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The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1907-1939, August 08, 1910, Image 1

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THE JZ IPAIPER HH EJAMV KKDEJEGTIXJIZ D3LV PAPER -IM- CVEAOILY
T
big:
AND SUN-TELEGRAM.
VOL. XXXV. JiO. 2V2.
BICIUIOND. IXD.. MONDAY EVENING. AUGUST 8, 1910.
SINGLE COPY, 3 CnNTS.
MAYOR'S CABINET
WAttTS A SiriKlllG
FUI10 FOR PLANT
Accepts Suggestion of M. J.
O'Brien for Saving J&per
Hav in Pav Off the Bonds
of City Plant.
SUPT JOHNSON WANTS
THE PLANT ENLARGED
He Says Before the New Pro
' ject Is Placed in Effect, a
New Unit, Badly Needed,
Should Be Built.
The proposition (or creating a sink'
log fund to pay for the Municipal
Light plant was presented at the may
or's cabinet meeting this morning, by
M. J. O'Brien, president of the Blnklng
fund cominlKKlon. in general the prop
osition was similar to that outlined lu
the Palladium several weeks ago. All
members of the cabinet and other elty
officials say the plan is a fine one and
Mayor Zimmerman promised to do all
that is possible to secure its passage ia
council.
Approximately $22 a day for sixteen
years and six months beginning Ot to
ber 1, 1010. will pay the bonded In
debtedness of $141,000, which falls due
March 1, 1027, as the money could be
lut out at compound Interest in a lo
cal bank. This money would be known
as the light plant sinking fund and
could be used for no other purpose
than to pay the bonds of the plant
To Prevent Extravagance.
Mr. O'Brien, in presenting the mat
ter said that It is a plan to guard
gainst the extravagance of any fu
ture administration spending money
from the regular municipal light plant
fund for unnecessary, repairs on the
plant i .
The regular sinking fund at present
contain! l'5,rj6.07. At any time
council may pass an ordinance - to
spend any Or all of this money' for
Improvements on the plant, so It la in
no way protected from council "raids"
In the future.
It wai stated as Mayor Zimmerman
was really tbe -father of the plant,"
he should If possible, form a plan of
paying for It The interest on the pro-
posed fund would be compounded at
the rate of 3 per cent
Mmrod H. Johnson, superintendent
of the light plant, although favoring
'the project, says It should be post
poned until the new unit is Installed
at the plant. This unit will mean the
construction of a new building, boilers
and other equipment and an expendit
ure of over $40,000. Mr. Johnson
thinks the plant could not make the
Improvement, which is absolutely ne
cessary and at the same time pay $22
per day to the light plant sinking
fund. Other city officials, however,
favor temporary loans to construct the
Dew unit
New Unit la Needed.
,"The new unit" declared Mr. John
on, "is an absolute necessity, aa we
re carrying almost the full load ca
pacity of the plant at present. The
real capacity is 1,250 kilowatts, but
we are now carrying over 1,450. In a
pinch 1.600 can be carried. This will
be the case this winter for, although
m. Unnalo fir til hi. ua Installs It a
own plant, we have other big orders
to fill."
Mr. Johnson states if the city would
pay what it owes the plant for light
and power and the sinking fund is not
created the new unit could be install
ed next year and paid for within a
year of ita completion without making
any loans at all. He said vhen nec
essary to make the Improvement the
city would probably iasue bonds
against the plant when it is already
Indebted to the plant "That is not
fair." he said.
The plant Is securing new custom
ers every day, and now particularly
because the natural gas has faflod
and many small factories are putting
In electric power. Also becauite a
large number of big factories are In
stalling electric motors Instead of
team power.
POISONS A FAMILY
(American News Service)
. Rochester, Aug. S. Toadstools
which they mistook for mushrooms
poisoned an entire family and caused
the deaths of Celia Kingsbury, 3. and
her sister Ruth, aged 15 months, last
night. The children's grandmother.
Hannah Kingsbury, is dying today at
ma my noapuai. me loaastoois
were gathered by the victim's grand
father and were fried for supper.
TWO BALLOONS LOST
Munich. August 8. Three army diri
gibles ascended from here today to
search for the two army balloons
which ascended on August 5, and from
which no news has been received.
Grave fears are entertained for the
safety of the passengers, three in each
balloon.
HALF A MILL
1011
KNIGHTS ARE HI
THE WINDY CITY
An English Delegation, Headed
by the Earl of Euston, Was
Among the Arriving Delega-
jons Today.
LOCAL DELEGATION IS
IN CONVENTION CITY
Knights from This City, Num
bering Thirty-five, Left Sun
day Many Special Trains
Passed Through.
(American News Service)
Chicago, Aug. 8. Half a million vis
itors, including many thousands of
white plumed uniformed Knights Tem
plars are exacted to be entertained
by Chicago this week during the thir-ty-firBt
triennial conclave. Half that
number are already here, including to
day's arrivals, among which were the
world-famed Raper Comroandery No. 1
of Indianapolis, whose drill. team has
won many prizes in contests. Other
arrivals today included the Right Hon
orable Earl of Euston, most eminent
and supreme grand master of the
Knights Tomplar, heading a delega
tion of English visitors. He repre
sents the Duke of Connaught. head of
the order in England. Los Angeles Is
being boomed for the next conclave.
It Is estimated that Tuesday's monster
parade will require three hours In
passing the reviewing stand.
LOCAL KNIGHTS LEAVE. .
Richmond was the center of much
activity among the Knight Templars
yesterday and today. The local
Knight Templars, about thirty-five
strong, several accompanied by mem
bers of their families, left on a special
car for Chicago yesterday noon to at
tend tbe triennial conclave.
r Thrte c special .-. trains I carrying
Knights Templar from Dayton, Spring
field. Cincinnati, and delegations from
different points in Eastern Kentucky,
passed through the city today. There
were two trains from Cincinnati, each
bearing about five hundred passengers.
The lodges represented for the most
part Included members of Manson,
Trinity and Cincinnati lodges. On the
special from Dayton, O., Reed lodge
No. 6. of Dayton, and Palestine lodge
No. 33 of Springfield were .provided
for. Each lodge had its own band.
and : short concerts were rendered in
the Pennsylvania depot. Clarence
Green, a member of Reed lodge of
Dayton, formerly a resident here, is a
member of the Reed drill team.
HOT WATER BLEW UP
(American News Service)
New York, Aug. 8. Two men were
dreadfully scalded, one fatally, and
thirty-families were panic stricken to
day when a 400-gallon tank of hot
water in an eight-inch wall blew up in
the airshaft of the six-story building
at tbe corner of Broome and Clinton
streets.
Max Kallenberg was taken in a dy
ing condition to Gouveneur hospital.
Nathan Zackin suffered many scalds,
but was taken to his home. Both were
employed as bakers in the basement.
POUR INTO BOSTON
(American News Service.)
Boston, Aug. 8. Delegates to the
national convention of the Catholic
Total Abstinence Union of America
are thronging into Boston and several
hundred of them will be here when
the first session is held at Fanuiel ball
on Wednesday.
It will be presided over by the Rev.
Peter O'Callaghan, S. P.. president,
who is of the most forceful and versa
tile orators connected with the Paul
let order of Chicago.
FAIR AT LEXINGTON
(American News Service)
Lexington, Ky., Aug. S. The. annual
Blue Grass fair opened today under
favorable conditions and will continue
through the week. In conjunction
with the fair an attractive program
of races will be carried out.
AT POLICE COURT. "
A case for beating ' a board bill
against Earl Regan, was dismissed In
police court this morning because of
failure of the prosecuting witness to
appear against the defendant. "Jim"
Stephens and Ira Stlnson were fined
$5 and costs for drunk and George
Trotter was fined $1 and costs for the
same offense. - -'- -
AMERICANS GIVEN
A . CONCESSION BY
TURK GOVERNMENT
United States Syndicate Now
Have Privilege of Develop
ing Mines and Building
Great Railroad.
BERLIN AND LONDON
ALARMED AT REPORT
Private Cables Indicate that
the United States Steel Cor
poration Is Behind the Great
- Project.
London, Aug. 8. By securing the
right to build a $100,000,000 railroad in
Turkey, and getting invaluable mining
privileges, an American syndicate of
financiers has outwitted the mo3t
astute commercial interests of Germ
any and England, the chief contend
ers for rights in Turkey, according
to information received here today.
Coming soon after America had forc
ed Europe to grant her bankers par
ticipation in the Chinese railroad loan,
the Turkish development is the source
of alarm here and in Berlin.
Private cables received here indi
cate that the . moving power behind
the syndicate is the United States
steel corporation.' With tbe right of
exclusively working for twenty years
one of the richest mineral districts of
Turkey, untold millions are today In
the grasp of the Americans, London
financial district holds.
, Crumbs for English.
British contractors, however, may
secure a 'share of the construction
which Is soon to begin. The big Eng
lish contracting firm of MacArthur.
Perks & Co., is Indirectly represented
in the deal .through the participation
of tbe ' connected American firm - of
MacArthur Brothers, which has taken
a large part in the construction of
American western railroads, including
Harriman lines.
Rumors - of the railroad deal and
mining concessions have been current
here since last fall, when the Ottoman-American
Development company
was organized in New Jersey with a
nominal capitalization of $500,000.
The full extent of the undertaking was
not understood here, however.
With concessions for 1.200 miles of
railroads through the mineral and oil
territories of Kurdistan and the Tigris
and Euphrates . valleys, and . with the
mining rights for twelve and a half
miles on each side of tbe road for its
entire length given to the Americans,
the Turkish government will be forc
ed to abandon working the govern
ment mines, which are in the territory
affected. "
Europe to Protest.
The Turkish cabinet has passed fa
vorably on the project. Europe how
ever, will . bring to bear all possible
pressure to prevent the matter being
laid before the Turkish parliament
when it meets on November 18.
The reports current here indicate
that probably the most important fig
ure in the syndicate is E. C. Converse,
who is a steel trust director.
MacArthur Brothers are represent
ed by .Arthur F. MacArthur, and oth"r
prominent men involved are Franklin
Remington, of New York; James L.
Laidlaw, C. A. Moore and C. M. Ches
ter, Jr.
HOLD A CONFERENCE.
Constantinople, Aug. S. T. B. Hoh
ler, first secretary of the British em
bassy, today conferred with Rifaat
Pasha, minister of foreign affairs.
Though the subject was not announc
ed, it was reported semi-officially that
the conference was caused by the an
nouncement that American interests
had secured railroad rights and im
mense mining concessions.
PaUcdimn's Daily
Avercge Gradation
For Week Ending Aug. 6th, 1910.
(Esnept Saturday)
This Includes all our Regular Com
plimentary Lists
AVERAGE CITY CIRCULATION
3,291
TOTAL DAILY AVERAGE
For the Same Week. Including Rur
al Routes. Small Towns. City Cir
culation, Etc.. Six Day
5,007
THIS DOES NOT INCLUDE
SAMPLE COPIES
WIFE AND CHILD
WAITING TO HEAR
FROM CHEHQWETH
Well Known Local Dentist Left
the City Last Friday and
Wife Says His Whereabouts
Are Unknown.
FAMILY TROUBLES ARE
ASSIGNED AS REASON
Mrs. Chenoweth Says That
Her Husband Refused to
Live Longer With Her Par
entsWas in III Health.
- Dr. Leslie S. Chenoweth has left the
city and his whereabouts are un
known to relatives.
His alleged desertion of wife and
j child, and abandonment of a lucrative
I practice in dentistry caused a big sen-
sation in social as well as business
' - 1. i . i J
tnvico wucu it uecame Known luuay.
He left the city last Friday.
His departure is said by the young
wife to be due to trouble in the family.
On Friday evening when he went home
he remonstrated with bis wife, she
said, because of the strained relations
which had existed between her and
his mother, Mrs. W. S. Chenoweth.
The outcome was that he declared he
would never again live with his parents-in-law,-
Mr. and Mrs. Alvin A.
Marlatt, 131 South Ninth street.
, Relatives Not Alarmed.
On Saturday morning it was an
nounced by his relatives that he had
left the city for several weeks for the
benefit of his health. It was said then
that he would go north or to the north
west, but no word has been received
as to where he has located, so far as
could be learned today. His relatives
are not greatly alarmed at his ab
sence and they believe that his where
abouts will be made known soon.
.Relations existing .between Mrs.
Alice Chenoweth and her mother-in-law
were not the most congenial, ac-
i cording to statements-of the young
wife today. - Dr. Chenoweth and his
mother had planned to take an auto
mobile trip into the southwest, expect
ing to leave here on August 15. His
wife was not to be a member of the
party, and she refused her consent to
her husband making the trip.
Kissed His Wife Goodbye.
When Dr. Chenoweth . went to his
home on Friday evening he upbraided
his wife, it was stated. Her mother,
Mrs. Marlatt, interposed and. told her
son-in-law that if he would stop being
a baby and be a man that there would
be no reason for any marital trouble.
Kissing his wife good night and say
ing that he was going, away, but would
return on Saturday morning, he in
formed his mother-in-law that he
would never spend another - night in
the Marlatt home. He went to the
home of his parents, W. S. Chenoweth
and wife, and left early tbe next morn
ing. The promised visit to his wife and
child on Saturday morning was not ful
filled. No word was received and his
continued absence led her to suspect
and afterwards ascertain the real con
dition of affairs.
Most congenial were the relations
of Dr. Chenoweth and his wife, accord
ing to the latter, except when the trou
ble between the two families arose and
made circumstances somewhat strain
ed. The young wife has planned no
action against her husband and says
that she will take none.
Left For His Health.
It was stated by Dr. Chenoweth's
relatives today that he left the city
for the benefit of his health. They
said that he had had hemorrhages
since last November. They did not
know where he had located or where
he expected to locate but are antici
pating word from him iu a few days.
His wife, before her marriage, was
Miss Alice Marlatt. She was but sev
enteen years old when married. She
is twenty-one years old today. Eigh
teen months ago today a son was born
to Mr. and Mrs. Chenoweth. Dr. and
Mrs. Chenoweth were popular among
the younger set and he had built np in
excellent practice in dentistry. His
office was located In the Murray build
ing. It has been closed and some of
the furniture removed by a local deal
er. REVOLT III PERSIA
(American News Service" V
Teheran. Aug. 8. Sporadic fighting
was reported today ia the Northern
sections of the city and the suburbs,
where the Nationalists' yesterday made
a stand against the government
troops and were routed by machine
guns. It Is believed that the list of
casualties exceeds 100 dead and 500
injured., Scores of. Malcontents were
captured today, the government forces
following up their advantage.
The condition of , Sater Khan, the
wounded nationalist leader, is . pro
nounced serious. Bakir Khan, the oth
er chief captured, today refused to
consider a peace agreement In behalf
of his followers. . . r
Would Adopt
ESyyW'SVCir , VsjCi
jy J
Mrs. Adolpb Ladentturg. well-known in tne society or two continents,
and little Beatrice, the thirteen-year-old daughter of
who has been supporting, herself and six children selling cigarettes. Mrs.
Ladenburg, who is exceedingly wealthy has offered again and again to
adopt little Beatrice, but the Baroness stands firm against it.
CIVIL SERVICE IS
NOT FAVORED HERE
Competitive Appointments of
City Employes Rejected
by the Mayor
SUGGESTED BY F0ULKE
EX-CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
ER ADVISES THE SYSTEM, AR
GUING IT WOULD ADVANCE THE
CITY OVER OTHERS.
With disfavor was the proposition
of W. D. Foulke looked upon by the
mayor's cabinet v this morning when
Mr. Foulke suggested that a competi
tive examination be established in tbe
city government of Richmond for, the
appointment of subordinate employes.
According to Mr.'Foulke's plan the
heads of departments would be ap
pointed as at present by the mayor,
but all other employes, including those
on the police, fire and street depart
ment would be required to take" exam
inations to secure appointments.
Mayor Zimmerman stated absolute
ly that he did not favor the plan of
appointing men who had worked
against the interests of the adminis
tration. The mayor said he believed
the present - administration had - ap
pointed competent men and that there
were no incompetents in the cabinet.
Would Advance the City.
It was stated by Mr. Foulke that the
plan had been successfully tried in
many of the large cities of the United
States and in a few small ones. As
a former , member of the civil service
commission Mr. Foulke urged the
adoption of the system saying it would
place Richmond in a position much in
advance of that of any city in the
state.
Other routine business was taken up
by the board. Dairy Inspector Fluke
reported the dairies of the city In fair
condition. He said there are 17 dairies
furnishing milk to Richmond, with 23
wagons,, and 450 cows, of which 23C
are tuberculin-tested.
William Whitacre, superintendent of
the crematory, reported that 469 yards
of wet and 110 yards of dry garbage,
and 19 animals were consumed at the
crematory during the past month.
017LS III COIIVEIITIOil
f American Kwt Service.) ,
Rochester, N. Aug. S The annual
convention of the Order of American
Owls will open here tomorrow. Fred
erick J. Seames of Buffalo is A candi
date for president of the ; National
council. .
THE WEATHER.
.
STATE -Partly cloudy tonight" and
Tuesday.
LOcXFai'r tonight and Tuesday.
a Nobte Waif
CAMPBELL FOLLOWS
THEHAHLY SYSTEM
Fearing Defeat of Temperance
Cause, Texas Solons to
Have Extra Session.
HE FAVORS DRASTIC LAWS
SITUATION IN TEXAS NOW THE
SAME AS IN INDIANA' WHEN
THE COUNTY LOCAL OPTION
LAW WAS ENACTED.
(American Ncw Service.)
San Antonio, Tex Aug. 8. Gover
nor Campbell and his prohibition sup
porters are now credited with the
Intention to use "dynamite" on th
antis, said agent to take the form of
a ten-mile and a Quart law. A mes
sage of the governor's transmitted to
the senate a few days ago recom
mends the passage of both these law
and will also prevent the saloon men
from making campaign contributions.
The ten-mile - statute would prohibit
the running of a saloon or liquor store
within ten miles of any educational in
stitution supported wholly or in part
by the state, and the Quart law would
in effect drive the saloon out of busi
ness by prohibiting the drinking of
alcoholic beveridges on the premises
where bought. A provision of the
latter measure would close all liquor
stores or dispensaries between the
hours of 6 p. m. and ? a. m. Needless
to say these recommendations ' If
brought into effect would put every
saloon in the state out of business.
Obstacles in His Path.
' But obstacles have already ben met
by tbe governor. Bills Introduced in
the senate for these changes have met
with support only on the part of the
regulars, though only one vote beta?
needed . to get a majority. Out of a
total of 31 senators 15 have signed the
bills, but there Is at present no Indi
cation ' that a better showing can be
made by the prohibitionists. -In the
house the opposition to these bills will
be much, greater.
v The puzzle: Why "... did Governor
Campbell call a special session of the
legislature, is now no longer troubling
the people of the state. The gover
nor's Intentions have been made clear
by the drastic measures advocated by
him. . Fearing that the cause of prohi
bition would not be advanced mater
ially as the result of this year's elec
tion, the prohibition machine Induced
the governor to call the special ses
sion with a view of making one last
assault on the antis. It Is now claim
ed that the. fire insurance matter
could have been regulated without the
calling of the special session and that
such other legislation as was propos
ed is of really no importance.' Some
labor laws proposed were flat!y turned-down
as being not wanted. ,
FINANCES OF
cms
BY nIWHAN
In a Report Submitted Today
the City Controller Points
Out that Utmost Economy
Is Necessary.
EIGHT FUNDS OF CITY t
ARE ABOUT EXHAUSTED
He Says Supplies Must Be
Purchased Only When Nec
essary and He Advises No
More Appropriations.
STREET WORK IS COSTLY
AND THE ACCOUNT FOR PARKS
HAS BEEN DRAWN UPON HEAV
ILY STATEMENT IS MADE V
MAYOR ZIMMERMAN.
FROM CONTROLLER'S REPORT
Eight city funds running very
low.
Supplies must be purchased only
when necessary.
Funds being drawn on heavily
in August
Advises no additional appropri
ations. Recommends all ' bills be '0.
K.'d" by department heads.
Balance in sinking fund August
1. $2075.15.
Receipts on AuguBt liquor ' li
censes, SI ,255; total receipts 12,780.
Absolute economy in all depart
ments of the city government and no .
additional appropriations are the only
things that will carry the city through '
the next five months, according to tha
report of "Clty -Controller E. G,..lfov
Mahan at the meeting of the mayor's
cabinet this morning.
The- following funds are especially
low as shown in the report:
Parks, pay roll Appropriation 3.
400; used g2.4K8.30; balance $911.70. '
Parke, miscellaneous Appropriation '
$2,700; used $1,21.35; balance $V
4:J8.G3.
Streets, miscellaneous Appropria
tion, $2,200; used $1,233.29; balance
$900.80.
Streets, pay roll Appropriation, ,
$2U0O; used $14,054.08; balance $0,
345.12. Garbage hauling Appropriation 4.
GOD; used $2,710.08; balance $1,280.02.
Fire dep., miscellaneous Appropria
tion $2,15o; used $2,020.41; balance ,
$129.59.
Fire dept. feed Appropriation 1,- '
30D; used $832.94; balance $407.00.
Police, miscellaneous Appropriation
$280; used $170.73; balance $9.27.
"In addition to the small balances'
some of the accounts have been drawn
on pretty heavily since August 1," say '
the report "The miscellaneous ac
count for parks has used $063.00; sup
erintendent of streets pay roll $1,070.
lO; superintendent of streets, miscel
laneous $20.25, and the fire depart
ment miscellaneous, $4,188.
Must be Economical.
Continuing the report says:
"It is plainly to be seen by tha
above figures that there must be the
closest kind of economy exercised ta
make the various funds last ' until ,
January, 1911. At this time I ,do not
think it advisable, for tha rfCnder
of this year, to ask for any additional
appropriation for the different ac
counts. "I would respectfully recommend
that all the heads of, the various de
partments inspect and mO. K." alt bills
for .supplies of their respective depart
ments before they are passed on by
the board.
"It is absolutely impossible for tbe '
heads of tbe various departments to
make out intelligent reports unless
they. have given the Items that save
been purchased for their respective
departments and have correct receipts
for the same,
" "Ia conclusion I will urge that only ',
such articles be purchased' aa are ab
solutely necessary in order to nest
the necessary demands of the depart
ments' "r
Favor "O. K." Feature.
. Especially commended in the report
was the recommendation that all bills .
be "O. Kd by department beads
before sent to the board.- This has -not
been practiced, previously, it is
understood except by the light plant .
It is probabe the system will be adopt
ed by the board.
In connection with the report Slayer
Zimmerman took occaslost to g;ar. 1 "-,
his position on city Cnanel-i cfra.
The mayor said that it Is a bad tZZzj --
and poor business proposes t tr :
row money and to pay taterext ca f),
"The taxes. sboaSa be bm-S tX .
HOW
Contiae4 ca Pit rive.)
I..

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