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The daily palladium. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1904-1905, January 30, 1904, Image 1

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WEEKLY ESTABLISHED 1831.
DAILY ESTABLISHE U 187.
RICHMOND DAILY PALLADIUM, SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 1904.
ONE CENT A COPY.
LOST I
THE SHUFFLE
DEBATERS BEADY
FOB BE PADI
EABLHAK
0BAT0BI0 SOCIETY
BREW LOTS
THIS MORNING
.... ;.
HARRY STARR HAS SOME EXPERIENCES
AT NATIONS CAPITAL
About to be Admitted to Practice Be
fore the Supreme Court, But
"Was Lost.
"Washington, Jan. 30. James P.
Goodrich, of Winchester, arrived yes
terday, Last night he called on
Senator Fairbanks and other mem
bers of the delegation. Today Mr.
Goodrich, accompanied by Harry C.
Starr, of Richmond, conferred with
President Roosevelt.
Attorney R. F. Davidson, of India
napolis, was admitted to practice be
fore the United States supreme court
yesterday on motion of Senator Fair
banks. Harry Starr, of Richmond,
accompanied Senator Fairbanks and
Mr. Davidson and made u: his mind
at the last moment to take advantage
of the opportunity to be r.dmitted to
practice before the tribunal. He
made an effort to approach the court
and was stopped by an attendant,
who asked him if he was a member of
the bar. The reply was in the nega
tive. Mr. Starr thereupon was in
vited to take a seat among the spec
tators. When Senator Fairbanks was
about to make the motion in Mr.
Starr's behalf he was unable to lo
cate him. Mr. Starr will make the
attempt again at a later date.
They Will Go to the World's Fair in
a Special Train The Boston
Herald Pays All Expenses.
St. Louis, Jan. 30. One hundred
popular Bostonians will enjoy a rare
trip and see the sights of the World's
Fair at the expense of the Boston
Herald.
"The Herald's Hundred" will
leave the Hub on Monday, June 27,
at 10 o'clock a. m. On Tuesday they
will be en route through Indiana and
Illinois, arriving at St. Louis at 3:30
p. m. Carriages will be in waiting
and the party will be driven to the
Southern Hotel, which will be their
home until the following Monday.
The programme provides for the
party to visit the World's Fair
grounds on the evening of their ar
rival for the view of the splendid
electrical display.
- On Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
and Saturday special trolley cars will
each morning take the hundred to the
world's fair grounds where they may
remain in a body or separate as they
wish.
On Sunday carriages will be fur
nished and the Bostonians will be
driven to the various points of inter
est in St. Louis, including Shaw's
garden.
Monday will be devoted to indivd
ual sight seeing, the party reporting
at the Union station at 3 o'clock p.
m. for the home journe3'. The train
the party will i-ide in will be a spec
ial and will be made up of Pullman
sleepers, and a dining car. The train
is due to arrive in Boston Wednes
day, July 6, at 7:30 o'clock in the
morning.
DEATHS AND FUNERALS.
Coffman. The funeral of the six-year-old
son of Mr. Frank Coffman,
of Eaton, who died of diphtheria, oc
curred in Eaton at 9:30 this morn
ing. Another child in the family is
ill of the same disease.
Mr. Coffman is a relative of An
drew J. Coffman, of this city.
Henderson. The funeral of Mrs.
Emma E. Henderson, daughter of
John X. Croker, will take place Mon
day afternoon at 2 o'clock from the
A. M. E. church. Rev. Baker will
officiate. Interment at Earlharn
cemetery.
B0T1AI
f nmk
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GENERAL REYES
Assures Colombia of the Intentions
of the United States.
A
AT
THE UNION STATION
RESTED HERE THIS
MORNING.
AR-
ON CHARGE OF
EMBEZZLEMENT
Sum of Money Missing at Kendall
ville and King Charged With
Taking It.
Two .Panhandle detectives arrived
this morning from Kendallville, Ind.,
with a warrant for the arrest of Jo
seph W. King, on a charge of embez
zlement. Until about two weeks ago
King was a G. R. & I. railroad opera
tor at Kendallville and was sup
posed to be an honest and good
young man. Then he suddenly left
Kendallville and came to Richmond,
where he accepted a position as
night operator at the Union station.
A few days ago it was discovered at
Kendallville that quite a sum of rail
road money was missing there and
that King must have taken it. The
night operator there is also ticket
agent and this is how King got the
money. It is not definitely known
exactly how much was taken but at
all account it was a considerable
sum. The detectives left for Ken
dallville this afternoon with King in
charge, where he will be tried on a
charge of embezzlement.
MME. SCHUMAN-HEINK.
One who has heard Mme. Sehu-mann-IIeink,
recently, says:
"To commence with Mme. Schu-mann-IIeink
has really a majestic
voice, and her command of it is well
nigh perfect as her flawless execu
tion of the two octave jump in the
famous 'Brindisi' proves. In all pas
sages that lie between the natural
range of her voice her emission is
smooth, sonorous and productive of
unfailing beauty of tone. Her phras
ing is almost invariably . the perfec
tion of art and enunciation of the
text shows a perfect command of vo
calization. These features of her
method enable her to sing such
things as the 'Brindisi' area with all
the beauty of olor ever imparted to
it by an Italian singer, while with
her keen intelligence, her glowing
temperament, her subtle humor and
her winsome personality enables her
to fill the hollow melody with a
wealth of vitality, unequaled by any
other singer now before the public.
She is gifted with true artistic tem
perament. This great artist is now making
her "fare. veil" concert tour in
America and she is engaged to give a
recital here on Thursday evening,
February 1Kb at the Coliseum.
Though this concert is announced as
her "farewell' it does not mean that
she is to retire from the stage, but
in the future is to devote her time
to opera solelv. , . I
PANHANDLE
OPERATOR
THE FINALS OCCURRED LAST
EVENING AT THE
COLLEGE.
JUNIORS WIN OUT
Placing Two Men on the Team
Seniors Got Left All in
Readiness.
The final debate took place at Earl
ham last night at S:30 in the chapel.
Raymond Wehrly, J. R. Phillips and
a Leere were chosen. This is the
trio that will debate with De Pauw
when she comes here March 5. The
subject of the debate wras:
" Resolved, That the fifteenth
amendment has not been justified."
The Ionian and Phoenix societies
adjourned early yesterday evening in
order to attend the debate.
The Junior class of Earlharn are
crowing over the Seniors today since
the upper class failed to place a man
on the team and they received two
places.
APPLEYABD
Consolidation of Four Com
panies. The following dispatch will be in
teresting, because the Appleyard peo
ple are connected with the Columbus,
Greensburg & Richmond:
"Columbus, O., Jan. 29. A. E.
Appleyard & company today author T
ized the statement that arrangements
have been practically completed for
the consolidation, under the name of
the Ohio Union Traction company, of
the following electric roads controlled
by them: Central Market Street
Railway, of Columbus, Columbus,
London & Springfield Railway, Day
ton, Springfield & Urbana Railway,
and Urbana, Bellefontaine & North
ern Railway. The four companies
operate about two hundred miles of
track, and have a total capitalization
of .$5,000,000. The merged company
proposes to issue 5 per cent, bonds to
take up the preferred stock of the
several companies, which amounts to
.$3,250,000."
CIVIC
Movement Made to Bring Albert
Kelsey Here.
The Aftermath Society, Tourist
club, Athenae and Commercial club
have conjointly agreed to bring Mr.
Albert Kelsey, of Philadelphia here
to lecture on Tuesday, February 9,
the place not yet being determined
upon. Mr. Kelsey has
has charge of the model city
exhibit at the St. Louis exposition,
and also editor of the Architectural
Review. The theme of his lecture
will be "The City Possible." This
is along the line of civic improve
ment and the expense will be borne
by the clubs mentioned.
THE LIBRARY
Some Changes in its Hours
For Being Open.
Ada L. Bernhardt, librarian, an
nounces that the Morrisson-Reeves
library will hereafter be open
on Sundays from 2 to 9
p. m. instead of from 2 to 5 as here
tofore. This is certainly good news
to the patrons of the library and
the efforts of the librarian will no
doubt be appreciated.
COMBINE
IMPROVEMENT
CANDIDATES TOR OFFICES MET
: x AT THE COURT
HOUSE
AND DRAW NUMBERS
Which. Indicate Their Place on the
Nominating Ballot.
The candidates for offices at the
coming nominating election met in
the commissioners' couri room at the
court house at 10 a. m. this morning
for the purpose of paying their as
sessments and drawing for places on
the ticket. The chairman, Mr. Gard
ner, and secretary, Mr. Converse,
conducted the meeting.
Secretary Converse had the num
bers prepared and sealed in envelopes
and the candidates lined up and
drewr in turn's. It was expected there
wrould be some withdrawals, but such
was not the case, as only one coun
cilman, George Cotton, of the seventh
ward, withdrew'. "We announced Elias
M. Hoover's withdrawal as a candi
date for eounty commissioner yester
day. Following is the result of the
drawing:
For state senator Kirkman has no
opposition, and Richard M. Elliott
has none for joint representative.
John F. Dynes has no opposition
for commissioner and Richard Smith
has none for sheriff. For coroner Dr.
Markly is alone in the field.
Representative.
1. Dr. M. W. Yencer.
'2. Walter Ratlin. , ;
Recorder.
1. John C. King.
2. King R, Williams. ! '
3. Alvis M. Nicholson.
4. Harry T. Fisher. - - -p 7
5. Frank C. Mosbaugh.
6. Benjamin F. Parsons.
7. Aaron Conlej'.
County Commissioner.
1. Elwood Clark.
2. Robert N. Beeson.
County Treasurer.
1. Albert R. Albertson.
2. Robert A. Benton.
3. Benjamin B. Myrick, Jr.
Prosecuting Attorney.
1. Paul Comstock.
2. Wilfred Jessup.
Township Assessor.
1. C. II. Bulla.
2. John-M. .Winslow.
3. George Bishop.
4. Josiah T. Elliott.
5. Thos.- F. Swain.
Township Trustee.
1. George E. McCov.
2. John W. Tingle.'
3. John E. Moffitt.
4. Chas. E. Potter.
City Offices.
John F. Taggart, for city clork;
has no opposition, neither has Chas.
A Tennis, for city treasurer.
Mayor.
1. Dr. W. W. Zimmerman.
2. Dr. J. M. Bulla.
First Ward.
No candidate.
Second Ward.
Mr. II. W. Deuker and W. W.
Alexander arrange place between
themselves.
Third Ward.
1. Edgar Norris.
2. W. T. Earley.
3. II. H. Engelbert.
Fourth Ward.
1. Robert. F. White.
2. Richard M. Whitman.
3. J. Rue Riule. ;
4. J. F. Haner. ' .
Fifth Ward. i .
1. O. A. Letftwich.
2. C. F. Walters.
3. Cash Peck.
4. OrviUe S. Nixon. ,
Sixth Ward.
U W. J. Rhoads.
3. Chas. F. Neal. "
4. Samuel Wolf. '
Seventh Ward.
1. Chas. C. Smith.
2. James E. Harris. :
3. George Muhl. ; ' - ; ".""
SIR HENRY M. DURAND,
In Whose Honor a Banquet Was
Given at Delmonico's,
New York.
4. Alonzo II. Crowell.
5. E. G. McMahan.
The seventh ward people have an
agreement that the candidate on the
south side of the railroad receiving
the highest number of votes be the
nominee and on the north side the
same.
There was genei-al good feeling
among the candidates , this morning
and all seemed hopeful of success.
AN OLBlAT
MEETS BEATH
IN A HORRIBLE MANNER ON
THE PANHANDLE RAIL
ROAD. HURLED FIFTY FEET
Mr. Wolff, the Victim, Was a Par
mer, About Sixty-Five Years
of Age.
A very shocking accident was wit
nessed yesterday morning by the
passengers on No. 14, which, leaves
here for New York at 9:50 a. m.
Near Air Hill, about thirty-five miles
from here, the train struck and killed
Mr. Henry Wolff, a farmer about
sixty-five years old. Mr. Wolff is
very deaf and did not hear the train
coming.
He was walking with his head
down against the Avind and his hat
pulled low over his eyes and the
train, suddenly rounding a curve,
struck him full and hurled him fifty
feet in the air. Every bone in the
man's body was broken. He was lift
ed into the train and carried to Day
ton, where the train coroner held an
inquest over the dead body. No. 14
was an hour late and was striving
to make up the lost time, and the
engineer, on account of the curve,
was not able to apply the brakes
soon enough to prevent hitting the
man.
TO SELL OUT
His Stock and Retire From
Business.
(Special to Palladium.)
Cambridge City, Ind., Jan. 30. S.
B. Fisher, one of our worthy business
men will soon have a closing out
sale of his stock of shoes. Mr.
Fisher came here from Dublin in
1872, accepting a position as clerk in
Frank Mat Us' shoe store.
In 1874 Mr. Fisher began working
as repair man in the shoe store of S.
L. Wheeler. He worked there a few
months then he and Mr. WTheeler
went into partenrship. In 18S2 the
partnership was mutually dissolved
and each began business for himself.
Mr. Fisher occupied the building
now used as J. W. Marson's furni
ture department until 1900. Since
then he has occupied the new building
of C. T. Wright. By his genial ways he
occupied. By his genial ways he
has won many friends, and the public
regrets very much to lose him. It is
hoped that Mr. Fisher will remain
in Cambridge City and will still be
an active business man as heretofore.
GREAT INTEREST TAKEN IN
THE APPROACHING
CONCERT.
DIRECTION PROF. CHASE
A Complete Performance of Haydn's
Famous Imperial Mass, to In
clude "Inflammatus."
Great interest is being felt in col
lege and musical circles in the ap
proaching concert of the Earlharn
Oratorio society, which is set for
sometime about the middle of March.
It is expected by the director of the
chorus, Prof. Chase, that the stand
ard set by the rendition last 3ear of
"The Creation" will be equaled, if
not surpassed, by the work of this
year. Last year the management wras
fortunate in securing some of the
best soloists in the United States and
it is believed that the quartet of
singers brought to Richmond this 3ear
will insure even better results.
The main feature of the program
will be a complete performance of
Haydn's famous Imperial Mass; this
is considered by musicians to stand
among the very first of the great re
ligious choral compositions and a sat
isfactory rendition of it is an event.
The second part of the program will
include the "Inflammatus" from
Rossini's Stabat Mater, by Miss
Blamere, of Chicago, and the chorus,
and the "Sanctus" from Gounod's
Messe Sollemnelle, containing one of
the finest arrangements for tenor solo
and chorus ever written; each one of
the soloists will, have an. opportunity
in this half of the program to be
heard in some great aria.
The exact time of the concert will
be announced within a couple of days,
but the date, is set early so as not to
conflict with the performances of the
May Festival chorus. This concert
by the Earlharn society is coming to
be looked upon as an annual event
and "much enthusiasm is shown among
the members of the chorus, which un
doubtedly surpasses that of last year.
POLO TEAM
To Be Revised Composed of ex-High
School Students.
One of the old polo teams is being
revived. This team is composed of
ex-high school students, and formerly
played in the Main street rink. The
manager, Joe Hill, has written to
Shortridge High school at IndianapG-
lis and several other places for games.
The players will be as follows:
Henley Bell First rush.
Harry Henley Second rush.
Dudley Elmer Center.
Tom Kaufman Halfback.
Ramsey Poundstone Goal.
GAS EXPLOSION.
Wheeling, W. Va., Jan. 29. A
natural gas explosion at the House
of D. A. Smith, a retired brewer on
Wheeling Island, wrecked the dwell
ing and fatally injured William Da
vis, an employe of the gas company.
Joseph A' Busse and Miss Ida Ho-
man were quietly married at St.
Paul 's church yesterday morning,
Rev. Pohlschneider officiating. The
attendants were William Busse and
Miss Clara Homan. Among theguests
were : Mrs. Louise Homan Mrs.
Elizabeth Busse, Mrs. Rose Hack
man, Mrs. Louise Greiwe, Mr. and
Mrs. Edward Busse,- Miss Frances
Homan, Miss Lillian Greiwe, Harry
Korf, Jr., Julius Hackman, Harry
Greiwe, Alfred Greiwe and Miss
Ella Murray, of Lexington, Ky.
Cincinnati Enquirer.
Mr. Busse is quite well known here
and has a number of relatives in this
city.

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