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The daily palladium. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1904-1905, February 20, 1904, Image 1

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"I
The
V
WEKKIiY ESTABLISHED 1881.
DAILY ESTABLISHED 1878.
JIM PUBLIC
LAST MET
SATISFACTORY TO BOTH AU
DIENCE AND PERFORM
- ERS.
SCENES FROM
SHERIDAN'S RIVALS
Large and Enthusiastic Audience
Seniors "Were in the
"Clear."
In the high school hall last night
took place the great school event of
the Junior year the public. As a
Avhole it was a success and satisfac
tory to both audience and performers.
The ony thine: that seemed to de
tract, in the opinion of many per
sons, was the fact that scenes from
Sheridan's, "The Rivals," were given
instead of an entire play, as has al
ways been the custom up to this time.
A threat many were rather in
clined to "knock" the public on that
account. While it is true that "The
Rivals" is one of the most noted
comedies of today, yet when only
parts of it are given, it can never be
quite the success of a whole play.
However, the play came off finely.
The 'following was the cast:
Sir Anthony Absolute Karl Pier
son. Captain Absolute (Beverly) Ar
thur Meyers.
Mrs. Malaprop Miss Lent Coffin.
Lydia Languish Miss Tilara Haas.
Lucy Miss Hazel Reid.
Fag Harry Sloan.
The scenes given were those con
nected Avith the story of Captain Ab
solute and Lydia Languish. Captain
Absolute is ordered by his father to
marry the girl the latter has chosen,
and he naturally refuses, as he has
never seen the girl. However, when
he learns that the girl his father has
picked out is Lydia Languish, whom
he has been making love to under the
name of Beverly, he quickly consents.
Mrs. Malaprop, the aunt of Lydia,
arranges things suitably for the two
younger people, and, after several
stormy periods ,all ends well. Miss
Lena Coffin was the bright particular
star of the play- Her acting was ex
ceedingly fine, her speech was a fine
imitation of what Mrs. Malaprops
might have been, her words distinctly
articulated.
Altogether, she is- one of the finest
amateur actresses that has ever been
on the high school stage, and her
work was the more remarkable when
one considers that it was her first
. annearaticc. Indeed for that matter
it was the first appearance for all
of the performers.
Karl Pierson was a close second
to Miss Coffin, and, in the scene be
tween him and his son,was especially
strong, acting the part of a willful
old English baronet to perfection.
Miss Haas and Arthur Meyers were
very good and acted their parts very
creditably. Miss Reid and Harry
Sloan carried the two minor parts
very well also.
When the curtain rose again after
the play, it revealed the Misses Eliz
abeth Ilasemeier, Lillian Horton,
Edith Moore, Bessie Trueblood, Ethel
Henderson, Edna Jones, Ethel Lock
wood, Hattie Lyons, Mary Wilson,
Nellie Williams, Irma Horn and Ma
tilda Yon Pein, all dressed in' Colon
ial costumes and with be-ribboned
staffs in their hands. These young
ladies then went through one of the
prettiest drills ever scen on the high
school stage, being full of intricate
maneuvers and windings. They re
ceived warm and well-merited ap
plause and were encored again and
asrain.
The hiirh school orchestra then ren
dered the "Naiad Queen," by Rolin
son, in its usual pleasing manner.
The next number was the most
unique and absolutely novel .that any
public, has given. The description of
it on the programs .was thi: "One
of our learned professors, while re
turning from a midnight stroll, start
ed to pass through an obscure and de
serted churchyard just as the clock
was striking the midnight hour.
Hearing weird music, he hastily se
creted himself and was witness of the
fools' fantastic dance. With great
presence of mind and lightning rapid
ity, he drew his faithful kodak com
panion and secured this representa
tion of their revels : 'Tis midnignt,
birds, owls and crickets are heard,
the steeple clock striking the hour.
They dance, but are frightened by
the watchman's pistol"
A beam of revolving light, from an
improvised cinematograph was
thrown on the stage and presently
Fred Gennett, Harry Niles and Geo.
Rettig appeared, clad in a parti-colored
fools' costume of red and yel
low. They then performed a fantas
tic dance, which was very fine, es
pecially the fancy dance by Harry
Niles. This was the greatest "hit"
of the public, and its mysterious title
only added .to the favor with which
at was received. It was encored sev
eral times.
The following boys appeared in
tennis costume and gave a very pleas
ing drill: Merle Genn, Galen Hop
kins, Paul Kienker, Frank Dickin
son, Rudolph Hill, Orba Decker, Har
ry Sloan and Burt Johnson.
Then followed the class song, the
curtain rising, showed the entire class
weepinsr around a grave on which
was inscribed "1904. Requiescat in
Pace." Then a large, electric-lighted
" '05" flashed into view and the song
changed from a dirge to a song of
triumph. This was a new and novel
way of upholding the Junior class
over their Senior schoolmates.
One notable thing was the non-ap
pearance of the Seniors at the cru
cial point. Generally the upper class,
not eiviiur the rmblie, shows in some
way that they are still in the run
ning, but, strange to say, beyond a
few stampings of feet, the Seniors
were not heard from.
Notes of the Public.
Miss Katherine Schaefer was in
chai-ge of the public.
The newly painted scenery was
shown for the first time last night.
TWElff-flVE"
PERSONS KILLED
AND FIFTEEN INJURED IN A
RAILROAD WRECK
ON SOUTHERN PACIFIC
Indiana Family Among the Killed
Eight of the Dead Are
Americans.
(By Associated Press.)
Ogden, Utah, Feb. 20. -Twenty-five
people were killed and fifteen injured
on an explosion of dynamite caused
by a collision of two freight trains
at Jackson, on the Ogden-Lucin cut
off of the Southern Pacific railroad.
A great amount of railroad prop
erty is destroyed. Eight of the killed
were Americans, the others being
Greek laborers. Among the killed
was T. Wr. Burke, wife4 and three
children, and Wr. L. Holler, formerly
of Andrews, Ind.
Plead Not Guilty and Says He Can
Prove an Alibi.
Benjamin Day, a Henry county
man, whom we mentioned yesterday
as being arrested for stealing a horse
and rig from Greenville, Ohio, was
tried at Muncie yesterday and he
pleaded not guilty. He says he can
prove an alibi. His father is wealthy
and will fight the case.
Mr. Charles Goodwin, of Middle-
town, Ohio, and Mrs. Lydia Smith, of
Berne Ind., were married at b o clock
last evening by Rev. M. E. Nether-
cut it the First Methodist Episcopal
parsonage. Mr. and Mrs. Goodwin
left last evening for Dayton, where
they will make their future home.
THE
ACCUSED
RICHMOND DAILY PALLADIUM, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1904
ANOTHER LIE
FOB EICHMOND
THE OHIO AND INDIANA TRAC
TION COMPANY'S SUR
VEYORS ABOUT FINISHED WORK
Having Been Working All Winter
The Route Given Here.
That Richmond is to have a trac?
tion line from Liberty seems almost
certain. The Liberty Herald of this
week gives the following account of
the new road:
"The Ohio and Indiana Traction
company's surveyors have about fin
ished their work, having been plug
ging at it all winter, trying to se
cure the best possible route into Lib
erty, and, since the severe weather
of the last two months has not routed
hem from the active pursuit of the
best way of getting into Union coun
ty's beautiful capital city, we can
bank on the ultimate victory over
the obstacles such as hills and
streams, and the completion of their
project. The fact that two roads are
now being pushed with Liberty as one
of the objective points, will make us
all chirp up, and will cause, when
running, a better business circulation
o our community. L. N. Bonham
and his assistants were here several
times last week and this, and have
given it out that from Oxford they
come to Billingsville, thence in a
northwest direction, past Wash
Ward's; crossing Hannah's creek,
they enter a valley m?ar Joseph Con-
nell's farm, which, by a gradual in
cline, strikes the Camden pike a? A
of town and comes into Liberty,
thence to Main street, where the
tracks go north to Richmond. Thus
two good lines are projected and
nearly everybody is longing to see
the -cars running. We hope to see
both lines actively constructed dur-
ing the coming summer.
The Frances E. Willard W. C. T.
U. will hold a memorial services Sun
day afternoon at 3 o'clock in Rhoda
temple. A good program will be ren
dered. You are invited.
PENNSYLVANIA
I
EAST BOUND PASSENGER LEAV
ING CHICAGO AT MIDNIGHT
COLLIDED
WITH WEST
BOUND FREIGHT
At Hobart, Indiana Chas. Strayer,
Baggageman Killed.
(By Associated Press.)
Fort Wayne, Ind., Feb. 20. An
east bound Pennsylvania train, leav
ing Chicago at midnight, collided
with a west bound freight train at
Hobart, Ind. Chas Strayer, baggage
man, was killed. Mail Clerks Brick-
er, Bowers and Thomas passengers,
E. G. Weisenberger and C. F. Hav
erin and Foreman S. A. Linder were
injured.
MRS. LAND ILL.
Mrs. Charles Land is very ill at
her home on south eighteenth street.
While the disease is uot liable to
prove fatal. Mrs. Land is in a verj
precarious condition. General sym
pathy is expressed and her large cir
cle of friends hope that she will re
cover soon.
TRAIN
WRECKED
CflMEBCIAL CLUB
EETING SOON
ANNUAL GATHERING WILL BE
HELD ON MARCH
FIRST.
ELECTION OF OFFICERS
And Other Important Business to
Come Before the Meeting.
On March 1st will occur the regu
lar meeting of the Commercial club.
At this meeting the officers for the
ensuing year will be elected and oth
er business of importance transacted.
We would suggest that this meeting
be well attended, and that all mem
bers show an interest in the organi
zation. The Commercial club has certainly
done some splendid work during the
past year, and intends to do still
more the coming year. The bringing
of the chautauqua here was a big
thing in itself, and advertised this
city as not other enterprise in years
had done. It brought ten thousand
people here last summer and housed
them in our beautiful Glen Mil
ler park. Each one of those ten
thousand visitors spent money here,
and they were not only benefited in a
literary way, but our merchants were
helped in a financial way.
The project of erecting a pavilion
in the Glen should meet with en
couragement from our people, and it
should be no mean structure, either.
Tf one is erected, let it be a good
one one that will answer all pur
poses and for all time.
WHEAT $1.04
Chicago, Feb. 20. May wheat
sold today in enormous quantities at
$1.07.
(By Associated Press.)
Chicago, Feb. 20. May wheat sold
at $1.04 today.
A CONVENTION
FOE RICHMOND
THE ELEVENTH ANNUAL
STATE MEETING OF
ST. JOSEPH'S
STAATSVERBAND
To be Held in This City the 24th
and 25th of April Next.
Richmond will be the scene of sev
eral conventions the coming spring
and summer. These gatherings could
go to no better place than this city,
and no place where they would be
treated better.
One of the many meetings to be
held here is the eleventh annual state
convention of St. Joseph's Staats
verband of Indiana, which will meet
here on the 24th and 25th of April.
There will be a large number of dele
gates from over the state, .and ar
rangements are now making for their
intertainment.
On Sunday afternoon, April 24th,
there will bo a public parade and
other exercises of a public nature.
A business session will be held on
Monday, the 25th.
Births. Born to Mr. and Mrs. Wil
liam Miller, 224 north fifth street, a
girl-
EARLHAM SOCIETY.
The first musical recital of the win
ter term at Earlham college was given
yesterday afternoon in Ionian hall at
4:15, under the direction of Miss
Papworth, of the musical department.
The program was well given, and was
as follows:
Gavotte in D, Bach Ethel Ed
wards. Tanz-weise, Meyer-IIelmund Edna
Miller.
Song: The Mission of a Rose, Cow
en Laura Hobson.
Scherzo, Schubert Marcia Furnas.
Boat Song, Neidlinger Grace Wol
ford. "
La Gondola, Henselt Gertrude Le
Fevre.
Song: The Conqueror, Bischoff
Rezin Reagan.
The Shepherd's Tale, Nevin Nina
Haris.
In a Garden (Male Quartette)
Emi IMills, Nathan Davis, Chester
Leggett and Rezin Reagan.
Caprice, Schumann Mamie Hough
Song: Echo, Somerset Chester
Leggett.
Valse de Concert, Wieniawski
Louise Boyd.
The Ionian and Phoenix societies
of Earlham college met in their
rooms last evening and enjoyed very
interesting programs, which were as
follows:
Ionian.
Paper, Primitive Ideas of the
Origin of the World Manning
Smith.
Droll Remarks Charles Rush.
Recitation Park Newland.
Probable Nominations in the Com
ing Campaign Arthur Mendenhall.
Phoenix.
Music Reba Stetson.
Debate, Resolved, That the United
States Action in Regard to the Pana
ma Affair was Unjustified.
Affirmatives Oliver Hedges and
Edna Doau.
Negatives Maude Helm and Bess
Huff.
Music Jennie Lindley.
SOON FOLLOWED
DEATH OF CLARENCE GORMON
OF PNEUMONIA,
IN FAR OFF TEXAS
Wife Died Day Before Last Thanks
giving in Centerville Son of
James Gormon.
Centerville, Ind., Feb. 20. Word
has been received here of the death
of Clarence Gormon, who died this
morning at 10 o'clock in Texas,where
he was an operator for the M. P. &
T. railway.
Mr. Gormon was twenty-eight
years old, and his death resulted from
pneumonia. The deceased was a son
of James Gormon, of Kokomo, and a
son-in-law of Lloyd K. Hill, of this
place. He also was a nephew of
Superintendent of Police Gormon, of
Richmond.
Mrs. Clarence Gormon was buried
here the day after Thanksgiving, and
Clarence left immediately after for
Texas.
CUB.
Surveying Corps Reached Connersville
Yesterday.
Connersville, Ind., Feb. 20. The
surveying corps of the Columbus,
Greensburg & Richmond Interurban
railway reached this city yesterday,
and the residents are having their first
practical evidence that at least one
of the many roads which have been
built on paper is making an earnest
effort. The farmers over whose lands
the road has been surveyed are gen
erally in favor of it.
C. C. Border has returned from
Chicago, where he has been spending
a few days on business.
HS
WIFE
ONE CENT A COPY.
EDUCATIONAL
ASSOCIATION
WINTER MEETING OF THE
WAYNE COUNTY TEACHERS
AT HIGH SCHOOL HALL.
DR. HILARY A GOBIN
Gives a Splendid Lecture on Phases
of Twentieth Century School
Work.
(By Prof. W. A. Fiske.)
The second session of the Wayne
County Teachers' association met
this morning at 10:30 in high school
hall, with Mr. Wissler presiding.
On account of the illness of Presi
dent Hughes, Dr. II. A. Gobin, vice
president of De Pauw University,
was present and delivered an excell
ent address on "The Incentives to
an Education."
On beginning his address Dr. Go
bin said he had no apology to make
for himself, but he wished to present
an apology for Dr. Hughes, in that,
on account of his great labors of last
week, and exposure to which he was
necessarily subjected, he was unable
to be present today, which he re
gretted very much, "But," he said,
"you should not relinquish your
claims on him to have him present in
the near future to address you on
an occasion of this kind.
In developing his subject he said:
"Why is it we spend so much money
in schools, libraries, salaries of teach
ers and euipments of various kinds
but to overcome ignorance and to ele
vate our brother man. Teachers and .
equipments cost many millions of dol
lars, yet the United States spend
much more annually for the wide
spread ignorance that we now have
among us. All the losses through
fire, storm, flood and thousand other
ways, are in some way more or less
the result of ignorance, and it is
to diminsh these that our schools ex
ist today. But these losses, as a re
sult of ignorance, are on the material
side and are not to be compared to
the losses on the intellectual side.
The educational work of our coun
try is a training to competency.
Many illustrations were given at this
ers and equipment of various kinds
ing is to this end.
An education also trains to lucra
tiveness. An instance wyas given of a boy,
on entering the high school, who stat
ed to his father that he was now
ready to begin the study of Latin.
The father endeavored to persuade
him that Latin would be of no use
to him; that it would not prepare
him to better plant potatoes and do
the general work of the farm. The
boy, however, through the' entreaties
of his mother, succeeded, and began
the study of Latin.
During his college course he made
Latin his major,, on graduation took
special honors in the subject, after
ward becoming a fine Latin teacher in
an institution in New York city.
One phase of educational work is
to discover talent and lend to its de
velopment. The educational movement also
leads to the development of the fam
ily, to elevate the home, which is the
great corner stone of our nation. It
is going to protect us in the greatest
social conflicts by placing the for
eign" element, so-called, in such a po
sition that instead of being a menace
to our eountry, it may become a
blessing. In this elevating process
our public schools will ever have the
greatest influence.
The educational movement will
finally overcome the clashing of the
races in our country and lead to a
more perfect brotherhood of man.
The speaker laid special emphasis
on the ameliorating influence of edu
cation in the home.
He said he had traveled about some
and he finds this condition very large
y on the increase.
"All this," he said, "makes me
(Continued on last page.) ;
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