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The Lake County times. [volume] (Hammond, Ind.) 1906-1933, August 24, 1906, Image 4

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TOE LAKE COUNTY TIMES
da
August 21, 190(1.
PAGE FOUR
THE LAKE COUNTY TIMES
AN EVENING NEWSPAFEIt PUI3
1.1SIIED BY THE LAKE COUNTY
miNTING AND PUBLISHING COM
I'ANY. Terms of Subscription:
Vrariv " 3.uu
l : .1 1 r Yearly J1-50
tl e Copies... 1 cent-
"Entored as second-class matter
.'ine 28, 1 DOG. at the postoffice at
!! wHv.v.a, Indiana, under the Act
f t Congress, March 3, 1S79."
OTc"? in Hammond building, Hara-
In J. Telephone 111.
7.-'',
FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 1906.
Statement of Circulation of
Lake County Times July
16 to August 1, 1906.
July 16, 1906 2310
July 17, 1906 2484
July 18, 1906 3271
July 19, 1906 2671
July 20, 1906 2691 ,
July 21, 1906 2767
July 22, 1908 Sunday.
July 23, 1906 2860
July 24, 1906...... 3103
July 25, 1908 3296
July 26, 1908...... 3267
July 27, 1906 3462
July 28, 1908 3531
:July 29, 1906. . .Sunday.
July 30, 1905 3612
July 31, 1906.... L. 3578
..42,903
Samples, Waste ..2936
Net Circulation. .39,967
EUGENE P. M'GOVERN,
Circulation Manager.
Circulation books always open to
. public inspection.
TITANS AT WORK.
AFFAIRS of great moment move
so quickly in this Calumet region
that one has to keep on the keen
jump and wear seven-league boots to
keep in even close touch with them
Vast areas of desert waste are con
verted in a day. The concentration
of all the industrial combinations of
the United States at this point not
only seems reasonable but probable.
The strategic commercial position of
this territory was recognized many
yprtrs ago but, it remained for the
United States Steel corporation to
begin the work of industrial coloni
zation, on a scale of such vastness
that now the eyes of the. world are
turned hltherward. Struggling vil
lages which a few years ago looked
like warts on the wind-blown dunes
are destined today to be welded into
one vast community. This is no Idle
dream or the ' inspiration of a real
estate boom. The discoverers of this
region its early pioneers, who
fought a stubborn, unpromising field
have been engulfed by the wave
which had its beginning in Xew
York, Chicago, Pittsburg and Phila
delphia. Some of them are profiting
by the value that has been added to
their slender holdings. Geography
and the shaping of the ends of mighty
projects have done much for thi3 sec
tion. Nature did little for it ex
cept to place it in the direct path of
the stream of commerce. Now that
stream is branching outward with an
outlet through the Panama canal.
The Titans of trade are working
wonders here.
THE Register of Crown Point this
Week makes an urgent plea for a sew
erage system in that place, lest that
picturesque town become contamin
ated with every vile smell which
makes Hammond suffer. We have
lost our packing house but we still
have the Globe refinery near us and
we also have the ill smelling Calumet
and plenty of residents who neglect
their alleys. Hammond needs many
Improvements and it is hoped that
among those which come will be an
atmosphere not polluted except by the
savory odor from the great refineries
of the Standard oil at Whiting. Like
the poor, these
with us.
will likely always be
THE argur.it nt that a dead spar
row is better than a live one was
knocked out at Three Oaks. Mich, yes
terday. An epidemic of typhoid fe
ver had prevailed there and the cause
was located at the top of the water
work? tower where upwards of 1000
dead young sparrows in various
stages of decomposition were found
floating on the surface of the water,
poSsf.ning ihe city's supply.
WITH THE EDITORS.
Iwpod has been drawn in Cut
ha.
The revolution that's what the out
break amount? to is on in earnest.
The sit nr. lion is viewed with regret
by n!I Americans. The welfare of the
inland republic has been a matter of
keen interest in this country and anv
untoward circumstances are sadly
wutiurtcu, wu'ja nas made a rernrrt
of which it can well be proud. Guid-m.
ed by President Palma
the progress j
along Industrial and commercial
lines has been most pronounced.
Just as the experimental stage set ru
ed to be passing, however, a group
of revolutionists busy thfiuetlvc e,
Htir up the lower classes, and the out-
break resulte. An unfortunate set -
back for the republic is threatened,
The island stands to lose much pres -
tige which It had labored hard to
obtain. It is surely a lamentable
condition. The one and only hope is
that the leaders may be quieted be
fore any further damage is done.
This country, that is, all patriotic !
Americans, take an unusual interest
in the Cuban republic. We protested
against Spanish misrule and later
were able to give the island its lib
erty. Until now American hopes for
the future of the little nation have
been justified. Cuba has heretofore
seemed to be striving to be truly
worthy of the freedom which was
secured for it after the island itself
had tried in vain to throw of the
Spanish voice, it is surely to be hop
ed that the government will be suc
cessful in the present crisis. South
Bend Tribune.
Between Trains
Queen' Maud of Norway has just or
dered two new bicycles from London
on whirh she Intends to make a tour
of her new kingdom. London Dis
patch.
On two of 'em? There's a stunt for
you, girls!
Count Tilstoy neither smokes,
drinks nor eats meat, and yet his pub
lic outgivings don't seem to indicate
that he's such an awfully happy fel
low, after all.
RAILROAD NOTE
The suits instituted by the Indiana
Railroad commission against the
Adams Express company, the United
States Express company, the Ameri
can Express company, the Western
Union Telegraph company and the
Postal telegraph and Lable com
pany to compel them to deliver
freight and telegrams to any and all
parts ot Indiana towns Having a
population of 2,300 without extra
charge over their regular tariff rate,
will be taken up preliminarily in the
superior court at Indianapolis before
Judge Vinson Carter, September 4.
Another eminent railroad mechan
ical engineer has given up railroad
service to take charge of the manu
facture of automobiles. This is 11. F.
Ball who has been with the Luke
Shore railway for about sixteen yenrs,
the greater part of the time serving
as superintendent of motive power.
He has left that company to tako
charge of the manufacturing end of
the American Locomotive Cos. auto
mobile department, with headquarters
at Providence, II. I. The American
Locomotive company is to be congrat
ulated on securing the services of
such an able mechanical engineer.
The Pennsylvania and other rail
roads entering Pittsburg are in sore
straits for men to man their trains.
Some of them have raised the age lim
it established for new employes years
ago, while others are abandoning it
altogether. The tremendous increase
in freight business rinds them all
short-handed, while at the same time
the western roads are draining the
eastern market of all available men
to help move the crops. Advertise
ments are appearing for men to fill
positions as brakemen and conductors
wages are being advanced and every
effort made to increase the working
forces before the heavy rush of fall
freight business causes a complete
blockade.
GATES BACK OF GLUCOSE DEAL?
It was discovered today that John
W. Gates is backing the Western Glu
cose company which recently was or
ganized to compete with the Corn
Products Refining company and
which will build its factory in Rob
ertsdale. The announcement that
the Western Glucose will build such
an enormous plant has caused quite
a furor in financial circles.
FIBE $18,000 STOKE FOR $50.
The safe in the store of R. Adams
at Rolling Prairie, Ind. about six
miles east of LaPorte was blown
open by robbers who either acci
dentally or intentionally set fire to
the building which was totally de
stroyed at a total loss of $1S,000.
The amount the robbers secured was
just f.'.o. The residents of the busi
ness district had considerable diffi
culty in saving it from destruction.
MAN HIT BY TRAIN A SUICIDE.
At the inquest over the body of the
unknown man who was hit by train
j No. 2 on the Monon which passes
; thrmtffh ii!,nim,m.i c.-r-
developed the fact that the un-
fortunate man was undoubtedly a
sicide. Engineer William Ballen
ger who was in charge of the engine
that caused the death, testified that
he saw a man on the track in front
of the engine wildly waving his
arms and apparently not heeding the
i approach of the train. Defore the
j engineer could reduce the speed of
ihis engine the man was struck and
tossed into the air. Death must have
been instantaneous. The unfortun
ate man is thought to have been de
mented as several yard employes saw
I him earlier in the day acting queer-
ly and were compelled to get him out
of the way of passing trains on sev
eral occasions. The body will be
buried in the potter's field at Hess
ville this afternoon.
ANN STREET PAVING
BIDS OPENED.
Bids on the paving of Ann street
were opened by the members of the
board of public works this morning
and were found to be as follows:
Hatch and son, $5.04 for Metropoli
tan block, S4.85 for llarr block and
G cents for curb. Wm. Ahlborn
$3.13 for Metropolitan block and 37
cents for curb. The contracts will
not be let until the people of Ann
street have had a chance to express
an opinion m regard to the matter.
The bids on the Doty street pavement
which were considered too high were
rejected by the board and they have
decided to re-advertise.
SIX SHOOTER SAVES
BARBER FROM DEATH.
Highwayman Stops Traveler and De
mands to See Money Is Shown
Some Blue Hardware.
A good six-shooter was all that
saved J. L. Ewinsr. a barber whose
place of busines is on North Hoh
man street, from being robbed of a
watch and about $40 in money.
' Mr. Ewing was on the way to see
a friend of his, L. C. Kogler, who is
encamped on the Little Calumet
river near Black Oak, and drove over
from Hammond in one of Undertak
er Stewart's rigs.
When he had reached the place
where the Nickel Plate and the In
diana Harbor railroads cross the
road, almost at the end of his des
tination, he was accosted by six
men.
Two of them asked him for a ride
and when he refused them one of
the man grabbed his horse by the
bridle and another demanded that he
throw up his hands.
Mr. Ewing was equal to the occa
sion and reaching in his hip pocket
he pulled a revolver and told the
man who was holding his horse to let
At the same time he slappetaol
go or he would shoot. At the same
time he slapped the horse with the
reins and it jerked away from the
grasp of the man who was holding it.
The men seemed rather surprised
at Mr. Ewing's show of fight and al
lowed him to pas3 on without fur
iner molestation, lie went on to
Black Oak and about 6 o'clock in the
evening was compelled to pass the
same spot on his return, but the
would-be holdups had evidently left
the locality.
In commenting on the affair Mr.
Ewing said that his hair stood on
end. as the men were tough looking
customers, but the gun saved
He says the bushes along the
are filled with tough loafers
gun saved him.
road
and
that
that
a man's life
locality after
is hardly
dark.
safe In
TAPEWORM DOCTOR ARRESTED.
Some time ago Dr. D. F. Bixler and
his brother were arrested at South
Rend for practicing medicine with
out a Hcene. Attorney Drummond
defended him but the men were
found guilty and were fined $100
each. The doctor and his brother
were unable to furnish the money
and Attorney Drummond finally
agreed to stay their fines. He took
the responsibility for the fellows re
appearance and found that his confi
dence had been misplaced for Dr.
Bixler never put in an appearance.
Several days ago the police depart
ment received a telegram from South
Bend asking if Bixler was in town
as he was wanted for horse stealing.
He was found here last night at
11:30 and was arrested. An inquiry
was telegraphed to South Bend and
this morning Deputy Sheriff Keer
and Attorney Drummond arrived in
the city with a warrant charging
Bixler with jumping his bond instead
of the former charge of horse steal
ing. He was taken back to South
Bend by the officers.
ACCIDENT AT HEGEWISCH.
' While Dave Strum was working
on the planing machine in the wood
mill at Hegewisch this afternoon a
planer slipped ripping his arm open
from the wrist, to the shoulder. He -
was taken to St. Margaret's hospital,
Two other accidents occurred in
'quick succession in the steel depart-
, miii
-HliCEJD -"TRADE-
(Special Stock Service to the Lake
County Times).
NEW YORK LETTER.
New York, Aug. 24. Another wild
and exciting day on the stock ex-:
change with everything on the list 'it
traded in. The volume of t ran sac- j w
tions were about on the same scale j
as yesterday, only tne fluctuations
were wider and more erratic than 1k;s
been the case lately. Manipulators
were at work again in Consolidated
gas. This stock sold "ex-dividend"
this morning at 140 and immediately
advanced on the same class of buy
ing that annears every time any one
has the arrogance to sell this issue!
short. It was bid up to 143 without j
an effort, and shorts were compelled j
to pay high prices to regain their
contracts sold under 14 0. j
The Harriman stocks, I nion and
Southern Pacific were taken in hand
again with renewed vigor and the
confidence displayed in the purchase
or these two issues is simpiy mar
velous. Union Pacific opened around
183 and from the opening gong there
was terrific buying in lots of one to
five thousand. At the close tonight
it shows a gain of five points, selling
at 189, the highest in the history of
the road and within three points of
St. Paul, a stock that has been paying
7 per cent tor years and one mar is
under very conservative manage
ment. The enthusiasts on Union
Pacific are talking $2 00 for their
stock. They argue if it can afford
to pay 10 per cent annually, there ir;
no logical reason why it is not worth
this figure or more. Southern Paci
fic, also, was in the limelight. It
opened around 89 and all during the
session there was large blocks of it
wanted at any price. It gradually
advanced until it had reached the
high level of 92 H, a rally of over
three points for the day.
The market generally closed act
ive and strong for most of the high
class rails and rather weak for the
Industrials. Sales 1,300,000.
Wil TO STOCK MARKET.
Closins:
Aujr.24 A,igv23
Description. Open High. Low.
Atch 10
Amer. Susar-- 140
Amer. Car ... il'
r.nl. Copper
Amer. Smelter 15
Am. Ice See's. . 11
Am. Loeomot 71
Anaconda
Am. Tobac ifd
Am. Woolen.- iTs
IQl'A iVV;i U.ili jo '
l-l- I W ,41 j ! ;4
4 1 ;-a 4 J 'a 41 t ij v4
ni iiu aov,' , , . 3
loiJ-8 HS'-g 1 5a"
'' J'' :' 7-! 77
n; Hoi 71 '.o'.i
; M.S.
li:;,4 D7V4 ilTjg uV,
V "th :Vi I'M
lS;i l li I Js
M?'8 (Si fl-s 01 g
Wi" ihli". HIV
37 i 34 7?i .-.7 s,;
IV 3
Si'- S2i,
.170 liia: lti?.4
H6 14j H'j 44S
40 vy 41 39 Hi"
Vk -H! 'i4'i 44!,
61 :4 t(i4 (,1 -,4 t (, ;
It.' 8 4j.'i 40? 8 45 '5
17i 175
41 37 4.;i 37
' Si 2S?j
ss. 5v; .v-;4 r,s-.
151 ;4 1.-" :4 irxjjj i4;it-.',
.u: . :-4 21 21 !i
00 ;4 ..()4 3t'4
7 Us li't 71.' . ..
S9 1,4 95 3
fl .'.! . ; j ;
I43,i4 1 4 -; 3 4;:4
; i y!- y.".
47. 4 7 4 ft 47
3si 34 3.'f
71 -Jin m
li-'fj S4J 1 4 : 7 s 1.'
i'-H l-l'A 5C
141j 139 Mlfl' n-U
31 M'j 31 3i;'-.
h'l lu . i' r 1u-j4
i7'4 if4 7 ;4 27
bH ( 1 t;v, M--,'
, J' ;3 I ,S i.
ri4 f.o4 y.'ig H'U
i-.-l 'V
U'3 !.i 4 -2lt I'M
-3U 2o'4 2 n4
- 4t
o4V, -4!, .44 "x 31
t9 1S 1-2V,
'": 4oh 17 'i 4c j
ij?; ;.)"'.. ,11. -j in.Vj
H9
-VVy V'.'i ill'.j ' h:2
1f:3 ''j
40 4;'
Zlh H 51 cl
.-i.''
H. & O
Biscuit
B. R. T
C. (1. W
C. & O
C. A A. co:n
C. K. I
Col. So
ir.'i
7-.
Corn Pro-.lucts
Cotton Oil 3J
Can. 1'ac Id
Coast Line 1 "
Cent. Lea., . 34
Denver com . . 41.'.,
Pis tic 3
Frie 54
111. Cen 173
lntcrboro 37
(vttu.O.So. com 2.S,'-2
prfd
L. & N lxe.i
Mel. Cent io;4
M. K. & T com 3:i
prfd 1 ! 3
Mo. 1 BC Al
Nat. Lead . . ;'
N. V. (. cut li';g
Nor.& Western
Unt. it Western t7i,
Pacific Mail . . ;
i'eo. Gas vl '4
I'enD 1 tj.;4
1'res.seil Steel :j4 -j
K failing i -9'
Kcp. l..'c S -u'4
Do lJt lui
Rock lskl com 7;4
prfd rtij
Rubber 4;
So. I'M H)
South. Ry com 5 ?a
M. l'a-.il ...... t,'..v4
St. L. .V S. W. i4.
St.L.tS.F.-VUHl in
l ex as- I'ac u -.'
1 C. lr.iik ..
U. Pacific... !S.-'.j
C S. Meei-. . . 4 : j -
DO l'fu JU7;""j
Virs Ckomi-jai
Wabash
Do Hcl 4 5
Wis. Central . . m
prfd 5.,
WesteruUinon
.HUncj CIOSIU o :2 x
Total sales 1,4 ii.'OQ
GRAIN AND PROVISION SET
Mouth Opening
N beat.
Higli
71 a
Clo-iii
"! a 71 ',3
7. Ha 74;.4 54i
Sot t.
Dec.
7- '-S tO -3
Ibh to t'i
741;
7
Corn.
Scj.1.
Dec.
Mar
4i-'
44
4 . :
45
4i;.
444
4-i
.b 45y.b
Oat.
Sept
Dec.
May
29'
29-"4b
1
33!, tc
1
'
Pork.
Sept. 1703
Oct
j.tn. 1342
Lard.
Sept. ?57
Uct. "65
Jaa 7i0
Ribs.
Sept.
Oct- -0
Ja. 72)
171:2
l4:t
5-0
170:a
l:4:b
-"7h
13
7 17
CHICAGO lette:
Chicago, Aug 25. WHEAT
Early trading was at a slight conces
sion in prices, lat?r, however, the
j market turned strong on buying
- one of the large elevator houses
by
to
j cover short contracts made at very
much higher prices. Foreign mark
ets were reported one-quarter lower.
Argentine shipments to United King-
doni were 1,12S,000 bushels, against
850,000 Inst week. This was used
as one of the bear arbuments, but
its effect was only momentary. The
market closed steady at about yes
terday's ruling prices.
CORN A little higher late in the
session. in sympathy with the
strength in other cereals. Trade not
large and professional in character.
The news on the crop was such that
did not affect speculation either
ty very much.
OATS The market opened frmer
than yesterday but with very little
activity. Prices covered a range of
one-hali" a tent with the tone cf the
market rather strong. Receipts cf
oats are beginning to increase and
this movement retards bull specula
tion in the future options.
PROVISIONS Slightly weaker in
sympathy with the live cent decline
at the yauls and on the liberal re
ceipts over estimates. The market
eioscd :ol't with a ten cent loes in
pork, balance of hog products dull.
UNCALLED-FOE LETTEKS.
The following letters remain un
called for at the Hammond postoffice
for the week ending Aug. 20, 1900:
Mr. Austin Drown.
Mrs. Barbara Burke.
Mr. John Purley.
Mrs. Dixon.
Mrs. J. H. Fisher.
Frank Graczyk.
Mr. Freddie Hoover.
Mr. Fred Hanford.
r. G. Hanford.
Mr. Dennis Hennesey.
Mrs. Wm. Jonas.
Mrs. Jane Logan.
Josef Likewiez.
Mrs. II. F. Murphy.
Mr. J. R. Maschke.
Mrs. John Maloy.
F. E. Mann.
Josef Pawlak.
Mr. John L. Pugh.
Savica Radakovic.
Sava Radakovic.
Ferine Ruttkaj.
Miss A. Raker.
Mr. Arthur Shearer.
Chas. Smit'a.
Mrs. Georgia Savage.
WM. H. GOSTLIN, P. J!.
IIotv to 2Inke C'nrrant Puncli.
Among the delicious summer drlnka
there is none more refreshing than cur
rant punch.
Threo pints of ripe currants and one
pint of red raspbv-rries will make a
large punch bowl full. Crush the fruit
and add the juice of two lemona twl
two oraneres and three quarts of water.
Sweeten to the taste with sugar sirup.
Let stand for about an hour, then filter
through a jelly bag. Chill on Ice be
fore serving. Put a small quantity of
shaved ice into each glass and fill the
glasses with the punch. It Is better to
add the cold sugar sirup after strain
ing. Sugar sirup Is made by boiling gran
ulated sugar with half the quantity
measured by cupfuis of cold water
for teu minutes, ooling before It is
used.
How to Tal;e Care of FInirfr Talis.
In caring for discolored or stained
finger nails a tenrpoonful of lemon
Juice in a cup of warm water is in
valuable. Tin is one of the very bet
manicure acids. It will loosen the cu
ticle from the finper nails as well as
remove diseolorations. Brittle nails
may be ?ured by soaking them daily
for a few minutes in Mood warm sweet
oil. Polish the nails daily with the:
chamois skin polisher to improve the
circulation of the parts and make them
c!iar and pink. No paste is needed.
After washini: the hands press back
with the towel the flesh about the nails.
TL! will prevent hangnails.
Hove Gloves May Be Cleaned.
To clean gloves rub with very slight
ly damp breadcrumbs. If not effectual,
scrape upon them dry French chalk
when on the hand?" and rub them
quickly together in all directions. Do
this several times. Or put gloves of a
light color on the hands and wash the
hands in a basin of spirits of hartshorn.
Pome gloves may be washed in a
strong lather made of soft soap and
warm water or milk, or wash with rice
pulp, or sponge them well with turpen
tine and bang them in a warm place
or where there is a current of air, and
all smell of turpentine will be removed.
Ilor to 'MfiUe Ragpberry Punch.
To one quart of ice cold water add
five tea?poonfuls of raspberry vinegar
or raspberry royal. Turn it into a
largo pitcher or a punch bowl and stir
well. Tut into each glasg a generou3
supply of ice and fill from the bowl.
If raspberries are in season a cupful
of them may be added, or, it not, use in
their place a cup of shredded pineapple
or a banana sliced.
now to Clean Burned Dishes.
Baling dishes that become burned In
th3 oven and plates and platters that
?oco:ne blackened with food scorched
upon them should not go through the
tedious process cf scraping. Simply
put a little water and ashes in the dih
and let it become warm, and the burn
ed and discolored tortious may be
easily cleaned without Injuring the
dish.
! Probably.
; Pro'-obly a woman would be a bride
: to ner nnsoand longer if she should
j continue making company of him. Most
women begin to save their Jam for
i visitors when they have been married
i laree niontb.3.
usmess Directory
OF LAKE CCUNTY
F. L. KNIGHT 5 SONS
Surveyors, Engineers, Draftsmen.
Investigation cf records and examio- j
! ations of Drouertv lines carefully
made. Maps
Crown Point
and plates furnished.
Indiana Since IS
W V.'.
See WM. KLEIHEGE
FOR PLUIuBISG.
132 South Hohman Street.
Telephone, 61.
HAMMOND REALTY CO.
Owners of choice lots in
Mcllie's;
Sub-divUioa.
Hammond, Eldg. Hammond, Ir.i
NELSON THOMASSON
85 Dearborn Street, Chicago.
Buys and sells ncres and lots at
GARY and TOLLE3TOX. The cheap
est and best. Probably has bought
and sold more than any other HKAL
ESTATE firm.
REFERS TO CHICAGO BANKS.
Eyes Tested Free
i
Glasses $1.00 Up.
Correct in style to suit 3011 r
features. Repairing1 done after
noon nnd evening.
C. Breman, O. Q. Optician
1S3 South Hohman St.
Up Stairs.
XEsL iflJO flWi,
Recently Enlarged
WITH
25,000 New Words
New Gazetteer of the World
with more than a,000 titles, based on tte
latest census returns.
New Biographical Dictionary
containing t Lo names cf over 10.000 uotcd
persons, date cf birt II, death, etc
Flitect by W. T.nAItUIS,rh.7V,LL."n.,
United States ConuuisoioutTof tUucauou.
2380 Quarto Pages
Jfew Flute. COOO Uluitrmtioss. likh Bindings.
Needed in Every Home
Also Webster's Collegiate Dlciiouary
1118 i 't". 1J0O Illurtrtltoni.
Regular Edition 7x10x2' indict. SbiaJinj.
De Luxe Edition B'JiSJixl'J In. PHntpJ from
me filnt. cn Mlile paper. b-t;tifiil bhidinri.
FRE E, "DiJtioiuiry Wrinkles." Illustrated ntnpLUt.
n. ,Fa r.. MPn t a m rn
B t t t 1 O - m
NOTICE.
On Labor Day, Monday, September
3rd, the Uland and Germania clubs
will give a joint picnic at Kindel's
grove. Dancing, fine refreshments
and a general good time are booked
for this occasion. The Hammond
Saengerbund, also Fidelia Singing so
ciety will be there in a body and
render fine songs. Special invita
tion Is hereby given to all members
of Calumet Lodge No. 606 I. O. O. F. ;
John A. Logan Encampment, Uni
form Rank. Dorcas Rebekah Lodge,
Moltke Lodge No. 67 6 I. O. O. F., and
all other lodgea in the city. Come one.
come all and spend the day among
a jolly crowd. Committee.
7-lS-ot.
Ttirc is mere catarrh In tn gTfion of the
count r than a'! otfcr diee jut tPther an 1
unti' the lnt few rears was aurfo?-'! to i e in
cnrable. For a rrrat many rears doctor pro
roan ced it a local disease and rescihd I oral
remedies, and by coTSart'.T fail'rs to cure with
local treatment. prinn-rce." it jncnrrh!f:. Sci
ence na proven cstarrn to t e a err u'lnrri!
disease aid threfire requires ciT-thuMonsi'
treatment. Hall's Catarrh Cure. nia':fartured
Vy F. J. Cheney A Co.. Toledo. (Mo. i the nnlj
conftituticnal cure on the market. It is taken
internally in doses fro'n tf ndro; to a fear;w:on
fn! It acts directly on the !.Wd and maw
fiirtacs of the system. They of!r one h-indrKl
dollers for any cise it faiis to cure. Send f jr
circulars and testimonials.
Address: F.J. CHENEY & Co.. Toledo. Ohio.
Sold by Drurrists. T5c.
Take Hail's Family Pills for constipation.
Hlonsy to Loan
In any amount on short notice, on
re&l estate or personal property, by
Stin30n Eros. Attorneys at Law,
Stenographer and notary in efSce. All
inqoiiiea strictly confidential. Suite
105, First National Bank Euilding,
Hammond Ind.
I ""1.','- Vii.tii-;. j? lv--V4 1
a
DH. WILLIAM D. WBIS
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
EutUeher Arzt.
Office and residence 143 Hohman St..
Phone 20
and
(private wire) day
night service.
JOHNSON'S STUDIO
lias two back entrances that all par
ties can drive to with the! brid
al parties and flower pieces un
til State street is finished.
TIASONIC TEMPLE.
WM. J. WHINE RY
LAWYER.
Telephcne 2141 Suita 306 Hammord
UalKling.
W. F. MA'SHINO
FIRE INSURANCE.
OCice in First National licnk Dldg.
CALUMET HOTEL
Otto Matthius. Trcp.
MEALS AT ALL HOURS.
Corner Calunlft Avenue and Hoffman
Street.
Phone 20-13. Hammond, Ind.
MAX NASSAU
JEWELER AND OPTICIAN
Olcott Ave. East Chicago. Ind.
Fine Repairing is Our Success
S BEST IN TOWN
When You Are Hungry
K t H t M U I; R H'.U
MAINE
RESTAORAMT
AND LUNCH ROOM
Veal it A!
Hours
For Lsj!r and
Uf-ntleraen
CEREOLOS BROS.
122 8. Hohman Street
Fred Dumke
Shoes Repaired
221 Mich. Avenue. Opposite
Library.
V
My latest and most improved ma
chinery, coupled with 35 years prac
tical experience, enables me to niske
your eld shoes look like new.
The
Metropolitan
Magazine
HOW OS 54f at all SnwS-STANnS
Pictures In Color
Clever Short Slories
Striking Articles
Many Illustrations
K A
I 3
A 3c. Magazine for 15c.
WESr 29lh STREET. NE1Y YORK
For Ice Cream and Cold
Drink3
N. HORELiI & GO.
IS THE
HEADQUARTERS
Ice cream for party3 and
picnics at moderate prices.
Bricks a spacia'ty
Phone 2031.
25S So. Hohman
-LJ. 1 1 1 , f
CHiCHESTEH'S SKGLISH
FEilirROVAL PILLS
CO"
1 Hit HKSTKR S 5(.UM1 i;, U-d and
oia mt-uuiic bois. euel with blue rbboa.
rak no oihfr. llrfn.p rixoroH b.li.
or send -le. in .:, for Pan'lrnlr. Telti.
rt-tarti .natl. lo,OCh 1 erxtwuiiwA stold
JaJcH"THR CJEMICAU CO.
1194 EmdUoa Sqor,
Palace of Sweets
CANDIES AND ICE CREAM

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