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The Lake County times. [volume] (Hammond, Ind.) 1906-1933, August 22, 1917, Image 1

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VOL. XIL, NO. 56.
""Delivered lfy" TIMES carriers,- 30crr
month; on streets aad at xiewsitaads, So
per copy; back mmlin 3c per copy.
HAMMOND, INDIANA,
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 1917
AfLQ
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FAIR CROWD
EXCEED
OPENING DAY RECORD
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sistii
SHOWER OF
RAIN; TRACK
IS FLOORED
Crown Point In Gala Attire With
Hundreds Pouring In By
Trains end Autos
BULLETIN.
Tbe track tv flooded by a heavy
ihowtr of rain thin afternoon, causing
tbe racea to be called off for the day.
(Special to Ths Times.)
CROWN POINT, IND., Aug. 22.
Thousands of people from all
parts of Lake county today throng
ed the grounds at the opening of
the fifty-ninth annual fair. The
first day's attendance will exceed
15,000 and for the three days offi
cials estimate 50,000 will have
entered the gates.
The races started at 1:30 p. m.
with sixteen horses .entered in the
pacing events and eighteen in the
trotting. The purses amounted to
$300.
Crown Point Is decorated from stem
to stern and every train, interurban and
automobile disgorges visitors to the
fair. The restaurants and hotels do a
land office business and the road to the
grounds is streamed with automobiles
from every nook and corner of Lake
county.
The Rice Shows are an added attrac
tion at the fair this year.
PXXZE3 AWABEED TODAY.
There are two bands of music, the
first led by Barney Young' and the sec
ond furnished by the Rice Shows. The
fair grounds are never without music.
Vaudeville performances are held each
evening. The hot dog man, the chap
with the balloons, the cane rack fellow
and the girls with confetti ere on the
job same as usual or more so than
usual.
The agriculture building, the ladies
department, the poultry and stock shows
were places of great interest today as
Judges were busy and prizes are to be
awarded this evening.
Thomas Grant of Lowell is president
of the fair association; W. B. Stratton.
Hobart. vice-president; Edward Black,
Crown Point, treasurer: Fred Wheeler,
Crown Point, secretary.
The judge of stock is James B. Bar
ney. Coldwater. Mich.; V. L. Handley.
Lowell, is judge of art. and Charles
Keeler of "Winimac, judge of poultry.
The official starter of the races 13 J.
A. Gavit. The judges of the finish is J.
B. Peterson. Crown Point; James Ma
lone. Valparaiso, and George Miller, Val
paraiso. (Ey United Press.)
WASHINGTON. Aug. 22. Answering
the pope the United States and the al
lies will declare that the only peace pos
sible will be one with autocracy ban
ished. That interpretation was placed
by experts today upon a withering blast
from Secretary of Commerce Redfield in
a retort to a pacifist letter. It squared
with utterances by Premier Lloyd
George and Sir Robert Cecil In Eng
land. Redfteld's letter was the first formal
utterance on the subject of peace, by a
cabinet member since the pope's peace
proposals were received. It is presum
ed that Redfield knows President Wil
son's mind. In that case it would indi
cate that the president will repeat even
more strongly than heretofore his views
on autocracy, ruthlessness and intrigue.
Of the two opposing ideals of the
world autocracy and democracy one
must go down before the other.
America will wage her war until dem
ocracy is triumphant, Redfield declar
ed. As these strong statements on Amer
ica's position were issued the Japanese
commission swept up Pennsylvania ave
nue behind an exeprt of craclwAmertcan
cavalry.
The Japanases were greeted ' at the
station by Secretary Lansing and other
officials. The Viscount Ishii in a brief
speech assxired Secretary Ianslng of the
cordial feeling entertained by the Jap
anese nation for America. Word was
also received at the state department
that Foreign Minister Montono in Tokio
had informed the American charge that
the reception accorded the commission
in this country was a matter of "deepest
gratification" to Japan. .
i PEACE
WITH OUT
11 VICTORY
SPECIAL SESSION OF
LEGISLATURE OFF
TZMXS BUREAU,
AT STATE CAPITAI
INDIANAPOLIS, IND.. Aug. 22
Governor Goodrich, through E. I. Lewis,
chairman of the public service com
mission, announced today there will not
be a special session of the legislature
as the president has fixed coal prices.
In a long statement Issued just before
noon the governor voiced emphatic ap
proval of the president's action.
Prices fixed for Indiana, he said, will
encourage production rather than ham
per it.
"Indiana with the entire country ap
proves without reservation the step that
has been taken by the president in fix
ing the price of coal," the governor's
statement declared.
LIGHT PRICE
HEARING- STOPS
TX3IXS BUREAU,
AT STATE CAPITAL.
INDIANAPOLIS. IND. Aug 22. The
president's action in fixing coal prices
today suddenly stopped hearing on peti
tions of electric light companies for
permission to increase charges for
service.
ANTE ID
L
I
Pork Chop, Potato, Ear of Corn, Tomato and Bean Is
Royal Flush and Laid on Table Sweeps Stakes
Clean, to Use Poker Terms.
Sometime ago a story was rrlnted of
a man who lived 30 days without eating.
It went on to say he dieted thus every
year. He certainly believed in prepared
ness, for if prices keep soaring many
will have to accomplish the remarkable
feat, but not from choice.
Horrors eggs are going to take an
other leap skyward, so an Ohioian farm
er says, and meats are growing scarcer.
The poor housewife with hubby's pay
check is in a dilemma. Friend Herbert
Hoover, new food chancellor, is going to
ballast prices, it is said, and the house
wife is eagerly awaiting the time when
she can stretch a dollar bill as she did a
few years ago.
Flour for instance has shot up to
around $3.75 per 50 pound sack and a
year ago the same sack sold for 2 and
a bit before that the price was much
lower, according to A. C. Milne, assist
ant manager "of the Lion Store grocery
P
INDIANA CANAL PLAN
Deep Waterway From Lake
Erie to Lake Michigan
Frowned On.
TPIES' DIHEAl'
AT STATE CAPITAL.
INDIANAPOLIS. Ind. Aug. 22. A
dispatch from Washington says: "The
United States board of engineers to
day made an unfavorable report to
the House on the feasibility of build
ing a canal from Lake Erie to the
southern end of Lake Michigan by
way of Toledo and Fort Wayne. The
report was made by a special board
and comprises several hundred pages
with numerous maps and illuftratlons.
"The board did not consider at any
length the proposal to build a ship
canal, but did investigate in detail
the feasibility of a barge canal. It
was estimated by the board that a
barge canal would cost approximately
$135,000,000 with single locks, and
would cost more than $2,000,000 a
year for operation and maintenance.
A double lock canal would cost about
$143,000,000 and about $2,000,000 a year
for maintenance."
In its report the board said: "The
board is of the opinion that the pro
posed waterway could not offer rates
that would be economically sound and
at the same time sufficiently low to
attract traffic. Also that the possible
returns to the United States from
water power developed would be so
small as to have little weight in de
termining the question of the advisa
bility of constructing the waterway."
SECOND DRAFT
SET FOR Ji. 1
WASHINGTON. Aug. 22. Ja-cry 1
has been tentatively -set for the second
draft; the number of men to be cal
led will be approximately ToO.nno.
With an army of more than 1.200,000
assured, the government is devoting its
entire attention to transporting the men
already enrolled or drafted to France.
The principal problems are being met
with much success.
CEDAR LAKE RESORT
OMOSHOT DOWN
Posse Scours Countryside
Seeking Mysterious
Stranger.
(Special to The Timss.)
CROWN" rOINT. IND.. Aug. 22. The
electric pianos in the resorts that border
Cedar Lake were stilled last night and
groups formed around the bars to dis
cuss the evening's sensation. Jimmy
Leathers, proprietor of the "White City"
resort and formerly of the Chicago
cafes, had been shot twice in the abdo
men following a Quarrel over a bet.
Meantime Sheriff Barnes and a posse
of men scoured the country, for miles in
search of M. McConnell, a somewhat
mysterious stranger who recently rent
ed a cottage near the lake. McConnell,
it is said, did the shooting. Leathers is
in the Mercy hospital at Gary. His life
is despaired of.
McConnell and Leathers had quarreled
in the latter's saloon and the former
drawing a revolver shot twice, both bul
lets taking effect, according to informa
tion given the sheriff. The shooting
took place at 9:45.
NO
department.
"Prices are soaring, but business Is
just as good as It was a few years ago."
said the grocer. People must live and
few are trying the famine experience.
King potato has been dethroned for
the time being but you can't tell Just
how soon grasping food "thieves" will
store 'em away age.in for the price to
rise, and rise back to $1 a bushel. Xew
potatoes are selling now at $1.80 and
they're going down, some grocers say.
Aa example.
Tear ago. 2 mos. ago. Today.
Potatoes, bu. $1 00 $4.00 $1.80
Navy beans, lb .12 .23 .21
Peas, lb. 12 .24 .11
Lettuce, lb. .10 .25 .11
Tomatoes, lb. .08 .18 .10
Sweet corn, lb .15 .45 .23
Cabbage, lb. .02 .17 .02
The above prices furnished by the
grocery department of the Lion Store.
COMMISSION REARS
SURCHARGE PETITIONS
TIMES' Bl'REAU
AT STATE CAPITAL.
INDIANAPOLIS. Ind., Aug. 22. Elec
tric light companies of the state will
finish today the presentation of their
petitions to the Public Service Com
mission for permission to place a sur
charge on their rates to meet the in
creased cost of operation. The peti
tions heard yesterday were from the
Rockport Water company, the Owens
viile Light company and the Boonville
Electric Light and Power company, all
of which showed the commission that
their coal bills had been enormously
Increased because of the action of
coal operators In boosting coal prices
to the highest possible notch. Al
though all of these towns are in the
coal district, these companies say they
have been compelled to pay greatly
increased prices for coal.
Even companies doing business on
the Ohio river, where coal transporta
tion charges are low, coal prices have
been boosted.
M. F. Tennis, general manager of
the Madison Light and Railway com
pany, said coal prices for his com
pany had increased from $2. 15 a ton
in July and August. 1916, to $4.50 in
the same months this year.
George W. Clark of the Oaktar.d
City Light and Power company, said
hi? coal prices increased from $1.25 to
J2.40 a ton, and Oakland City is in
the coal district.
Today the petitions to be heard are
those of the Martinsville Gas and
Electric company, the Indiana Utilities
company and the Wabash Valley Elec
tric company.
KOPELKE TO ADDRESS
OLD SETTLERS' PICNIC
Efforts are being made to make this
year's annual "Old Settlers and Histori
cal Society" outing at the Crown Point
fair grounds, Aug. 29, the most memor
able one of years.
"Good fellowship" is the keynote.
"Bring your basket luncheons and
stay the day. Meet old friends and
make new ones." read advance notices.
Judge Kopelke of Crown Point will
make the principal address. Other
speeches will be made.
The big picnic will open at ten o'clock.
Wonderful relics of years ago will be
exhibited.
IT 111 FOOD IE
JAPANESE MISSION
rv5 2 T
O .4
J titrrm
The
p::-h , ,.;. 'iky yi't y J,i
MUNICIPAL DUMP TO GO,
CITY COUJCLTIKES STAND
Dave Boone Comes to Front With Reduction Plant for
City Garbage as Solution of Unsanitary Methods
". , to Which East Siders Object.
A reduction plant ior city garbae
which would pay for Itself In four years,
was the solution of the perplexing gar
bage problem presented to the council
last night by Councilman David E.
Boone.
Rsid-ats near Columbia park have
for years resented the "terrible stench"
arising from the city dumping grounds.
"Something must be done immedi
ately." demanded ' Alderman Williams.
Mayor ' Smalley appointed a committee
to investigate. Last night the first re
port was given. Councilman Boone's
suggestion will probably be carried
through at the next council session, the
third Tuesday in September.
According to Attorney Boone it now
costs the city nearly $14,000 annually
to handle the city garbage. A new re
duction plant would cost approximately
$20,000 and the upkeep and the handling
of the garbage "would be less than $3,000
yearly. It is Mr. Boone's plan to take
the handling of the garbage away from
the city. "I have a man in mind who
will take complete charge of the plant
and the gathering of the refuse on a
ten-year contract. He will modify the
garbage into commercial fertilizer and
will reduce tin cans and other metals
into commercial use. That will be his
ONE NON-GDMBATANT
SOLM ACCEPTED
Hammond Board Accepts
14 More One Has Re
ligious Scruples.
Hammond's exemption board to date
ths week has accepted fourteen young
men for service in the new army out
of sixty examined Monday, Tuesday
and today. Of the fourteen, one will
be sent into non-combatant service be
cause of his religious scruples against
taking up arms. He is Arthur Otto
Klussmier, 21, of S4 Russell street,
and he had fleeted to accept the gov
ernment's offer to allow those having
religious objections against fighting
to work back of the lines.
One married man with two children.
Georpe Mangan of Hessvile, refused
to accept his right to exemption.
The following is the list of thirteen
men accepted for service under arms:
Paul Lang. 23, 171 Detroit St.
Alonxo Jeffery. 23. N. T. C. Camp,
Gibson.
Walter Mueller. 22. Hessvllle. Ind.
George Kereikes. 24. 120 Columbia
Ave.
Ernest Strickler. 2T, 165 Logan St.
Her.ry Younkers. 27. 348 Hickory St.
James F. Vanes, 23, Hessville.
Jan-.es Grenvillon, 21, 28 Sibley St.
Wm. G. Brougher. 30, State and
Oakley.
Raymond C. Johnson. 23. 94 State St.
. Fred Mueller. 21. Hessville.
George J. Mangan. 27, Hessville.
Wm. F. Rodenhorst, 22, 511 Murray
St. ,
The board of exemption desires to
inform those called to the draft who
ask exemption that the government
no longer provides the affidavit blanks.
They may be purchased across the
street from the courthouse from
Postlewalte. who has had them printed
and sells at cost He refuses to make
a profit out of the war.
GETS REGAL WELCOME
arriTal of the Japanese mission in San Francisco.
recompense. At the end of the ten
years the plant will h.ave paid for Itself
long before and will practically be in
just as good working condition," said
the councilman.
New Pumping- Station.
The council authorized the board of
public works to advertise for bids on oil.
electricity and steam engines for a tem
porary rumping station for the Calumet
avenue sewer which is to be stationed
near Michigan avenue. It will probably
cost nearly $14,000. At present prop
erty owners are remonstrating as their
basements are frequently flooded, caus
ed by stoppage of sewage in the big out
let. Horses Qettltg Hungry.
Funds for the maintenance of the city
stables have run out. only $1.69 is left.
The council appropriated $500 more for
its upkeep.
Appropriation was made of an addi
tional $1,000 for miscellaneous city hall
expenses and $1,500 additional for police
expenses for the remainder of the year.
Jcha Kane Acting Mayor.
Councilman John Kane was selected
as mayor pro tern in the absence of
Mayor John D. Smalley.
FRENCH ASK NO
RESTRICTIONS
(By United Presa.)
WITH THE FRENCH ARMY AT
VERDUN, Aug. 22. Fired with a zeal
that made their charges irresistible.
French soldiers, victors In France's
greatest blow at Verdun, petitioned
their commanders today for permission
not to be limited to specified objec
tives in their advances. They want
to keep on going. In some places yes
terday they could hardly restrain
themselves from exceeding the limit
of their stern orders.
SENATE NEARS
INCOME FIGHT
(By United Tress.)
WASHINGTON. Aug. 22. Sentiment
in the senate today began leaning to
ward higher income and war profit
taxes. The struggle promised to be
more spectacular and bitter than ariy
recent parliamentary conflict. Those
who believe wealth should pay a
greater share than provided by the
senate finance committee had Senator
Chamberlain on their side today. A
poll by opponents of the present bill
indicated 36 senators favor higher
taxes, 42 favor the committee bill and
thirteen are doubtful. Senators from
farm states favor Lafollettes higher
reronue bill. '
"Oldest Employe" Dead.
JOLIET. ILL., Aug. 22. George W.
Biebcr, 79 years old, said to be the old
est employe of the Michigan Central
Railroad, died here yesterday. His uncle
served on the staff of Napoleon.
Hammond-Made Lenses
No long waits for your new or broken
lenses. We make all our own lenses.
S. Silver. Jeweler and Manufacturing
Optician, 177 State St., Hammond. Ind.
8-22-1
Ask Yourself How
Serve Your Country?
You Can
OX ARRIVAL IN U. S.
11 KILLED
LATEST
1 RAIDS
(By trnited Press Cablegram.)
LONDON, Aug. 22. Tea enemy
aeroplanes raided England today,
dropping bombs over Dover and
Margate.
Lord French, commander-in-chief
of the Home Defense Forces,
announced that two of the German
flyers had been brought down.
The raids occurred at 10:15 this
morning.
Margate and Dover are near the
mouth of the Thames. The Humber
River and Yorkshire where Lord French
reported German airships is at least 165
miles north of the Thames. Hull, one
of the great ship building centers in
England, is a short distance up the
Humber.
Late this afternoon Lord French sum
marized the casualties as follows:
Margate None killed or injured.
Dover1 Eleven killed; thirteen injur
ed. '
Ramsgate None killed or injured.
Hospital and a few houses damaged.
(By United Press.)
WASHINGTON, Aug. 22. The first formal uttetance from any
member of the president's cabinet or other high official of the gov
ernment since the Pope's peace proposal was received came today in
a scathing denouncement of peace movements launched in this
country.
Secretary of Commerce Redfield declared there are two great op
posing ideals in the world, the ideals of democracy and autocracy.
Germany he styled as a desperado among the nations.
President Wilson today turned his attention to framing a reply
to the Pope. He probably will have at least the tentative draft
ready tomorrow.
(By TJtited Press.)
WASHINGTON, Aug. 22. Before the war ends it will be neces
sary for the government to take 60 and possibly 80 per cent of war
profits, Senator Lodge predicted in the senate today. He defended
the revenue bill as it now stands. He also sounded a note that peace
at the present time is impossible.
(By United Press.)
WASHINGTON, Aug. 22. Japan received her first close-up
glimpse today of America at war.
For the first time since the opening of the world's conflict offi
cial Japanese representatives other than regular ambassadors were ir
a war capital for conference. The visit of the Ishii commission was
believed to hold the greatest possibilities in the international situation.
(By Unittd Press Cablegram.)
PARIS. Aug. 22 Death of 0. H. Chadwick of Lowell, Mass.,
and Aviator Biddle, also an American, in recent fighting on the wtst
front was confirmed today. Corporal Harold Willis of Boston, a
member of the Lafayette flyers, was announced as a prisoner of war
of-the Germans.
(By United Press.)
CHICAGO, Aug. 22. The price of retail coal dropped $1 to $1.5C
here today with the announcement by President Wilson that the
price of coal at the pit must be reduced.
RAZE TOWNS .
I RETREAT
Victorious Advance of General
Cadorna Continuss; fiiv
er Runs Red.
By JOHN II. II EAR LEY
(United r're Staff Correspondent.)
WITH THE ITALIAN ARMY
IN THE FIELD, Aue. 22. Aus
tria's terrible toll of casualties in
the continuous Italian advance to
day reached 35,000 in dead and
wounded, according to headquar
ter's estiraates.
Italian troops have swept the
enemy from the villages of Descla,
Britof, Canale, Bomrez and Rosa.
All were found smokinc heaps of
ruins burned bv the Austria ns and
shattered by artillery fire.
The Italian poet and dramatist. Ga
briel D'AnDunzio, was among a hun
dred or more Italian aviate rs who co
operated with the land troops in
Italy's greatest offensive.
bridge: the: river.
Crossing of the Isonzo was iilmplifl
ed for the Italians by a KUdden fog.
The impenetrable curtain shut down
before the night and the rtys of Aus
trian search lights vainly sought to
pierce it. Italian engineers threw
bridges across in many places and over
this the attacking forces pourod.
Other regiments anxious to gret into
the fight iiwam the stream, over-
whelming" enemy patrols with their
bayonets and grenades.
The main, body of the Italian troops
massed on the far bank li a bloody
battle drore the Austrian! from a
triple line of trenches. A s .eady artil
lery fire shattered the eneny lines as
the victorious troops pushed on.
SIGHT IXTO DAY.
Last night the Austrians desperate
ly but vainly counter-attacked. The
barrage on both sides lighted the night
to day-time brilliance and threw
shadows over the rocky lines. Holes
in the granite literally mined out to
afford protection were bla;k In this
radiance of shot and thell while
around all wierd shapes and shadows
fought hand to hand.
It was a night mare of sound and
strange distorted figures in the un
earthly light of the shells.
TRAINING CAMP
FOR ARMY BAKERS
(Br United Press.)
NEW YORK, Aug. 22. Army bak
eries for troops in training here are to
be established at Gettysburg, Pa ;
Washington, Syracuse, N. Y. ard Fort
Ethen Allen, Vt., by the quartermaster's
department. Captain John C. Pegram Is
enlisting 1010 bakers. There will be a
total of ten bakeries. Later big army
bread factories will be placed along the
American lines of communication in
France.
"&lSS5n55r&

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