing you.
If our present blind tiger law is not
effective enough to reach and convict
all illegal sellers of liquor, it will be
made more effective as soon as its in
efficiency has been sufficiently proved.
The way to improve a poor law is to
make much use of it. and constantly
expose its weakness. That's the way
the Nicholson remonstrance law was
strengthened and made effective by
the passage of the Moore amenhment.
Complaints have been made in some
places about officials who are slow to
do their duty or absolutely refuse to
do it. There is a remedy for this.
Our county seat. Decatur, had such a
mayor, and a little over a year ago he
was impeached and put out of busi
ness. He is now a traveling salesman
for a liquor house.
The people are the boss in this
state and majority rule is the boast
of this country. The government of a
town or city or state is seldom better
nor worse than the prevailing public
sentiment of the respective commun
ity. FRED ROHRER.
Editor Berne Witness.
Centerville, Ind., Jan! 19.
flO RECOGNIZANCE
PAPERS FOR HER
Eaton Woman Preferred to
Remain in Jail Than to
Accept Parole.
WAS CONFINED 2 MONTHS
HOWEVER MRS. SCHILLING,
CHARGED WITH CARRYING CON
CEALED WEAPONS REFUSED TO
PLACE NAME ON "ANY PAPERS"
Eldorado, O., Jan. 27. The refusal of
a prisoner to sign a recognizance bond
for release from jail was an unusual
Incident that occurred in the common
pleas court at Eaton yesterday. It
was a most unusual event. .
Mrs. Lydia M. Shilling, confined in
county jail under $200 bond on the
charge of carrying concealed weapons,
was the prisoner who refused to sign
the bond. She has been in jail two
months awaiting trial.
Judge Fisher was requested by Pros
ecutor H. R. Gilmore to release the wo
man on her own recognizance and the
court gave the order.
No Bonds for Her.
The necessary bond being prepared
was presented to the prisoner for her
signature. After reading it over care
fully she threw it down saying "I'll
not put my name to any paper," and
started to leave the county clerk's of
fice. Deputy Sheriff John Huffman de
tained her.
The bond was read and explained to
her, but she remained obdurate. Mr.
Huffman warned her to sign it or go
back to jail.
"I will stay in jail the rest of my
life before I will sign any bond," she
said as the officer locked her in.
Mrs. Shilling is the party who cre
ated a panic in a traction car some
time since by suddenly displaying a
gun and theatening to shoot up the
car. After being taken before the pro
bate court and examined by two local
physicians who pronounced her sane,
she was placed in jail.
.. Henry W. Deuker
FANCY GROCER
High Grade
Coff ccs and Teas
Cor. 6tb St. and Ft. Wayne ave
Pbonel204
Established 1874
10
Suits
Overcoats
No More. No Less.
Positively $15 Vaioes.
71(1
y.-. Main
Epilepsy,
Fits,
"My son was cured of a very
bad case of epilepsy with Dr.
Miles' Nervine."
MRS. D. BAKER, Cleveland, O.
"My little daughter who was
afflicted with St. Vitus' Dance
is now entirely well after taking
Dr. Miles Nervine only four
months."
MRS. C. G. BENNETT,
Alma, Mich.
Epilepsy, Fits, St. Vitus
Dance and Spasms, are all nerv
ous diseases. They have been
cured in so many instances with
Dr. Miles' Nervine that it is
reasonable to conclude that it is
almost sure to cure you. With
nervous diseases of a severe
type, persistent use has almost
invariably resulted in a complete
cure or lasting benefits, worth
many times the cost of the rem
edy. The best evidence you can
get of its merits is to write to
those who have used it. Get a
bottle from your druggist. Take
it all according to directions, and
if it does not benefit he will re
turn your money.
The Store of Bargains.
Richmond Brokerage
Company.
8TH AND FT. WAYNE AVE
SMALL PIG HAMS
Mild Cure. 15c per Pound
Special This Week.
HADLEY BROS.
HOUSEHOLD
Goods
Packed for STORAGE or
SHIPPING.
DUNHAM'S
Furniture Store
627-629 MalnStroat.
A COUPON WORTH ONE-HALF
CENT WITH EACH 5c CIGAR Don't
refuse your ., coupons because you
haven't received them before. They
are worth saving. This is the age of
progress. QUIGLEY DRUG 8TORES,
821 N. E. Street. Phone 1722. 4th 4.
Main St., Phone 1298.
Make Hay While the Son
Shines.
Get the best while it is to be
had. You will never get anything
better in the way of SEED OATS
than what I am now offering, and it
will be to your advantage to order.
Omer G. Whelan
33 South 6th St.
Phone 1679.
PALLADIUM WANT ADS. PAY.
"THEY THAT RIDE BY NIGHT"
A thrilling, fearless, accurate;
sketch of actual conditions in the
Kentucky Blue Grass country j
today, telling the whole truth
about the Night Riders for the J
first time the Farmers' "Equi
ty" Tobacco Pool, the greatest)
in history the fight against the ;
.Trust, etc.
You cannot realize the horror
and magnitude of the situation
in Kentucky and Tennesee until
you have read Eugene P. Lyle's'
careful, thorough and dramatic
article.
HAMPTON'S
MAGAZINE ,
February On Sale Now
t
Cfiarles Edward Russell: "Re-J
; during the Tariff Yes?"
j You'll start some new thought!
waves by reading this article.
And , the resultant conclusions
may save you a lot of excitement
and worry when Congress tack
les its Tariff job.
j Vocal Ciords and Purse
Strings Did you ever blow spit-
( balls to develop your voice ? Doj
you know the "umbrella meth
od" of manufacturing prima
donnas? Read Reginald Wright
: Kauff mann's funny expose of the
fakirs who teach "vocal lessons"
in New York one was a banjo
player who said he ought to
know how, because the human
i voice was just like a banjo string.
j Twenty great features; nine
; splendid stories, including Rex
I Beach's new novel, "The Silver
Horde."
1 Boy it today: from any live newsdealer
15 cents
" Manor' Worth or Moaoy Bock" Buy
nliSLWt Vftll -ftrm tic t Via rfrer LAn tti
:ine, let us return Jo you 15c, plus the postage
you have used. If your newsdealer is already
sold out of Hampton's, send 18c and your
dealer's name to us.
HAMPTON'S MAGAZINE, New Yerk
For your supper or Breakfast,
try
PURITAN A MUSH .
A delicious new health food; fe
cents for a two-pound roll.
Made at ZWISSLER'S.
Ask your Grocer for it.
Just Received. Several
Cars of
$3.50 COAL
"Try It."
II. C. Bullerdick & Son
529 Scab 5th SI
Phone 1235. .
11 SPECIAL STAWin
11) SALE THIS WEEK B
20 Stamps with one two-ounce bottle of A. 45. P.
cxiraci ai zac a Dome.
25 STAMPS with one
lb. of Coffee at Sac.
20 STAMPS with one
lb. of Coffee at 30c. .
15 STAMPS with one
lb of Coffee at 25c
10 STAMPS with one
Box A. & P. Jelly
Jowder at 10c a box.
All flavors.
10 STAMPS with one
box Toilet Soap at 10c
a box.
(BO
STAMPS.
Willi one 18-oz
can of A. & P.
BaklngPowier
at 50cts.acan.
Perfectly Pure.
Best Made.
50 STAMPS with one
lb. of Tea at 70c a lb.
45 STAMPS with one
lb. of Tea at 60c a lb.
40 STAMPS with one
lb. of Tea at 50c a lb.
10 STAMPS with one
bottle Vermont Syrup
at 25c a bottle.- "
10 STAMPS with one
box A. & P. Currants
at 10c a box.
19 lbs Pest Granulated Sugar Q1 ,00
The Great Atlantic
Cl Pacific Toa Co.
727 Main Street
PkonotaiS
BJSEiurc - KniniraiiiE)
TONIGHT
III
ITU
op Wj
M
"The Silver Tongued Orator
of Georgia"
Every one, "wot" or "dry," should hoar
this one, "tho greatest off thorn all."
ONDOANA'S ROLL OF HONOR
,27 Counties Dry by Remonstrance.
7 Counties Dry by County Option
COUNTY. MAJORITY.
Wabash 897
Lawrence 1,508
Pike 917
Putnam 1,564
Tipton 1,581
Decatur 1,708
Hamilton 2,396
WHO PAYS THE LICENSE ?
'The saloonkeeper doesn't pay it. He produces noth
ing. As far as he is concerned he has nothing to pay it
with. Who pays it then? Those who can least afford it
and those of whom it ought to be least expected. The
drunkard's family pays the saloon license. See the poor
woman, pale and wan and wretched, wearing her life out
over the washboard. What is she doing? She is paying
the license. See the little boy going along the street half
clad, with his feet protruding through9 the holes in his
shoes, and with degradation written on every line of his
face. What is he doing? He is paying the saloon license.
Equity Js a great word in the law, and in the Constitution
of the 'State. Is there any equity about that? We have
boards for the equalization of taxes. What is the board to
do in such a case as that? What can conscientious voters
do in the matter but VOTE DRY?"
THE
SecdDidl HatI(D)isil Wmk
Depositary for the United States and the State
of Indiana.
OFFICERS:
JOHN B. D0UGAN, President
D. G. REID, Vice-President
GEO. H. EGGEMEYER, Vice-Pres.
DIRECTORS:
HOWARD CAMPBELL
JOHN B. D0UGAN
GEO. H. EGGEMEYER
C. W. ELMER
CLEM A. GAAR
S. W. GAAR
HENRY GENNETT
JOHN J. HARRINGTON
C. W. ELMER, Vice-Pres.
S. W. GAAR, Cashier
W. C. SEEKER, Asst. Cashier
E. G. HIBBERD
E. G. HILL
JOHN R. HOWARD
CHAS. H. LAND
GEO. W. MILLER
D. G. BEID
P. W. SMITH
HENRY C.STARR
S. S. STRATTAN, JR.
Absolute Security to the Depositor and the Unquali
fied Strength of the Institution Offers the
Greatest Advantages to
Its Customers.
ESTABLISHED 1872.

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