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The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1907-1939, February 10, 1919, Image 12

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PAGE TWELVE
THE RICHMOND PALLADIUM AND SUN-TELEGRAM MONDAY, FEB. 10, 1919.
FRANKLIN LOSES
FAST GAME TO
EARLHAM TEAM
Best Playing of Season is Done
f by Quakers Score at End
29 to 22.
. Earlham basketballerg returning to
- form once more defeated the fast
and supposedly invincible Franklin
' quintette on the Franklin floor Satur
day nisrht. 28122.
It was the best game of the season
' for Earlham and every man was key
ea up to a high pitch, working for
victory every minute of the game.
With the team going on high the Bap
tists were simply outclassed and had
so chance.
Hall played with all his ability Sat
urday night and his goal shooting and
floor work surpassed all expectations
Pitts played his first game as a reg
ular guard on the Earlham team, and
fitted into Meek's position well and
; broke up many Franklin plays, and
, also Drone into the scoring.
, Johnson, as usual, played a steady
game and there were a very few
short shots made by Franklin because
... as soon as the ball came into John
son's territory it was lost
. Roth and Campbell were the bright
lights for Franklin, with four and
ttareo field goals respectively. The
Baptists fought the Quakers every
minute of the game but could not stop
-tho Earlham forwards from breaking
tnrough the defense time and time
again for foals.
The Quakers . 6tarted the scoring
hut Franklin was not slow in getting
points and the score seesawed back
'and forth the entire first half. Both
teams started off ie second half but
Earlham took the largest lead and
never lost it
The following men participated in
the contest: Earlham Lawler, Hall,
Carey, Pitts. Johnson; Franklin
Roth, Kingsolver, Pike, Campbell and
Muller. Field baskets Lawler, 3;
Hall, 5; Carey, 3; Pitts, 3; Roth, 4;
Campbell, 3; and Kingsolver, 2.
HAGERSTOWN TEAM
DEFEATS FOUNTAIN
CITY QUINTETTE
The Hagerstown Independent Bas
ketball team won from the Fountain
City quintet at Hagerstown Saturday
night, Feb. 8. by a score of 34 to 18.
Both teams played rough and the con
dition of the floor made team work
almost impossible. The score at the
end of the first half was 12 to 8 in fav
or of Hagerstown but the locals began
to connect with he basket in the sec
ond half and ran the score up on their
opponents.
Hagerstown . Fountain City
Hartley '. Mercer
Forward
Holiday Bonder
Ferward
Werking Huff
! Center
Bookout Lacey
Guard
Witcherman Henderson
Guard
Bryson Hartely
Forward
Field Goals Holiday 5. Werking 4,
Bookout 3, Witcherman 2, Bryson ' 1,
Mercer 2. Bourier 2, Hartely 1.
Foul Goals Holiday 3, missed 2,
Werking 1, missed 1, Huff 8, missed 3.
Scorer Faust.
Timekeeper Stout.
TTMPTRFS HAT TT SOFTTHESE PLAYERS COUTDNT BTTE 'EM
I IjFHBsr pi
fx - fW: 11 l
Group of big league players and one
of umpires who participated in
first "masked' ball game. Below,
Carl Sawyer, with masked mascot s
masked dog.
What is believed to be the first
masked ball frame ever staged was
played recently at Pasadena when
the Pasadena and Standard
Murphy clubs clashed. Every
player, both umpires and even the
mascot wore ftu masks. The game
went eleven innings. Many of the
fans who rooted hollered through
their linen masks, too. The upper
photo shows many of the major
league celebrities who played.
From left to right the players are:
Trash Hannah, N. Y. Americans,
catcher; Doc Crandall. Boston Na
tionals, pitcher; Chic Gandil,
White Sox, first base; Art Griggs,
Detroit Americans, second; Fred
McMullen, White Sox, third; Ole
Olson, Brooklyn Nationals, left
field; Carl Sawyer, New York
Americans, shortstop and center
field; George Cutshaw, Pirates,
second base and right field; Bill
Piercy, New York Americans,
pitcher, and "Buster" Crandal,
mascot. The lower picture shows
Carl Sawyer with Buster Crandal's
dog.
No Hitch in Willard-Dempsey
Fight, According to Tex Richard
Association Will Help
Players Hurt in War
(By Associated Press)
MILWAUKEE, Feb. 10. Club own
ers of the American Association plan
to take care of their teams injured
in tho war, according to A. F. Times,
president of the Milwaukee club.
TRAINS AT HOME.
COLUMBUS, O., Feb. 10. There
will be no spring training trip for the
Columbus club of the American As
sociation. President Joe Tinker has
tentatively planned to have the play
ers report here March 25. The Uni
versity of Michigan team will spend
the first week of April in Coluribus
to train with the Senators. Tinker
has arranged exhibition games with
the Boston Nationals for Neil park,
April 12 and 13.
Cleveland Abandons
Barnstorming Trips
CLEVELAND, O., Feb. 10. Barn
storming will be eliminated from the
spring training trip of the Cleveland
American league club this season.
Manager Lee Fohn believes that bet
ter results can be obtained if the
entire squad remains in camp instead
of making side trips to play exhi
bition games.
STANAGE SIGNS CONTRACT.
DETROIT, Mich., Feb. 10. Oscar
Stanago, veteran catcher with the De
troit Americans, Is In line for the
1919 season, having affixed his signa
ture to a contract. Stanage will em
bark upon his eleventh season with
tho Tigers. He became a member of
tho club in 1908 when purchased from
the Newark club of the old Eastern
league.
Cargo Steamers Turned
Into Training Ships
WASHINGTON, Feb. 10. To main
tain facilities for training merchant
seamen, the shipping board has decid
ed to turn six of the wooden cargo
steamers built during the war' into
training ships. Over 38,000 young
men have signed applications to take
the courses which the board is now
giving and it is planned to add deep
sea cruisers to the curriculum.
When the new vessels are made
ready, the board will release from re
quisition eight of the ten coastwise
vessels which were turned into train
ing ships during the war. The City
of Berlin, receiving snip at uosion,
and Iris, at San Francisco, will be re-
By JACK KEENE
According to the latest dope from
Tex Rlckard, et al, there- isn't any
hitch so far to the proposal to stage
a championship battle between Cham
pion Jess Willard and Jack Dempsey
some time in July.
Whether or not the fight really doea
come off is a question. But Tex Rick-
ard, Jess Willard, Jack Dempsey and
the other parties to the deal owe the
fans of this country a square deal
before the mill starts as well as after
the two men have shook hands.
Under the terms given out Willard
has accepted an offer of $100,000 to
enter the ring.
Rlckard stated that he would de
posit 110,000 of that coin in Chicago
at the time the offer was accepted.
He agreed to post 515.000 more
sixty days before the fight and thg
remaining 575,000 the aay Deiore me
battle. .
Willard agreed to post a $10,000
guarantee immediately that he would
live up to his word.
Now the fair thing for Rickard and
Willard to do is to show that the first
deposits were actually made with rep
utable people. Then Rickard must
give the same publicity to the posting
of his other two amounts.
These men owe it to the public to
show that the preliminary arrange
ments are bonafide and not mere talk.
Dempsey has agreed to accept $27,-
500 for his share. We believe the
public ought to know it when he signs
up and what the exact terms are. ,
Having fulfilled these obligations
the promoters and fighters ought to
lay their other cards up before the
public when the least hitch occurs.
They should lay off the mudsling
ing. Without the fullest publicity, should
any hitch arise, the negotiations for
the fight will end in a cloud.
Personally, I'm more interested in
seeing the affair pulled off fairly and
on a high plane than I am in seeing
the question of supremacy settled in
a bout that makes of "secret treaties"
and back-room chicanery.
the Boston Checker club he took part
in a great number of club matches and
often traveled long distances to see
matches played. Less than ten years
ago he traveled from Boston to Tole
do to watch a match in which a player
he had backed was engaged. He was
rewarded for his pains by seeing his
player lose.
Lannin has always believed that
checkers were in no small way respon
sible for the success of Mathewson on
the pitching mound. Big Six realized
from his experience at the checker
board that a ball game is not over
in one inning; the score at the end
of the game is what counts in baseball
just as it does in checkers. Checkers
helped Matty to plot and plan at the
beginning of a ball game, as, he had
done many a time at checkers, and
taught him many other lessons of
strategy on the ball field.
Baseball fans have heard so much
about the expertiress of Christy Math
ewson in checkers they have been led
to believe that Big Six is without a
rival in the ranks of organized base
ball. Such is not the case, however,
for Joseph J. Lannin, erstwhile owner
of the Boston Red Sox and leading
spirit in the International league, when
he is in practice can give Christy the
game of his life at the checkerboard.
Long before Lannin became identi
fied with baseball he was a checker
fan. Not only did he indulge in the
game for his own amusement and pas
time, but he backed with his bank
roll some of the leading checker play
ers in the United States.
Long before Lannin ever thought of
becoming the owner of a world's cham
pion baseball team his thoughts were
on checkers. He was only eighteen
years old when his interest turned
to the game up in Massachusetts. He
soon perfected his play to such a de
gree that he vanquished all the so
called country store champions in the
locality. Then he set about to con
quer the champs of the towns in the
immediate vicinity. As a member of
Reviving an old formula invented
seventy-five years ago and almost for
gotten, French shoe manufacturers
are trying to produce a leather, useful
in their industry, from rabbit skins.
FOUNTAIN CITY TEAM
DEFEATS NEW LISBON
FOUNTAIN CITY, Feb. 10. Foun
tain City high school won from the
New Lisbon basketball team here Sat
urday night, 50-12. ,
Fountain City had the New Lisbon
boys outclassed in every department
of the game and from start to finish
there was no doubt about the winner
of the game. The game was fast but
clean all the way through.
The first half ended 20 to 6, with
New Lisbon at the wrong end. Thomas
was the bright light for the locals,
with twelve field goals and five free
shots to his credit. Nation was the
main point getter for the New Lisbon
team making five field goals.
The lineups follow:
New Lisbon Fountain City
Nation Thomas
Forward
Luellen '. Reynolds
Forward
McCord .j.. Hampton
Center
B. Gaul Huss
Guard
P. Gaul . Hatfield
Guard
LIKELY ASPIRANT TO KILBANE'S CROWN
IS A STABLEMATE OF FEATHER CHAMPION
DAVENPORT ANXIOUS
FOR CENTRAL BERTH
More cities are falling in line in the
middle western baseball revival. One
of the latest to come through with
definite plans is Davenport, la., where
a mass meeting of fans will be held
tomorrow night to determine the fate
of the national pastime in that city.
Davenport's action will have a pow
erful effect in Moline, 111., where the
fans say if Davenport lands a Central
league franchise, Moline is in line for
a berth in the circuit.
Joe Tinker has not yet decided on
the Dayton situation. He Is awaiting
developments there and his action
will be determined by the conditions
he finds on his visit to that city this
week.
Tinker is worrying . whether fans
will travel to Westfood field to see
the game. This park is the only avail
able one In Dayton. The Dayton Gym
nastic club, which holds a lease on it,
has promised the ground to Tinker at
reasonable terms.
Depends on Patronage.
If the fans assure Tinker of patron
age, the presence of a Central league
team is assured. Otherwise, he will
pass up the proposition. Joe is part
owner of the Peoria club, which, with
his aid, has been made one of the
best paying small league franchises in
organized baseball.
Five former Central leaguers are
figured on In Roger Bresnahan's plan
to give Toledo an American associa
tion team. Paul Carpenter, who led
the Grand Rapids pitchers in 1917,
and Bowman, who got a chance with
the Cleveland Indians, after leaving
Grand Rapids, are to be with Toledo
in 1919.
Other Central Leagues.
Other ex-Central leaguers under re
serve at , Toledo are First Baseman
George Beall, Pitcher Red McColl and
ShortstopNBunny Fabrique. The first
two went from South Bend to Toledo,
and Fabrique was in the International
after leaving Fort Wayne.
The Fort Wayne proposition will
be solved on Tuesday when Jack Ry
an will hold a conference with George
Beimer, prominent sportsman of that
city.
Beimer in the estimation of Louie
Heilbroner, dean of all minor league
baseball fans in the middlewest, is one
of Fort Wayne's best sportsmen and
Is interested in baseball.
MADRIGAL SOCIETY REHEARSAL
The Madrigal society of Earlham
will rehearse Tuesday evening at 7
o'clock.
Catching mice in large numbers in
orchards and fields is the purpose of
a new trap made principally of glass
100 SPECIALS
at $1.00 for Wed.
SEE PAGE FIVE
PUBLIC SALE
48
PUBLIC 8ALE
48
Public
Sale
The undersigned will offer at public sale at his residence on the Hunt farm
4 miles north of New Paris and 3 miles southeast of Whitewater on ,
, TlhiuirSo9 Febo 13
Beginning at 10 o'clock sharp the following property:
4 Head of Work Horses 4
One gray mare 5 years old weighing 1600 pounds; 1 gray horse 6 years old,
weighing 1450 pounds; 1 brown horse 8 years old, weighing 1550; 1 bay horse
4 years old, weighing 1350 pounds. , '
TWO GOOD JERSEY SPRINGERS, WILL BE FRESH, IN MARCH
127 Head of Hogs 127
Ten tried sows that will farrow in March and April; 92 head of feeding shoats
weighing 120 pounds; 25 head of shoats weighing 50 pounds.
600 BUSHELS OF GOOD CORN IN THE CRIB. TEN TONS OF GOOD V
MIXED HAY IN THE MOW. FIVE BUSHELS GOOD YELLOW SEED CORN
Farming Implements
Hercules stump puller with 200 feet of cable; Weber wagon with flat bed and
hog rack; two-row corn plow; single row corn plow; Black Hawk corn plant
er; 2 walking breaking plows; Oliver gang plow; land roller; disc; carriage
carriage pole; set of double carriage harness.
TERMS WILL BE MADE KNOWN ON THE DAY OF THE SALE
NORLIE R. HUNT
THOMAS CONNLFF and MER PLATT, Aucts. H. J. HANES, Clerkv
Lunch served by ladies of New Paris Christian church
Verlie Patchen Wants
To Race Single G
Fred Kline's challenge to the own
ers of Single G., 1:59; Miss Harris
M., 1:58 and Directum J., 2:01,
for a stake race with Verlie Patchen,
2:0114, owned by Kline, is attracting
wide attention in the harness wodld.
Kline's .proposition is for each of the
four owners to put up $2,500, which,
with $5,000 added by a race associa
tion would aggregate $15,000, winner
tako all.
n form, as such is judged on the
harness tracks, either Single G. or
Miss Harris M. would be considered
the best bet in such a match. A win
ner pool would probably find the first
named favorite, with Miss Harris M
nearly as well thought of, Directum
J. next, and Verlie Patchen last.
Of the three pacers at which the
defi was aimed, Single G. is owned
by W. B. Barefoot, of Cambridge City,
Ind., and is in the stable of Allen
Bros., at Indianapolis; Mi6s Harris M.
is the property of Paul Kuhn, Terre
Haute, Ind., and is in charge of Will
Fleming, at Terre Haute; Directum
J. is owned by a patron of Thomas
W. Murphy, and is in charge of that
famous driver at Poughkeepsie, N. Y.
MOTHERS
, DO TH1S-
PUBLIC SALE
Having sold my farm, I will sell at public auction on my farm, 3 miles west
and north of Richmond and 5 miles northeast of Centerville, on
TUESDAY, FEB. 18TH, 1919
Beginning at 10 o'clock a. m., the following live stock and farming Implements
4 Head of Horses 4 .
One gray horse, 9 years old, good worker; 1 bay horse, 9 years old; 9-year-old
mare with colt by side.
6 Head of Cattle 6
One Jersey cow, giving 3 gallons milk a day; 1 red heifer, 2 gallons a day; 1
Shorthorn cow, 2 gallons a day; 3 calves; 2 heifers; 1 steer.
41 Head of Hogs 41
All these hogs are cholera immuned. Twenty-three head of shoats weighing
from 65 to 75 lbs.; 1 Big Type Poland China male hog; 3 sows with 15 pigs.
Poultry
Sixty-five S. C. White Leghorns, 12 Buff Leghorns, and 20 White and Plym-'
outh Rock hens.
Implements, Household Goods, Etc.
One farm wagon, with flat bed and hog rack; 1 Hocking Valley hay loader,
good as new; 1 spring tooth harrow, good as new; 1 strike tooth harrow, good
as new; 1 five-row disc wheat drill, good one; 1 spring wagon; 1 wood roller; i
1 one-hundred gallon gasoline tank; 1 closed buggy; 1 pair platform scales. j
1,000 lbs.; 1 one-hundred gallon steel hog waterer; 1 set buggy harness; 1 pair
fence stretchers; 1 grindstone; 1 corn shelter; 1 binder; 1 mower; 1 John
Deere riding breaking plow, good as new; 1 corn planter with fertilizer at
tachment; 3 corn plows; 1 corn grinder; 1 fifty-gallon kerosene barrel with
30 gal. oil; 1 steel farm tank, two barrels; 4 sets work harness and collars;
40 rod roll new fence; 3 hog houses; forks and shovels; 1 Belle City incu
bator, 140 eggs; 1 barrel churn, 7 gallon, good as new; 1 steel range, good as
new; 2 kerosene and gasoline stoves; 1 washing machine; 1 cream separa
tor, good as new; 1 Florence Hot Blast heating stove; and other miscellane
ous articles. One ton of hay; 15 cords of wood.
TERMS made known on day of sale. Lunch served by the Ladies' Aid
Society of Webster.
HOWARD ELIASON.
SIMON WEDDLE, C. MORROW, Auctioneers. H. W. GILBERT, Clerk.
Jack Wolfe, at left, and Johnny
Kilbane.
Jack Wolfe looms up as one of
the leading aspirants to Johnny
Kilbne's title as featherweight
champion. Wolfe not only lives
in Cleveland, Johnny's home town,
but is managed by Jimmy Dunn,
Johnny's manager, and trains in
the same gymnasium Johnny uses.
Wolfe's stock was boosted the
other night when he outpointed de
cisively Artie Root .another Cleve
lander prominent in the feather
weight circles. Root was handi
capped somewhat by the fact that
he had trained down too light foi
the bout.
LAXCARIN
LAXCARIN
06
mi
Quick Relief from Constipation
by using LAXCARIN
it is EXCELLENT
for HEADACHES
SUBSTITUTES MUST BE REFUSED
Sold Exclusively By The '
LAXCARIN PRODUCTS CO.,
Price $1 per box; 6 boxes, $5.00. Dept. No.'E-94, Pittsburgh, Pa.
n
LAXCARIN
LAXCARIN
When the Children Cough, Rub
Musterole on Throats
and Chests
No telling how soon the symptoms maf
develop into croup, or worse. And then's
when you're glad you have a jar of Mus
terole at hand to give prompt, sure re
lief. It does not blister.
As first aid and a certain remedy,
Musterole is excellent. Thousands of
mothers know it. You should keep a
jar in the house, ready for instant use. ;
It is the remedy for adults, too. Re-"
lieves sore throat; bronchitis, tonsilitis,
croup, stiff neck, asthma, neuralgia, head
ache, congestion, pleurisy, rheumatism,
lumbago, pains and aches of back or
joints, sprains, sore muscles, chilblains,
frosted feet and colds of the chest (it
often prevents pneumonia).
30c and 60c jars; hospital size $2.50.
EM
At Home
Dr. J. J. Grosvenor
Practice limited to internal
medicine
Office hours: 9-12, 1-4, 7 to 8,
Except Sunday
City Light Building 32 S. 8th St.
Car Load
YELLOW SHELLED
at
Richmond
Roller Mills
o
PER BUSHEL
Phone 2019
PUBLIC SALE
On account of changing location. I will sell at Public Auction at .Farm,
located 1 miles northeast of Williamsburg and 4 miles west of Foun
tain City, Ind., on
1 E11ESII1 FElo 1 S
Beginning at Ten o'clock a. m. The following personal property to-wit:
1811
16 HEAD OF HORSES
pair bay horses, 7 years old, well mated, weiffht 3.000 lbs.
pair bay horses, 5 years old. well mated, weisrht 2.S0O lbs. j
pair roan mares, 4 years old, well mated, welgrht 2,800 lbs.
pair black mares, 4 and 5 years old, weigfit 2,800 lbs.
pair grrey mares. 5 and 9 years old. both heavy In foal, weight. 2,800 lbs.
grey horse, 6 years old, weight 1.650 lbs.
dapple grrey horse. 5 years old. lady broke, wefg-ht 1,350 lbs.
black horse. 8 years old, a real city horse, broke In all harness, welgrht
1,350 lbs. The rest are 3 to 6 j ears old.
These horses are every one sound, every one broke and broke rigrht, having
worked every one myself. This is undoubtedly the best bunch of horses you
will see sell this spring. Backed by guarantee that is iron clad. If in need
of a good herse, come to this sale.
30 HEAD OF SHORTHORN CATTLE
One registered 2-year-old bull, red: 1 registered yearling bull, red; 1 reg
istered yearling bull, roan; 3 coming yearling bulls out of Recorded Sire,
1 white and 2 reds; 1 two-year-old heifer, registered roan, due to calf fn
Harch, bred to Recorded bull; 2 five-year-old cows, due to calf In March,
red. 1.600 lb. kind; 1 five-year-old cow. red, due to calf 1st of April; 4 red
cows due to calf in May and June; 1 roan cow due to calf In March; 7 two-year-old
heifers, springers, mostly calve in March, some with calf at foot.
Roans and reds, real ones. The above cows and heifers are all bred to reg
istered Shorthorn bull. Some yearling heifers and some good calves; 2 Jer
sey cows, fresh, extra good ones; 1 Jersey heifer with calf at foot. If you
want Shorthorns, yon can't afford to miss this sale.
39 HEAD OF HOGS
One Big Type Poland China sow, farrow 1st of April; 6 Big Type Poland
China gilts, weight 125 lbs.; 2 Big Type Poland China boar pigs, weight
125 lbs.; 30 feeding shoats, weight about 50 lbs., double immuned.
GRAIN AND HAY
Some good yellow corn in crib; 400 bushels or more Big Four White oata,
suitable for seed, yielded 65 bushels to acre; 12 tons of mixed hay; 20 ton
of clover hay. This hay was all put up without rain.
FARMING IMPLEMENTS, HARNESS, ETC.
One Fish wagon with hog rack complete; 1 Studebaker box bed, good: 1
gravel bed; 1 rubber tired carriage; 1 John Deere two-row corn plow, good
as new; 1 Ohio one-row corn plow; 1 Deering hay tedder, good as new; 1
Black Hawk corn planter with fertilizer attachment with new set ef run
ners, splendid condition; 1 three-section spring-tooth harrow; 1 three-section
spike-tooth harrow, wood frame; 1 steel roller; 1 Osborn steel hay
rake; 1 fertilizer disc five-hoe wheat drill;. 1 Janesville sulky breaking:
plow; 1 five-shovel cultivator; 1 Hatfield seed cleaner; 1 Galloway five
horse gasoline engine, almost new; 1 Galloway feed grinder; 1 twelve-foot
line shaft with hangers, belts and pulleys; two double-harpoon hay forks,
trip ropes and pulleys; 1 set of breeching harness, nickel-plated, used one
season: 1 set breeching harness made by Philip Birch, nickel plated, good
condition; 1 set breeching harness, good; 1 et leather fly nets; lot Food
leather collars. 21 and 22-lnch 2 Delight hog feeders; 1 galvanised Clark
feeder: 1 wood feeder; 1 Riprey steam cooker: 1 large heating stove; 1
seven-barrel galvanized tank with hog fountain attached; lot galvanized
hog troughs, hog fountains, hog oilers; one 120-egg Old Trusty Incubator,
used last year: forks, shovels and other articles too numerous to menttJa.
TERMS made known on day of sale. ......
Sale will be held In heated sale pavilion Trains will be met at Fountain
City and Williamsburg Come early and enjoy the day with us. Lunch
servea Dy xaaies Aia society or rienas- church ol Williamsburg.
FRANK A. WILLIAMS
AUCTIONEERS Thomas Connlff, Richmond; Oran Ross, Winchester;
Dempsey Dennis, Richmond. CLERK Porter Pike.

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