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The Lake County times. [volume] (Hammond, Ind.) 1906-1933, October 31, 1906, Image 4

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PAGE FOUR.
THE LAKE COUNTY TIMES
Wednesday Oct. 31, 1906.
THE LAKE COUNTY TIMES
AN EVENING NEWSPAPER PUBLISH
ED BY THE LAKE COUNTY PRINT
ING AND PUBLISHING COMPANY...
"Entered as second-class matter June,
2S, J906, at the postofSee at Hammond,
Indiana, under the Act of Congress,
March 3, 1878."
Offices in Hammond building, Ham
mond. Ind. Telepnone, 111.
Cbicngo Office.
Room 1502 Tribune Building, Hugh W.
Montgomery, representative.
Terms of Subscription.
Yearly $3.00
Half Yearly 1.50
Single Copies 1 cent
NeTlDrPAlD
Circulation
October 1, 1906,
ii
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1906.
For Best Essays on Ben-Hur
and Lew Wallace, its
Author.
POPILS 10 COM
Contest Open to Members of High
School, and Boxes to Ben Hur
to Go to Winners.
The play which is attracting per-
haps the greatest interest of any in
the country at the present time is the
stupendous production of Gen. Lew
Wallace's " Ben Hur," which is now
being produced at the Chicago Audi- i
.;-.y.i'-
;:-::.:-'-'':.r.J- 7 fSS
TlltS OFFERS
10 PRIZES
CHARLES WARREN FAIRBANKS.
Vice president of the United States, who
noon.
torium. It is safe to say that more
Hammond people have attended the
performances of this play than any one
play which has ever appeared in Chi
cago. Gen. Lew Wallace, who wrote the
book on which the play is founded, is
perhaps tho greatest of all Indiana
writers, and his book ranks as one of
the greatest pieces of literature ever
written. Only within the last week
this book has boon the subject of
study and composition by the students
of literature in the Hammond high
school. In order to encourage the
study of this book and its author on
the part of high school students The
Lake County Times herewith offers
prizes one for the best essay on Gen.
Lew Wallace and his work In general,
and the other on his great classic,
Ben Hur." The prize in each case
wlil be the use of a box containing six
persons at the performance of " Ben
Hur" for any evening during the run
of the play, which may be chosen by
the priie winner.
Conditions of Contest.
The conditions of the contest are as
follows:
The only persons eligible are mem
bers of the Hammond high school.
Each essay U to contain not more th&a
four hundred words, must be written
In pen and ink on one side of the paper
and must be received at this office not
later than 12 o'clock noon on Friday,
Nov. 9, Members of the high school
faculty, to be chosen later, will be the
judges of the contest one for the
Wallace essays and the other for the
"Ben Hur" essays. General neatness,
as well as grammatical and rhetorical
construction, will be considered by the
judges. The decision of the judges as
to the person winning the prize will be
announced through the columns of The
Lake Countt TiMEa as soon as possible
after the contest is closed.
The name of the writer of each essay
must be handed in with the essay, but
on a different slip of paper, in order i
that the judges will not know the
writer's identity. These will be kept
for reference at The Times office.
CONGRESSMAN CRUMPACKER
t TirA-fcT I
WRITES TO HAMMOND MAN.
Deplores Police Interference When He
Tried to Answer Question Put to
Illm By Edward Stoliey.
Edward Stoliey of this city has re
ceived the followin
communicu.Liu.i
from Congressman E. D. Crumpacker,
who spoke at Towle's opera house last
, . ....
Aionaay evening, ai me ume M.r.
Stoliey asked the speaker a question,
but was unable to hear the answer
at r- --rv.. hAn of
v v. v...... , -
me luieriereiitu ui iuc yunwc.
Crumpacker has written Mr. Stoliey on
this account. The letter follows:
Valparaiso, Ind., Oct. 30, 1906. I
Mr. Edward Stoliey,
Hammond, Ind. I
Dear Sir: I want to express to you
v Klnrerp resrrpts over the occurrence
y sincere regrets over tne occurrence
the opera house at Hammond last
my
at
evening.
I considered your question J
an absolutely fair one, and would have
been glad, indeed, to have had you re
main to hear my attitude on the sub
ject you referred to. Of course, I can
not be held responsible for the action
of the officers in expelling you from
the hall. I would have much preferred
to have had you remain, because from
what I know of you I am satisfied you
are an honest man and was only seek
ing the truth, and I could have stated
my position to you clearly, and have
satisfied you that I am not, and never
have been, opposed to the interests of
labor, but, on the other hand, I have
always supported every measure cal
culated to benefit the cause of labor,
organized or unorganized. While I do
not now remember of ever meeting you
personally, I have known you as one
of the substantial citizens of Hammond
for a number of years, and I do not
want you to misunderstand my atti
tude on questions of interest to you.
As you know, men are often misquoted
and misrepresented, and I feel I have
been misrepresented in this campaign
and unjustly charged with things that
are not true. I am sure that you, as
an honest and patriotic citizen, who
desires to do justice to his fellow men,
would not want to oppose my election
1V
will be in Hammond tomorrow after
because of false charges that may be
brought against me. My sympathy is
with labor, and my record in consrress
vindicates my statement. Of course. I
am only one of the 3S6 members of
congress, but I submit to you that
never nave 1 Deen opposed to the
in-
terests of labor.
With kind personal regards, and
hoping you will give me that same
consideration that you would ask for
yourself, I am,
Sincerely yours.
P. S. Let me hear from you.
ANNIVERSARY CONCERT AND BALL.
iiammonu aengerDuncl announces
a grand concert and ball, which is to
be given next fc-unday evening, Nov. 4,
at Hufhn s hall. The Saengerbund
has its home in Chopin hall, but be-
cause of the large crowd that is ex-
pected, Huehn's hall has been chosen,
It will be remembered that this annual
celebration of the singers was one of
tne cmer social events oi last year,
This one promises to out-do it. Ad-
mission tickets are 25 cents a person.
The doors pan at f :!C 16-Sl-lt
mmm
STOCKS AND
Latest Movements in
(B7 Direct Wire to
v T3T.W YfmTT TTTTTP
New York, Oct. SI. Disappointment I
over the announcement of the United
States Steel company in failing to in-
crease the dividend on the common
shares was instrumental in opening the
stock market lower. This issue opened
oft three-quarters of a point, and the
selling seemed to be of a better char
acter than the buying.
In the higher-priced railroad shares,
ennsylvanla. Reading, bt. Paul, union
Pacific, Northern Pacific and Baltimore
& Ohio all opened fractionally lower
with a downward tendency and losses
of about a poi
int in each of the above
t v, j,,,
order of the day.
issues was the
The money market continues very
firm, call loans today at one time rul
ing as nIgn as 9 per Cent., with the
larger loans being made well above
$ Der cent. One reason advanced for
the firm tone in the money market is
tne fact tnat interest disbursements
fan jue on Nov. 1, and bankers are
..4i
uwMiifi picyaiiuuus lyjyi
mem. it is arguea alter xnese pay- i
ments are made the money market will
assume normal conditions again.
In the last hour quite a sharp break
was brought about by liberal selling in
Pennsylvania and Reading, which had
a sympathetic weakness in the entire
list
usu aA
The close tonight is ragged ana
weak, with losses of one to two points
In all of the active issues.
NEW YORK STOCK MARKET
Description. Open
High
101
101
132
44
110
154-4
92
74
8
34
119
74
78
58
30
76
52
38
20
34
175
36
39
Low
100
101
132
43
109
152
89
74
98
34
118
74
77
57
30
76
50
38
19
34
174
36
39
Close
100
101
132
43
109
152
90
74
98
34
118
74
77
57
30
76
50
3t
19-4
34
175
36
39
Atchlaon ...1014
Atch. pfd...l01
.m. Sugar. .132Ta
Am. Car ... 44
Amal. Cop.. 110
Am. Smelt.. 153t
Vm. Ice Sees 92
Am. Locom. 74
Am. Tob. pfd 98 s;
Am. wool.. 3 4fe
B. & 0 119ft
Mscuit .... 74 it
Brook. R. T. 7 8 Ms
Ches. & O... 58 Vi
C. & A. com 30
& A. pfd. 76 M
C. F. & I 52
Col. South.. 38
Corn Pdts.. 20
Cotton Oil.. 34
'an ad. Pa c. .173
Cent. Leath. 36
Denver, com 39
Denver, pfd. 83
Det. U. Ry.. 90
83
90
68
43
75
172
35
58 Vi
142
23;
Distillers . . 69
69
43
173'
36
143
24
34
94
74
128
45
142
54
141
25
98
27
65
49
91
34
171
25
36
182
47
106
19
44
68
43
172
35
142
23
33
93
74
126
45
140
53
138
34
97
27
65
49
90
33
170
24
35
180
46 Vi
106
18
42
Erie, com... 431
I'rie, 1st.
111. Cent 173
tnterboro .. 36 i
K. C. S. pfd. 684
l j. & N 143
Mex. Cent.. 24
VI K & T cm 34
33
68
93
74
126
45
35
141
53
138
35
98
27
65
49
51
90
33
170
24 Vi
35
180
46
106
M K & T pf. 68
Mis Pac 94 '4
N'at. Lead .. 74 V
N. Y. C. ...128
Ont. & W... 45
Pac. Mail... 35
Pennsyl .142
Press. Steel. 54
Reading ...140 s.
R. I. & S 35
R. I. & S. pfd 97
R. Isl. com.. 27 V2
R. Isl. pfd... 65ii
Rubber 49
Railway Bps 51
South. Pac. 91
So.. Ry. com. 34
St. Paul 170
St. L & S W 24 i
Texas Pac. . 36 14
Union Pac. 181
U. S. Steel.. 46
U. S. S. pfd. 106
Wabash ... 19
Wabash, pfd 44
42
26
86
Wis. Cent... 2t
Western U.. 86
86
S6
GRAIN ID PROVISION MARKET
Month Open High Low Close
Wbeat.
Dec. ..73-74 74 73 74
May ..78 78 78 Vi 78a
luly .. 77 77 Vi 77 a
Corn.
Dec. ..43 43 43 43a
May ..44-44 44 44 44a
July .. 44 44 44a
Oat.
Dec. ..33 33 33 33a
May ..35-35 35 34 35a
July .. 33 33 33a
Lard.
Jan. ..1370 1385 1370 1385a
May ..1375 1392-95 1375 1390b
Pork.
Oct. .. 935
Jan. ..832 845 832 842-45
May ..832 842 832 840-42
III he
Oct. .. 805 800 805
Jan. ..740 750 740 747-50
May ..755 762 755 762
CHICAGO LETTER.
Chicago, Oct. 31. WHEAT Active
and higher in the early trade this
morning based on stronger cames.
Liverpool being quoted three-eighths
higher than yesterday's closing figures,
jalso future options in the Minneapolis
market were five-eighths higher. Re
ceipts of wheat at that quarter are
disappointing, owing to the car short
age, and millers are complaining that
they are unable to fill their flour con
tracts. The market here scored an
advance of about one-half a cent for
the day, shorts covering being the
feature. The market closed with a!
firm undertone.
CORN Dull, narrow market with
CORN Dull, narrow market with
tho vninmA of business smalL Weather
conditions throughout the west are
mora favorable for the movement of
the new croo. although the quality of
new corn arriving is rather disappoint-
ins. Cash corn m the sample marKet
It-hIo.i stca.lv S.i1p5 tn ptnorfprs were
reported at about 150,000 bushels. The
market closed steady, with very little
1 .M.anA fm vostPT,iv
I - - '
OATS Trade almost lifeless. Fluc-
tuations confined to cne-quarter of a
cent for the entire day. A few of the
best traders are of the opinion that
there is a large short interest in this
cereal, and any unfavorable news will
cause a buying spurt which will ulti
mately put oats on a higher plane,
i The market closed steady.
ERIE BEGINS NEW RATE.
The 22 cent rate goes into effect on
the Erie railroad tomorrow. The con-
ductor's slip will also be used begin
ning tomorrow. By its use a passen
ger may purchase a ticket on the train
An additional 10 cents will be charged,
however. The slip that the conductor
i nanas tne passenger serves as the
ticket and may be redeemed at any
I point en the road within 30 days for 10
I cents.
PROVISIONS
Finance and Trade.
Lake Canary Times.)
SOUTH WATER STREET
MARKET.
Chicago, Oct. 31. Disagreeable
weather conditions again prevailed this
morning and had a demoralizing effect
on trade in produce circles. They also
delayed the unloading of potatoes on
track. Buyers were few, only those
who were badly in need of supplies
ventured out. In poultry offer
ings were rather small and prices heia
steady at the recent decline.
Wuotations on round lots ranged.
Butter ReceiDta. 4.442 tubs. Extra
creamerv, jobbing, 25 4c; price to re
tailers. 27c; print. 28c; firsts. 22 ft! 2 4c;
seconds, 1921c; ladles, 17c; renovated,
:u!i:i; dairies, Cooieys. Z6c, msi.
211 22c; packing stock, 162 17c.
Eertrs Rer-eints. 3.49S cases, b resh
stock at mark, new cases included or
cases returned. 2022c; firsts, 23c,
prime firsts packed in whitewood cases
grading SO per cent fresh stock. 2i1Ac;
extra, SO per cent fresh, pacKea lor cny
trade, 27c
pn ,n;,R(M..it, sn cars. Early
Ohio, Minnesota, 45(a'4Sc per bu; white
stock, Wisconsin, free from frost, 44
(rii-c nr hn fnnlaininfr held frozen.
r.A JZ. k. ' "I" -, 38040c
per bu; mixed, red and white, 3840c
per bu; common, small, unripe, red or
white, 303ac per bu; Jersey sweet
potatoes, S2.853.00 per brl; Virginia,
ji.&oi.eo per bu
Veal Quotations for calves In good
order were as follows: 50 to sd-id
weight, 6 7c; 50 to 75 lbs, 7M:9c; So
to 100 lbs, fancy, 94 (tj) 10c; laO to 1 a
lbs, good meaty, 4&6c.
Dressed Beef No. 1 ribs. 14 c; No.
1 loin. 17Ac: No. 1 round. 7Vac; No. 1
chuck, 8c; No. 1 plate, 2,c.
lAve Poultry Turkeys, per lb, 14c;
chickens, fowls, 8 c; springs, 9Vic;
roosters qi$C; geese, $6.00 9.00; ducks,
9 gi0c
Fruits ADDles. SI. 5003.35 per brl;
bananas. Jumbo, per bunch, $1.401.50;
straight, S1.101.25; lemons, California,
.50fof8.00; oranges, Calitornia, $4.00g
$5.00. . 4,
lieans Handnicked. choice. $1.44;
screened and depending on quality $1.00
ftiU.30: red kidney, per bu, $2.002.30;
r'fr srrads. S1.4G cti) 1.90 : brown. Swedish,
21.00(91.70: limas. California, per 100
IbK. S4.50(fi'4.7o.
firpen Vegetables Carrots. $1.00
1.25 per 100 bunches; celery, 15c$1.00
per case; beets, $1.001.25 per brl;
cabbage, 75 if 80c per crate; parsnips,
;'i7-65e per tub; turnips, 7580c per
crate.
HAMMOND MARKETS.
The following are the average prices
viuoted in the local markets:
Flour, 50 lb.,
Potatoes, bu .
Sggs, doz
Eggs, doz. . ...
Milk, qt
Sugar, lb
'ream, qt. ..
Round steak,
$1.30
70-75c.
26c.
26c.
6c
6c.
24a
14c.
20-22c.
20c.
15."
17c.
7 c.
4 c.
1.00-1.30
10c.
lb.
Ham, lb
'orterhouse steak, lb
Pork, 113
Sirloin steak, lb .....
Lima beans, lb
Celery, per stalk . . .
Vpples, bu
Cranberries, per qt..
HEARD ON THE BOURSE.
New York, Oct. 31. The stock market
is deadly dull. The commission house
business is nothing; money up to 6 per
ent on call and looks as if it would
;oon be higher. No money can be bor
owed in Europe. Last November
noney was 125 per cent and tho bank
reserves c'fmble what we have on hand
this year, and November and December
are always tight in regard to pioney.
The election is only a week off and no
ne can advise to either buy or sell
stocks to advantage in thi3 kind of
narket.
The odds on Hughes still keep around
1 to 1. J. W. Gates is reported as mak
ing a bet or ?30,ooo to ?io,ooo on
ilughes' election. It is the history of
New York elections that the candidate
who goes to the polls with the odds of
2 to 1 in his favor is always elected.
One of the best posted plungers says
if Hughes goes in with a decent vote
he will buy all the stock he wants in
London before the New York market
s open, and hethinks he can make
mywhere from $5,000 to $15,000 per
;hare. He thinks steel is quite a dis-
lppointment, not so much on the one
mlf of one per cent dividend, but be-
2ause the earning are not up to the
$40,000,000. Some of the steel people
lave been quoted as expecting $42,000,-
300 in this quarter of the year. Steel
is expected to work below 45 before it
.vill be a purchase again, and then the
talk will again be an Increase to 4
per cent per annum dividends.
The short interest in the market is
jretty well eliminated and unless ag
gressive buying comes in the market
is in for a slump before election. Th$
?nd of the month will make a demand
on money that will put rates up and
stocks down.
So far, the outlook is bad for the
bank statement this week, as the sub-
treasury is again gaining from the
banks.
Mexican Central is being bulled by
Toakum and Frick on a new govern-
ment concession; they expect to get it
up to 35 or 40 and unload it on the
Rock Island crowd.
Fourteen million dollars of new cir
culation has so far been taken out of
the "banks under Shaw's latest rule.
St. Louis & Southwestern snows a
e-ain In net of 115 rer cent over last
year. This shows how the cotton belt
roads will come in if the election goes
the right way. All of the southern
roads are selling too slow, especially
E. & N.
Th T.nnriATi statist savs of the posi
tinn of th Rank of England: "When
cash returns from the country m M)-
vember. and the bank also obtains tne
gold coming to hand from South Africa
and elsewhere, the improvement in the
reserves will be rapid. However, it
should be realized that the bank must
- obtain a large addition to its reserve
- ,-rv,K- ir, to hA nrenared
to meet the usual drain of cash to the
provinces in December, amounting to
about J0 000 000 Hence any reduc-
any
tkn in the bank rate is unlikely to
occur until the new year brings easier
-noney to all the international markets."
WITH THE EDITORS.
A MONOPOLY CHECKED.
The action of President Roosevelt
in withdrawing the coal lands from
sale as well as retrieving as much as
he can of those that had been secured
by fraud, has checked the most mon
strous monopoly ever conceived in this
country. Through its purchase from
the Great Northern railway, the United
States Steel corporation has become
owner of more than half the iron ore
beds in the United States. Were the
coal lands available, it would seize
them and thus have an absolute control
not only of the iron and steel output,
but of the fuel supply of the nation.
Thanks to the prompt action of the
president, a part of this control has
been rendered difficult, if not impossi
ble. South Bend Times.
A CALM CAMPAIGN.
One thing that strikes all observers
of the New York campaign, says the
New York Tribune, is its calmness.
Last year the campaign was hysterica!;
this year it is quiet. The Tribune con
tinues; No one is lying awake nights because
of the campaign. No one is threatened
with nervous prostration over the is
sues. In this city there are few signs
that an election Is coming on, and up
In the country, according to all reports,
the people go about their affairs just as
if they had not the saving of the state
on their hands. It is a little odd that a
community capable of growing wildly
excited one year over a savior of so
ciety should view him the next year
with dignified unconcern.
Between Trains
Nautieul Ignorance.
Young Captain Sealby of the White
Star liner Cretic, was talking about
the ignorance of the sea and of nauti
cal terms that is sometimes displayed
by female passengers.
'Last fall," he said, "there was a
young lady from warwicK wnom 1
showed over the steerage.
"As we were making our tour, the
steerage people were eating their din
ner, and I couldn't help remarking the
tremendous appetite of a red-haired
fellow.
" 'Great Jupiter,' I said, 'just look
at the amount of food that fellow con
sumes.'
' 'I suppose, captain,' said the young
lady, 'that he is what you sailors call
a stowaway.
A Football Enthusiast.
W. J. Clothier, the tennis champion
of America, said at a dinner in Phila
delphia: 'Tennis is all very well in its way,
but what is the excitement, what is the
enthusiasm of tennis, compared to that
of football?
"Perhaps you have heard of that
Pennsylvania guard who, coming to
at the end of a football game, whis
pered to the physician bending over
him:
' 'Did we win, doctor?'
' 'Yes; hand down,' the physician an
swered.
Never mind that fractured thigh,
I then, doc, he said.
'Just take these
broken teeth out of my mouth so's I
can holler. "
POMPADOUR FINALLY DOOMED.
Down with Mary Jane's topknot!
The doom of the pompadour has at last
become certain. And the fall of Rome
was not greater or accompanied by
more sighs and tears and murmurings
The girl who ror years has hidden a
too intellectual forehead beneath its
illusive waves, the girl who has filled
out a narrow head, the girl who has
shone in the glory of a marcel wave
all these are heartbroken at the pass
ing of the pompadour. It made a wo
man look ten years her junior. But
all is changed, and the new side part
according to bulletins of hairologists
or the Madonna coiffure, will replace
it. Almost ever other New York wo
man who has the price visits her hair
dresser's twice a week, if she hasn't
a maid who is an "artistic person with
experience.' Almost every society
leader and telephone girl in New York
now wears the marcel Or the washboard
wave, and some of them look like the
silent wax figures that stand in the
windows of dress emporiums. Pitts
burg Dispatch.
AN OPEN' LETTER.
June 18, 1906
Quaker Herb Co., Cincinnati, .:
Gentlemen:
I want to let you know what your
wonderful medicine did for me.
About five years ago I had kidney
trouble and backache. I was unable to
be up part of the time, and had pains
that nearly bent me double. When
commenced to use your Quaker Herb
Extract, I had no confidence in it, but
in two days time I felt like a different
man, and in a week I was cured.
keep your medicine in the house now
all the time, in case I should need it;
and it has helped my neighbors won
derfully. I enclose you $1.00 for more,
Thanking you for what your medi
cine has done for me, I am,
Yours truly,
HENRY POST,
Red Key, Ind., R. R. No. 1.
Quaker Herb Extract, a specific fo
disease of the stomach, liver and kid
neys made from a combination o
herbs, roots, barks, berries, leaves an
blossoms, is prepared as a cure for the
above and kindred diseases, rheuma
tism. catarrh, biliousness, pains in the
back and sides, headaches, neuralgia,
loss of appetite, nervousness, etc.
I Quaker Herb Extract and a complete
stock of the time-tried Quaker Herb
Remedies can always be found ln the
stores of these enterprising druggists:
- James W. TYeis, 1C btauner & Co.,
Otto isegeie, ju. ivoio.
ANNOUNCEMENT.
The Strauhe Piano factory wishes to
announce that it has no retail branches
or stores in Hammond or elsewhere.
The company sells direct from the fac
tory only, at factory prices. Do not
be misled or confused by pianos
with similar names, bat when In the
market for an Instrument, buy direct
from the factory, thereby savins mid
dlemen's profits and agtnti commission.
Ttrma to salt. Take South Hohmaa
street rnr. - c aaa see I "Oor
f ianos are made 19-25-lwfc
P'
alias fee
lusmess '.Directory
OF LAKE
See WH. KLEIHEGE
FOR PLUMBING.
152 South Houmap Street- '
Telephone, 61.
Lash Hotel & Sample Eoom
Rates 2 Per Day
FEED LASH, Prop.
271, 273 E. State Street.
Phone 34. L. D. 90. Hammond. Ind.
LUNDT & CARLE Y
ROOFING CO.
Phones :
140 & 1381. 210 STATE ST.
HAMMOND REALTY CO.
Owners of choice lota ia Hcllle's
Sub-division.
Hammond, Bldg. Hammond, Ind.
ASK FOR CHAS. MARTIN'S
NEW ENGLAND BREAD
Wholesome and nutriclous
Try our Bohemian Rye and
Home-made bread
AT ALL GROCERS.
C. E. Green,
Carriage
ant. aon
Painter
236 Plummer A en., Hammond, Ind.
Accuracy, Promptness and ReasonaDle
Rates Guaranteed.
MRS. L. A. 1UNARD,
PU3LIC
STENOGRAPHER
Office, 151 So. Hokman St., Room 6,
Telephone 1802. Hammond, Ind.
COAL! GOAL! GOAL!,'
Notice to the Public!
Wt, tbe firm known aa Riverside Coal
Co., located at corner of Michigan and
Soal streets, wish to announce, that ne
art now ready to do business. We villi
handle nothing; bnt grood grades of coal.
Quick sales, small profits and 2,000
poonds to the ton shall ever be on
motto.
RIVERSIDE GOAL GO.
Residence Phone 1493 Office Phone 3932
FOR SALE
A two-story house, barn and 8
lots at a sacrifice.
$2,000.00 buys all.
APPLY TO
SAMUEL A. ROSENBERG
1506 Tribune Building,
Tel. Central 2056. CHICAGO.
dtalir i f Makes WaklTnr a a "
fir U f plnure. Kf'y er-plird.Mife
1 -w (.ifgn-wnnomlcnl-roM twice
ju far an other pol!be.
FREE SAMPLE Addreas Depv.3.
Lamont.rm-H" rn . Ar .THtidon 8t..N.Y.
UP-TO-DATE LIVERY
Rogers & Burge
71-73 State Street.
NEW, FIRST CLASS EQUIPMENT.
OUR CARRIAGE MEETS ALL NIGHT
TRAINS.
Thre Is mire catarrh In this sctinn of tbe
conntry tban a'l other dieMsi pnt tntnther an1
nnti the few ears was pnosed tn le In
caralle. For a erea rnanv 'ears doctor pro
nounced it a local fHese a""1 rtrescnVc' loral
reme'Ms. a by cons an tl faflin" to rare with
local treatment, prono nce1 it incurable. Ser
ence ha proves catarrh to e a cotist'tTior'al
dipxe and therefore requires constitutional
treatment. Hall's Catarrh Cure, mannfactured
Try F. Cheney A- ro.. Toledo. fhio, is tbe only
constitrttional core on the market. It is taksn
In tern a' lj m dows from ten drops to a teapoon
fal. It acts directly on the i lood and mnco s
surfaces of the system. They offer one hundred
dollars for any case it fails to cpre. Send for
circulars and tes'imonials.
Address: F. j. CHENEY Co Toledo, Ohia,
Sold by Drursrista, 6c
Taka HaU's Family Pills for cos.stlps.tioa.
Palace of Sweets
CANDIES AND ICE CREAM
u.v , nmsrt-nTnir i ir-ft n
im st
r
3
COUNTY - ' -
Best Equipped Repair Shop in the State
G. W. HUNTER
AUTOMOBILE GARAGE
Compressed Air FREE
Hawser Gasoline System
91 S. HOIIMAN STREET
Phone 122. HuPlm Block. lUiumund, lad
jt MASHINO
EIRE INSUHANCX
n , v
0Sce ln FIrst Natloaal Bank B14-
CALUMET HOTEL
Otto Matthla Prop.
MEALS AT ALL HOURS.
Corner Calumet Avenue and Hoffman
Street.
Phone 2043. Hammond, Ind.
If yon want every Engllab apeak
lug person In Lake County to read
year advertisement put It In
Tim lake: county times.
DR. WILLIAM D. WEIS
PHYSICIAN AND -SURGEON.
Duetscher Am.
Qflce and residence 145 Hohmaa St
Phone 20 (private wire) day
and night service.
Correct Siyie Period tit
Richard Halilweg
MERCHANT
TAILOR
Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing
All Orders Promptly Filled
Moderate Prices
251 S. Ilobman St., Hammond, Ind.
Phone 41)1
J. W. GARVEY
iPluiribinsr. Gas Fitting and
Sewerage
Steam
ami Hot Water Ileatlns
Jobbing Promptly
Attended To
602 HOTn STREET, WHITING, IND.
bone 2183.
DR. W. H. DAVIS
DENTIST
Rooms 1-3, Majestic Bide.
Special Notice Do not confuse this
office with the Harvard Dentists, for I
am in no way connected with them,
never have been.
Tel. 22(51. Chung Maw, Mgr.
CHUNG KEE LO.
Chlneae Chop &uey und American
Restaumnt.
CHINESE AND JAPANESE GOODS.
91 State St. Hammond, Ind.
Open from 10 a. m. tn 1 a. m.
Fine Residence and Brick
Flat Building
a specialty. Estimates on
short notice. Plans free.
3
. Kolling.
411 Sohl Street.
op That Leak!
Art you interested in that and
willing to do a little savins.
WE PAT TOU INTERST ON
TOUR SAVINGS.
THE CITIZENS GERMAN !V ATIO!V Alt
BANK OF HAMMOND, IND.
We'll help you. Give us yout
account ln your savings line
and we will pay you 3 in
terest compounded every six
months One dollar and up
wards will start you on the
Road to Success, try it one year.
The only National Savings
Bank tn Hammond. This is a
Home Bank, owned by Ham
mond citizens, sixty-three 'a
number and therefore is not
one-man's bank.
Okas. C. irottb, Pres.
Y m. D. Well, Vlee-Prea.
George M. Eder, Casbler.
C S. Emerlne, Ass't Casblm
Honey to Loan
In any amount on short notioe, C3
real estate or personal property, by
8tinson Bros Atorneys at Law,
Stenographer and notary ln office. All
ni.iM atrirtlv rtnnfidential Rnits
tnqoiiiea strictly eonnaenuai. cunt
106. First National Bank SaHai&f.
. , .
BmOn1 Ba-
The
Metropolitan
Magazine
HOW OS SALE mt mil NEWS-STASDS
Pictures in Color
Clever Short Stories
Striking Articles
Many Illustrations
A 35c. Magazine for 13c.
3 WEST 29th SHEET. NEW I0S5
"J
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