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The daily palladium. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1904-1905, February 19, 1904, Image 1

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WERKLY ESTABLISHED 1881.
DAILY E8TABLI8HEO 1376.
RICHMOND DAILY PALLADIUM, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1904.
ONE CENT A COPY.
1
V
MEDAL OF HOPE
TO BE AWARDED
TO A CITIZEN OF RICHMOND
FOR BRAVERY DURING .
CIVIL WAR
HON. D. W. COMSTOCK
Col. Jackson of Tacoma, Washington,
Instrumental in Bringing the
Subject About.
According to a dispatch from
Washington a Richmond man is to be
signally honored for bravery during
the civil war. Such honors as those
suggested could certainly fall upon
no better citizen or braver soldier.
Following is the text of the dis
patch :
"Washington, Feb. 19. A medal
of honor for gallant service per
formed immediately after the battle
of Nashville during the civil war
probably will be awarded to D. W.
Comstock, of Richmond, judge of the
Appellate court.
"Application for the medal has
been made in Judge Comstoek's be
half by Col. George W. Jackson, of
Tacoma. Wash., who commanded the
Ninth Indiana cavalry. The papers
have been placed in the hands of
Senator Beveridge, who will submit
them to the secretary of war with
the recommendation that appropriate
action be taken.
"Colonel Jackson forwards a nar
rative of the deed of heroism of
Judge Comstock which, lie thinks, is
entitled to recognition. He states
that while in pursuit of Hood's army
after the engagement at Nashville his
horse reared and plunged, throwing
him into a ditch, disabling him and
preventing his escape. Comstock,
.who was adjutant, went to his as
sistance, and, in the face of a with
ering fire from the enemy, rescued
the colonel at the risk of his life.
Colonel Jackson states that the deed
was a daring one, for which Adjutant
Comstock was highly commended by
his superior officers.
The ease will be submitted to the
board in the war department haying
jurisdiction over such matters."
I
TRUSTEES
Have a Meeting at the County Sup
erintendent's Office.
The township trustees of Wayne
township met with County Superin
tendent Jordan this morning. Sev
eral matters of importance were dis-
cussed, especially the matter of mu
sic in the public schools and renum
bering of all the schools in the coun
ty. A number of schools have been
abandoned in the last few years, and,
. -iii it - - 1 .
in onicr ro nave me muuui-is nm m
reendar order, it is necessary to re
number them. Other minor matters
were attended to.
dr""Sston
Is Improving Very Nicely He is
Able to Sit Up.
Dr. J. M. Thurston is improving
rapidly at Indianapolis. A telephone
message was received last night from
Mrs. Thurston, saying that her hus
band was able to sit up a little
while and that he is now able to talk,
though only for a short time. Many
expressions of sympathy and hopes
j-for a speedy recovery are being
heard on all sides. He will probably
be brought home in a week or so.
TRANSFERRED.
James Sharkey has been transferr
ed to Anderson from Eaton. lie is
the station agent.
T0KHIP
COURT HOUSE
Some Few Items Gathered There
Today.
The following marriage license was
issued :
Charles Dalyrymple and Emma
Smith.
,
Letters testamentary were issued
to. Alice Elliott on the will of Exum
Elliott.
A report of sale was made in the
Kessler assignment, Oliver Beeson,
assignee. Sale, $650.
James J. Bolander filed final set
tlement in estate of Barbara Bolan
der. '
The Dickinson Trust company filed
final settlement in estate of Margaret
B. McDonald. . . -
II ORATORICAL
CONTEST DJ MAY
THE STATE COLLEGE PROHIBI
TION LEAGUE TO HOLT
CONTEST
ON THE 15TH OF APRIL
Winner to Represent the State in
the Eastern Inter-State
Contest.
On April 15, in Lindley hall at
Earlham college, the Prohibition
league of Indiana, composed of eight
or ten colleges, will hold a state ora
torical contest. The winner of this
contest will represent the state of
Indiana in the esatern inter-state con
test, which will be held at Lexington,
Ky., on May 20, and the one being
successful there will be the contets
ant for the eastern states of the
Union in the gr'and national contest
at Indianapolis on June 28.
The primary contest, in which Earl
ham will choose her representative
for the state contest will be held at
the college about the end of March.
Several competent members of Earl
ham's Prohibition club have been
working for some time on their ora
tions, and a good primary is expected.
Among the colleges to be repre
sented in the state contest are Mor
ris Hill, Butler, De Pauw, Wabash,
Taylor college and Earlham. Tay
lor college won the contest last year,
in which contest oratory of a very
high class was shown.
During the last few years the num
ber of sjeakers from the colleges over
the country have become so numer
ous that it was found necessary to
divide the country into three divis
ionsthe eastern, central and the
western divisions, a contest being
held in each division.
Last evening Mr. I). L. Colvin.who
has been visiting Earlham yesterday
and today, and who is the president
of the National Inter-Collegiate Pro
hibition club of the United States,
addressed the Prohibition club of
Earlham on the subject of "The
Liquor Traffic of the United States
is a Political Question."
Mr. Colvin showed, in a very able
waj', the great detriment which the
use of intoxicating liquors is to the
wellfare of this nation. He showed
the failure of state prohibition and
of local option. He outlined the man
ner of working of the Prohibition
party, and showed that the liquor
traffic must be stopped through na
tional legislation.
At the meeting of the Prohibition
club last night committees were ap
pointed to arrange for the coming
contest, and make plans for the en
tertaining of the delegates from oth
er colleges.
DR. BALLARD IMPROVING.
The many friends of Dr. Mieajah
Ballard will" be glad to know he is
somewhat better today.
If MENTION
RICHMOND MAN
FRED HAMILTON'S PARCEL
PACKAGE AND CASH
CARRIER
COMPANY TO ORGANIZE
ror the Manufacture of the Same
and Place it Upon the
Market.
Another Richmond man, in the per
son of Fred Hamilton, has applied
for and been granted a patent fro'.T
the patent office at Washington. Mr.
Hamilton's invention is a new parcel,
package and "cash" carrier, which
will be on the order of the carriers
now in operation in nearly all of the
large stores. But Hamilton's inven
tion is a great improvement over all
of those now in use and all the per
sons Avho have seen the new affair
are greatly pleased and enthusiastic
over it and predict a large sale for
it. It is a marked improvement over
all the present ones, in that it is
cheaper to manufacture and to oper
ate, faster and gives better service
all around, is less complicated and,
as a consequence, easier to handle.
Mr. Hamilton is a young electrician
of no mean ability, and has been hard
at work on his invention for quite
a while.
A stock company will soon be or
ganized to place this invention on the
market. A number of our best, and
safest business men are interested
and it will be a sure success. Mr.
Hamilton is to be complimented on
his success, which is well deserved.
IRS. LOWERY DEAD
After a Serious Illness She Passes
Away.
(Special to Palladium.)
Cambridge CitjT, Ind., Feb. 19.
Mrs. David Lowery, after a serious
illness of several weeks, died at her
home on Carolina Hill yesterday aft
ernoon. She leaves two children,
Mrs. K. P. Diffenderfer and Charles
Lowery, her husband having died a
number vears ago.
WEDDING
At Milton of Two Prominent People.
The marriage of Miss Nora Smith,
of Milton, and Clement V. Page, of
Deshler, Ohio, was solemnized at the
home of the bride's mother, Mrs. IT.
C. Meeker, Wednesday at 4 p. m., by
Rev. Jensen. The bride wore a trav
eling suit of brown cloth, skirt wTith i
sveep and handsomely trimmed white
silk waist. The bride is the daughter
of Mrs. Meeker by a former marriage
and the stepdaughter of II. Meeker,
proprietor of the Wayne Specialty
Works. The sroom is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. J. W. Page, of Deshler, O.,
and is one of the firm of Page & Co.,
merchants at that place. Mr. and
Mrs. Page left this morning for their
future home in Deshler, bearing the
good wishes of their friends here.
MOTHER HOLD UP
Over In Ohio, in Preble County.
One of Christ Somers' boys, while
going home on horseback Monday
evening about 7 o'clock, claims he
was held up and robbed when near
the cemetery, by two men whom he
thinks were colored. One grabbed the
horse while the other thrust a re
volver in his face. He had $3 and
some change, which, he says, he gave
them. He reported the case Tuesday
morning to the police, who are now7
investigating it. Eaton Register.
S
GET $720 A YEAR
MUST NOT SOLICIT. BUSINESS
OR CARRY MERCHAN
DISE DURING WORKING
HOURS
An Effort Will be Made to Increase
the Pay to $800 a Year Cost
About $170,000,000.
Washington, Feb. IS. "That the
carriers shall not solicit business or
receive orders of any kind from any
person, firm or corporation and shall
not carry merchandise during their
hours of employment for hire."
This is the language of the proviso
in the amendment increasing to $720
a year the salaries of rural carriers.
It is the purpose of the committee to
insist on the adoption of this amend
ment. While some opposition has
been manifested to the limitations
imposed on the carriers, it is not in
spired by the carriers themselves or
their friends in congress. As hereto
fore stated in these dispatches an ef
fort will be made on the floor of the
house to have the salaries of the car
riers increased to $S00 a year. Rep
resentative Overstreet will report the
postoffice appropriation bill to the
hotise early next week. It will carry
about $170,000,000.
Mrs. J. G. Oxer, of Campbells
town, who has been a guest of Mr.
and ?&rs. J, P. Deardorff for several
weeks, returned home yesterday.
A MISTAKE
The C, G. & R. Have Not Rented
Masonic Temple.
Some time ago we published a no
tice that the C, G. & R. would rent
the Masonic temple building for of
fices. We are informed by Mr. Wil
son, the general manager, that such
is not a fact. The road is not far
enough advanced to want offices yet,
and, when they do want them, official
notice will be given.
leavITtIm
John Berberian Goes to Chicago.
The many friends in this city of
Mr. John Berberian, the young Arme
nian gentleman sent to this country
by the Turkish Empire to learn all
he could about threshing machinery
and -who has been working with the
Gaar, Scott Co., of. this city, will be
soiTy to hear that he leaves today for
Chicago, to finish , his trade in that
city. Mr. Berberian is an accom
plished and educated gentleman wrho
has travelled quite extensively and a
very interesting talker, speaking sev
eral languages, and will be greatly
missed by the young set in our city.
COLORED MISSION
To Be Abandoned for the Present.
The colored M. E. Mission, J. E.
Boarl, pastor, the Rev. G. A. Sissle,
presiding elder, of the Indiana Dis
trict was with us on the night of the
12th and preached to the satisfaction
and delight of all those present, after
which he proceeded to administer the
Sacrament of the Lord's Supper, and
we regret that he could only be with
us one night. Owing to the misunder
standing in regard to the Hall 'where
our services were conducted and this
will also disarrange our previous ap
pointments viz. every second and
third Sunday of each month. So we
will make no further appointments
until matters are more definitely ar
ranged and then Ave shall publish our
appointments accordingly.
RURAL
Gil
ER
FOR TRESPASS
L. W. Matthews Arrested and Fined
in Police Court.
L. W. Matthews was arrested last
evening and fined this morning in
police eourt for trespass.
For some time he has been going
into back jrards on south sixth street,
and, at one particular home, he en
tered the yard three different times in
one night, and, the last time, he
called at the back door and persisted
on the lady's coming out. He said
he wanted to see her on special busi
ness. The lady was badly frightened
and reported the matter to the po
lice. He told the police he was pass
ing socialistic literature. The man
is about twenty-seven years of age.
He was fined one dollar and costs,
which was paid.
'S
LAST RITES PERFORMED OVER
THE REMAINS OF THE
DEAD SENATOR.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES
Large Concourse of Distinguished
People Present at the
Obseauies.
Cleveland, O., Feb. 19. Thousands
of people were unable to reach the
Hanna bier today before the doors
closed at 11 o'clock this morning.
The Ohio legislature was among the
last to be admitted. Washington
delegations arrived today, including
Secretarys Taft, Wilson, Cortelyou of
the cabinet; James Garfield and the
senate and house committees. Gov
ernor Dui-bin and staff, of Indiana,
are also present. All of the morn
ing trains were filled with visitors.
At 1 o'clock the funeral cortege
was met by the clergy at the entrance
to the church, and the solemn burial
ritual began. It was conducted by
Bishop Leonard, Dr. McGrew, rector
of St. Paul's church ; President
Pierce, of Kenyon college, and Rev.
W. H. Jones, rector of St. John's
Episcopal church. The choir of St.
Paul's church sang during the serv
ices "Lead Kindly Light," "For
ever With the Lord" and "Now the
Laborer's Work is O'er." Bishop
Leonard delivered a brief eulogy.
This ended the public services. The
remainder of the service wras at Lake-
view cemetery and was private.
Only the family in carnages and
the pall-bearers and clergy went to
the cemetery, but the way was lined
with people who reverently looked at
the passing cortege. The burial serv
ice was in the chapel. The body was
placed in the Wade memorial vault.
D. F.
State Statistician is Visiting in the
City.
Mr. B. F. Johnson, state statistic
ian, is in the city today looking after
his interests. He is a candidate for
re-election and his chances are surely
favorable, for he has filled the office
with credit to himself and the state.
Mr. Johnson is a very pleasant gen
tleman and impresses one as being
fitted in every wray for the position
he holds. For the past three years
he has lived at Indianapolis, coming
from his old home at Fowler, Ben
ton county.
Mr. Johnson, until he was elected
to the office he now holds, taught
school since 1S67. He was county
superintendent from 18S1 to 1S91 in
his home county, and afterward was
elected township trustee. The Pal
ladium can recommend Mr. Johnson
as a man of high standing and of no
mean ability, capable of filling any
position that might be given him.
HAM
FUNERAL
JOHNSON
HIGH SCHOOL
HIGHLY HONORED
ILLINOIS COLLEGE PLACES LO
CAL SCHOOL ON LIST
OF THOSE
DMITTED BY
CERTIFICATE
Seniors Held Meeting to Arrange for
Regular Bann.net.
The seniors of high school held a
meeting yesterday to perfect their
arrangements for the regular banquet
which they will give to the juniors
after the latter's public tonight.
One notable thing is that the sen
iors will give the banquet in the
school building, instead of in some
hall, as the banquets for several years
have been held in the I. O. O. F. '
hall.
" 1
One of the greatest honors possible
has fallen to the lot of the local high
school. . The Illinois college, at Jack
sonville, 111., has announced that it -has
paced the Richmond high school
on the list of those whose students
will be admitted by certificate, i. e.,
a graduate from the Richmond high
school, providing that he has a certi
ficate from the principal, can enter
Illinois college without taking the
preparatorj' examinations. There are
onlv a few hizh schools which have
been placed on the certificate list of
this college, and the fact that Rich
mond is one of them shows what out
siders and all educational men think
of the Richmond high school.
To all such accredited schools the
Illinois college makes the following
offer of scohlarships: To the boy
who ranks either first or second
among boys, and to the girl who
ranks, either first or second among
girls,, this college offers scholarships
good for tuition during the years
1904, 1905 and 1906. These scholar
ships are given, providing that, in no
case, shall the pupils grade for the
last j'ear in high school be not less
than 90 per cent on a basis of 100.
The basketball team will leave for
Union City tomorrow, where it plays
in the afternoon.
I
I
On the C. C. & L. at Muncie Yes
terday. While standing on the running
board behind the tender of the en
gine when the water tank slipped off
the tender and pinned him between
the engine and box car, Mr. S. G.
Ervin was probably internally in
jured. He lives at Muncie and has a
wife and three children.
'S
Edward Colston Offered Resolutions
of Respect in Court.
Cincinnati, Feb. 19. Street cars
were ordered stopped five minutes
beginning at 1 p. m., in honor of the
memory of Senator Hanna. In . the
United States court Edward Colston
offered resolutions of respect which
were ordered entered on the journal
and the court 'adjourned. All courts
adjourned and the Chamber of Com
merce closed its session at 1 o'clock.
Mrs. Eugene Hatch, of Detroit,
who has been here for some weeks.
the guest of her mother, Mrs. Julia
Bobbins, at the home of Mr. John F.
Bobbins, returned home today.
Claude Wallace, a member of the
Marion Soldiers' Home band, is in
the city to attend the funeral of his
grandfather, D. C. Jenks.
SWITCH
AN
NJDHED
HANNA
MEMORY

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