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The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1907-1939, December 03, 1919, Image 9

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THE RICHMOND PALLADIUM AND SUNEIJEGRAM,
PAGE NINE
o
CHICAGO CLAMPS .
UN UUAL HULCd
- (By Associated Press) ' '
CHICAGO.' Dec. 3. Fifty per cent
reduction in the number ox steam su
burban railway trains, closing of all
department stores- two days each
week, , and all theatres ono . night
weekly, and the limitation of business
hours for all stores to between 11 a.
m. and 3:30 p. m. were among the
measures ordered today for conserva-
, tion of fuel by the Chicago public
utilities commission. . Trains on ele
vated roads are to be reduced to one
?. car except during the rush hours,
' morning and evening.
Limitation of street lighting also
was,, ordered by the commission. It
vuaVstated that not more than a 26
day's supply of coal 'remained in the
possession of Chicago's public utilities,
and that virtually no coal is being re
ceived in the city. The commission,
supported by Governor Frank Lowden,
who . is in Chicago today, held that
most extraordinary measures of re-
striction are necessary to "prevent a
public calamity.
( Mostly Personal
FORM COLLEGE ASSOCIATION
President David M. Edwards of Earl
ham, was the Richmond representa
tive at a meeting of 13 Protestant col
lege presidents in Indianapolis Tues
day, which formed a temporary or
ganization of the Protestant Church
College Association of Indiana. Ad
vancement of the Inter-Church World
Movement is among the plans of the
association. The main conference of
he niter-church World Movement for
e state, which opens today. Is attend-
by several Richmond delegates.
TWO IN NEW YORK
Fred Gennett of Richmond, is regis
tered at the Claridge hotel in New
York, and B. C. Bartel is registered at
, tne Flanders.
CAPITAL STOCK INCREASED
The Richmond Loan and Savings
association increased its capital stock
from -$2,000,000 to 12.500,000 with the
secretary of state, Tuesday.
DOLLS GO TO ITALY
Seventy-seven dolls were Rich
mond's contribution to the children of
Italy, sent in response to an appeal
by Robert Underwood Johnson, and
colected in a local store. Many of the
dolls bore stockings qn their backs
lor tqeir future owners.
DOCTORS TO MEET 1
The Wayne County Medical society
win meet at the Commercial club
rooms Wednesday evening at 8:13
o'clock for the closing meeting of the
year, ana ror.an election of officers
tor 1920Y Dr. Charles Bond of Rich
mond will read . a paper.
MARINE -SERVICE OPEN
Opportunity for travel and rapid ad
vancement. unlike any formerly offer
ed by: the governments may be had
with the mechant marine, according
to Edwin JjjZimmer, of Chicago, re
cruiting, officer for the merchant ser
vice. Young men. and Dartlonlarlv
those yhO saw service in the navy in
the recent "war have a special advant
age, end: wjy jJto-aMe-to- -draw High !
pay, a's Well as allowances for :othing
and food.
Advancement is rapid for those who
learn. Pull or favoritism does not
count in climbing the sea ladder.
When one is qualified to apply for
z9-rr ,auufi ne i given tree in-
Tff prepare for a mate's or engineer's
license. - .
-The recruiting officer is Edwin J.
Zimmer, and he is located at 116
N. Dearborn street, Chicago, III
.RICHMOND LODGE ELECTS.
TJelbert D. Minnick was elected Mas
ter of Richmond lodge No. 196, F. and
A.JM., at the meeting in the &fasonic
temple Tuesday evening. Otfter of
ficers chosen for the year are Arch
Campbell, S. W.; Lewis C. Niewoehner.
.1. W.; Edward J. Valentine, treasurer;
Luther E. Bruce, secretary, and Alfred
Anderson, trustee. I
NAVAL RECRUITS WANTED
Authority for sending recruits to
the naval artificers' school at Norfolk
or San Francisco, has been granted to
district recruiting officers. Only re
cruits that want a trade, as shipfitter.
shipwright, painter or blacksmith, are
1o he sent to these schools. Additional
instructions in the plumber's trade is
given at the Norfolk school. Molders
and patternmakers are instructed at
San Francisco. Enlistment periods
are for 2 years.
MISS WOOD TO SPEAK.
Miss Caroiena Wood, who hais in
vestigated food conditions in Ger
many, will speak at 7:30 p. m. Thurs
day in St. Paul's Lutheran church.
Miss .Wood it identified with the
Friends committee which will super
Vise the distribution or food to the
starving children of Germany. The
public is invited to attend.
ARMY MAKES AMERICANS.
3 year enlistment in the United
states army will turn a foreigner into
n American citizen, says Recruiter
Wright. Men who can neither read
nor .write, will be sent to a govern
ment school at Camp Upton, N. Y.,
where a 3 months course is given.
Sergeant Wright also says that ser
vice, with the signal corps in the
Panama canal zone, Philippine islands,
Hawaiinan islands and St. Thomas
Islands, is now onfn for recruits.
Probable trouble ith Mexica has
spurred enlistments.
MANY GIFTS RECEIVED
"Enlargement of the Heart" is the
way the matron of the Margaret Smith
Home for Aged Women accounts for
the ur.r--ually large number and
amount of gifts made to the home this
year. "Never in the history of the
home, have we had such a response in
foodstuff and money," said the matron.
The week's car .ign was considered
nighty satisfactory. i
GIRARDIN KEEPS SALE OPEN
Frank Girardin, who is conducting
a private sale of paintings on the
third floor of the Union National
Bank building, has announced that
his display will be open until Dec. 10,
owing to an increased demand for
ictures. Several charming canvases
ate been purchased, and Mr. Gir
ardin's friends have requested that
he keep his exhibit open until the
middle of next week.
ISLEY CALLED AWAY
Itevt C. Raymond Isley, pastor of
3
JiAe Second English Lutheran church,
SfT&t West Richmond, was called to his
-Rome at Edinburg. Indiana, Wednes
day, on account of the death of his sister,'-
Mrs. May Mullendore. Due to his
Absence there will be no prayer ser
vice at the church on Thursday, even-
LABOR FATIGUE HAS I
ITS MORAL DANGERS,
SAYS MISS ADDAMS
Miss Jane Addams.
Miss 9ane Addams recently
startled an audience of physicians by
announcing that despite the well
known sayings. "Satan finds vork
for idle hands to do" and "All work
and no play makes Jack a dull ooy."
that work and hard labor &ra tend
ing to make Jill a bad girl. Miss
Addams explained that while labor
and (Is consequent fatigue rids a
person of the physical inclination to
ward lewd or immoral diversion, that
psychologically, the -everse is often
the case. The connection Latwcen
fatigue and the lowering of moral
res' tance has not yet been fully
worked out. but there is an ap
palling connection between them is
the verdict of Miss Addams who is
always a careful and dependable ob
server of industrial condition.
HOLDS REVIVAL MEETINGS
John Hatfield, revivalist, is conduct
ing a series of meetings in the Friends
church at Bloomingsport Services i
will be held each evening until a week
from next Sunday. .
QUAKERS TO SPEAK
Delegates to the preliminary Tor
don Conference of Friends prohab;
will speak from pulpits in Friend
churches next Sunday morning.
COMMITTEE TO MEET
Further plans for the foreign mis
sionary work of the Richmond Y. M.
C. A., will be taken up at a meeting
of the foreign work committee in tin
"Y" at 5 o'clock, Thursday afternoon
H. R. Robinson is chairman.
$2 FIRE DAMAGE . ,
Damage to the extent, of $2 was j
done to the roof of the home of Ros-
coe Clayborn, at 1322 North "J street,
early Wednesday morning by fire.
BUILDING OPERATIONS
Construction work, estimated at
$65,700v"was done in the city of Rich
mond in -November Jigurea in the city
building inspector's report filed today
showed. Ten building permits; . 7 re
modeling, "22 wiring, and 4 heating
permits were issued during the month;
$60,450 was expended for new build
ings; remodeling cost $5,300. Inspec
tions made follow: New buildings, 50;
remodeling, 37; wiring, 38; heating.
8; flues, 3; trees cut, 2, and miscel
laneous, 30.
WILLIAMS IS BACK.
CO. Williams, county superintend
ent, and secretary of the State Teach
ers' association, returned from Chi
cago Wednesday where he attended
a committee meeting. A memorial
commission, to erect a memorial on
the campus of the state house in In-
dianapolis, in commemoration to the
school teachers who participated in
the world war, was appointed, said
Williams
CITY READS MAGAZINES.
"Richmond postmen have figures
showing that this city is one of tho
best magazine spots in the world,"
Postmaster C. B. Beck said Wednes
day morning. ''Our mails are tre
mendously heavy at publication time
each month."
Prefers Starvation to
Spending His Coin
(By Associated Press)
NEWARK, N. J., Dec. 3. Death by
starvation although he had more than
12,000 has overtaken Frank Zabielskl,
who denied himself tht harest neees-
sides of life in order that he might
some day return in opulence to his
wife and three children in Russia.
The hollow cheeked and pallid Rus
sian died Sunday of a "malady" which
puzzled physicians until County Phy
sician Warren Reported yesterday that
death was due to starvation.
GOVERNMENT WILL PROBE
ELECTION FRAUD CASES
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., Dec. 3.
Frank C. Dailey, special assistant
United States attorney general charg
ed with -prosecution of the cases
against 135 men indicted in connection
with the election of Senator Truman
H. Newberry today took up prepara
tions for the trials, the date of which
will be set next Monday. It is report;
ed the first case will probably cc e
up during the first week of 4liinuary.
Tho trials are expected to continue
ten or twelve weeks.
TREASURY CERTIFICATES
TAKEN IN LARGE AMOUNTS
(Cy Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Dec. 3. Subscrip
tions to two series of treasury certifi
cates of indebtedness closed after two
each, it was announced today by Sec
retary Glass. The certificates offered
will mature Feb. 16 and March 15,
1920. The demand for certificates of
indebtedness to be used in payment
of internal revenue taxes due March
15, next, was so heavy that Mr. Glass
said he had decided to issue a new
series maturing on that date. The
amount the treasury will accept was
left open in order to accommodate all
commercial institutions.
OUR POLICIES SATISFY
Dollings Securities Pay 7.
Carefully Investigated and Supervised. Phone 2994 or 2150
E. M Haas, Representative, Richmond. Indiana. Over 901 Main.
THE, R. L. DOLLINGS COMPANY
Indianapolis ' . . Columbus . Pittsburgh - - Philadelphia
Partial Text of President's Message to Congress
Tt u -with this nurnose in mind that
i called a conference to meet in Wash
ington, Dec. 1, to consider these prob
lems In all their broad aspects, with
the Idea of bringing about a better un
derstanding between the two interests.
The great unrest tnrougnoui me
world, out of which has emerged a de"
xn&nd for an immediate consideration
of the differences between capital ana
labor, bids us put our own house in
order. Frankly there can be no PBr
manent lasting settlements between
capital and labor which do not recog
tiz e the fundamental concepts, for
which labor has been struggling
through the years.
World-Wide View.
The whole world gave its recogni
tion and indorsement to these funda
mental purposes In the league of na,
tions. The statesmen gathered at
Versailles recognized the fact that
orld stability could not be bad by
reverting to industrial standards and
conditions' against which the average
workman of the world had revolted.
It is, therefore, the task of the states
men of this new day of change and re
adjustment to recognize world condi
tions and to seek to bring about,
through legislation, conditions that
will mean the ending of age-long an
tagonists between capital and labor
and that will hopefully lead to the
building up of a comradeship which
tovlll result not only in greater con
tentment among the mass of work
men but also bring about a greater
production and a greater prosperity to ,
business Itself,
To analyze the particulars In the de-1
mands of labor is to admit the Justice
ot their complaint In many matters
that lie at their basis. The workman
demands an adequate wage, sufficient
to permit him to live in comfort, un
hampered by the fear of poverty and
a want in his old age. He demands
the right to live and the right to work
amid sanitary surroundings, both in .
home and in workshop, surroundings
that develop and do not retard his own
health and well being and the right to ,
provide for his children's wants in the '
matter of health and eddcatian. In !
other words. It Is his desire to mane ,
the conditions ot his life and the lives
of those dear to him tolerable and easy j
to bear. 1
The establishment or tne principles
regarding labor laid down in the cov
enant ot the league of nations offers
us the way to Industrial peace and1
conciliation. No other road lies openj
f- ?. Not to pursue this one is-long-i
fer to Invite enmities, bitterness and
antagonisms which in the end only
lead to industrial and social disaster.
The unwilling workman is not a prof-,
itable servant. An employe whose in
dustrial life is hedged about by hard
and unjust conditions, which he did
not create and over which he has no
control, lacks that fine spirit of en
thusiasm and volunteer effort which
are the necessary ingredients ot a
great prdoucing entity.
Need of Frankness.
Let us be frank about this solemn
matter. The evidences of vorldwide
unrest which manifest ther" elves in
violence throughout the world bid ns
pause and consider the means" to be
found to stop the spread of this con
tagious thing befor& it saps the very
vitality of he nation itself. Do we
gain strength by withholding the rem
edy? Or is it not the business of
statesmen to treat these manifesta
tions of unrest which meet us on
every hand as evidences of an econ
omic disorder and to apply construc
tive remedies wherever necessary, be
ing sure that in the application of th?
remedy we touch not the vrf al tissues
of our industrial and economic life."
There can be no recession of the tide
of unrest until constructive instrumen
talities are set up to stem that tide.
lclus""e "lc
rights Of men Collectively tO bargain
or human objects that have at their
Dase tn mutual protection and wel
are of those engaged in all Industries
J Labor msst not be longer treate as
4i. .in v oe regaruea as
the activity of human heings. posess -
ed of deep yearnings and desires. The
business man gives his best thought
. uw .rii ouu icmsHiucm ui u
machinery, so that its usefulness will
rot be impaired and its power to pro-
duce may always be at its seight and
kept in full vigor and motion. No less
regard ought to be paid to the human
machine, which, afterall. propels the
machinery of the world and 13 the
. . . . . . -
TnZ r .VH ,
VJZTZ .Z,rB I
.a i.VJ; i - " " , T . 1 . . t
and industry in
'"""""J cjut.,,iunil IB Uii:
thinkable. The terrible tragedy of
war which has just ended and which
has brought the world to the verge of.
etiaos and disaster would be in vain
11 mere snouia- ensue a return to. tne
condition of the past.
Europe an Example.
Europe itself, whence has come the
unrest which now holds the worl at
bay, is an example of the standpatism
in these vital human matters which
America might well accept as an ex-
amnle. not to he fnlM rmt ct-
dlously to be avoided. Europe mado l!L,Mlss,D,ri3 Lrton.. Miss
labor the differential, and the price of I.?.6816 Eards, a clerk in the Lee
it all is enmity and antagonism and i ; usbauoii store, presented her father,
prostrated Industry. The right of lab-1 FJak Edwards, a most delicious cake
or to live in peace and comfort must?f hef, own make Ior nis Thanksglv
be recognized by government and ? dinner. Mr. and Mrs Donald
America should be the first to lay the j Banes and baby spent Sunday with
foundation stones upon which indus-1 ir- a"d Mr- Hoyd We-Mr. and
trial peace shall be built Mrs- Howar Jefferis moved Thursday
Labor not only is entitled to an ade-1 the R,ussl Whlte farm- - Prank
quate wage, but capital should receivs j A1'en and aily and Clyde Thomas
a reasonable return uoon its invest-:and famllv spent Thanksgiving with
BlWlt. and fa ontitloH In. nrntoftlnn ntTfllr- a"0. JUTS.
the hands of the government in every
emergency. , No government worthy of
the name can "play" these elements
against each other, for there is a mu
tuality of interest between them which
the government must seek to express
and to safeguard at all costs.
The right of individuals to strike is
Inviolate and ought not to be inter
fered with by any process of govern
ment, but there is a predominant right,
nd that is the rieht of the eovernment
-TABLETS- N?
mm
fen fVrere (tMVW
Clem
i'lethwaite. Richmond
PARTICULAR INVESTORS
Tax Exempt in Indiana
mr I
to protect all of its people ana to as
sert its power and majesty against the
challenge ot any class.
The government, when . it asserts
that right, seeks not to antagonize a
class, but simply to defend the right
of the whole people as against the ir-
reparable harm and injury that might
be done by the attempt by any class
to usurp a power that only government
itself has a right to exercise as a pro
tection to all. ' 1 .
In the matter of International dis
putes which have led to war, states
men have sought to set up as a remedy
arbitration for war. Does this not'
point the wy for the settlement of
industrial disputes, by the establish
ment of a tribunal, fair and Just alike
to all. which will settle Industrial
disputes which in the. past have led
to war and disaster.
Must Master Itself.
America, witnessing the evil conse
lauences which have followed out of
such disputes between the contending
forces, must not admit itself Impotent
;to deal with these matters by means
jof peaceful processes. Surely there
must be some method of bringing to
gether in a council of peace and amity
these two great interests, out of which
will come a happier day of peace and
co-operation, a day that will make far
more comfort and happiness in living
and a more tolerable condition among
all classes of men. Certainly human
intelligence can devise some accept
able tribunal for adjusting the differ-
encefl Detween capital and labor.
This is the hour of test and trial for
America. By her prowess and strength
and the Indomitable courage ot her
soldiers, she demonstrate1 her power
to vindicate on foreign battle fields
her conception Of liberty and Justice
Let not her influence as a mediator
between capital and labor be weaken
ed and her own failure to settle
matters of purely domestla concern be
proclaimed to the world.
There are those In this country who
threaten- direct action to force their
will upon a majority. Russia today,
with its blood and terror, is a painful
object lesson of the power of minori-
ties u roake8 little difference what
minority It Is, whether capital or labor,
or ther class, no sort of prlvllego
will ever be permitted to dominate
this country. "
We are a partnership or nothing that
is worth while. We are a democracy,
where the majority are the masters, or
all the hopes and purposes of the men
who founded this government have
been defeated and forgotten. In Amer
ica there is but one way by which
great reforms can be accomplished and
the relief sought by classes obtained,
and that !s through the orderly pro
censes of representative government.
Thor who would propose any other
method of reform are enemies of thJs
country. America will not be daunted
by threats nor lose her composure or
clamness in these distressing times.
We can afford, in the midst of this
day of passion and unrest, to be self
contained and sure.
The instrument of all reform In
America is the, straight road of Justice
to all classes and conditions of men.
Men have but to follow this road to
realize the fufl -fruition of their ob
jects and purposes. Let those beware
who would take the shorter road of
disorder and revolution. The right
road is the road of justice and orderly
process.
Middleioro, Ind.
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Coblerrtz enter
tained Sunday Mr. and Mrs. Dan Ros
ier and children, Charles, Mildred,
4 Elizabeth and Mary, also Roy Eu
bank of California, who served under
General Pershing in the war against
Germany. Mr. Eubank gave a very
intrOKtino- arx-nnnl nt hta nan-lrog ind
'showed quite a number of souvenirs
and pictures of France and Germany
"VI t onrl Vlro Puoaol i""1! a vlr ontnr.
UaYned 'Thanksgiving the following:
, IIarry Pattl and fami,y aml Miss
Rnth Weidner. .. .Mrs. It. W. Peterson
of Richrnond j3 spending a few days
iv h w H Netoa aml famllv.
I)ll(fp. Smith r11fr1 nn Avprv
Cook
Ulna a., Mr mA" a PpmhprtnT.
called on Mrs. Mary Vanzant Sunday
afternoon Mr. and Mrs. Claude
Curry and daughter spent Thanksgiv
ing with Mr. and Mrs. Guy Adams
n fn. T)Ynnc.nvi4 TT'.ll TIT.. n A Hf
i mm x u u.-nui. Jiiiii . . . ..ill. uu mia.
Ed Bucllfor and family of near
Fountain W entertained he follow-
ing Thanksgiving : Charles Little and
fomtlv- At- nnj -Ta A T I ln
son, Air. ana airs, caarles tsrawiey,
Miss Izora Little and Mr. and Mrs.
Lyndsey Canaday and son Mr. and
'Mrs. Floyd JJogar spent Sunday even
ing with Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Jackson
at Richmond Mrs. Miriam Little
came Wednesday to spend some time
with Joseph Reid and family Mrs.
Clyde Thomas spent Tuesday with
Mrs. Minnie Clark Mr. and Mrs.
Glenn Rankin are the proud parents
VL a uauguier. iw
"of a 'Baby daughter. Mrs. Rankin was
Fred Vernouff and
iMr. and Mrs. Will Wi3ler
pcalled on Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Addle-
"Zgjr 1 ,irm
Grand Yniet&ZlZXi
firearms 6 Ammunition
"Write for Catalogue .
THE REMINGTON ANMSllJM.CCO.INa
DR. LEE C. HOOVER
Veterinarian
Phone 1399
,20 S. 12th SL
in ;n
It! LI
I mm
m
I 47
Mrs. J. H. Coblentz entertained the
Thursday: Mr. and Mrs. C.R.-Cob-lent
and children, Lawrence, Mary,
Ruth and John J., Mr. and Mrs. J. V,
Hughes pad daughter, Lois ot. Wester-
ville, O... Avery Cook took supper
with Mr. and Mrs. Rnssel Clark and
daughter Thursday evening Mrs.
Mary Vanxant spent Thanksgiving
with Mr. and Mrs. Frank Edwards. .
..Burt Hawkins and two sons- spent
Sunday j morning with Mrs.' 'Nancy
Hawkins. ...Mrs. Clyde Thomas and
Clark Little ailed on Mrs. W. . H.
Urtoa and daughter Tuesday after
noon. v ,
; . Mr. Will Hansbarger and family en
tertained the following relatives
Thanksgiving, Mr. and Mrs. Merl Cole
man and son, Mr. and Mrs. John Hard
ing and two daughters, and Mr. C. H.
Clark Mr. -Evin Edwards, brother
of Mr. Frank Edwards, of the Middle-
noro pike, and a former resident of
Richmond, but now living at -Baxter
springs, Kas., spent Wednesday night
with Mr. and Mrs. Frank Edwards. The
evening was spent talking about the
changes of the people and the times,
Mr. and Mrs. 'Claude Curry -and
daughter and Mr. and Mrs. Guy Adams
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. S. O.
Adams at Lynn Mr. and Mrs. Jes
sie Bailey and son and Miss Lois Ben
rett spent Thanksgiving with Mr. and
Mrs. T. J. Addleman.. ...Mr. and Mrs,
Pleasant Seaney spent Saturday even
ing and Sunday with Mr. and Mrs,
Frank Bradbury near Abington. . . . . .
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Buckhofer and family
spent Friday with Mr. and Mrs. Lynd
f ey Canaday and son Mr. Clyde
Thomas and family spent Sunday with
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Sho waiter. .... .
Mrs. Russel Clark, Mrs, Harry Pattt
antf Miss Ruth Weidner called on Mrs.
Norman Kirkman. Sunday afternoon.
.... Mrs. Nancy Hawkins will go soon
to spend the winter with relatives at
Richmond. Mr. and Mrs. . E. Danner
are staying with her now Mr. Erin
Edwards, of Boston Springs, Kansas,
spent one hour with Mr. and Mrs.
Theodore Cook, Wednesday morning,
renewing old acquaintances.. . . .Mr.
and Mrs. Floyd Bogan and Mr. and
Mrs. Joe McKee and son spent Thanks
giving with Mrs. Lucy Jones and
daughter.. .. .The Middleboro Gleaner
Girls! Your hair needs a little 'Danderine"that,s all! rWhtti
it becomes lifeless, thin or loses its lustre; when ugly dandruff
appears, or your hair falls out, a 35-cent bottle of delightful;
dependable "Danderine" from any store, will save your hair,
also double it's beauty. You can have nice, thick hair, too.
BnnDnonnannnnnDnnnannncanDnannnnnnnncanannnnccDninDnnczancDna
Fascinating-1
are our "Pretty Shoes
pretty shoes k?ore than
surely please the man
u
u Look at what we offer
$9o95
Ladies' patent Lace Boot, Louis heel with ivory
buck top and Uts and Dunn quality Boot. Beaver
Brown lace Boot.i -in.cn leather Louis heel, a
positive 12.00 value
Do your shopping
You must see these
a
a
H
a
m
a
n
a
u
$8o0
Ladies' Black Kid Lace Boot, Louis or Military
heels, welt soles. Men's Brown lace shoe, best
oak soles, wide or narrow toes. We will not have
these long.
a
We carry every style of Men's heavy
Rubber Footwear
Don't miss these at
a
a
a
a
n
$5.00
Ladies Black Kid Lace Shoes, Military. Louis or
Cuban heels. Ladles' Kid hand turned comfort
shoes. Rubber heels. How mother would enjoy
these. -
a
a
Rubber Boots and Slippers
B3
n
ta
n
u
a
a
n
ti
a
a
Buys a Boys'' solid leather school
full soles. 'Boys' Tan Army shoe,
boy wiH sure like these for Xmas.
$.4.35
The Hoosier . Store J6th;and.I"ait?
Lodge elcted officers for the following
year, enter Cleaner, cnaries utue;
vice chief, Norman Kirkman; - secre
tary ! and treasurer, Will Barton;
chaplin, Minnie Clark; lecturer. Emma
Barton; . conductor,' Russell Clark;
conductoress, Lula Kirkman ; inner
guard, Anna Cook; outer guard. Harry
Patti. Next regular meeting will be
Dec. 10.;. . .Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin
Duke spent Thanksgiving - with Mr.
Charles Duke and family,. ... Ruth Ul
mer, of "Chester, spent Friday and
Saturday with' Miss Matilda Pogue....
Miss Marie Pogue spent her Thanks
giving vacation with her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Frank Pogue Mrs. Alice
Ruggles. whose , maiden name was
Bond - and her . daughter. Mrs. ' Islab
Garwood, both of Huntington; and
Mrs. DwightVWells and son Theodore
Garwood Wells of Richmond, spent
Tuesday with Mr. Sylvester Cook and
family, Mrs. Rugghs Mr. Frank
Pogue and family spent Thanksgiving
with RevT. F. Ulmer and family at
Chester.
Not Healthy for Germans
in U. S. Yet, is Advice
COBLENZ. Dec. 3. -There has been
iso much talk among German individ
uals recently of emmlgrating to the
United States as soon as possible that
the German newspapers have taken
up the question editorially. The ma
jority ot them advice against such
move on the part of the young men
fand women desiring to leave the fath
erland.
Quite a' number of Germans who
were interned. In America during the
'war and have been, brought back to
Germany are planning, however, to re
'turn to the United States immediately
'after congress takes definite action on
the treaty of peace.
Y. M. I. WILL MEET
Installation of new officers and ap
pointment of ' a committee that will
have the New Year's home coming
celebration in charge, will be the prin
cipal features of the semi-monthly
meeting ot the Y. M. I. to be held in
the club rooms Wednesday evening, at
8 o'clock. The Rev. Oment Zept
will make a short address. .
for Women" and-who would not enjoy a pair of our
anything else? Our good looking quality shoes would
you wish to make happy.
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you for only
Here
mornings
A complete
outsize tops
at
If bought today
than
We
i.
j Where
for Children
Arrow
shoe with two
solt box. The
Women's Legion XlfcssU -
- to Atsitt American
.(By .Associated Prew)
' -TOjLEDO. O.. Pec 3J- National of
ficers of the -AVomen's Service Star
Legion- want-only to. exist and worK
on equal . terms ' with the -American
Legion, according to the , Views ex
pressed by Mrs. Robert C". Morris, of
Toledo, In the convention which start
ed its second day's session today.
Mrs. William N. Irving, fourth vice,
president of Boston, who visited na
tional headquarters of vtbe American
Legion on her -way- Jiere told the
delegates . that she found, those in au
thority favorable to the recognition ot
the women's legion a a co-existing or
ganization and the setting aside of
action taken at Minneapolis. ;
. ,For home, use a new bread box can
be-taken apart tpr cleaning.
Sin ire
Relief
6 Bellans
Hot water
Sure Relief
E (LL-AMS
FOR INDIOCSTIOM
Suits Dry Cleaned'
and Pressed
$1.25
SUITS PRESSED, BOo
TROUSERS Cleaned and Pressed BOo
CARRY" AND SAVE PLAN
Altering, Repairing and Pressing done
by practical tailors
JOE MILLER, Prop.
17i Main Street. Seeend Floen
We're
Got 'Em
Guaranteed
Rubber Boots
Red or Black
New Method
Up-Suris
Colonial Bldfl-
WANTED
400 LIVE TURKEYS
J. M. Eggemeyer & Sons'
BEE HIVE GROCERY
are two specials at
$8.95
Ladles' Black Kid Lace Boot, Louis heel, turn
sole, 4 -inch vamp, a real dress shoe. Ladies"
Brown Kid Button Boot, beaver brown top.
Men's Brown Calf Lace Shoe on comfort last
dressy and good for winter.
line of style Shoes with
for women, Sizes 3 to 1 1
these would be worth a lot more
$6.00
Ladies' Brown Kid Lace Shoes, Louis or Military Q
heels. ' El
Men's Brown Lace English Shoes, welt soles. The H
kind you have been paying $S.OO for. H
- 13
a
a
sell Rubbers for less
- n
else can yon buy ttfeso for
$3.45
Misses' Gunmetal Lace Shoes, fine for dress or
school. ' .
Men's Muleskin Work Shoe, heavy soles, wear like
iron, i . . ' , . - i
Boys" heavy School Shoe in lace or button.
Rubbers
Don'i miss seeing our. line of heavy Work Shoes, O
Felt. Sheepskin and Wool Shoes. Everything for H
the man who must keep warm.,. ,
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