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The Lake County times. [volume] (Hammond, Ind.) 1906-1933, December 22, 1906, Image 5

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PAGE FIVE.
Saturday, Dec. 22. 1906.
THE LAKE COUNTY TIMES
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Telegraph News by Direct
Wire from All Over
Indiana
Munrlp, Ind., Doc. 22. That an at
tempt is Loin;? made to blackmail the j
widow of John M. Itloss, ex-state su- j
perintendent of public instruction, is I
the latest theory of friends and rela- I
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tlves who have received, on heart-ehape-d
slates, supposed "spirit mes
sages" from I'.Ioks. The several mes
pacres tLus far received have all Ween
of one tenor that Mrs. Bloss should,
give up certain Bums of money alleged
tc be due several persons from Bloss.
Thuf far, all the persons save one In
dicated by the "messages" say that
1'los.s did riot mve them a cent and
that, as far as they are concerned, the
Tvritin on the mysterious slates is un
true. No Money in This for a Crook.
Mrs. P.losa. who lives alone on her
country estate, save for servants, was
for a while alarmed by lho writing,
hut now has come to believe as the
others, that an interested person is
the Avrlter of the messages, and has
lent her aid to the authorities who are
trying to unravel the mystery. One
of the mysterious slates was found on
the doorstep at the home of Harvey
West, nrw trustee of Hamilton town
ship. It was in effect, as follows:
"When I left the office of trustee of
Hamilton township I was deeply In
debt to the township. Tell my wife
11 t'd she will pay you." This is signed
"John M. Bloss.' West says he has
examined the township looks and finds
that lUoHsdkd without owing the com
munity n cent.
Nor Is There in This.
George Sheets, nn intimate friend of
Bloss and a business partner of hlsf,
found a message similar to the follow
ing Inscribed upon the slate left at his
door: "I took pecuniary advantage of
you in several trades in which we
were interested jointly. Find out these
amounts, and my. wife will pay you."
This also is signed "John M. Bloss."
Sheets says that he and BIoss had
traded together for many years and
had many deals in common, but that
ttloss was strictly honest and at death
vrns not in debt to him a dollar.
- . . Message Abont a Tenant.
One message was left at the home
of n man who had been a tenant on
one of the Bloss farms, but who had
been discharged. This message said
that Bloss had treated the tenant tin
fairly, but that Ms. Bloss would
make It "nil right' with him. A mes
sage similar in sentiment was received
by Mrs. Bloss, and the tenant came to
her with the slate that he had re
ceived. stouy of a rrccrc or monky
Question In : What Iil He Want of a
Two Bushel Sack? Twenty
Years' Savings.
Frankfort. Ind.. Ieo. 22. "The pirl
who marries that toy will receive a
Tjiser pile of money than she ever
Pnw outside of si bank." said Zimri
Sheets, of Owen township, twenty
years ngro, referring to his son, Walter
Jj. Sheets, at that time an infant.
Thursday Sheets, who is an ex-county
commissioner, made procxi his word by
fcivinj: to that son and his bride a
peck of United States coin.
During the last twenty years he has
been laying aside money, secreting it
in jars that he had hidden beneath
nn old apple tree on his farm ten
miles north of this city. The money
"was kept In the secret hiding place
until a storm blew down the tree a
few months ago. Since then the
hoarded wealth has been kept in the
Sheets home. Sheets, accompanied by
his son and daughter-in-law, came to
Frankfort bringing the money in a
two-bushel sack. The money was
placed on deposit in the Clinton Coun
ty bank.
Acquitted of Train Wrecking.
Fvansviilee. Ind.. Dec. 22. Th
Jury in the case of Shirley Erwin,
charged with murder In the first de
gree by causing a wreck on the South
ern railroad at Mnuren, Ind., on the
night of Aug. 1.". brought in a verdict
at Petersburg, Ind., acquitting the de
fendant. The jury was out twenty
two hour?.
Workman Radly Scalded.
Princeton. Ind., Dec. 22. Elmer
Pkelton. 20 years old, was seriously
scalded while working in the canning
factory. A kettle filled with boiling
water was overturned on his shoul
der and arm, cooking the flesh. The
scalding water barely missed his head
in the descent.
She Found Out, All Kight.
Summitville. Ind., Dec. 22. Mary
.Tores. 10 years old, in a spirit of mis
chief, thrust a pin into the insulator
of an electric light wire just to see
what might happen. She was danger
ously shocked, while the entire light
ing system of the town was temporari
lv knocked out
Rig Price for Farm Ind.
Rushville, Ind., Dec. 22. Percy
Walker has bought the W. O. Frazee
farm, paying $130 an acre for it
RAILROAD NOTES.
T. B. Hunt, passenger fireman on tha
Wabash road, is on the eiclc list this
week.
Fred Pryuns, conductor on the Lake
Shore road, will spend Christmag with
friends in Hammond.
P. J. Shepson of Crown Point was in
Hammond today on business at the
Erie yards.
Thomas Grady is a new section em
ploye on the Monon road.
Frank Mallay, agent for the Monon
road at Lowell, was a Hammond vis
itor last night.
George Connors of the C. I. & S.
engineering department, will spend the
holidays with friends in Champaign,
111.
R. II. Crosby of the Erie yard office
will spend tomorrow with friends and
I rtlativs in Huntington, Ind.
1 H. L. Jackson, chief engineer of the
C. C. & L. road will leave today for
Cincinnati, O., where he will spend the
holidays. .
Roy C. Ilidy of the Erie Coal Storage
plant, will be the guest of friends at
Frankfort over Sunday.
John McGlnley, switchman on the
Monon road, was a Chicago visitor last
evening.
John Lewis, formerly of the C. J.
road, has taken a job as switchman on
the C. I. & S. road.
Frank Barry
the Erie yards.
is a new employe at
Several Hungarians arrived in Ham
mond yesterday to work on the Indi
ana Harbor road.
The New England Car Service asso
ciation reports having handled in No
vember 163,070 cars compared with
107,095 cars in November, 1905. The
average detention on all commodities
was- ninety-six hours. The New Eng
land association evidently is not en
forcing the car service rule to the ex
tent that it is enforced by the Indiana
Car Service association.
The Chicago rate sheet has been re
vised without friction to conform to
the opinion of President Tuttle of the
Boston & Maine in the Michigan Central
dlffential case. It was feared for a
time that the Wabash or the Grand
Trunk m ight object, but general opin
ion now is that tho matter will be al
lowed to rest on Mr. Tuttle's decis
ion. Eight thousand three, hundred and
fifty-three freight cars were handled
over the New York Central lines In a
single day this week from the DeWitt
yard and nearly as many over the
Eastern division.
The Interstate Commerce Commission
has ruled that the sum of local fares
over certain trunk lines are less than
through rates, and that the through
rates must be reduced or the local fares
between certain points revised.
The purchasing agent of the Pennsyl
vania railroad has invited bids for the
construction of 5,000 box cars. The
contract will be awarded within a few
days. Their estimate cost is $0,000,000.
It 1s not expected that the cars will be
i.. livered before the latter part of next
year. With the placing of this order
the company will have ordered within
tho last two years nearly 60,000 addi
tional cars of various types. It is also
said that the company Is getting bet-
j ter service out of its cars than ever
i before. The average movement of its
j cars per day in 1904 was 16.52 miles.
while for the same time this year the
average movement was 27.19 miles a
day.
Charles S. Miles, a veteran conductor
of the Pennsylvania railroad died at
his home on Friday night of pneumonia.
He was 63 years old and had been con
ductor running between Baltimore and
Washington for forty-five years. He
was one of the best known railroad men
In the country, and noted for his cour
tesy and affability.
The new train of cars for the Mich
igan City division of the Monon rail
road is expected in the city in a few
days. A new baggage car has already
been placed on this division and was
taken south for the second time this
morning. The cars are now In Lafay
ette and are being detained there ow
ing to some delay in the gas lighting
arrangement. The cars are of the fin
est vestibule style and when placed on
this division will make a very attract
ive appearance.
Chicago. Dec. 22. Lines In the West
ern Passenger association today decided
to put on their heretofore proposed
new 1000-mile mileage book, which will
be sold for $25, with a refund of $4.50.
A proposition to put out a 500-mile
book at a flat rate of 2 cents was not
carried. The southwestern lines al
ready have such a mileage book as
the western lines propose selling, and
it is possible that an arrangement will
be reached whereby one book will be
issued good over all lines. At present
the new book will be one issued by each
road separately. The mileage book
changes are being made in the hop
mat ine western states will not pass
a 2-cent legislation.
A Tie-up Today.
New York. Dec. 22. Demands of the
yardmen of seven railroads entering
New York have been refused and a gen
eral tie-up of traffic is expected today.
Announcement than he ultimatum of the
union would not be considered further
has just followed a conference of the
general managers of the roads affected.
The officials say the demands are "as
tonishing and unfair." An increase of
5 cents per hour is asked. The roads
have offered 4 cents, but the men eav
they will strike for the extra cent.
The railroads represented at the con
ference were the Erie, Lackawanna,
Lehigh Valley, Jersey Central, Balti
more & Ohio, Long Island and Staten
Island railroads. Three thousand men
will be- affected,
J. r. Orr Testifies.
J. P. Orr. general freight agent for
the Pennsylvania Railroad company.
testified before the state railroad com
mission yesterday afternoon in the
action brought by the independent oil
companies of the state against nearly
all of the railroads to reduce rates on
oil shipped by the independents so that
these concerns can compete with the
Standard Oil company.
The independent companies, which
compose the membership of the Na
tional Petroleum association, declare
that the railroad companies discrimi
nate against them in the interests of
the oil trust.
General Agent Orr informed the
commission that his experience had
taught him that a "distance tariff" is
generally impracticable. The inde
pendents are asking for a rate based
on mileage entirely. They term their
plan a "distance tariff."
Mr. Orr said he believed the new
oil rate to go into effect Jan. 1 next
would be satisfactory. The rate is SO
per cent of the present fifth class.
After Jan. 1 oils will be put in the
fifth class.
"From "Whiting to Indiana points,"
the witness said, "there will be an ad
vance in the rate on oil. Between
other Indiana points there- will be a
reduction and between soma of the
points the rate will . be the same.
It is contended by the defense that
the railroads have been able to make
a lower rate from Whiting, Ind., on ac
count of the large Quantity of oil
shipped from there by the Standard
Oil company. It was declared by the
witnesses for the railroad companies
that no matter how low the freight
rate is made the oil trust will make it
impossible for the independents suc
cessfully to compete with it by the
use of tha tank wagon system em
ployed by tho trust.
Changes on Lake Shore.
There have been several changes in
the Lake Shore offices recently. J. W.
Daly, of Buffalo, has been appointed
general passenger agent with head
quarters, at Cleveland, to succeed A. J.
Smith, whose death occurred last Au
gust. Mr. Daly has been doing all the
work of the general passenger agent
since the beginning of the fatal illness
of former Agent Smith, last May. He
is thoroughly competent and his promo
tion is vell deserved.
Another change in the Lake Shore
circles is that of the routes to be cov
ered by the traveling agents. C. S.
Rogers has been making the local di
vision, with Detroit as his headquart
ers. He made his report to W. G.
Knuttle recently appointed general
agent, with headquarters at Toledo.
Owing to the Inconvenience of this ar
rangement, H. C. Carson has been put
on the local division, which extends
from Hillsdale to Toledo. Mr. Rogers'
last visit here was made yesterday.
The new arrangement will greatly
facilitate the running of this division
in the general offices.
THE QUAKER WAY.
Do you know the Quaker idea of
medicine and good health? They be
lieved that as nourishing materials of
the earth must first pass into some
form of vegetation, and through that
mysterious agency of life and sunshine
become fit for food, so also must medi
cinal materials pass into vegetation
before they oan properly benefit the
human system. Such was their belief,
such also was their practice.
Sound in both mind and body, their
sturdy descendants of the present day
are living attests to the wisdom of this
doctrine.
To properly prepare the Quaker Herb
Remedies, for which there was an ever
Increasing demand, a company was lo
cated many years ago at Fourth and
Mill streets, Cincinnati, O., not far from
the site of the first Quaker church In
Ohio.
In the same location of their humble
beginning and by the merit of their
preparations alone, the Quaker Herb
Company (Inc.) has steadily grown un
til their present out-put goes into every
state of the Union.
One of the best known remedies is
the system purifier, Quaker Herb Ex
tract, a specific for diseases of the
stomach, liver and kidneys, used as a
cure for rheumatism, catarrh, indiges
tion, dyspepsia, pains in the back and
sides, neuralgia, headache, etc.
Quaker Herb Extract is for sale by
your local druggist, or is sent on re
ceipt of price, $1.00 Quaker Herb Co.,
Cincinnati, O.
Quaker Herb Extract and a com
plete stock of the time-tried Quaker
Herb Remedies can always be found Id
the stores of these enterprising drug
gists: Jos. W. Weis. E. R. Stauffer &
Co.. Otto Negele. M. Kolb.
Free booklet and circular sent to any
address upon request.
HALLWAY DIFFICULTIES
Eeems the Only Backset in the World
of Trade Everything Else Is
Encouraging.
New York. Dec. 22. R. G. Dun &
Co.'s Weekly Review of Trade says:
Weather conditions accelerate distribu
tion of seasonable merchandise at re
tail, but increased traffic difficulties,
freight blockades and shortage of mo-
I tive power not only retards business
but threatens serious results at some
western points. Holiday trade has
v J equaled sanguine expectations, yet this
large volume has not interfered with
the brisk demand for staple articles,
which depleted stocks to such an ex
tent that wholesale trade experiences
unusual activity for the season.
The only noteworthy decrease in
comparison with activities a year ago
appears in building permits. Most in
dustrial work is maintained at the
maximum, mills and factories having
so many contracts for next year's de
livery that Inventories receive little
; attention. Scarcely any change is re- i
! corded in prices of iron. In rails the
j mills report about two-thirds of next
I Jr's total output already sold.
Liabilities of commercial failures
thus far reported for December
nmormted to $o.70S.S27, of which $3,
431,ST0 were in manufacturing, f 2.118.
244 in trading and $150,753 in other
Evenings 8:15
FIRST MAT. WED.
Prices' $1.50 to 50c
Special Attraction for tha Christmas Holidays
flEURIETTA CROSliN
In Ernst Denny's Great Comedy Success
"ALL OF A SUDDEN PEGGY"
BUY TICKETS NOW FOR CHRISTMAS WEEK
II I IrVLTMCZ LAbl ?
IJUi-rliVI WEEK
TRIUMPHANT AND ABTISTIO SUCCESS
Nison & Zimmerman Present
HEHftV B. ERUIHG
and London Co. Including Doro hea Baird
TONIGHT I MAURICETTE
Also Sat. Mat. I and S.,?liser
' Tuesday, Thursday and Sat. Mshtu,
THE 1IKLLS (first time by Mr. InloK.
preceded by KING KR.XE'S UAKiH
TEH. AVetlueaday nischt, TlIK LYONS
1II, and KI.NCi UE.VK'S IA ITillTEK.
Friday -Might, KING CHARLES I.
NEXT MONDAY. I FRITZI
Seats Thursday I crm:!:
Mail Orders Now oLilcrr
In MLLE. MODISTE.
DEALER IN
FURNITURE, RUGS, PI
ANOS, FANCY ROCK
ERS AND BOOK
CASES.
HIGH GRADE OF PIANOS
Call
Chair.
and see my Reclining:
248 STATE STREET
Telephone 1472.
E
D. BRANDENBURG
FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG.
4-room cottage in fine con
dition, sewer and city water
in house and yard; lot fenc
ed, and good out-houses.
$150 cash and balance $12
month, including interest.
Xice 7-room house on May
street, in fine condition; lot
25x125; $2,000.
Fine 8-room modern
house and good barn; lot 57
xllO, on East Carroll St.
This is a very fine new resi
dence; one-half cash, bal
ance three years; price,
$3;700.
Fine modem 14-room
residence, large barn, all
kinds of out-buildings; lot
100x125. Price $11,000,
one-half cash. This is one
of the finest homes in the
city; on Carroll street.
Store room with living
rooms in rear; good condi
tion; lot 25x118; East State
street; building in fine con
dition. Price $1,800.
Vacant lot, 25x125, on
Hoffman street near Calu
met. $350.
WEBSTER'S
DICTIONARY
NEEDED in every HOME,
5CH00L and OFFICE.
Reliable, TJsefsd, Attractive, Lastin?, Up
to Datn and Authoritative. 23S0 Paeea.
C000 Illustrations. Recently added 23,000 'J
ew words, rew uazetteer ana ewiiio-
frapbic&l Dictionary. Editor W.T. Harris,
h.f.,LL.D., United States Com. of Ed"n.
Highest Award! at St. Louis end Portland.
mr triugT-..nt. R-pular cd Tain P.per
rdit'uu. t'c. irpaaifed f r e irarc .ad con
wmr!c. lilt rae- a" 1'01 i inttioas.
Write for "Tte Story cf a Book" Free.
G. & C. 5IF.RP.IAM CO., SpringSeld, Joass.
GI.T THE BEST.
POWERS'
Q -D
We challenge any competitor
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The most
We will positively have all engraving ready
before the holidays.
B AST AR & McGARRY,
175 S. Hohman Street, Hammond, Ind.
m s m Liu
Money is one of man's
best friends, but how to
aquire it is the question.
Come let's talk it over.
I have real estate. to sell,
want to sell it, that's the
way I make my living.
I believe those who buy
now of me wTill find my
judgment in values good,
and that you will profit by
it.
It's the right time to in
vest. Is safe and now profitable.
Prompt action is necessary.
I have some good invest
ments, worthy of your in
vestigation. H. L. rJlILLER
Real Estate Investments
Suite 403 Hammond Bidg. HAMMOND, IND.
Phone Hammond 3021
EKAKCH OFFICE,
TCLLESTOH, IND.
Palace of Sweets
CANDIES AND ICE CREAM
The Lake County Times want ad
column Is a beneficiary to 20,000 people.
It's for yon.
You can make a three line cry for
"Help" In The Lake County Times for
10 centa and nearly everybody in Lake
county and the Calumet region vrlll
bear.
Real Estate
SHOW A LARGER LINE
AT LOWER PRICES.
Rings,
Watches,
ds,
lamon
verware,
Cut Glass.
complete line in Hammond.
Any goods bought of this firm have tho
guarantee of Reliability to back them.
We have an extra staff of clerks
to wait on everybodyno delays.
Artistic Commercial
HOLIDAY GO
FOR MEN AND
Come and see the exceptional values wo are offering' in Holiday
Cravats, Gloves, Handkerchiefs, Mufflers, Half Hose, Bath Robes,
Smoking- Jackets, House Slippers, Collar and Cuff Boxes, etc. An
mmense stock of new goods just in at prices you can't match elsewhere.
ROTHSCHILD
Use Uncle Sielberi's Bread
THE HUNGER CURE
Manufactured fcy THE HAMMOND BAKING GO. Iscorp. Hammond Buildinj
Lake County
& Guaranty Company
ABSTRACTERS
Title
P. R. MOTT, President, J. S. BLACKMUN, Secretary.
FRANK. HAMMOND, Vice-Pres. A. H. TAPPER, Treasurer.
S. A. CULVER, Manager.
Hammond and Crown Point, Indiana.
Secretary's office in Majestic Bid?., Hammock.
Abstracts furnished promptly at current rates.
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PrintingTimes Office
IT OTP
YOUNG MEN
& HIRSCH.

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