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The Lake County times. [volume] (Hammond, Ind.) 1906-1933, August 21, 1917, Image 1

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(WAfflERlTATR J R A I N ICOOLEPj
Delivered j TXMXS carriers, 30o pel
month; on afreets and at newsstands, 2o
par copy; back nnmbers 3o per copy.
VOL. XII., NO. 55.
HAMMOND, INDIANA, TUESDAY, AUGUST 121, 1917.
COUNTY
i ad i kjL L
Si STiE
OFITS ARE
ENOUNCED
WU1UCU Ul JU1UUU tf.il U Ui
Land, Says Hiram John
son in U. S. Senate.
U. S. STEEL
WAR EARNINGS
Charging- that Americana wr fly-lag-
ia rranca while war profits were
belay hoggishly pUed up at home
Senator Johnson of California said In
the senate;
"W fflre it a dividend upon its
preferred stock. Then we permit it
to pay all its expenses and all its
taxes of every kind and every nature,
and then we ffiva it in our time of
stress and in our time of dire need,
when every man's heart is bleeding"
for his loved ones that go beyond
tho sea, a dividend eiual to more
than has been paid in upon its capital
stock.
"How the people must love to
scorn a Congress that deals thus
tenderly with war profits, while dealing-
with such severity with the com
mon human clay to be put up against
the guns the Steel Corporation, to
which Is returned under the bill
nearly $300,000,000 profits for this
year, not of ordinary profits, mind
you, but of war profits, computed
under the terms of this bill, because,
forsooth, it has coined the blood and
the bone and the sinew of the land
into the dollars that It has made.
Can you Justify itt
Whence this enthusiasm for taking-
our tlood and the tenderness
protecting- the wealth that comes
from that blood t
"England today takes 80 per cent
of the wax profits there to run the
war. We take do you realise how
"xiuch, bed upon the minimum t
53,000,000 war profits for the last
yearf We take under the bill less
than 20 per cent." i
WASHINGTON. Aug. 21 Sentiment
In the Senate yesterday leaped toward
high taxation of war profits and large
Incomes. AN stirring speech by Hiram
Johnson of California stimulated the
move already under way.
"Those who coin the blood of war are
those best able to pay the expense of
war," he cried. "Those who make swollen
profits out of this particular exigency
are those who should pay. We are will
ing to conscript the youth of this land.
We must have the same inexorable at
titude toward money."
JOHNSON'S ATTACK
COKES AS SURPRISE.
The assault of Senator Johnson upon
the war revenue bill had not been an
ticipated and caught the proponents of
the measure by surprise.
He spoke to a filled chamber and his
racing eloquence held all in their seats
until he had concluded. He said:
"The observations I desire to submit
upon this measure are general in char
acter, but none the less, from the stand
point of some of us, quite fundamental.
CONTENTED PSOPM
MUST BACK TRENCHES.
"The design that I have in speaking
In general terms to this measure, in
voicing my opposition to the rates that
are in this measure prescribed under
certain captions, is that ultimately we
may do that which is best for all the
people of the nation, and that behind the
line of trenches which will be ours in
the future, we may have a contented
people, a reople not irritated by any
sense of injustice or inequality in taxa
tion, and that finally we may not only
conscript the blood of this nation but
we may conscript the part of the wealth
of this nation that Is coined out of Its
blood."
DECISIO
IS AGAI
POSTPONED
TIMES BUREAU,
AT STATE CAKTAI.
INDIANAPOLIS, IND.. Aug. 21.
Governor Goodrich again has postponed
his decision as to whether there will be
a special session of the legislature. He
said. Saturday night, that he would an
nounce his decision, today. He expected
to hold a conference with close advisers
and associates, including state officers,
last night, but this conference was put
off until tonight, and this means that
the decision cannot be made before to
morrow. A strong effort is being made to head
off the possibility of a special session,
but those who are watching the pro
ceedings believe it will not be possible
to prevent it. However, such a thing
might happen.
It is understood that the Governor
and othern are waiting to see just what
plan is adopted by the Federal govern
ment for handling the coal situation be
fore any definite action is taken in re
gard to calling the Indiana legislature in
session
MAY BE CHOSEN
G. A. R. COMMANDER
s
X
. f V'-w-"
Orlando A. Somers.
That a private for the first time
will be chosen commander-in-chief of
the G. A. R. at the convention soon
to be held in Boston, is the belief of
the many friends of Orlando A.
Somers, of Koko"no, Ind. Mr.
Somers' election is already conceded
by many delegates to the convention-
AVERT
WIDE STRIKE OF
SHIP BUILDERS
:" - -By-united Tress.)"
WASHINGTON. Aug. 21. A nation
wide strike In steel ship yards working
on government contracts will be pre
vented by wage increases paid by the
government.
In his first clash with organized labor
on war work Uncle Sam will recognize
the claim that increased cost of living
warrants a higher wage scale.
This developed today from the diffi
culty into which the requisitioning of
ship construction faced the shipping
board. Ship yard owners refused to
make new wage scales with the Inter
national Metal Trade Union until the
shipping board approve the increases.
The final decision is to be left to a spe
cial commission of three members one
appointed by President Wilson, one by
President Gompers of the American
Federation of Labor and the third mem
ber to be appointed by the shipping
board.
Ilfi
GETTING
NTO WAR
TX3CES BUREAU,
AT STATE CAPITAL.
INDIANAPOLIS. IND.. Aug. 21.
With seven companies of the Fourth In
diana national guard regiment off for
training camp at Hattiesburg. Miss., and
the First Regiment of Indiana Field
Artillery ready for the start to France.
Indiana is at once getting into the war
with a good start.
The troops that have been ordered to
Hattiesburg will be utilized in getting
the camp in shape for the thousands of
others that will go there a little 'tter.
It is believed it will be but a short
time until the entire Indiana national
guard will be in that camp.
Brigadier General Edwin M. Lewis,
who will command the Indiana brigade
at Hattiesburg, was expected here to
day, and he is under orders to report at
Hattiesburg not later than August 25
to take over his command.
TILLING AUTO
LEAPA FEATURE
Elgin Six Stock Car in
Unusual Performance
at Fair.
(Special to The Times.)
CROWN rOINT. INI., Aug. 21 One
of the thrills of the Lake county fair
will be the exhibition of an Elgin Six
stock car driven by Buck Slavin. A
hurdle is to be erected on the track and
while running at the rate of sixty
miles an hour the machine will leap
through the air a distance of seventy
feet, it is announced by J. Van Ram
short, distributor of the Elgin Six in
Lake county. The performance will
follow the races Wednesday and Thurs
day afte-noons.
ill r)
NATION
ILUEO ARMIES
CONCENTRATED
il BIG ASSAULT
Greatest Battle of World
Going On Over 435-Mile
Front.
DY 1IEMIY WOOD.
(United Preaa StnfT Correspondent.)
WITH THE BR1TIES ARMIES IN
THE FIELD. Aug. 21. Over a front
of 433 miles the greatest battle of the
world is being fought today.
The battle line extends from the
scacoaft to the Swiss frontier.
Fighting in Flanders, the Anglo
French offensive extended to the
British offensive, thence to the French
attack around St. Quentin. thence to
the French offensive at Chemin des
Dames. Moronvilliers and Verdun, and
concluded with heavy artillery fighting
in Lorraine and Alsace down to
Switzerland.
With three more months of fighting
weather this year, Germany's hold on
the western front may become pre
carious before winter.
Underlying the English and French
attacks is perfect and co-ordinated
strategy. Their attacks have been so
timed as to convert all the fighting
into one great battle.
Germany made her supreme effort
in concentration of men and of artil
lery in the 1916 assault on Verdun.
No offensive had ever reached the in
tensity of this one. But the French
assault of today in the identical sec
tor has surpassed it. The combined
French and German artillery brought
into the play of death is probably the
greatest concentration of weapons for
a single attack the whole war has
yet seen. During Sunday night's
final artillery preparation by the
French, although it was cloudy and
the French military rules strictly for
bade the slightest glimmer of light. I
was able to leave Verdun at midnight
and proceed to an observation point a
greater distance from the city than
Duoamont as my way was lighted by
countless thousands of gun flashes.
Great artillery kept the night con
tinually light. It was as though a
million lightning flashes blended into
one shot.
(Hy United Pi-ens.)
NEW YORK. Aug. 21. Germany was
receiving today the mightlert offensive
blow yet struck by the 'allies.
On every front save the Russian
and Macedonian lines the allies were
on the offensive. The great 435-mile
western front was a continuous battle
line. Italy's 100 miles of fronts from
the Adriatic to the Alps was in mo
tion with General Cadorna's troops at
tacking everywhere.
On the French front along the
Chemin des Dames and north of Ver
dun the Germans massed forces for
tremendous counter-attacks.
TRAIN HITS AUTO;
MOTORBIKES TURTLE;
FQURJN HOSPITAL
Two Hurt in Grade Crossing
Accident of N. P. at
Burnham.
As the result of a train-automobile
collision on a Burnham grade crossing
and two motorcycle accidents in Ham
mond, four men are in St. Margaret's
hospital. Their names foHow:
Jacob Olson. 39. 7311 Wabash avenue,
Chicago, driver of auto bakery deliv
ery wagon, struck by Nickel Plate
train on Center avenue crossing in
Burnham; head badly injured; bruised
and cut.
John Farrar. 29, 5420 Wabash avenue,
Chicago, concussion of the brain; in
jured in same accident. (The truck was
a complete wreck.)
Martin Howsley, 24, 121 Douglas
street, Hammond, arm and leg broken
when he was thrown from motorcycle.
George Dickson, Highlands, leg brok
en when motorcycle he was riding struck
an automobile.
XiOV'S LEO BBOXEN.
Johnny Deavish. 7 years old. 12th
avenue and Hayes street. Tolleston.
Gary, sustained a broken leg yesterday
afternoon when he got it caught in the
wheel of a motor truck. The youngster
was trying to get onto the machine
driven by William Pictor and owned by
the Klink newspaper agency. The police
took the boy to Mercy hospital.
100 SIGN FOR
HAMMOND MILITIA
Twenty more signed the enrollment
blanks for the Home Guard militix
last night, making a total of 100. Of
ficers are to be selected during the
week.
ARE YGU CAREFUL "
when you Oil
YOUR AUTOMOBILE?
WORKING OX MAMMOTH TORPEDO FOR UNCLE SAM'S NAVY
One of the giant torpedoes destined for use on American battleship in process of assembly.
Torpedoes far the navy are shipped in parts from the factory at which they are made to a barg? : jo-cI
In a little port somewhere alonjr the coast. Here they are assembled and then tested. Government officials
watch the -seats carefully and reject all torpedoes found not up to tho standard. This photograph was taken
aide the barge while the torpedo was being put together.
SLACKERS Hi TEARS BEFORE
UNITED STATES CMISSIEB
Their Loyalty; to Old King Alcohol Chief Barrier to
Registration, They Tell SurpriseAre Bound
Over and Taken to Indianapolis.
Booze was the alibi !n slacker hear
ings before United States Commission
er Charles Surprisli today. Four men
arrested at Gary and one take at East
Chicago were bound over to the fed
eral grand jury it Indianapolis and
were to b taken tSere tonight by Dep
uty Marshal Frank.' Barnhart.
Joel Roue. 68 yvars old. white haired,
sobblngly begged forgiveness for im
personating an -of.fACvr at Gary & week
ago tonight. ' .
Sir, I'vs been addicted to the liquor
habit ever since I can remember. Guess
it's hereditary. I live in Zlon City. I
voted against the saloons so I wouldn't
be tempted and when I came to Gary
to visit my son I fell. I didn't know
what I was doinir," tearfully the old
man told his story.
It was learned that his son had
bought him the first drink. For this
the son, married ard living between Ho
bart and Gary, wasi reprimanded by the
commissioner. Th father was releas
ed. Fridham Held.
George Fridham, 114 Clinton street,
Hammond, was to have been taken to
Federal .prison w th the flackers" un
riiiirnn nr
ru lLnHL Ur dftli
STATH1S HELD TODAY
More Than Fifty Autos in
Procession to the
Grave.
Hundreds of rootle today raid their
respects to the Memory of James
Stathis, proprietor of the Columbia
hotel and restaurant in East Hammond,
who died suddenly of heart failure Sun
day. There were more than fifty automo
biles in the funeral procession which
took the remains from the homo of Mrs.
j James Bereolos. daughter of the de
ceased, to the St. Jonn cemetery.
Stathis was one of the best known
Greeks of the county and his estate
is estimated at $50.(00. He is survived
by a widow and son in Greece, and his
daughter.
ENGLAND FIRST TO
RESPOND TO POPE
ROME. Aug. 21. England, first of
the belligerent powers to answer the
Pope's peace suggestion, presented a
formal note to the Vatican today
through British Minister Desalis, de
claring the Holy Father's plan would
be examined in a "benevolent and seri
ous spirit." Cardinal Gasparri, papal
secretary of state, expressed his
gratification at the response. The
cardinal said he hored all belligerents
would admit of agreement on four
principles which he said had already
been approved by' England, France.
Russia, Germany and Austria. He de
clared President Wilsons peace note
of last December implied all that was
contained in the Pope's program.
It is not clear what the "four funda
mental principles'" ate. So ftr as cable
dispatches have shown no common
ground has yet bees reached by any
of the belligerents officially.
FINED FOR DRIVING
WITH OPEN MUFFLER
Louis Walter, Gar, was fined $3 and
costs in city court today for driving
his car with the muffler open.
s"
x s - 1 4
less he raised a $1,000 ball. He was
tried last week and given on opportunity
to enlist but the army refused to take
him. Consequently evidence proving
him to be a deliberate "draft dodger"
forced Commissioner Surprise to send
him to jail to await the pleasure of the
grand Jury.
Walter Zdonak, 4327 Magoun avenue.
East Chicago, gave himself up. He said
he didn't know anything about register
ing as he lived on a secluded Wisconsin
farm during the registration period and
that he could not read English news
papers. He was granted an opportunity
to register.
Nick John, Greek, said he was drunk
registration day; Joe Williams, negro,
was in aiToIedo Jail, but said some one
registered him. (His story will be in
vestigated.) Walter Abbott, negro, said:
"Just careless, boss," when asked why
he didn't register, Sam Mavde, Polish,
didn' know about it, he said.
East Chicago: Walter Dennlson.
American, said, "Oh, I was bumming
registration day."
Deputy Marshal Barnhart arrested
Charles Baker last night as a slacker.
He gave $500 bond.
VOLUNTEER PICKED UP
R. C. Johnson Escapes Jail
When He Proves He Is
Patriot.
Accepted as an officer reserve train
ing applicant and arresttd in Chicago
as a "slacker" was the unique exper
ience of R. O. Johnson, associate city
attorney, who resigned his position to
day. He will enter training camp at
Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis,
next Sunday.
A few days ago Mr. Johnson was
stopped by an officer in Chicago. He
had forgotten arid left his registration
card at home. Luckily he was able to
prove his identity and was released
without a stay In jail.
Mr. Johnson is well known in Ham
mond. He applied sometime ago for the
second training camp and passed the
examinations easily.
PICKED TEUTON
TROOPS FLUNG
(By United Prean.)
PARIS. Aug. 21. German pilced
troops were flung violently but vainly
against four points of the French fight
ing line last night. At three places
on the Chemin des Dames special
stossstruppen battled desperately to
loosen the French grip on and around
Verdun, but General Petain's fighters
repulsed the assault.
All French ground was held, the of
ficial statement declared today.
"At Cerny plateau the Germans at
tacked at three points twice," the of
ficial report asserted. "They were re
pulsed and flowed back to their
trenches with heavy losses. .
German attempts at Hurtebise like
wise failed.
"On the front north of Verdun the
Germans carried out an energetic
blow. There were counter-attacks of
the most violent nature, especially at
Avocourt and Caurieres Woods, which
were all broken up in the fire of the
French. We kept all .war gains."
To Arms Your Country Calls.
V
K' -
s
Zz i uv-' V
TWO BOYS, ONE 15,
OTBDMf, MAIMED
One Had Worked in Plant
Only Five Minutes When
He Lost an Arm.
Mothers who fear to send their boys
into the army should realize the fact
that limbs are torn from bodies in the
peaceful pursuit of industry in Lake
county as well as beneath the flag in
the trenches. Whether the danger is
greater in France or in the Calumet re
gion remains for the statistician to
prove. At any rate there is glory to
be had wearing khaki.
Two Lake county boys have been
crippled for life in local Industries this
week.
Edwar3 Bolda. who states he is 15
years of age, lost his right arm at the
shoulder while working in the
plant
of the F. S. Betz Co. yesterday. His
home is at 123 154th street. West Ham
mond. His left leg was also broken,
but the poor lad bears his sufferings like
a hero.
A. Koldowski, aged 16, had worked at
the Indiana Box Company's plant about
five minutes when his right arm was
taken off at the elbow. His home is
at 131 Indiana boulevard, Whiting.
vVasraaE
It
ITALIANS CAPTURE 10,000
PRISONERS IN GREAT DRIVE
By JOHN H. niUIT
(United Press Staff Corraspondsat.)
ROME, Aug. 21 Italy's prisoners in the greatest of all drives
her troops have made in the world war, reached a total of 10 000
today.
Semi-official figures places the Austrian losses in dead and
wounded at a minimum of this same figure.
On the three fronts today the Julian, Carso and Isonzo, General
Cadorna's drive was continuing in a fierce combat of men and of
guns that resounded ove'r nearly a hundred miles of fronts.
Italian airmen reported desperate attempts by the enemy to fill
breeches in the line already achieved by the attackers.
Prisoners declared hurry calls had been sent for reinforcements
from Prussia.
(By TTaltsd Prssc Cablegram.)
LONDON, Aug. 21 By vote of 1,234,000 to 1,231,000 the La
bor Party members today decided to participate in the Stockholm
peace conference.
(Br trait d Frass.)
HUGO, OKLA., Aug. 21. Aroused over Senator Thomas P.
Gores attempt to force an amendment to the appropriation bill pro
hibiting use of funds in waging war outside of the United States
territory, four hundred citizens of Hugo and Choctaw counties to
day demanded that Gore resign. The demand took the form of a
telegram to Gore at Washington.
(Br TJaitsd Press.)
WASHINGTON, Aug. 21. President Wilson today postponed
discussion with his cabinet of the Pope's peace proposals in order
to give attention to war work.
Br J. w. peox.es
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
WITH AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY ARMY, FRANCE
Aug. 21. American tropps were "gassed" for the first time today
but it was voluntary.
The soldiers donned their gas masks and were sent through regu
larly built gas chambers to meet various kinds of vapors used by the
enemy in his attacks.
The soldiers quickly caught the idea of donning the masks and
after holding a few drills were putting on the air filters in four or five
seconds.
BOMB MIDDLEKERKE.
LOXDOX, Aug. 21. British naval
aeroplanes at midnight last night
dropped many tons of bombs on the
ammunition docks at Middlekerke and
the German works at Brugeoizs. an
admiralty statement announced today.
NOTICE.
Our business will continue during the
alteration and remodeling of our store,
1S3 State street. Charles Arkin, Jewel
er. Adv
HARK MFG.
COiPfli
TDBUjLD IT
Col. V. J, Riley, Property Agent
Given Orders to Rush Con
struction ot 1st Unit.
Work began yesterday at Berrj
Lake on the 200 acre tract owned
by the Mark Mfg. Co. and lying be
tween its plant and the Standard
Oil plant on what is the most stu
pendous building project ever start
ed in the county outside of Gary.
Col. Walter J. Riley, property
agent for the Mark Mfg. Co., is
beginning the erection of the first
unit of 188 homes on the property
and a force of engineers, architects
and' landscape gardeners expect to
make things hum at Berry Lake
before snow flies.
An Idea of the scope of the work may
b obtained when it is said that tho
filling in of the swamps alone will cost
three hundred thousand dollars.
The work will be s revelation to La'.e
county people and social economy work
ers when it is completed. The archi'.c
spent two years in Europe studying lio,.
to get the greatest building efficiency in
the tract. When all the units arc com
pleted the beautiful subdivision for it :.
going to be a beauty and will be a pat
tern and model for working men's
homes. The houses are to cost from
$2,000 to $8,000 each. They will l,o
the last word. in scientific house build
ing. The building scheme is so different
from all schemes now in vogue in LaV
county as to be as different as day i
1 1 "L J ; . -
" urajnage, engineering.
isnusrape garaening, nouse arrange
ment, concrete work and lighting will
make the subdivision, which is practical
ly on the lake front, a most desirable
one for workmen. The houses will be
leased only to the employes of the Mark
Mfg. Co. and its subsidiary the Bl Prod
ucts company and they and Col. Riley,
their property agent, have every reason
to be proud of the prospects they have
outlined.
ECONOMY TO
ALSACE-LORRAINE
(By United rre.)
ZURICH, Aug. 21. Chancellor Mieh
aelis will announce German's decision
to grant economy t Alsace-Lorraine
at this afternoon's session of the
Reichstag committee, according to a
special agency dispatch here today.
il

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