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The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1907-1939, October 12, 1910, Image 8

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PAGE EIGIIT.
THE RICII310XD PALLADIUM AD SCX-TEIiEGEA3I, WEDXESD AT, OCTOBER 12, ISIO.
OPEUiriG
SESsmn
OF SYI10D TODAY
United Presbyterians from
Various Points Are Attend
ing the Meetings.
SCHOOLS ASK FOR FUNDS
BUT NO DEFINITE ACTION HAS
BEEN TAKEN ON THE8E PETI
TIONS AS YET SOME REPORTS
ARE RECEIVED.
WEDNESDAY EVENING.
7:30 p. m. Devotional service.
7:45 p. to. Report of committee
on Signs of the Times, Dr. W. S.
McClure, chairman.
8:30 p. m. Address by Dr. Jno.
A. Henderson representing the
board of education.
8:65 p. m. Address by Dr. W. 8.
McClure representing the board of
Home Missions.
' 9: IS p. m. Business.
9:30 p. m. Adjournment.
At the opening business session of
the second Synod of the United Pres
byterian church at Reid Memorial
church on Wednesday morning sever
al matters of business were brought
to the attention of the delegates but
nearly all matters were postponed un
til the sessions this afternoon and
Thursday morning, when action will
be taken.
Perhaps the most Important matters
touched upon by the synod was that
pertaining to the seminary at Xenla,
Ohio, and Monmouth college at Mon
mouth, O. Representatives from the
schools spoke on needed Improve
ments at both places. Monmouth col
lege particularly Is In need of more
dormitories. No money was voted to
either of the schools.
The Rev. John A. Hendricks of Day
ton, talked on matters pertaining to
ways and means of raising money for
Mission work. The regular represen
tative of the ways and means commit
tee with headquarters in Pittsburg
was unable to be present. This com
mittee hat In charge the manner of
raising money among the different
congregations In the synod.
A number of papers and petitions
were presented to the synod which
the clerk of the meeting put in charge
of the proper committees for report
later. The Rev. R. J. Kyle, chairman
of the committee on narrative and
state of religion, made his report
which was approved and placed on
file. Owing to business taking up so
much of the synod's time the address
by Dr. A. M. Jamleson, representing
the board of church extension was
postponed until later.
The meeting at the church on Wed
nesday evening will be in the nature
of a popular affair. Several address
es will be made by visiting clergy
men. The public is Invited.
Address By Shumaker.
Business before the synod was re
sumed at 3:15 o'clock Wednesday af
ternoon following a fifteen minute de
votional service. The Rev. E. S. Shu
maker, superintendent of the Anti-Saloon
league of Indiana was the prin
cipal speaker and his talk was upon
matters in connection with the fight
which the league Is making against
saloons. The Rev. J, R. Millin, chair
man of the committee on the boards
of the church made his report. Dr.
C. R. Watson secretary of the board
of foreign missions addressed the del
egates before adjournment.
At the opening session of the synod
on Tuesday evening at the Reld Mem
orial church the election of a moder
ator for the ensuing year resulted In
the selection of the Rev. A. T. Hast
ings of Idavtlle, Ind. He is a member
or the Northern Indiana Presbytery.
He succeeds the Rev. C. E. McStravick
of Dayton. O. The other officers of
the synod Include, the Rev. John M.
Moorehead of Hamilton, (secretary
snd the Rev. Edgar MacDAf of Madi
son, Ind., as treasurer.
There are about a hundred dele
gates present. They are representa
tives of th different churches In the
synod, which Includes six Presbyteries
located in portions of three states, in
cluding Ohio, Tennessee and Indiana.
The Presbyteries which compose the
synod are Ohio, Indiana. Northern In
diana, Xenla, Sidney and Tennessee.
It is probable that the session will be
concluded with the Thursday morning
meeting. The visiting delegates are
staying at private homes and at the
hotels. Dinner and supper is served
in the church parlors.
Two N. Y. Democrat Chiefs
COMMITTEE AIID
MAYOR III WRAUGLE
(Continued from Page One.)
head and you kill one of the best
things for the prosperity and adver
tisement that your community has
ever had," declared Mr. Jordan. "The
Chautauqua and Fall Festival are the
two biggest things Richmond has ever
known for her good. I have every
reason to believe that the Fall Fes
tival will not be held next year. Con
aider very carefully before you end
'the Chautauqua.
"Both of these things have been ab
solutely square. There's never been
a taint of graft In either. We've work
ed hard for the Chautauqua and never
received a cent of pay.
"Why If the people dont like the
Chautauqua what do ten thousand go
out to a meeting for?" queried Mr.
Jordan. "Why do we find 1,000 camp
irs enjoying the use of the park for
PLANS F0R DEBATES
And Oratorical Meetings Have
Been Made at Eariham
by a Committee.
TO MEET ALBION AGAIN
Eariham college again expects to
make a showing in debating and ora
tory, and at a meeting of the college
oratorical association yesterday after
noon it was decided to appoint a
committee to arouse interest among
the students in the contests to be
he'.d this year.
Professor E. P. Trueblood made the
suggestion yesterday that a contest
be held soon to test the lib'lity of the
students to make extemporaneous
speeches. He suggested that twenty
four hours before the contest a sub-
! ject be suggested, announced and
each speaker be given ten minutes to
make his speech. The suggestion was
received very favorably by t!ie ass
ciation but action was postponed un
til next meeting.
It was decided yesterday that Eari
ham will meet Albion college. Albion,
Mich., in a debate at the college this
winter term. Last year the Quakers
met Albion at that institution and won
the debate, and this year Albion is
anxious to retrieve her lost honors.
Xhe question for th'e debate has .cot
been decided, but those of commis
sion government and the initiative and
referendum have been suggested. .
Arrangements for the annual col
lege oratorical contest at which a rep
resentative will be chosen (or the
state oratorical contest which is held
in Indianapolis next February - were
begun yesterday. For the past few
years Eariham has won the state
contests and will make a hard right
again this year. All orations will be
handed in by November 15, and the
college contest will be held some time
in the first part of December.
The senior class will hold a camp
supper on Clear creek this evening
to talk over the plans of the class for
the coming year.
WM. SULZER (left), G. W. BLAKE.
two weeks? Does this seem like it's
unpopular with the people?"
People Oppose Paying.
"The people are against anything
that you have to pay for to get into
the Glen," said the mayor.
"Well, how about the pavilion and
the lake," flashed one of the Chautau
qua committeemen. "Both of those
are rented out to private parties. The
principle is the same."'
"We didn't grant the pavilion mana
ger the right to sell stuff in the park,"
said the mayor. "The other board tied
us up on that."
When' Mayor Zimmerman told the
Chautauqua association Le could not
say some things before the newspaper
reporters, one member of the associa
tion told him to put the reporters out.
The reporters offered to go but the
mayor refused to permit it.
Leaks Have Been Known.
"There have been secret sessions be
fore where the proceedings of the
meeting appeared in the papers next
day," said the mayor.
The city officials stand four to two
in favor of holding the Chautauqua
in Glen Miller park, those favoring
it being City Controller McMahan,
City Engineer Charles, Clerk Baits
Bescher and Attorney A. M. Gardner,
and those opposed Mayor Zimmerman
and President Hammond of the board
of works. According to the state law
the board of works or board of park
commissioners of the city shall have
the power to grant such associations
the use of the park.
LEAVE TONIGHT TO
GREET ROOSEVELT
(Continued From Page One.)
may be as to the gestures he makes,
he will have plenty of room for any
amount of such emphasis. When the
building of the platform was planned
it was decided that It should .be. ex
tended eight feet beyond the balcony
and here the colonel will stand during
the speech, with nothing closer over
head than the blue sky.
The speaker and the committee will
enter the platform by. means of. a
stairway leading to it from the lobby
of the opera house, reaching the lobby
by passing through the theater from
the back entrance on Wabash street.
As the escort moves about' Monu
ment Place the marchers will proceed
to a point in front of the speaking
stand, where especially desirable
places will be reserved for the mem
bers of the Old Soldiers' Republican
club and other veterans who wish to
march. The automobiles carrying Col.
Rodsevelt and the reception commit
tee will continue on Meridian street
to Wabash street and turn west to the
stage entrance of the theater.
After the cars are unloaded they
will proceed to Illinois street, thence
south to Market street, thence east to
the first alley west of the Hotel Eng
lish, Col. Roosevelt's machine, which
will be the first one in the line, pro
ceeding to Wabash street. After the
meeting the committee will take the
automobiles for the union station, go
ing north to Ohio street, west to Illi
nois street, north to New York street,
east to Meridian street and thence
south, around the east side of the
monument, to the union station.
CROWD HEARS DANT1
There are but three more days in
which the public may hear Rev. -Ar
thur Pann, the great English Quak
er evangelist now conducting a gos
pel mission at the South Eighth Street
Friends church, as he leaves Saturday
for Indianapolis, where he is to bold a
week's meeting. The crowd last even
ing was about twice as large as the
previous audience and - the interest
and spirit of the meetings is on the in
crease. Many were helped by the
splendid sermon last night on "Blind
Bartimaens."
. "The preliminary prayer service
opens each evening at 7 o'clock in the
Sunday school room, the main service
following at 7:30 in the auditorium.
Special music will be given each ev
ening. 'All are very earnestly invited
to attend these services.
It you are troubled with sick foeadacne. coo
stipation. indigestion, offensive breath or any
disease arising from stomach trouble, set a 50c
or & bottle of Dr. Caldwell's Syrop Pepsla. It
.' positively guaranteed, to cure von.
M f iiBiii
FOR THE COLD WEATHER? IT
MEANS WARMER CLOTHES AND
STILL IT IS NOT ONLY WARMER
CLOTHES YOU EXPECT IN BUY
ING YOUR SUIT AND OVERCOAT,
BUT YOU WANT NEW AND NEAT
LOOKING FABRICS, THE LATEST
FALL STYLE, AND IT MUST FIT.
NOW WE ARE HERE TO PLEASE
AND GIVE SATISFACTION. ALL
THESE REQUIREMENTS CAN BE
FOUND IN OUR CLOTHES.
Sou
II
No. O north Tonth Gtreot.
ALLISON MADE GOOD
Karl Allison, the local high school
athlete who was given a place on the.
all state high school foot ball team
as captain and quarter la6t year is
making a big stir "in. the foot ball
pool at Indiana university where he
is a freshman. Allison is playing left
half on the freshman eleven and in a
recent game against the varsity re
peatedly got away for. t long runs
around the ends- He will win a
1914 jersey.
SKELETON FOUUD
Workmen on the Old Lucy
Farm, Near Milton, Make
Startling Discovery.
PROBABLY WAS AN INDIAN
(Palladium Special)
Milton, Ind.. Oct, 12. The skeleton
of a man thought to have been an In
dian killed by white men in the early
days of the settlement of this part of
the county, was unearthed on the T.
J. Connell farm south of town when a
gravel bank caved in a few days ago.
Uannen Smullen and John Smullen
who live on the farm of R. P. Lind
say were digging In the gravel pit
OBSERV
EH
HOLIDAY
(American News Service) .
Boston, Oct. - 12. In accordance
iwith a law passed by the Iast-legis-
' lature Columbus Day was observed as
a legal ' holiday throughout the state
j today for the first time. The program
i for the celebration in this city includ
ed a pontifical high mass in the Ca
thedral, a big parade of Catholic so
cieties and Italian organizations and
commemorative exercises. The, eighty
Chinese Catholics marching in the pa
rade attracted particular attention. .
made. An attempt was made to raise
the bones but they fell to pieces.
The pit is popularly believed to
have been the burial place of the
Indians, who had a trail in vicinity in
the early days of the settlement.
There was a block house near by
where pioneers took refuge when the
Indians became threatening.
The farm has a bad name in the
neighborhood, being notorious from
the fact that the late John Lynch was
murdered there a few years ago. The
murderer of Lynch has never been apprehended.
The Ktwdirorilfe,
w.nM Mnta should learn what to do tor
one another's little ills, and for the His of tee
children that may come. Tbey are ear sooner
or later to hay occasion to treat constipation
or indigestion. When the opportunity cornea
remember that the quickest way to obtain relief,
and finally a permanent core, ia with Dr. CaM
well's Syrup Pepsin, the great herb laxative
compound. A bottle shoo 1 always be ia the
boos. JtcostsonlYSOcanuortlatdrugstorev
PALLADIUM WANT AOS PAY.
n Workingman!
We can arrange your bills and accounts so
that one convenient payment will settle all. We
do so by advancing you enough to pay all the
small debts and arrange a suitable weekly or
monthly payment. We have plans and rates that
will suit you and all transactions are strictly, con
fidential. Furniture, Pianos, Teams, etc., serve as
security.
Let us show you how we loan amounts from
$10 up.
a
u
-i
to
3
ui
tr
ELEVATOR TO FOURTH FLOOR.
Cor. Main and 7th, Richmond, Ind. Phone 2560.
uDoes Foe FaDO
and BinifteG' Tlhaft
AJoan five gaftns-
facDiDon,
The cold weather that will soon be here will de
mand that you give some attention to your footwear
the oxfords and light shoes that you are wearing
will have to be replaced with heavier shoes for the
cold weather.
Our line of shoes, such as the "Queen Quality" and
"Dr. Reed's" are the best makes on the market
they give you that satisfaction of long wear, solid
comfort and style that tell in well made shoes. We
ask your inspection before you buy. Our line is com
plete; it includes many of the well known makes, but
also others equally as good for the money in the
$2.50, $3.00, $3.50 and $4.00 line.
QUEEN QUALITY for Ladies, in button and dull
kid, patent and gun metal, and vici kid, $3.50 and $4.
DR. REED'S CUSHION SHOES for Men Vici kid,
gun metal, $5.00 and $5.50.
j. trj. -curaraoKiQMArj
807 Main Stroot
A wB (HI IMIMIP
H. C ends A T door, open ,
in 1 piece , r .tf ?-
open Y " ' '
R
' Just to show you that we are in earnest about
the stove question, we are offering you our $60.00
malleable range at the extremely low price of $45.00.
You cannot afford to get a cheap constructed range
when you can get this high grade range at this price.
This Cut of Stove Shows the Contraction
The stove is made of only selected material, has
the malleable six-hole top, the duplex interlock grate,
so easy to change for all kinds of fuel.
This Range Will Burn Any Hied of Feel
. It has the copper tank that can be detached as
shown in cut. This, of course, will last a life-time.
This range has the full sized oven, allowing four 9i
inch pie pans. . '-' ' ' .
It comes in either high stove base or the low fiat base. THE HOOSIER RANGE WILL BAKE WITH ONE-HALF
THE USUAL AMOUNT OF FUEL. Remember, only the stock on hand will go at this ridiculously low price. They
will not be here at this price very long. If you cannot pay cash, we try to arrange terms so that you pay as
you get paid. ; V ,
We Have Ofltticr Ranges As Cheap As 025.00
A COMPLETE LINE OF HEATERS
W '-Z&ILJLHKI-.
Richmond's Loading Homo
925927, 929
Main St.
horo

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