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The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1907-1939, March 25, 1910, Image 1

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T
MOOT) FAIXABMJM
AND SUN-TKLEGRAM.
r
SINGLE COPT, 9 C2HTS.
rOL. XXXV. HO. 138.
RICII3IOND, IXD., FRIDAY EVENING, MARCH 25, 1910.
j tne Kicnmona Chautauqua, be has seen
MC
El
I!
il
II
6?.
';L
TOWNS
jWEPT AWAY
BY HOT L
AVA
5m Angry Mount Etna a Riv
, 1,200 Feet Wide and 34
Jcet Deep, Swept Down,
trestroying Property.
nncAwnc or aprpq
4 NOW SMOKING WASTE
jpror-stricken People Flee
ef ore the Molten Monster,
; $md Are Praying for Prompt
t Assistance.
DOPS RUSHED TO SCENE
THQUAKES BECAME MORE
SEQUENT TODAY AND THE
8S OF LIFE IS ALREADY RE
RTED AS VERY HEAVY.
j (American News Service)
tania, Sicily, March 35. A red
Tver; of lava, 1300 fet 1rU and
I deep, swept doVn the slopes of
t Etna, today, destroying all life
u-
path and turning the fertile
into a scene of desolation.
5,000 are already homeless.
mes destroyed or menaced by
iep of the lava. , In 24 hours
-advanced six miles and half a
f villages and settlements have
7lped out of existence or aban
td thousands of acres of cul
j'Jand turned into a smoking
Quivered with -the molten mass
Jours from a dozen craters.
h
Short-Lived Rejoicing.
slight diminution in the flow of
;Gf'ietfced this morning, and the
t brought rejoicing to the scores
lllages in which terror-stricken
ds have been pdaying constantly.
) respite, however, was of short du
an. i
ie constant rumblings which have
ked the . eruption since it started,
pased in volume, today and the
Jiquakes became more frequent.
V; ground is in an almost constant
able. More than seventy distinct
Iks have been recorded.
Voops are rushing to the threatened
jnt to quell the panic and aid in
ing the helpless.
Reports received here today stated
eight soldiers had been killed at
Leo and Rimaizi, and that scores
inhabitants were injured in those
s when the lava reached them,
r they had been bombarded by
s from the volcano.
A Village la Buried.
the village of Nldola is burned un-
a mass of lava. Borello, with a
lar fate, , was evacuated today.
del Bo sco has been wiped off the
- Nicolesl, protected by hills, is
to be safe and thousands of refu-
have concentrated, but Belpasso
loomed. Grass! is in the path of
,lava river, and it was seen today
I Aderno, near the towns on the
ihern slope of the mountain, could
laved only by a quick stop in the
Headed for Cantania.
e devastating stream is headed
"ght for Cantania, and this city of
100 Inhabitants, now the second
i of Sicily, and one of the foremost
outhern Italy, was threatened to-
with the fate of Pompeii.
pall of smoke covers the eastern
, of Sicily and extends far out to
- In the darkness the shooting
les of the volcano, geysers of fire,
I visible plainly at noon for many
heavy fall of ashes continued to-
Heavy stones are belched forth
e dozen craters, and in some vil
the inhabitants have been com
4 to flee for their lives from the
of rocks, which piles three feet
In the towns and over the coun
Americans Witness It.
spite of the grave danger, tour-
hnany of them Americans, are
leg to the slopes of the mountain
tempts to scale the heights. The
iv A line, and no one is allowed to
vSSelpasso.
, JJavery town of Sicily religious pro
5s were held today and divine aid
I implored. Cardinal Francisca
V the archbishop of Cantania, hur-
tto Nlcolosi at the height of the
ment there, and led a procession
e edge of the lava stream, pray
Sat it would stop.
BICYCLE RUN
aerii nf th TMchmond Blewlo
AX make a run to Eaton on Eas
jirning if weather conditions per-
rne party win leave nere at 10
a-
an4 expect to arrive at Eaton
of a chicken dinner,
CONGRESSMAN NORRIS
THE INSURGENT CHIEF
Representative Norrls, who is the
head of the insurgents in the present
fight against Speaker Cannon in con
gress. While many think that "Un
cle Joe" is supreme, the fight that Rep
resentative Norris has made has con
vinced a multitude that the speaker's
fall was inevitable with a man of Nor
ris's calibre in opposition.
PRICE OF ICE TO '
REMAIN THE SAME
Hardly Probable That There
Will Be Any Cut Rates
Offered Patrons.
NEW COMPANY TALKED OF
AND A MEETING WAS HELD OF
THE PROSPECTIVE STOCKHOLD
ERS, BUT. NO DEFINITE ACTION
IS YET TAKEN.
Indications are that the price of ice
this summei will be the same as pre
vailed last season, with the possible
exception of the consumers who pur
chase a ton or more of naturaj ice on
each delivery. This rate will proba
bly be reduced two and a half cents a
hundred pounds. However, individ
uals and small concerns who demand
artificial ice will continue to pay the
prevailing price.
Although the crop of natural ice was
unusually large this year, the compa
ny did not fill all of its houses. The
demand for natural ice is - not . very
great and B. B. Johnson states that
for this reason the company did not
fill all of its houses. It put up thirty-five
hundred tons and it is believed,
this supply will be sufficient for two
seasons, ' in event the company can
harvest ice once next winter.
Talk of New Company.
There has been an agitation, espec
Iapj, among some of the saloon keep
ers, confectioners, grocers and butch
ers of the city, to start another ice
company in the city. A conference
was held but at this meeting, it was
practically decided to drop the matter.
Several of the largest consumers of
natural ice have, however, installed
Ice manufacturing plants.
At the present time, consumers who
order one or more tons at a time pay
cents per hundred pounds for the
ice. After May 1, it is probable that
the prices will be reduced to fifteen
vents a hundred pounds when the nat
ural product is put on the market for
the largest consumers. The other
rates, which will prevail and do so now
Include: small butchers and ice cream
dealers, twenty cents a hundred; soda
fountains, twenty-five cents per hun
dred; families, thirty-five cents per
hundred, when 100 pounds are ordered,
and forty cents when less than one
hundred pounds is taken at a time. It
is probable that the present custom of
charging a fifty cent rate per hundred
pounds for the smaller users, where
the customers do not use coupons, will
be in vogue this summer.
BIG TOBACCO CROP
(Palladium Special)
Eldorado, O.. March 25 That the
tobacco crop this year is not a failure
is evidenced by the . fact that over
$25,000 worth of tobacco was shipped
out of this place this week. The price
received was from 5 to 8 cents a
pound. Five carloads of the tobacco
was shipped to Teith and Company at
(er& tit z
I1 ' v I
Jig-
v V ' stmt's f.
j Franklin, o, "
WEALTHY PASTOR
GIVES HOSPITAL
A BIG BUILDING
Late Dr. Wakefield of San
Jose, Calf., Provides Main
Street Block to Hospital on
Death of Heirs.
RENTALS FROM BLOCK
FOR THE INCURABLES
Former Pastor of the Local
Episcopal Church Was the
Father of the Hospital
Movement in This City.
Dr. John B. Wakefield, former rec
tor of St. Paul's Episcopal church, who
died at his home, San Jose, California,
last fall, and was buried in Earlham
cemetery, has further endeared his
memory in the hearts of Richmond cit
izens by his munificent provisions for
Reid Memorial hospital. ; He be
queathed the business block commonly
known as the Wakefield building,
northeast corner of Ninth and Main
streets, to the institution, in event his
two children, George and Miss Hannah
of San Jose, died without survivors.
The will was filed for probate in the
California courts on November 22,
1909, several days after his burial in
this city. Its provisions did not be
come known to local citizens, however,
until today, when a certified copy of
the will was probated in the Wayne
probate court, the copy being filed by
John L. Rupe, president of the board
of Reid Memorial hospital trustees. Dr.
Wakefield fathered the hospital movfr
ment here.
H Codicil to His Will.
Dr. Wakefield made the will on ine
24, 1899, and in this he provided that
the property should become a part of
the endowment of St. Stephen's hos
pital, which was then the only institu
tion of this nature in the cityind
which was established, largely through
the influence of Dr. Wakefield. How
ever, in a codicil to the will, which he
drew up on June 29, 1904, when it be
came known for certain that Reid Me
morial hospital was to be erected, Dr,
Wakefield provided that the property
should become a part of the endow
ment of that institution, instead of St.
Stephen's hospital.
He makes one request for the use of
the money which will be received from
the rentals of the Wakefield block,
This is that the trustees shall expend
it. in the treatment of patients who are
suffering from what are termed incur
able diseases.
Children Well Known.
George Wakefield, the son, is a well
known mining engineer in the west
Miss Hannah Wakefield, the daughter,
is also well known. Both are middle-
aged. The son is married, but has no
children. Dr. Wakefield's two chil
dren are to have possession of the
property during their life time, but
the will provides that they shall re-,
ceive the income only, indicating that
the building cannot be sold by them.
The building is one of the best busi
ness blocks in the city. Three large
store rooms are located on the
ground floor facing Main street, and
the building extends to Sailor street
on the north. There are a few small
er business rooms facing Ninth street,
and a blacksmith shop located on Sail
or street. The second floor of the
buiding is occupied by a number of
concerns.
The approximate value of the build
ing Is estimated at between $75,000
and $100,000. The rooms are always
rented and net a large annual income,
it is said.
STEEII TO BE HOST
Albert Steen, republican nominee for
sheriff, will entertain the members of
Triumph lodge this evening following
the lodge session at the Pythian Tem
ple. Mr.. Steen has been an active
member in this order for several years
During the evening, two candidates
will be given the third rank work.
FOR MBS. BHTT
Palladium Special)
Washington, March 25. A bill has
been passed by the Senate, granting to
Mrs. Anna M. Bennett, widow of the
late General Thomas W. Bennett and
former mayor of Richmond, Ind., an
increase in pension.
REPORT OF M'MIIIIJ
Francis McMinn, executor of the es
tate of Hamilton Williams, deceased,
has filed his report In probate court.
The report shows charges of $2,777.10
and credits of $2,700.93, leaving a bal
ance for distribution of 116.17.
WILLTUTROW
KILLED TODAY.
BY LIVE WIRE
Will Tutrow, single, aged 50 years,
and residing at the Brunswick hotel,
met death this afternoon about 2
o'clock, by being shocked by a live wire
while working on a city light plant
pole at the corner of West Third and
Kinsey streets.
It is thought that after being shock
ed he fell some distance. At 230 the
man's body was still on the pole, just
below the lower eross-arm. The body j
was neia in position uy me man s pen
which, became entangled in the wires,
and because when he fell he dropped
astride of a heavy wire.
A rope was attacher to the body
and after it was hauled above the en
tangling wires, it was then lowered
to the street. A large number of men
assisted in securing the body of the
unfortunate man.
A telephone message to the Palla
dium office at 2:40 stated that Tutrow
just prior to receiving the fatal shock
was cutting out a primary. Just bow
he came in contact with the live wire
is not known. It Is estimated that 2,
200 volts passed through his body. Be
fore the work of releasing the body
could be attempted, the power house
had to cease operations. After the
body had reached the street, efforts to
rveive the man were attempted, but
were useless.
Tutrow has a boy living in Indian
apolis, one- In Greenfield and one ' re
siding at the Brunswick. ' Tutrow
came to this city from Greenfield.
URGE CUSS WILL
GRADUATE III JUIIE
Expected That Forty-five Stu
dents Will Get Degrees
at Earlham. ,
COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM
HAS BEEN OUTLINED, BUT ALL
THE FINAL ARRANGEMENTS,
SUCH AS SECURING SPEAKERS,
NOT YET FINISHED.
It is expected that at least 45 Earl
ham students will receive diplomas
from the institution at the end of the
coming spring term. However, the
graduating class this year will not be
as large as the class which graduated
last June. With the exception of
speakers who have not yet been se
cured, the program for commencement
week has been arranged and will prob
ably be as follows:
June 12th Baccalaureate service,
10:30 a. m.
8:00 p. m. Ionian and Phoenix pub
lic exercises.
June 15. Wednesday, 8:00 p. m.
Class day exercises.
June 16, Thursday Business of the
Alumni association; commencement
"Drive"; alumni banquet.
June 17, Friday, 10:44 a. m. Com
mencement exercises.
4:00 p. m. Meeting of the executive
board of the Alumni association.
Probable Graduates.
The following seniors will probably
receive diplomas:
Mary Baldwin, Zola Beasley, Daniel
I Beebe, Clara Mae Bird, H. Payne
Comstock, Florence Corwin, Perley J.
Denman, Louise Estes, Brock Fagan,
Lilith Farlow, Janet Fenimore, Edgar
A. Fisher, Mary S. Gluys, Edna Hall,
Chester Haworth, Edna Hockett, Her
bert L. Huffman, William Johnson,
Clara B. Kendall, Margaret Knollen
berg, Paul Lewis, Iva J. D. Lindley,
Millard S. Markle, Florence E. Maple,
Pearl E. Moss, Lucile Mayr, R. Ernest
Neave, Vincent Nicholson, Levi T. Pen
nington, Lois V. Pitts, Dorothy Quim
by, Cora A. Reynolds, Maude Reynolds,
Herbert E. Tebbetts, J. Walter Teb
betts". Auretta Thomas, Harriett
Thompson, Harold Trimble, Edna
Trueblood, Amy Winslow, Addie E.
Wright, Orville C. Wright, Oliver Walt
hall, Glena Neth and Walter P. Bland.
WILL OF T.
Timothy Cronin. a well known con
tractor, wh died February 9, left his
estate to his wife and son, according
to the will, which was filed for pro
bate yesterday. The will was made
on December 13, 1905. In addition to
real estate he possessed a personal es
tate of approximately $500 value. The
widow, Mrs. Mary Cronin, is named as
executrix.
WILL GO TO
Myron and Rudolph Hill will leave
soon for Idaho. They will become as
sistants to Isham Sedgwick on a large
fruit farm belonging . to a land com
pany. v
CROII
IDAHO
FUMES DEVOURED
OVER 20 PEOPLE
III BLAZE TODAY
Building Occupied by Furniture
Company in Chicago Catch
es Afire and the Workers
Were Trapped.
HELPLESS CROWD SAW
VICTIMS MEET DEATH
Majority Of.ThOSC BlIITied tO
Death Were WomenIn
dignant People Take Lad
ders From Slow Firemen.
(American News Service)
unicago, March 25. Twenty or
more girls and three men. according
to estimates of the firemen and em'
ployes, were burned to death today in
a fire which destroyed the six story
building of the Is. Fish Furniture com
pany, corner Wabash and Nineteenth
streets. Five dead bodies of girls
have been recovered and one jumped
to her. death from the sixth story,
striking a steel awning. The flames
trapped the girls at the windows
where they were screaming for help
after the stairway escapes had been
cut off and the elevator put out of
commission. The immense crowd was
unable to offer assistance and saw the
girls drop back from the windows into
the flames. Isaac Fish, proprietor,
said that seventy-five girls were in
the building when the fire broke out.
Fish Blames Firemen.
Fish claimed the loss of life could
have been prevented if the firemen
had raised the ladders from the roof
of the adjoining three story building.
Indignation ' among the spectators
spurred them to seize the ladders
from the firemen and they attempted
to raise them to windows, but they
were driven back by the firemen.
After a hasty' investigation Chief
HthdrdeetaTd,tha,rtBei; firemen were
not to blame, as they did everything
possible but were hindered by the
crazy actions of the members of the
firm,' who became panic stricken.
Oils, varnishes and other highly in
flamable material caused the fire to
spread with incredible rapidity.
Brutal Actions Charged. ..
Many spectators said that life nets
would have saved most if not all of
these victims. Crazed by fire behind
her one girl, Miss Ethel Lictenstein,
hung out of the fifth floor window for
fully half an hour while the firemen
made not the slightest attempt to res
cue her. according to eye witnesses.
Some of the crowd made a rush and
captured a long extension ladder from
the fire truck, put it against the 'side
of the building and attempted to climb
up to rescue the girl. They were
driven away by the firemen, who took
the ladder down and threatened them
with arrest.
Several times the crowd attempted
to seize the ladder, but each time the
firemen drove them away. Finally the
firemen put up an extension which
broke the window just under which
Miss Lictenstein hung. A dense vol
ume of smoke poured out in her face
and she lost her head and fell to the
pavement and to her death.
When Chief Horan of the first de
partment, heard of the charges against
the firemen, he demanded an explana
tion of Battalion Chief O'Connor, the
first commanding officer to reach the
fire.
Gives an Explanation.
"When we got there," said O'Connor,
' I saw several girls at the front win
dows of the store and I saw the girl
hanging from the ledge on the sixth
floor. I did what I would do again
under the circumstances. We tried
our best to get them up, but found it
impossible. An immense steel awn
ing and a large sign in front of the
entrance prevented us from raising
them.
"I did my duty and I did it as I saw
it, and every man that was working
with me, did his too. When we got
to the fire we were met by a mob that
not only did not help us, but by trying
to get us to do something that they
thought ought to be done, they em
barrassed us and prevented us from
getting to work quickly. Fish acted
like a maniac."'
LEFT Oil 11 JUNKET
Mayor W. W. Zimmerman and Ho
mer Hammond, president of the board
of public works, went to Shelbyville
for the purpose of examining the new
bithulitie streets, which have proven
such a success In that city. The offi
cials were much Impressed with the
bithulitie streets, and it is probable
tnat an effort will be made to pave sev
eral thoroughfares in Richmond with
the substance. The streets have a
cement foundation with a crushed
stone surface and are very durable as
well as pliable, it is said While in
Shelbyville. Mayor Zimmerman and
Mr. Hammond also attended the horse
sale.
TWO PRINCIPALS IN
A DUELING EPISODE
r -V.
I -v
I ?AS
fey I
Baron John Joseph Fried rich von
Schiller, a great grandson of the cele
brated German poet. Schiller, and Ma
dame Alexandra Viarda, the German
actress, wno are . central figures in a
rceent uchallenge-to-a-dueP episode In
New York. The Baron forcibly enter
ed the house of Mrs. Alexander McAl
lister, who is Madame Viarda's daugh
ter, and left a written defl to mortal
combat for Mr. McAllister. Then he
decamped. Mrs. McAllister phoned
the police and they . soon captured the
Baron. The challenge was caused Jby
a' falling out wtthlfi6 McAmsters,vwlth
whom the Baron once lived. Recent
ly he deserted from the United States
army after a service of one month. His
mother. Baroness von Schiller, wrote
from Germany to -President Taft, who
saved him from imprisonment. It is
believed he will invoke influential aid
again to escape the consequences of
his last escapade. ..
CURB YOUR SPEED
OR GO TO COURT
Police Chief Today Issues an
Order Affecting Reckless
Auto Drivers.
INCLUDES MOTOR CYCLES
CHIEF GORMON SAYS THERE
HAVE BEEN SEVERAL CASES
RECENTLY WHERE PEOPLE
HAVE NEARLY BEEN STRUCK.
The warning is out. Now. hence
forth and forever, automobiling speed
ing in Richmond must be "cut out."
The days of joy riding through ' the
streets of this city at the rate of about
(X per, have been shuffled off into the
discards, backed into the continuous
and numbered in the "used to be
class. The order with the upper case
"O" was issued this morning by Chief
of Police Gormon.
The big chief did not make much
ado about the matter, simply stating
in a quiet, but forcible manner that it
was high time to rail a halt on such
reckless speeding and It would have to
be stopped immediately. He recalled
several instances where persons had
narrowly escaped serious Injury re
cently by being struck by the high
powered touring cars. In the hands of
speed fiends while dashing through
the street at almost a mile a minute
clip. South Fourth. Fourteenth and
Sixteenth streets are the favorite
speedways In Richmond, and at every
opportunity the motorists try their
machines out on these thoroughfares.
Motor cycles will also be affected by
the order and must slow down the
speed. Every violator of the ordi
nance will be nabbed and the advisa
bility of purchasing stop watches for
the patrolmen will; be discussed. The
movement of shutting down on reck
less automobile speeding is going to
become more general in cities all over
the country this year, it is said.
NEW RURAL CARRIER.
Hagerstown, Ind, March 25. Har
ley L. Benbow has been appointed rur
al carrier on route No. 18 and F. M.
Benbow received the appointment of
substitute carries.
T. ROOSEVELT
DECLINES TO
The Ex-president Cannot See
Where He Is Exposed to
Any Danger and Goes About
Like Ordinary Man.
CAIRO NOW CROWDED
WITH TOURIST HOST
And Nearly All of Them. Are
Americans, Who Flocked to
Egypt to See Their Idol,
Who Has Bully Time.
VISIT TO ANCIENT TOMBS
WAS MADE BY THE ROOSEVELT
PARTY AND ALL WERE IM
MENSELY INTERESTED IN THEM
HE SEES THE SPHINX.
(Special Cable from the International
Newa Service.)
Cairo. Egypt. March 25. Theodore
Roosevelt upset the plans of the gov
ernment today by absolutely refusing
the protection of a guard. Neverthe
less, because the radical Nationalists
have been angered by Mr. Roosevelt's
strictures on their alms and methods,
the authorities are taking no chances
of an attack or a demonstration and
he is never out of sight of the secret
police agents.
Col. Harvey, chief of the Cairo po
lice, co-operating with the government
police, arranged today to have a
strong force mingled In every crowd
that follows Mr. Roosevelt, and In
spite of the latter's democratic attitude
he is strongly guarded, though not as
well guarded as the authorities wish.
The Roosevelt party spent the night
at the Mena Honserwea the pyramids.
after their inspection of the ancient
monuments by moonlight last night
"The King of America"
There and at Shepheard's hotel.
where the Roosevelt while in Cairo,
occupy the royal suite, crowds of Euro
peans and natives gathered today In
the hope of getting a glimpse at The
King of America. as he Is known to
the major part of the native popula
tion. There are more than 7N Amer
ican tourists in Cairo today and every
one has a single object to see Roose
velt.
In an effort to avoid these attentions
Mr. Roosevelt uses a side entrance
when entering or leaving Shepherds.
Mrs. Graver Cleveland, who attended
the dinner at the Mena house given
last night by Mr. and Mrs. Cleveland
Dodge of New York, today spent some
time with Mrs. Roosevelt.
Visits Sakkara Tombs.
The main feature of the Roosevelt
program today was a tour of the tombs
of Sakkara, under the guidance of
Prof. Quibell, a noted Egyptologist.
The route extended along the Nile
for some distance, - with, return by
launch, stopping at the zoological gar
dens, before the dinner given by Sir
Eldon Gorst, the British agent and
consul general In Egypt.
At the zoological gardens Mr. Roose
velt spent much time in comparing the
specimens In captivity with those that
he bagged in his hunting trip.
Cry Down Any Danger.
"I've got better than those In my
bag." he laughingly said.
Although incendiary articles have
appeared in the more extreme publica
tions of the Nationalists since Roose
velt made bis first attack on their
principals, government officials today
cried down the danger of an attempt
at revenge on the former president
"There Is no danger,'" declared one
prominent official today. Neverthe
less he was one of those demanding
complete espionage.
The premier, Mohammed Said Pa
sha, himself a Nationalist, though
chary of making a direct reference to
Mr. Roosevelt, today Intimated that
there was no cause for anxiety.
A Significant Appeal.
The murder of the premier's prede
cessor, Boutras Pasha Chali. however,
is a seriousness of the Internal crisis
in Egypt, and the appeal In an open
letter from the Nationalist leader.
Eheikh Ayll Toussef. Jo Mr. Roosevelt,
asking him to desist Prom further com
ment on the Nationalists, Is signifi
cant. At the same time there Is much anx
iety among European residents over
the possibility af a native uprising and
the excitement aroused by Mr. Roose
velt's declarations has but added to the
uneasiness among them.
In spite of all however. CoL Roose
velt has done much to win the admira
tion of even his native critics by his
refusal of a guard when ft was offered
to him by the head of the police at
Lnxor.
THE WEATHER.
STATE AND LOCAL Generally fair
toalsfet and Saturday; cooler.
HAVE GUARDS
T
IP
1

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