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The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1907-1939, May 09, 1910, Image 1

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T
AND SUN-TELEGRAM.
VOL. $XXV. KO. 183.
RICHMOND. IND., MONDAY EVENING, 31 AY 9, 1910.
e2. SINGLE COPT, 3 G23TS.
KING GEORGE
IS
CALLED KING
Vith Mediaeval Rites, Shaped
by Thousand Years of Pre
cedent, New Ruler Pro
claimed to Subjects.
CEREMONY IS MARRED
BY CLOUDY WEATHER
Vast Crowds Swarmed to the
, Heart of London to See the
, Impressive, Almost Bar
baric Ceremony.
DOWAGER QUEEN IS ILL
IT WA8 REPORTED TODAY .THAT
SHE HAD BROKEN A BLOOD
VESSEL, BUT RUMOR COULD
NOT BE CONFIRMED.
(American New Service)
London, May 0. With mediaeval
rites shaped by a thousand years of
precedent the accession of George V
Iubi tnAa V nrrwlalmal r tha amnlra
The chief ceremony was In London,
heart of the empire, but In every city
of Great Britain and Ireland and In
the main centers of the colonies in ev
ery clime the proclamation announc
ing the death of Edward VII and the
' succession of his son "the sailor
prince," was heralded.
The ceremony here was marred by
leaden skies and a chill day which em
phasised the grief of the people. The
weather harmonised with the nation's
spirit A new note of sorrow was add
ed to the popular mourning '.today by
The' death of Edward proved a terrific
shock to her. Its gravity Increased by
the suddenness of his demise.
One report current today, was that
Queen Alexandra had suffered a brok
en blood vessel. The most optimistic
official statement that could be secured
was that she was "fairly well." This
was from an officer of tbe Buckingham
'Palace. .
Streets Were Lined.
When the vast crowds of the city
and Its suburbs thronged into the
heart of the metropolis today to wit
ness the splendid almost barbaric
ceremonies attendant on the final an
nouncement that the reign of George
V had begun, they found the streets
lined, mile upon mile, with people.
Life guards, soldier guards, foot guards
the crack regiments of Aldershot and
the London barracks, formed gigantic
lanes, Icbs picturesque because the
troopers had donned their great coats
against the chill wind.
Between midnight and 3 a. m., 7,500
soldiers were marched to their posts
In the city.
The majority of the spectators were
in mourning. In silent throngs they
flocked to the centers of the cere
monies St. James palace, Temple
Bar, the royal exchange and while
there three cheers for the new mon
arch rang sturdily as pledges of fealty,
rrlef for his predecessor dampened, the
enthusiasm.
Not all the splendor of the middle
ages could have added to the brillian
cy of the actors In this pageant of
announcing the Imperial .proclamation
though the bad weather detracted
. from tbe beauty of the pageant
- Harked Back to Other Days.
Fbr one hour London harked back
to the days of bygone centuries. The
ceremonies began at 9 o'clock, when.
In the Friary court of St James pal
ace, the hereditary Earl Marshall, the
Duke of Norfolk, took his stand on the
crimson draped balcony overlooking
. the court-
About him was a glittering and
many hued crowd of officials whose
titles are forgotten save when. a new
ruler takes the throne: The Garter
KIng-at-arms, Norroy KIng-at-arms,
the York herald, the Somerset herald,
the Chester herald, the Pursuivants,
rouge dragon, rouge csolx and blue
mantle. . n
As they approached a thrill ran
through the great mass of people
about the court, thousands upon thous
ands straining for a glimpse of the
' formalities.
At each side of the Earl marshal
stood a king's sergeant-at-arms, clad
in dark court dress and bearing
maces. From the balconies overlook
ing the court the scene was viewed
by a great gathering of diplomats, of
ficials and peers of the realm:
The Norroy King at Arms. William
. Henry Weldon, there under the inaus
plclously bleak sky, read the privy
council proclamation formally telling
England what all the world has
known for three days.
THE WEATHER.
' DTATE AND LOCAL Fair tonight
.' and Tuesday. ' ..'
FORMALLY
WEEK WAS MILD ONE
Days Were' Quite Springlike,
But the Evenings Were
Quite Chilly.
VOSSLER MAKES A REPORT
Mild weather, characterized by warm
days and cool nights was experienced
in this locality last week. There were
several frosts, tba one on the night of
Thursday, May 5, being unusually hea
vy and doing considerable damage to
the fruit trees. The highest tempera
ture was recorded on Monday when
the mercury soared to 81 degrees.
Thursday the 5th, the liquid registered
29 degrees. The weather was cloudy
during the greater portion of tbe week,
there being only two perfectly clear
days. The rat .fall for the week was
heavy, the total amount of precipita
tion being 2.45 of an inch. One and
five hundredths of an inch fell on
Tuesday. The dally temperature was
as follows:
High Low
Sunday m 51
Monday 81 51
Tuesday 75 44
Wednesday 57 34
Thursday 57 29
Friday k 2
Saturday -S3 44
TERM OF OFFICE
FOR SPEKEIIHIER
CLOSES TONIGHT
But Popular Official Will Re
main in Charge as E. M.
Haas, the Appointee, Has
Not Been Nominated. .
CAUSE OF THE DELAY
IS NOT YET PUBLIC
Mr, Haas Is Not Surprised as
He Says Such Delays Are
Frequently the Case
Spekenhier's Record.
The time of John Albert Spekenhier,
as postmaster of the local office, ex
pires tonight at midnight But inas
much as President Taft has not acted
on. the recommendation of Congress
man W. O. Barnard, that E. M. Haas,
at present secretary of the Commer
cial club, be appointed to the office,
Mr. Spekenhier will have to continue
in office until his successor is appoint
ed and commissioned.
The cause of President Taft's delay
In acting upon the matter is very per
plexing to the local politicians and
others interested in the matter. It Is
said that the postal department offi
cials often counsel the president to
delay appointments of postmasters,
until the department officials have
had time to Investigate and consult
with the chief executive on the mat
ter. This may be the explanation for
the delay here, but nothing authoritive
is known.
A Statement By Haas.
Mr. Haas stated this noon that he
had heard nothing from Washington,
except that his name had been pre
sented to the department. He does
not seem surprised at the fact that
he has not been officially appointed
and commissioned. He stated that it
was nothing out of the ordinary for
applicants not to receive their com
missions for several days or weeks,
after the postmasters terms expire.
. Congressman Barnard presented the
name of Mr. Haas as his appointee for
postmaster for the local office, to the
department last winter. There his
name has remained on file, never hav
ing been presented to the senate for
confirmation by tbe president
In speaking of the custom here, Mr.
Haas stated that Daniel Surface was
not succeeded in office by Mr. Spe
kenhier until July 1 and that Mr. Sur
face did not succeed his predecessor
until the same time. In this way. Mr.
Haas accounts for the delay in his ap
pointment I Makes a Fine Record.
The record made by Mr. Spekenhier
while postmaster, is not surpassed by
that of any of his predecessors. It is
generally believed that he was one of
the most efficient officials ever In
charge of the local post office, and it
is true that he' has more thoroughly
organized the office, than it ever wa
before.
From a business standpoint Mr,
Spekenhier has been a hustler. . Dur
ing his administration, the receipts
each year have' grown larger and larg
er and each year's record has been
better than any proceeding year.
When he took the office, four years
ago, the yearly receipts fbr the office
were averaging approximately $60,000.
The fiscal year which ended March 21,
showed a gain of nearly 112.000 over
the proceeding period -and the total
amount was more than $78,000.
LOCAL CATHOLIC
GOLDEN JUBILEE
TO BE BIG EVENT
It Is Expected That Between
5,000 and 9,000 Visitors
Will Swarm the City on Sun
day, May 15th.
MAMMOTH PARADE WILL
BE ONE OF FEATURES
Meeting Was Held Sunday Aft
ernoon at Which Arrange
ments Were Completed
Program for the Affair.
Sunday, May 15, the opening day of
the seventetenth annual convention of
St. Joseph's Staats-Verband and the
golden jubilee of St. Joseph's Benevol
ent society of Richmond will perhaps
be one of the biggest events In the his-
t
tory of the city from the standpoint of
the number of visitors in the city. Del
egations will be present from the
larger Ohio and Kentucky cities while
practically every Catholic society in
this state will send delegates. .
It is expected that the total number
of visitors will be between 5,000 and
0)000, the size depending largely on
the weather conditions of the day. Ex
cursions will be run to the city by ev
ery division of the Pennsylvania from
a distance of 100 or more miles, and
the C. C. & L. and the Terre Haute.
Indianapolis and Eastern lines will al
so run excursions.
Dining Halls for Crowd.
The general committe on arrange
ments is now confronted with the pos
sibilities of feeding the visitorsEight
different halls of the city have been
secured, which will be used as head
quarters.. The committee is also m&fc
ing every effort to add tothe'list.'So
far the headquarters Include, Coliseum,
Carpenters' Union hall, Main , street:
824 Main street; St. John's school
building. South Fourth street; South
Side Improvement association meet
ing place; Cutter'sfhall,; south Fourth
street; St Mary's hall for the Y. M. 1.
delegates; Knights of Columbus hall
for visiting delegates and others.
So far it is is known that 4,000 will
attend. The delegations will include
societies of Cincinnati, Louisville, Ky..
Dayton, Columbus. Ft. Wayne, Indian
apolis, South Bend, New Albany, Terre
Haute and scores of other cities in the
middle west Many of these societies
will be accompanied by orchestras or
bands. A large number will also at
tend in their uniforms and the mam
moth parade is expected to be the fea
ture of the Sunday meeting. An ef
fort was made to arrange the pro
gram Sunday. The program for next
Sunday's meeting is as follows:
0 a. m. St. Joseph's society together
with the City Band will meet the del
egates at headquarters, Westcott hotel
and escort them to the K. of C. hall.
0:30 a. m. Address of Welcome,
Caspar Jelly, Fest. Pres.
Address of Welcome, Mayor Zim
merman. Roll call of delegates and distribu
tion of badges.
10 a. m. Solemn High . Mass. Ser
mon by Rev. George Heldman, Rens
salear College.
11:30 a. m. Military Mass for uni
formed knights and late arrivals of
excursionists.
12 m. Dinner. Served by Ladies
near St. Andrew's church.
2 p. m. Forming of parade of local
and visiting societies and uniformed
knights, South Fifth and E street -
2:30 p. m. Parade will start. ,
4 p. m. Solemn Vespers.
8 p. m. Banquet for members of St.
Joseph's society delegates and the
clergy.
APPEAL LIBEL CASE
Government Takes Panama
Canal Litigation to the
Supreme Court.
WANTS HEARING IN FALL
Palladium Special)
Washington, May 9. The attorney
general today filed in the supreme
court the government's appeal in the
Panama canal libel case growing out
of the charge published in the last pre
sidential campaign by the New York
World and the Indianapolis News in
which the names of Charles P. Taft,
William Nelson Cromwell and others
were used in connection with the deal
by which the United States acquired
the interest of the French Company in
the Panama canal. ' On Monday next
the attorney general will make a mo
tion to advance the cases for hearing j
early in the tall term. 1
Kaiser, the Empress and Potsdam Palace
f
Kaiser Wilhelm and the Empress had planned to entertain the Roosevelts at the royal palace, but this ar
rangement will probably have to be abandoned because the German royal family will attend the funeral of King
Edward." . 1 r
FUNERAL OF KING
HELD Oil MAY 20
Body of the Late Ruler Will Lie
in State for Three
Days.
BUSINESS GIVEN BOOST
KING GEORGE ORDERS ALL BUSI
NESS HOUSES TO REMAIN OPEN
EXCEPT ON DAY OF FUNERAL
ORDER PLEASING. , '
(American News Service)
London, May 9. King Edward .VII
will be given the greatest royal funer
al of the century on March 20. The
tentative plans were announced today
by officials of Edward's household,' to
whom the arrangements were given
in charge by King George.
From May 17 to 19, the masses, will
have opportunity to pay their last're
spects to the ruler . whom they loved,
while the body lies In state at West
minster Hall. ..
. The final services will be held at St.
George's chapel, Windsor. -
To the Throne Room.
It was definitely decided today to
remove the body to the throne room
of Buckingham Palace, where privileg
ed persons will have the opportunity
to view it from Tuesday to Thursday
of this week. .
While at Westminster hall, the body
will lie in a lead coffin encased In a
casket of oak made from timber that
was grown on the' royal estate at
Windsor.
Stock exchange operations were
strong today and the quotations ad
vanced dispelling all the fears of the
financial panic. King George took tbe
first step toward winning the hearts
of hjs people today when he issued an
order partially relieving the business
stress, in which he expressed the wish
that-play houses be, reopened except
on the day of the funeral. The clos
ing down of the play houses served
to throw a- damper on all classes of
trade, all kinds of shops except mourn
ing goods are beginning to show finan
cial depression. The order was gener
ally hailed as a clever stroke on the
part of the new king.
HAVE PISTOL FIGHT
(American News Service)
Cordele, Ga.. May 9. In a pistol fight
on the street this morning between
Rowan, Edward and Herbert Mercer,
brothers on one side, and Grady Snell
grove on the other, Snellgrove and Bil
ly Benton, a bystander, were instantly
killed. Ed Mercer was wounded. The
Mercer boys objected to Snellgrove
courting their sister.
HIS WHEEL STOLEII
William Burden, colored, of Sooth
Sixth street, reported the theft of his
bicycle to the. police Saturday night.
The wheel was found in the yard of
Oscar Skillen. also colored, on South
Sixth street, yesterday where it had
evidently been thrown by the . thief.
The bicycle has been returned to Bur
den and the police are working on the
case. .
REPORT OF CULLOP
Oil SHORTAGE CASE
Disagrees With Other Mem
bers of Committee on a
Sub-treasury Leak.
PROBE WAS NOT THOROUGH
MAJORITY REPORT ABSOLVES ST.
LOUIS ASSISTANT TREASURER
AND SURVEYOR OF CUSTOMS
OF CHARGES.
(Palladium Special)
Washington, May 9. Representative
Cullop today presented the minority re
port in which he disagreed with the
other members of the committee which
has been investigating the shortage of
$61,000 in the St. Louis subtreasury.
The shortage was discovered in Octo
ber, 1900, in accounts of the receiving
teller. After taking an exhaustive tes
timony the bouse committee on claims
decided the responsibility should be at
tached to Thomas J. Aikens and bills
were reported recommending' his re
lief. The. committee on expenditures
in the treasury department of which
Cullop is a member, in sustaining this
finding went on to say, "But there are
other so-called charges contained in
resolution No. 582 which if true would
demand that a thorough investigation
should be made of the personnel and
methods of keeping the accounts in
both of these offices. Your committee
has not evidence to sustain a charge
of continued and prolonged absence of
the assistant treasurer, and surveyor
of customs from the performance of
their duties, or that either of these of
ficials was a frequent dealer in specu
lative transactions in the stock mar
ket. Indeed, this charge was emphatic
ally and completely denied." . Against
the finding Cullop protests and insists
that the charges should have been fur
ther probed.
ALLEN JAY
By RobLL. Kelly
Allen Jay was a great apostle of righteousness. Only those
who were intimately acquainted with him knew of the abundance
of his labors. He was the most widely known and best beloved
Friend of this generation. He had been a welcome guest in more
Friends' homes in America and Europe, than any other man. Ev
erywhere his counsel and aid were sought and freely given. He
had identified himself actively with' every phase of the work of the
Church. He was a powerful factor particularly in the evangelistic,
missionary, church-extension, philanthropic - and educational de
partments. -
He had been a citizen of Richmond for almost thirty years.
During that time he had been an officer of Earlham College. He
served the College faithfully and efficiently as Superintendent and
: Treasurer, Member of the Board of Trustees, - and Financial AgenL
It is difficult to see how the financial progress which has come to
Earlham during the. past thirty years wonld have been possible
without his labors. It will take a long time for us to become adjust
ed to his absence.
' He was a minister of great power who during his long period
of service received practically no financial compensation for his .
work. In the recent changes in thought and methods which hare v
been coming over the church,' he was conservatively progressive.,
He has served a valuable function as. a harmonlxer among fac
ialis, having made many extended trips with this purpose In view.
His presence was always welcome and his services - peculiarly ef
fective. He was a wise. God-fearing ; man and we are staggering
today under the shock produced by his death.
a4
I
COSTA
J
FACE
And the Dread of Pestilence Is
Also Abroad in Strick
en Land.
RESCUE WORK IS RUSHED
PROBLEM OF REMOVING THE
DEAD IS OVERWHELMING AND
PHYSICIANS ARE MUCH IN DE
MAND 2,500 DIED.
. (American News Service)
San Jose, Costa Rica, May 9. Pesti
lence and starvation today menace the
15,000 homeless victims of the Carte'
go earthquake. RIcardo Jiminez today
took the first step of his regime, fol
lowing his inauguration yesterday, by
leading a new relief expedition not on
ly to Cartago but to Paraiso and the
other points in the surrounding terri
tory which suffered as heavily as did
Cartago. -
Medical supplies are needed. The
problem of removing the dead is over
whelming, and it is probable that
months will elapse before the last
corpse has been taken from the piled
debris. :
The latest Investigations show that
previous estimates of the number kill
ed will be below the truth, in all prob
ability. That ' fully 2,500 lost their
lives is believed.
. The country between here and Car
tago as well as the suburbs of San
Jose has been , turned into' a vast
camp, to which not only stricken
townspeople, but hundreds of tbe in
habitants of the . hill and mountain
country have fled.
CROP CONDITIONS.
(American News Service) .
Washington, May 9. The agricul
ture department average conditions
are, winter wheat, 82.1; rye, 8L3.
RICAI1S
1101
STARAIIOII
jFRIENDS ARE
SHOCKED BY
JAY S DEATH
Most Prominent . Member of
the Friends' Church Died
Suddenly Last Evening from
Heart Trouble.
WAS ACTIVE MEMBER
IN VARIOUS AFFAIRS
He Was Chiefly Responsible
for Progress of Earlham
College, Acting as Its Fi
nancial Agent.
DID WORK IN THE SOUTH
HELPED FRIENDS IN TENNESSCK
AND NORTH CAROLINA, LEFT
DESTITUTE AT THE CLOSE OF
THE CIVIL WAR. . .
Allen Jay, aged 74 years, probably
the most W idely known Friend in the
world, died suddenly last evening al
6:15 o'clock at his home West Eighth
and, National avenue. Death was due
to heart trouble, resulting from an
acute attack of Indigestion. Mr. Jay
became seriously . Ill while passing
through Kokomo yesterday ' morning
on his return home from the National
Laymen's convention at Chicago. Up
on bis arrival in this city be was at
once hurried to his home In a critical
condition. Death relieved his sufferng
several hours later. The deceased it
survived by his wife, Mrs. Naomi Jay,
two sons, ,Kawm jajr or cnicago ana
I saac Jay of Kansas City and one 'sis
ter, Mrs. Mary Baldwin, ot Marlon,
Indiana. -
, By the , death or the Rev. Jay,
Friends the world over are plunged lo
the deepest grief. His sudden and un
expected demise is the occasion fot
the most heartfelt regret in this com-
munity. Not until the heavenly rec
ord is read will it be known how great
is the work that he has accomplished
Was Loved by All.
His own career. In perfect harmony
with his teachings, had won him the
love and respect of all. r The beautiful
memory of bis kind and' lovable dispo
w.wwft. " MUACI 7 . V.1 flu U11UUC
of all with whom he came In contact.
It is believed that death , was the re
sult of overwork at the Chicago con
vention. The Rev. Jay apparently was
in the best of health Friday when he
delivered an address before the con
vention. He did not seem to consider
bis illness of much consequence and
was conscious up until a few minutes
prior to his death. However, he com
plained several times of intense suf
fering. Tbe deceased represented
Earlham college at the convention.
After the lecture. In - company with
levl Pennington of this city, he at
tended a dinner and told of fats exper
iences in North Carolina.
Makes Trip Abroad.
The first wife of the deceased. Mar
tha Ann Jay, died in 1899 end in the
following year Rev. Jay was married
to Miss Naomi Harrison of this city.
Soon after this the Rev. Jay and his
wife went abroad, visiting Ireland and
England where ' he did much crest
work in . the interest of the Friends
society. :, " -
It I said that most of the money
raised for Earlham college from 1881
up to the time of his death was doe to
the exertions or the Rev. Jay, whose
untiring efforts in behalf of that insti
tution have caused it to be recognized
as one ot the leading Quaker colle
ges In the country. The Ber. Jay's
life work consisted fa misinx money
for different Friends' educational in
stitutions in the United States aad
his labors were rewarded with un
qualified success. Practically the en
tire endowment f F-ar-niam mlla
$350,000; was raised by him, tt is said.
Other colleges which he materially as
sisted are Wbittier college of Califor
nia, Penn college of Iowa, Guildford
college of North Carolina, Pacific col
lege or Oregon and Nebraska college
of Nebraska.
Tbe deceased finished his autobio
graphy late in 1. and It is now In
the hands of the publishers, the J. C.
Winston Co., of Philadelphia, publish
ers of the "American Friend, a well
known Quaker magazine. It Is a large
volume and in addition to the Ber.'
Jay's Interesting life contains valuable
information concerning the history of
the Friends society and educational In
stitutions. ; The funeral will, take tlace Thurs
day afternoon at 2 o'clock at the East
Main Street Friends church sad wO
perhaps be the largest aXbtmisl at aay
funeral held fat this city for years. Ev
ery society- of Friends t Vs tzMJ
west will be represented. TecrrtJ
(Continued on Pass Cli.)

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