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The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1907-1939, May 31, 1910, Image 8

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PAGE EIGHT
THE RICHMOND PALLADIUM AND SUX-TELEGftAM, ; TUESDAY,-MAY 31, 1910.
NEW YORK VETERAHS
SALUTEDBY TAFT
Chief Executive Reviews Pa
rade of Old Soldiers Along
Riverside Drive.
RANKS BECOME THINNER
FEWER PARTICIPATE THAN US
UAL WHILE MANY ARE SUP
PORTED IN MARCHING BY THE
YOUNGER MEN.
New York, May 31. Marching In re
view before President Taft 20,000 vet
erans, sailors and members of patriotic
and fraternal organizations, the largest
Memorial day parade ever seen In this
city, paid tribute to the martial dead
yesterday.
The parade of the veterans of the
Grand Army of the Republic made
a picture that will not be forgotten
by those who saw It. They numbered a
few more than 1,200 In all, the small
est number ever In annual parade.
Some of them were so feeble thit they
had to be assisted In what they prob
ably realized was their last march.
Sometimes it was a stalwart son
who helped a tottering father and
again It was two old comrades who
stood even closer than shoulder to
shoulder as they almost carried the
third in front of the president. In one
case a daughter guided a blind soldier
along the route.
There were uniforms of many kinds
but the one that attracted the most at
tention was the old Zouave outfit.
President Taft arrived In the city be
fore 8 o'clock, coming from Washing
ton in the special car Plymouth, over
the Central Railroad of New Jersey to
Communipaw. This Is the first time in
20 years that a president has arrived
in Communipaw from Washington.
The president crossed the ferry to
Twenty-third street and wedt to the
home of his brother, Henry W, Taft,
where he had breakfast. From there,
accompanied by General George. B.
Loud and escorted by a troop of
Squadron A, he went to the Sherman
Square hotel, where an Informal re
ception was held in the parlor.
The Old Guard, with, their big bear
skin hats and old-fashioned muskets,
acted as guard of honor to the presi
dent, and the crowd that lined both
sides of Riverside Drive had sympathy
for the men as they trudged along un
der the burden of their headdress.
The party went to the reviewing
stand at Eighty-ninth street and River
side Drive, near the Soldiers and Sail
ors' monument.
The distinguished party invited to
surround Mr. Taft on the reviewing
stand comprised Major General Daniel
Sickles and Major General Julius H.
Stabl, Brigadier Generals Anson G.
McCook, Horace Porter, Nicholas W.
Day, Walter Howe, John T. Lockman
(0
GS
D
S
I-
TWO raOKE DAYS LEFT OF THIS GREAT FOVE DAY FORE SALE
Thursday night ends this big cut in prices on high grade goods. Never before in this city has housefuraishing goods sold at otzc!i a ccssCZc?
Carpets. Rugs. Curtains, Drug
gets at Prices Hard to Beat
025-927-929
Main Street
and Thomas H. Hubbard, together with
a number of congressmen and other
notables.
LARGE CROWDS HEAR
MEMORIAL ADDRESS
BY COLONEL HARVEY
(Continued From Page One.)
of Nelson, her ocean Lord, and while
these heroes in whose memory these
shafts have been eeected sleep the
sleep that knows no awakening, yet it
is proof conclusive that people are not
ungrateful. So today this goodly com
munity proves to all the world that our
soldiers are not forgotten.
"I have not desired or sought for
public office, yet if I could by election
to a. legislative office make this day by
law as sacred as the Sabbath. I would
gladly spend of my means and time
sufficient to accomplish that end.
"I recognize the fact that I am
speaking in what is usually termed a
"Quaker neighborhood," in the pres
ence doubtless of some of that faith,
and of different representatives of the
great college located here. I was born
and raised a Quaker and have never
lived outside the precincts of a church
o that denomination, yet I feel safe in
saying In this address that here, as
where I live, there are none who now
believe in "universal peace," for his
tory has demonstrated that In every
Instance has war brought forth the
greatest results to all the people. The
rebellion taught men that there are
thoughts worth dying for; that men
can be, and were found who would vol
unteer for a pittance to save a nation
and free the slave.
"By war we became a republic; by
war we preserved the republic, and by
war our flag was kept spotless; and by
war we have kept our independence
and bywar will our rights be main
tained. The motto of every loyal Am
erican citizen should be, "Peace if pos
sible, but only peace with honor.
"The war of the rebellion was fought
between two sections of our own peo
ple. ; In many instances brother
against brother, and in the world's
history nowhere can be found a report
of such decided valor. I take it that
each side fought for what they thought
to be right. I have no harsh words
for any confederate who fought for
what he believed to be right. If there
is a confederate soldier here today he
will find the heartiest handclasp from
a true Union soldier, yet I deplore the
fact that in some instances it is said
that the war of the rebellion was a
failure. This country, as said by Lin
coln, could never become a "hydra
headed monster made up of warring
states" but was always destined to be
come a nation sovereign great and
free.
"In the recent war with Spain it was
demonstrated that the people of the
south equally with" those of the' north
were anxious to fight under the Stars
and Stripes, and let us hope that this
real Union will be perpetual and that
our flag will never be lowered, but
float victorious as she always has done
85c All Wool Carpets ...68c
75c All Wool Carpets ....57c
35c All Chain Carpets ...25c
$3.00 Wool Rugs, room
sizes .$5.95
$16.50 Tapestry Brussels
Rugs, 9x12 $11.85
$27.50 Axmlnster Rugs, 9x
12 $21.85
$2.00 Lace Curtains ....$1.48
$3.00 Lace Curtains ....$1.98
$7.50 Portiers .$5X0
$5.00 Portiers ........ .$3.50
65c Linoleums .....44c
Renecber Thursday night ends this sde.
in every honest endeavor to uplift hu
manity and the cause of righteousness
and justice.
"Many historic crimes have received
the sanction of judicial decision. It
is said that it was a judicial decision
that sent the Incarnate to his death
laden with bis cross; that it was a ju
dicial decision that .; condemned So
crates to drink the deadly hemlock;
that it was a judicial opinion rendered
by Chief Justice Taney that declared
"the black man had no rights which
the white man was bound to, respect;"
thatit was a judicial decision with
Lord Chief Justice Jeffries on the
bench that darkened the pages of Eng
lish history with the blood of Innocent
men, women and children; yet over ev
ery unjust act in' human history a
cloud of wrath has formed; and as
slavery was abolished, so has ever aris
en men to fight for and to die for prin
ciples. " 'My .Lord Cardinal,' Ann of Aus
tria once, said to Richilieu, God does
not pay at the end of every week, but
he pays. Every page of divine and hu
man history verifies her words. What
student of history can deny it? Pilate
condemned the Saviour of mankind to
crucifixion, but an early death awaited
him. Nero caroused while Rome burn
ed, but on the same day he became
a suicide. Napoleon drove from his
bed and breast the hapless Josephine
and forced his way to empire by brok
en oaths and through seas of blood,
yet just ahead of him was Waterloo
and St. Helena. Robespierre guillo
tined his thousannds but from neces
sity his own head must rest on the
same block.
"To Union soldiers here for the or
ganization I represent I wish to give
you this parting word. The bugle call
which sounded you to arms is stilled.
Among the mountains where you
fought are not even the echoes of your
musketry and only by your comrades
graves are many of your battle fields
known. You are all likened to the
'sere and yellow leaf.' On your dear
faces we must of necessity note the in
roads of time. All of your great cap
tains have at last surrendered. Old
Pop Thomas, the rock of Chicamau
ga; Grant, the real peerless leader;
Sherman, Sheridan, Logan and Morton
are all gone on before you. Soon Ah,
too soon, you must make your first
surrender to the common conqueror of
us all.
"Your sons have sworn that when
you are gone, your camp fires shall not
smoulder; "that to us and our children
you shall always be our heroes, and
your examples of patriotism, fidelity
to duty and unswerving loyalty shall
be our guide and our inspiration."
Some folks don't know that the
laws of Indiana and other states flac
thlncs so that money can not be
taxed. Preferred stock of Indiana
companies is the best way provided
by law to get the highest rate of in
come without giving up 20 per cent,
to 40 per cent, of it for taxes.
Central Trust Company, Indianapolis
ADMITTED TO EASTHAVEN.
, Dr. S. E. Smith, superintendent of
the Eastern Indiana Hospital for the
insane,- filed admission .-reports with
the county clerk, Harry E. Penny, to
day in favor of Parmelia Alice Lan
nerd and Catherine Mary Gildenhaar.
These two were pronounced insane a
few weeks ago.
ii is i ., rr mti im mrrt mi aaaaaa i i w rm naaw m m ar ar 1 1 1 m -a i. m w.
Beds, Chiffoniers, Dressers
at Exceptionally Low Prices
$12.00 45-1 b. Felt Mat
tresses .... ..$8.00
$6.00 Combination Mat
tresses .... $4.50 :
53.50 Cotton Top, Fibre
Filed, at ...$2.75
$3.50 Woven Wire Springs
at . ....$2.50
$2.C0 Pillows, per pair. .$1.15
$3.00 Pillows, per pair. .$2.00
$9.00 Chiffoniers ..... .$6.60
$27.50 Iron Beds .$13.50
$25.00 Dressers to go at $1730
$2230 Dressers to go at $16.50
$20.00 Dressers to go at $15.03
$17.50 Dressers to go at $14.00
$12.50 Dressers to go at $10.50
$9.00 Wash Stands to go
at .......... ; ...$7.50
$7.50 Wash Stands to go
at ;". $5.00
U yon are in need cf Innse
i ii
H
jJ3
. .
READ HIS FACE.
The Youthful Amateurs Were Sure Ke
Was a Philanthropist.
They were youthful enthusiasts lr
physiognomy. Ou the seat opposite in
the train was a mau of commanding
figure, massire brow and serious ex
pression. Splend!d facer one of them
explained. "What do you suppose his
life work has been?"
"A lawyer?" suggested the other.
"Xo-o; there's too much benevolence
In that face for a lawyer."
"Maybe a banker?"
Oh. no! A man with an expression
like that couldn't bare spent bis life In
merely turning over money."
"He might be an editor,",
: "An editor: Cutting and slashing his
enemies at every turn and even , his
friends occasionally for the sake of a
smart paragraph? JTou can't.-read
faces. Thai mau's a philanthropist or
engaged in some sort of public spirit
ed work. Why. there isn't a line that
doesn't indicate strength of purpose
and nobility: Look at that curve there
on the left !"
At the next station an old country
man took his seat beside the man with
massive brow and soon eutered into a
conversation with him. in the course of
which be asked the latter "what was
his Hue." V
The two opposite held their breath
in the intensity of their interest.
"Oh. I've got a little tavern and
butcher shop back in the country a
bit!" was the proud reply. "My wife
tends to the meals and I do my own
killing." Youth's Companion.
Picture Forgeries.
.There are three or four times as
many Corots in existence as the French
painter produced in his lifetime. He
lived to be nearly eighty, but at Mont
martre his post burnous canvases are
still being turned out to meet the de
mauds of the market. The old mas
ters never die. They are still working
overtime in the back rooms of Flor
ence and Rome. At Cologne the man
ufacture of genuine mediaeval metal
work and antique carving Is a thriving
Industry. These foreign forgers may
be scamps, but their tireless energy
also testifies to the reverence in which
posterity holds the great names of by
gone periods. If they are not so high
ly prized, what inducements would
there be for anybody to waste time,
paint and muscle in creating fraudu
lent copies and imitations and pass
ing them off under false pretenses?
Our millionaire collectors are not con
stantly exposed to the risk of buying
high priced forgeries where the origi
nals have no value. New York World.
Mourning In Japan.
The Japauese code of mourning is
very elaborate and complicated. As
followed by the well to do classes it
Involves the weariug of special , gar
ments and abstinence from ' animal
food. At the death of a husband or
real or adopted parents the custom de
mands thirteen months of mourning
apparel and fifty, days' abstinence
from meat. . Grandparents are honored
by 130 days if they are on the paternaV
side; If only , common.-, insignificant,
maternal grandpa rents, they have to
put up with uinety. The' same rcl?
applies to maternal uncles and aunts.
It Is one way of Introducing the orien
tal contempt for women.
i urcisbics cf ray kind, now cr a Utile liter, now is
- .
PROPERTY TO WIFE.
The late Jefferson Clark who died
at his home in this city on May 23 be
queathed all his property to his wife,
Mrs. Cora Clark, who is also named
as executor of the will to serve with
out bond. His personal estate was
of the probable value of $1,000.
Santford Wilson who was appoint
ed commissioner in the matter of Wal
ter J. Smith and others versus Anna
Combs and others has filed report
showing that the credits and receipts
of the commissioner were $1,540, leav
ing no balance.
An oversubscription means that
the Dodge Manufacturing Company
preferred stock will be sought after
at a . liberal premium above its par
value of $100 per share. It is exempt
by law from taxation and nets S per
rent., and by all the rules of modern
finance should command a premium
of at least 20 per cent.
Coastal TnMt
PEARL DIVERS OF JAPAN.
Women and Young Girls Who Are Ex
pert Swimmers.
The pearl divers of Japan are the
women. Along the coast of the bay
of Ago and the bay of Gokasho the
thirteen and fourteen year old girls,
after they have finished their primary
school work, go to sea and learn to
dive. They are In the water and learn
to swim almost from babyhood, and
they spend most of their time In the
water except in the coldest season,
from the end of December to the be
ginning of February.
Even during the most Inclement of
seasons they sometimes dive for pearls.
Tbey wear a special dress, white un
derwear and the bair twisted up into
a hard knot. The eyes are protected
by glasses to prevent the entrance of
water. Tubs are suspended from the
waist. " "
A boat in command of a man is as
signed to every five to ten women
divers to carry them to and from the
fishing grounds. When the divers ar
rive ou the grounds tbey leap Into the
water at once and begin to gather oys
ters at the bottom. The oysters are
dropped into the tubs suspended from
their waists.
When these vessels are tilled the div
ers are raised to the surface and jump
into the boats. They dive to a depth
of from five to thirty fathoms without
any special apparatus and retain their
breath while remaining under water
from one to three minutes. Their ages
vary from thirteen to forty years, and
between twenty-five and thirty-five
they are at their prime. New York
Sun.
Mark Twain In Parliament
After a visit to England once Mark
Twain said on bis return to New York:
"Among other honors heaped upon me
by Englishmen was that of being pho
tographed in parliament. I am not a
member of parliament. Bat neither
am I a member of congress. Has any
fellow American suggested that I
should be photographed In congress?
No. I blush to say that they have not.
And yet here is an honor that might
without risk be bestowed on any great
man. . And yet itwas not bestowed
upon Washington, Jefferson or Lin
coln. When I saw that photograph,
with the mother of parliaments in the
background; and realized my advanc
ing years I said to myself. 'Here are
Values in Dining Room Furni
ture Never Before Offered
$50 Refrigerators ... .$3730
$15 Dining Tables ....$930
$25 Dining Tables ....$1830
$9 Wardrobes ...$630
$10 Dining Chairs $730
$1.25 Plate Racks ....... 60c
Solid - gilt framed $430
pictures now at $3X0
Solid gilt framed Mirrors,
were $10, now $730
Solid oak framed Mirrors,
were $9X0, now ...... $6X0
Solid quartered oak Hall
Trees, worth $25, now
go at $1630
Others correspondingly
low from $6 up to $25X0
IFTLJII2.RIIISIHIEIR1S
.
mir Bom monuments ' of antiquity
two shining exam plea of the surrtral
of tha fittest!"
' Liberia.
Liberia shares with Haiti the dis
tinction of bains the only place In the
world where the negro rules not only
himself, bat also such white men as
dwell there. ".. Liberia's history haa
been one long record of Intertribal and
civil wars, although ita record in this
respect, it is only fair to say. Is less
sanguinary than that of Haiti. - Is
fact, so careful is the Llberlan of his
skin when fighting Is In progress that
it has become a standing joke that a
Llberlan battlefield is the safest place
on earth and that to become a soldier
lu Liberia is to embrace the least dan
gerous profession known to mankind
Pearson's Weekly.
The Prettiest FeeW
A Swiss professor named Bedorta
state that not one woman in a score
has a perfect foot owing to the wear
ing of high heeled boots and pointed
toe shoes. Russian. German. AmerU
can. Austrian and Dutch women, h
says, have broad feet, while those of
Englishwomen are too narrow to fulfill
classical and healthy conditions. The
women of the Latin races, excluding
Frenchwomen, have the best formfcd
and therefore the prettiest feet, the
professor says.
PALLADIUM WANT ADS PAY.
r,.. -ian Inanine monev
need on your own guarantee,
. r 1
there are iu enaorsemems,
ences. assignments or pledges
1
manded by our modern system.
We give you j ust what you ask for in.
a lump sum and allow you to pay it back
in small weekly payments arranged and
. , a IX
Stipulates vy yourseu.
Ask
So
A Sack
A Barrel
A Car Load
A Train Load
MATIHIEES
Parlor FnnirMtoire, Eflc,
Yea Sboalfl M AfcczL
$2X0 Screens $ 1X0
$15 Morris Chairs ....$10.50
, $12 Couches, velour . .$ 730
$1730 Couches, leather $1130
yczr tfcze to tsy. Store cpsa
1 I I
In a ffteal Way.
a huliM tm mm lament!
at
Gras, Austria, received a totter
a mother who explalne taac
bad i
and
rheumatism and had kept
girl at home to none her.
ettie :
Flower Stop
itu nta sl rts ita
enables you to borrow what TOtt &
saves you time and worry because K II
lima .nil vnrrv tinrail
de
INDIANA LOAN CO. VI
Srd Fleer Colonial BMf,
PHONE 1341 ROOM 4
RICHMOND.
t .
Order Tco Srndl zzi
None Tco Lrc2
FADES
IBISdDSo CdD,
$25 Davenports ......$1745
$25 Buffets ......... .$1745
$20X0 Sideboards .$14.83
$10 Library Cases ....$ 7.45
$15 Sectional Book
at ..... ........ ....$ MS
$9 Writing Desks 1...$ 630
$230 Magazine Racks $ 130
$1230 Library Tables) $ 73V
$15 Parlor Cabinets... $1030
$10 Music Cabinets . .$ 7XS
evczfrL
ItfONlIt
Nffcimi fib".
n fi) taffies
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on
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925-927-029

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