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The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1907-1939, May 29, 1909, Image 1

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AND SUN-TELEGRAM.
I VOL. XXXIV. NO. 202.
RICH210XD, IND SATURDAY EVENING, 3IAY 29, 1909.
SINGLE COPT, 2 CENTS.
PRETTY BETHEL
'PAYS HOIIOR TO'
DEADJTROOPERS
"
Today the Little Village Was
The Mecca of the Surround
ing Country, Hundreds Be-
- ing There.
(WILLIAM TAYLOR I
A SPLENDIvTADkIESS
Eloquent Indian olis u jator
Makes Plea frr Dirjrma
ment of NatiorA pJ for
World's Peace.
' One of the strongest pleas for dls
(armament of nations and universal
fceace that has been delivered in
iWayne county was included in the ad
dress of William Taylor at the Bethel
Memorial Day observance this after
tooon. Mr. Taylor is a prominent In
dianapolis attorney and republican
politician.. His words were delivered
with an enthusiasm that was con
vincing: and the large audience appre
ciated and responded to his senti
ments. .
This Is the one big day of the year
Eor Bethel and the country roundabout
iways makes it a Mecca. Early this
inorning the crowd began to gather.
Many of the visitors . brought picnic
dinners with them. By noon It was
estimated there was near 1 ,000 per
sons in the quiet little village. The
townsmen had decorated with flags
and bunting. The old soldiers were
but wearine memorial h&riees. - Bands
were playing on the street corners and
everywhere there was the spirit of the
Occasion manifested.-
Was a Short March.
Preceding the speech making a short
inarch was made to the grove about
the church. A speakers stand had
been erected and seats prepared. The
Did soldiers and their wives were giv
en places of honor. An Impressive
program of the usual - character ; was
rendered. ; Tnere were generous orrer
. Ina-s of flowers to be Disced on the
graves of the soldier dead.
. Mr. Taylor was Introduced to the au
dience by Charles E. Shiveley of this
city. 4 Mr. Shiveley complimented
Bethel on its speaker of the day. Brief
ly he recounted why Memorial Day Is
one of the grandest national holidays
and spoke of the great part played in
the Civil War by the soldier boys from
Indiana and Wayne county.
Taylor's Address.
Mr.' Taylor spoke in part, as follows:
"Most frightful losses were encoun
tered by the soldiers of the armies of
(he Union and Confederacy, during the
ons: period of. strife. If the soldiers
tof the two armies could have been
tood up twenty feet apart the line
would have reached entirely around
the globe. To appreciate the ravages
wt ought by the war It would do well to
remember that if it were possible for
the graves of those soldiers to be laid
In a row 125 feet apart across land and
cean, these graves of; men slain In
attle or victims of Injuries and sick
ness, would entirely encircle the
ferorld.
"When compared to other wars, all
tears sink into Insignificance as to the
great losses sustained. The light bri-
fade, under Lord Cardigan, at Balakla
a, made famous by Tenjnyson, lost 36
ber cent in killed wounded In that aw-
Kl crater. In the war of the rebel
m that loss was more than duplicat
ed by 200 regiments in single battles,
hlxty-four regiments in the Union
army lost over SO per cent killed and
wounded in a single battle, and fifty
four regiments In the Confederate
army lost the same per cent.
. Made Great Record.
"Nearly at the head of the list of
t.OOO regiments In the Union . army
which sustained losses, stands the
Enneteentn inaiana. cominanaea oy
ol Meredith, of this county and re
mitted from among the people of this
flctnity. At a single battle, that of
Kanassas. this regiment lost 61 per
rent of Its number, and at Gettysburg
the percentage was 44 of all those who
went into action. The 'Iron Brigade,'
f which the Nineteenth was a member
fa the single battle of Gettysburg, out
sf 1,883 men, lost 1.153 'killed or
wounded, or 61 per cent, nearly double
the loss of the famous 600 under Cardi
" fan :v)-r''',"--'y?:::.--'' v
"All these facts emphasise the fact
that never since the discovery of gun
, powder have the battle losses been of
' ruch frightful magnitude as In that
iwful war. which today we recall. It
s all because it was a contest between
brothers of the Anglo-Saxon race. The
essons to be drawn are more than can
e mentioned in a single address. The
tistory of this country can well be di-
Ided into parts one the time before
ifter. All the story of the republic
rom the landing of the first slave un
it slavery went down with secession,
olnted Inevitably to the coming strug
gle. Our Colore Lead.
"The story of the republic when sla
very and secession fell together and
Were buried In the same grave has
Teen the story , of commercial conflict
kSTw!
An Indian Rajah Wanted Marry Them
J ': f:
4 V ' x v7 n
fell . h
. Above picture Is that of Miss Marion Deering and the lower one her sis
ter, Miss Barbara Deering, daughters of Mr. Charles Deering of- Chicago,
chairman of the board of directors of the International Harvester Co., and
who, while on a tour of the world, were proposed to by the Inddan Rajah,
who already had 11 wives. Good thing for the Rajar that Papa Deering
wasn't there.1
COAL PRICE NOW
" AT ITS LOWEST
Increase Will Start
About
July the First.
A local coal dealer stated this morn
ing; that the price of coal at the pres
ent time was the lowest It would be
this year. Tie prices will begin to
rise again about July 1, and it is prob
able that the usual form of raising the
price 25 cents per ton each month un
til late in the fall will be followed.
A large number of the citizens are
taking advantage of the present pri
ces.
CRITTENDEN IS DEAD.
Kansas City, May 29. Ex-governor
Crittenden died today of apoplexy,
RYAN PREDICTED
MUCH PROSPERITY
' Thomas F. Ryan, financier, who in
an Interview in London recently, said
that with the settlement of the tariff
question, America will be more pros
perous than at any time ts her hls-
IP?
K WW i
i w 1
I
TRYING INVOLVE
UHClif SUM WITH
GEORGIA STRIKE
Second Assistant Postmaster
General Left Today for At
lanta to Look Over the
Complications. ?
FIRST TRAIN MOVED OUT
OF ATLANTA TODAY
At Lithonia the Tracks Were
Oiled for Five Miles to Pre
vent the Mail Trains from
Running.
' Washington, May 29. Second Assis
tant Postmaster General Stewart left
for Atlanta today to take charge of
the movement of the mails In the
strike affected section on the Georgia
railroad. It is understood that there
is a strong effort on the part of the
railroad officials to get the federal
government involved in the strike sit
uation, "but that President Taft will
not permit this to bo brought about.
RUN OUT FIRST TRAIN.
Atlanta, Ga.. May 29. the first mail
train to be run over the Georgia rail
road carrying a strike-breaker white
fireman, departed from. here today at
7; 30 o'clock. While there was no dis
order at the depot there was an un
dercurrent of tmrest among the strik
ing firemen's sympathizers, which
may result in federal intervention.
Wbile tne mail (rains operated yes
terday carried negro firemen the rail
road decided upon a bold move and
today made, the more or less experi
mental trip with a white strike break
er. . : . . . .
i Track Is Oiled.
At Lithonia, where Engineer George
Downing was seriously hurt last night,
the. track today was oiled for a dis
tance of five miles in order to tie up
the mail trains. .
. The railroad made an attempt last
night to move a train filled with per
ishable freight out of the Lithonia
yards but the strikers and their allies
stoned it and severely wounded Engi
neer Downing.
The situation in the towns along the
railroad is becoming desperate. They
cannot get food except what is trans-
sported by wagons and automobiles. In
some places the suffering Is keen and
the residents of the town have peti
tioned the railroad to make as speedy
adjustment as possible.
After the Lithonia incident Assis
tant Grand Chief Engineer Burgess
gContinue4 oa
THEY BROKE UP
housekeeping because " his busi
ness kept him away from home so
much. Then they had a hard time
finding congenial living quarters.
"If I only knew some quiet pri
vate family that would take me to
board," said the -wife, "I wouldn't
be so lonesome when my husband
is away." "There are many that
would be glad to have you," said
her friend. "Why don't you ad
vertise?" She did, and now the
problem is solved. Call Phone
1121.
APPOINT JUDGES
FOR ART EXHIBIT
Three of the Best Known Crit
ics in Middle West
Are Named.
THEY WILL AWARD PRIZES
PROGRAM FOR THE OPENING
1 NIGHT OF THE LOCAL EXHIBIT
PROMISES TO BE ONE OF THE
GREATEST INTEREST.
Walter Marshall Clute of Chicago,
George Julian Zolnay of St. Louis and
E. T. Hurley of Cincinnati, will com
pose the Jury of awards for the Mary
T. R. Fomlke and the Richmond prize,
to be given under the auspices of the
Richmond Art association, the exhibit
of which will open at the Garfield
school building, June 8. These three
men are artists of exceptional ability
and wide reputation. The association
feels much gratified in Its success In
securing them.
The awards of the jury will be made
public on the opening night of the ex
hibit, which will be for members only.
The program which has been arrang
ed for this evening will include short
talks by the three jadges, in all prob
ability, as well as informal talks' by
several local persons, interested in
the work. The high school orchestra,
under the leadership of Prof. Will
Barbart, will also render several mu
sicaL numbera.' The Domestle Scieaee
elttb, of which Mrs. Frank Land is
president, will act &s "hostess" during
the evening- and .will serve light re
freshments.
What the Prises Are. .
The prize given by Mrs. Foulke Is
$50, to be awarded to the artist, re
siding in this state, who has the best
painting on display. The Richmond
prize is open to local artists only. It
is $25 in cash. Besides these two,
prises for the best handicraft work
displayed will be given. Work on
hanging the pictures in the lower cor
rldor of the school as well as in Supt.
T. A. Mott'8 office rooms was started
this morning. A distinct feature of
the exhibit will be the display of two
cartoons for tapestry, entitled "Youth
and Love" and "Life and Work" and
acoompaning rugs and tapestries,
This display will be placed at the east
end of the corridor, and will repre
sent a room.
An Attractive Scene.
The two pictures will represent two
of the walls while a beautiful tapestry
will be hung at the east side to repre
sent a door way. The other side will
be left open and the entire ' exhibit
may be seen upon entrance to the
building. It will be lighted up in such
a way as to bring out the character
istic points of the display. The de
signs of both the cartoons the rugs
and the tapestries is Romanesque. An
interesting history is connected with
the exhibit as the cartoons, which are
in oil, are used for models in making
the tapestries which are in ereat de
mand in the east In the interior of
this room will be placed the better
specimens of sculptor's art
The arrangement of the pictures in
the study and recitation rooms of the
building will not be begun until Wed
nesday, at which time the majority of
the pupils will be through the spring
school work.
The officers of the association are
much pleased with the action of the
Keramic league in not holding an ex
hibition in i opposition to the art ex
hibit -
TO KEEP
Detroit Mich.. May 29. Detroit has
no intention of selling Claude Ross-
man at the waiver price.
"Our request for waivers was more
of a suggestion to the other manag
era than Tor a deal to get rid of
Claude, iid President Navln.
"Nobody seems to have anythm to
oner in tne way of trades. W will
not' let Rossman go to anybody for
si u looks now as If we could
hold him pending the time when some
body makes up his mind he needs him
worse than at present. In the mean
time be may come in handy In ease
we need a pinch or If somebody Is
hurt"
THE WEATHER PROPHET.
"drift rir mt
ROSSMA
POLITICS CAUSE
OF CARL W
BEING LET OUT
Fireman Appointed as a Dem
ocrat Is Alleged, to Have
Shown -Very Striking Re
publican Symptoms.
ADMITTED VOTING AT "
PRIMARY THIS MONTH
It Is Stated He Informed May
or He Voted Only to Help
Out His Candidate Taylor
Successor.
Politics was the cause of Carl Wad
man's release as a member of Hose
Company No. -1, of the city . ftre de
partment He was dropped from the
department yesterday and William
Taylor, an ex-member of the depart
ment, was appointed to succeed him.
Wadman was appointed to a place on
the department as a democrat He
voted at the last republican primary
election and this is believed to have
been the reason he was let out. The
day after the election it is alleged he
told Mayor Schillinger of his action
and claimed not to have voted as a
republican, but because he wanted to
help his candidate.
Board Investigated.
The board of works took up Wad-
man's case yesterday and decided upon
his release. The board regarded Wad
man as having Jeopardized his posi
tion from his own free will. Mem
bers of the department are not permit
ted to indulge in political work by the
rules and it was asserted Wadman
had not only voted, but used his influ
ence for one of the candidates. His
alleged violation of the rules cost him
his Job.
Wadman is one of the best known
and most' popular men In the depart
ment Chief Miller said this morning
he Is a splendid worker and a fine man
to-have- around the house. . .He, was
large, strong and daring. His loss to
the department is regretted by the
chief and the other members, as well
as fats friends.
EVERYTHIHG HON
READY FOB SYNOD
Delegations Will Be Met
Station and Shown to
Their Quarters.
at
WILL ARRIVE WEDNESDAY
LUTHERAN' PUBLISHING HOUSES,
BOARDS AND COLLEGES HAVE
FORWARDED EXHIBITS FOR BIG
MEETING.
The preparations for the big Luth
eran 8ynod are about completed. The
coliseum will be used Wednesday
night . Mr. Lee Nusbaum has had the
music in preparation. The large
chorus of one hundred and fifty
voices and an orchestra of forty
pieces will furnish the music. Nearly
all of the delegates will arrive on
Wednesday. The reception commit
tees will open headquarters at the
stations and the delegates will be as
signed to their places of entertain
ment at the station. A large force of
messengers have been appointed to
direct the delegates to their places.
The entertainment has all been ar
ranged for and both the delegates and
the hosts have been notified of the
assignments, which . will greatly sim
plify the matter on their arrival.
. New Appointments.
On yesterday the following addi
tional appointments were made by the
chairman: Glen Harsh, official steno
grapher; Miss Martha Miller, postmis
tress and Naomi Huber and Elma
Wiechman, assistants. Quite a num
ber of 8ynod supplies have already
arrived. The Lutheran publishing
houses, which are located at Philadel
phia, will have a large display of
books and other publications on hand.
The Synod! cal boards and colleges
will also make some exhibits. In ad
dition to the large number of dele
gates and officials: of the various in
stitutions, there will be cuite a num
ber of visitors. The committee is re
ceiving dally communications for
places of entertainment Tne hotels
are also making a large number of
reservations. The basements of the
churches are being fitted up into large
dining halls for serving meals for the j
ten days that the synod win be here.
Telephones will be installed and a lot
of additional furniture for the conven
ience of secretaries and tables) for the
use of the : press, also fiztsaras) for
handWag aalL St Paal'a win be a
hsshrrsi isf Jadaatrz fer Jsa ds-v. v
ADMAN
MARRIES FAT LADY
Chicago, May SO. Samuel G. Post,
45 years old. and Miss Rose Gertx, 4d
years old, six feet tall and weighing
380 pounds, eloped to Geneva, Ills., and
were married.
"He will not be henpecked." said the
blushing bride, as she tucked her new
husband's arm in hers and left the of
fice of the Justice who tied the knot
PLAN DELEGATION
TO CELEBRATION
Richmond Business Men Will
Probably Attend Wright
Brothers Affair.
IS GOOD ADVERTISEMENT
IT IS BELIEVED A QUAKER CITY
FEATURE OF THE BIG DAYTON
PARADE WOULD MAKE A DE
CIDED "HIT."
At the regular June meeting of the
Young Men's Business club, arrange
ments will be made in all probability
for the sending of a large delegation of
citizens to Dayton to attend the recep
tion to be given the Wright Brothers,
formerly of this city, who have had
such remarkable success in solving
the navigation of the air problem. A
special train will no doubt be chartered
and local automobile owners will also
be asked to go to Dayton to swell the
Richmond delegation in the great n
rade, to be held in the Gem City.
if a good sized delegation can be se
cured to represent this city, some ef
fort will be made by the dub to make
one of the "hits" in the parade. As
matter of advertisement to the city.
such a plan would prove to be very ad
vantageous. Either some unique
scheme of dress or formation of parade
will be decided on at the dub meeting
June . 9. For this reason it Is desired
that a very large attendance of dub
members and business men be present
at the meeting. -
DRUMMER SUICIDES
Cumberland, Md., May 29. HL ' C.
Patter, 50 years ok), a traveling sale
man for a Rochester, K. Y.. house,
committed suicide at the Windsor
Hotel here by cutting his throat with
a razor. He waa despondent but from
what cause, could not be learned.
A DANGEROUS FIRE
Pittsburg, Pa.. May 29. Fire, which
threatened to sweep a square and start
explosions, destroyed the Immense
Bender & Alder plant of the National
Lead and Oil company at Sharpsburg,
on the outskirts of the city at 1 o'dock
this morning. The loss is $40,000.
Two houses nearby were also badly
damaged.
MARCELLA SEMBRICH,
FAMOUS PRIMA DONNA
This fs tSsdaine Mareella Sembrfch.
the famous prima-douna, who sang
her farewell in February. Madame-
Sembrich. It is reported, has
been -compelled to cancel all her en-
on account of a sertsws 13-
i
CAR STRIKERS AT
PHILADELPHIA ID
BIG RIOT TODAY
Piles of Ties, Bolts, Stones
And Timber Placed on tha
Tracks to Prevent the Cars
Operating.
FRANTIC MOB STORMS
CAR HURLING MISSILES
Police Reserves Were Called
Out and the Rioters. Are
Driven Back After Waging a
Fierce Fight.
Philadelphia, May 29. Rioting
started today within a few hours after
3.500 employes of the Philadelphia car-
lines voted to strike. The action of
the union was unexpected and the
city's service was seriously crippled.
On but a few lines was any attempt to
run cars made, and every trolley that
went out was hindered by obstructions
on the tracks plies of ties, bolts,
stones and timber. Two riots occur
red before the day was well started. At
63rd and Thompson streets, a mob at
tacked a car. raining on It missiles of
all sorts. The reserves were rushed
to the scene and drove back the crowd
after a fight in which many were
hurt.
In the heart of town, at Tenth and
Ellsworth streets, another mob at
tacked a car and was dispersed only
after a hard fight with the police.
In both Instances the windows of the
cars were shattered and their -bodies
damaged. There were- many minor
Injuries from flying brick bats and po
lieemen'a club.
May close Saloons.
"If the disorder- continues I will
dose every saloon In Philadelphia to
day, said Assistant Director of Pub
lic Safety OLeary. after the disturb
ances. "The riotlngs am caused by
toughs and Irresponsible drunkards.
The strikers have had nothing to do
with It."
Every available policeman was' on
strike duty, and each platform of ev
ery car. surface and elevated, was
guarded by police. According to of
ficials of the Union, 3,500 of the 6.000
car men of the dty went out.
It was reported today that a large
body of professional strike breakers
were in readiness at a point Just out
side of Philadelphia waiting for orders
to enter the dty and taking charge of
the system.
The lines most crippled were those
of the West Philadelphia service.
These numbered fifteen or more, the
most important being the Angora,
Darby, Hattlngton . and Over brook
lines. Little effort to run these Unas
was made.
MENTAL TROUBLE
CAUSES TRAGEDY
-
David Henderson, American,
Kills His Daughter, and
Then Suicidss.
SCENE WAS A PARIS CAFE
HE HAO SEEN ACTING QUECRLV
FOR SOME TIME ANO HAO BEEN
CLOSELY WATCHED Wire IS
PROSTRATED.
Paris, May 29. Mrs. David Heads
son, of New York, whose husband
committed suidde last night after
killing his oldest daughter In a private
dining room of the Cafe Per Traa
quille, today attributed the tragedy to
a strange mental disorder. Ever since
Mr. Henderson same to Paris on May
19th. he has been acting queerly.'said
his prostrated wife. Henderson and
his family were dining when the man
suddenly drew a revolver and killed
his oldest daughter, Mary, aged 22. He
then turned the weapon on himself.
The shooting threw the cafe Into aa
uproar and the members of the family
today are still suffering from the)
shock.
SUICIDED EOR LOVE
SteubenvUle. Ohio, May
because Venn Nun as sr. aged; 17,
had Jilted him. JcSaf Keys, aged 21.
cut his throat and died aC the Gi3 kos
pttaL Hearing of the attempt at asSf
destruction. Miss Nunemaker repeated .
went to the hospital, aad weentasv
promised Keys that he would gat well
would smarry him. hm had to fea
i&rc&ly. removal tz Hi

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