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The daily palladium. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1904-1905, February 22, 1904, Image 1

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WEEKLY ESTABLISHED 1831.
DAILY ESTABHSUEu 1876.
RICHMOND DAILY PALLADIUM, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1904.
ONE CENT A COPY.
AFTEBBOOH
SESSION
r.
OF WAYNE COUNTY TEACH
ERS' ASSICIATION INSTRUCT
I ED BY A CHICAGO ED
UCATOR, MRS RUTH
MORRIS KERSEY
Addressed the Pedagogues on The
Novel in Education "With Char
acterization of Novelists and
Their Novels.
(By W. A. Fiske.)
At the afternoon session of the
Wayne County Teachers' association
at the high school on last Saturday,
Mrs. Ruth Morris Kersey, of the Chi
cago Kindergarten school, delivered
a very interesting address on "The
Novel in Education."
She discussed at some length in
the introduction of her subject the
prevailing bad habits that exist
among the general reading classes,
and thinks that they are due to the
conditions of our lives and that we
can not reconstruct our habits of
reading until we first reconstruct our
lives.
We, furthermore, do not see the
full and true meaning of books, the
cause of which is due chiefly to the
hurrying and scurrying methods we
employ in reading them.
"Onlya few years ago young peo
ple," the speaker said, "were not
permitted to read novels. If a boy
or girl should be found with such a
book, the boy had the book taken
irom mm wime iue yn l")uus muJe
bed.
"Yet, notwithstanding this former
opposition, the novel has pushed its
way to the front until, at present, it
occupies a place of great promin
ence." This, the writer regards as being
caused by the fact that, of all forms
of literature, the novel is in close
touch 'with life, and deals with forms
that are near to us.
The speaker referred to the var
ious waves of influence that had
passed over the realm of thought.
The first was the earlier wave in
volving memory, the second the Pes
talozzian wave, which considered per
ception as the fundamental idea,
third the Ilerbarlian wave, which in
cluded both memory and perception,
thus constituting apperception,
fourth the child study wave was ush
ered in, and lastly the social wave,
th"e one which is upon us now.
"In this social wave," the speaker
tit, "lies the opportunity of the
novel.
"The novel takes up the social
problems and the social significance
is its main feature.
"Every fiction dealt with things
pmaginary, tilings at a distance and
n no "way connected with the reader.
It is not so now, but it deals with
hings near at hand and of vital in-
fcerest to the reader."
The speaker presented a very in
eresting classification of the novel
The writers of character novels were
epresented by Goldsmith, Jane Aus
in, Charlotte Bronte and Hawthorne.
L The principal production of each
il li 11 1 1 x -1
ix iih'su writers was oisrus.eu iu il
lustrate their characterizations.
The historical novelists were Scott,
pumasJJulvver, Ebers and Thackeray.
Kcott's style was represented by
ienihvorth and Ivanhoe, Dumas' by
he "Three Musketeers." and Thack-
rav's by "Henry Esmond."
Scott's theory was that the facts
f history should be so grouped as
o represent character."
Thackeray is more loved than these
ther men, because they jortray the
istory of the outer life, while he is
.e novelist of the inner and spiritual
The writers of the romantic novels
ere represented by Goethe, and Wil
elm Moist cr was considered in this
onneetion as representing this par
ieular f tyle.
Romanticism was defined by the
speaker as the exploration in search
of an ideal.
The novels of reform were repre
sented by the writings of Mrs. Stowe,
Kinsley and Tolstoi. "Uncle Tom's
Cabin" was considered at some
length. It is regarded by the speak
er as the result of a great indigna
tion brought on by the existence of a
great wrong, and it had its influence
in bringing on the war, and the lib
eration of the slave.
It has not yet seen its day, as"
many novels, written under similar
circumstances, have. This is because
it possesses a srreat moral duality
that insures its life.
The speaker closed by saying that
the novel has a strong place in edu
cation because it brings us in close
touch with ' life, because it is a de
velopment from the outside to the in
side of life, because it is a transition
from the bodv to the soul.
"Today Ave study and reflect and
do not dream our lives away. We
are all romanticists; all wandering to
ward a desire, believing that some
time we will find our hope."
KNIGHTS OF
' COLUMBUS
INITIATE A CLASS OF ABOUT
THIRTY CANDIDATES.
IN THE FIRST DEGREE
The Work Most Successfully Put on
. by the Home Degree
Staff.
Yesterday was not the kind of a
day one would select tu parade the
streets, but the Knights of Colum-
a srood showing, when
about one hundred and fifty men
marched from their hall, corner of
fifth and Main streets, to St. Mary's
Catholic church yesterday afternoon
to attend vesper service, preparatory
to the putting on of the first degree
at their hall.
There was no special service at the
church, save the simple vesper serv
ice and the solemn "Way of the
Cross," and the singing of "Stabat
Mater," by the choir and congrega
tion. v
After services at the church the
candidates and members proceeded to
the K. of C. hall, where the work
was put on.
The class consisted of about thirty
persons, and the conferring of the
first degree occupied about one and
a half hours, and was most impres
sively done.
The other degrees will be admin
istered later.
C18M1M, JR.
Will Play With the Richmond Polo
Team Tonight.
Manager Henley announces that
the speedy first rush of the Kokomo
team, who, by the way, is the prop
erty of the home people, will play
with the Richmond boys tonight.
This fact assures an interesting
SABBATH WEDDING
Marriage of Two Richmond People.
Last evening occurred the marriage
of Mr. W. C. Jeffery and Margaret
E. Hines. .The wedding Avas aquiet
one, only the immediate relatives be
ing present. After the wedding a
supper was served at the bride's
home on John street.
Mrs. Jeffery is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. William Hines of John
street, Fairview, and an estimable
young lady in every way. Mr. JefT
ery is a son of W. C. Jeffery of Ma
rion, was formerly connected with the
Panhandle, but now with the Clover
Leaf, running from Frankfort to
Delphos. The newly married couple
will reside at Frankfort. We extend
best, wishes for future success.
a
miiiiimuuoii h
FLOWERY FURNACE
SUNDAY FIRE AT THE PLANT
OF CHESSMAN & SCHEP
MANN, CAUSED BY BOILER
Becoming Overheated, Setting Fire to
-the Structure and Spreading
Rapidly.
The usual quiet of the Sabbath was
disturbed yesterday afternoon by the
ringing of the fire bells, calling the
department to the green houses of
Chessman & Schepmann, on south
ninth street.
The fire was noticed a little after
o'clock, when the alarm was sent
in, and it wasn't long until both de
partments were fighting the flames,
which were rapidly gutting the beau
tiful hot houses and destroying the
plants in large numbers. It looked
like a shame to see those lovely
flowers devoured by the seething
flames. It seemed that the fire should
at least be touched by the beauty of
the scene and spare nature's chois
est gifts flowers. But, alas! such
was not the case, for what the flames
did not devour they exposed to the
chilly weather and the plants drooped
their heads as if ashamed to be
caught without covering'.
The fire departments were on the
scene early and worked hard to save
the houses and the plants and suc
ceeded to a greater decree than was
anticipated.
After the fire was extinguished the
work of saving the plants and flowers
that were left without shelter began, 1
and the remainder of the afternoon
and on into Sunday night was taken
up with this work.
Mr. Schepmann 's Story.
We saw Mr. Omar Schepman this
morning, and he gave us the follow
ing information about the fire:
"Sunday, just before noon, I went
through all the green houses to look
at the thermometers, and also went
into the boiler room to look at the
boiler. I found everything in good
shape and went home to dinner, and
was greatly surprised to receive word
about 1 o'clock to .receive word that
our green houses were 'on fire. As to
how the fire originated, we are not
able to say, only that the whole af
fair Is a mystery to us. We had
eight green houses and' six of these
will be a total loss. The two re
maining houses are damaged, but we
will be able to save most of the
plants in these houses. As to our
insurance, I am sorry to say we car
ried but $1,000, while our total loss
will be between eight and nine thous
and dollars. Our friends have been
very kind to us since our great loss,
especially our brother florists, who
have done all in their power to as
sist us in every way possible. They
have been working with us since the
fire and helping us to save what we
can. As to future plans we have
none and haven't had time to con
sider the future. The present now is
proposition for us."
MAN
Brought to This City From Farrville.
(Marion News-Tribune.)
Ambrose Waggaman, the Farrville
man declared insane by a lunacy
commission several days ago, has
been removed to the asylum at Rich
mond. He created some excitement
on the train by his exclamations. He
declared that he was worth millions
of dollars and that he intended to
show his friends a good time when he
returned from the asylum. His wife
accompanied him to Richmond. On
the train he embraced her, and told
the passengers of his love for her.
Waggaman was a well known
building contractor and was very suc
cessful. Too close attention to his
work is assigned as the cause of his
condition. : , .
INSANE
SOME FOLD
GOSSIP
NATIONAL ROLLER POLO
LEAGUE IN EMBRYO.
MAKING GOOD STRIDES
Talk About Richmond Being Dissat
isfied With Treatment in the
Western Leagued '
Cincinnati, O., Feb. 22. Things
seem to be coming the National Rol
ler Polo league 's way, and the or
ganization, now in embryo, is fore-
rng a successrui season. in. a leuer
to Manager Frank Bancroft yester
n -i T 1 . ii
day President T. J. Bryee, of Co-
umbus, wrote:
"If you feel that the people of
Indianapolis and Richmond are re
sponsible I would be willing to hook
up with them,, but will not be iden
tified with a circuit with any small
towns."
Both Richmond and Indianapolis,
no doubt, can obtain franchises in
the National, as both are among the
best cities and would add strength
to the league. With these two cities
in the make-up probably would be
Cincinnati, Columbus, Toledo, Cleve
land, Indianapolis and Richmond,
with prospects of Detroit and Day
ton being admitted if it was deemed
policy to make it an eight-club
league. One thing is assured: The
National Polo league will be in the
field next season to corner . all the
best polo talent in America.
A recent dispatch received in this
city from Richmond stated that the
managers of the Quaker team were
dissatisfied with the treatment they
have received at the hands of the
Western league and that they would
cast their fortunesvwith the National
league if it was organized.
BODY JFJMD
Only a Day Old Found in a Box
Car.
New Castle, Ind., Feb. 21. The
body of a child, apparently a day old,
was found in a box car on the Pan
handle road here Thursday. The car
was loaded with rails and ioud at
the freighthouse t?aek over Wednes
day night. Abe Batchfield, section
.nan, loaded a frog into th. ear
Thursday morning and. noticed some
thing in one end of the car amng r.
bunch of papers which he thought
to be a doll. The car was sent on
to Anderson and , Thursday evening
two colored men who boarded the
car at the edge of Andei-son discov
ered the body with the head missing,
wrapped in a coarse towel and two
copies of the Xew Castle Courier.
The body was returned to New
Castle, where an inquest was held
and an effort will be made to appre
lend the supposed murderers of the
infant.
P0flfp
State Committee Meeting Friday
Harry C. Starr Will Likely
be a Member.
A meeting of the Republican state
committee will jjrobably be held on
Friday of this week. The call has
not been issued, but will, it is un
derstood, he r sent out Tuesday by
State Chairman Goodrich.
The question as to the advisability
of moving the offices of the commit
tee from the Stevenson building to
the English hotel will be taken up,
and it is understood that the change
will be made.
It is also probable that the date
for the slate convention Avill be de
termined at this .meeting. It""seems
to be a matter of general agreement
among Republican leaders that the
convention should be held during the
third week in April, approximately
the same date of the convention two
year ago. -
"Another matter to be considered is
the bringing of a suit to test the con
stitutionality of the act of 1903 ex
tending the terms of certain county
and judicial officers.
At this meeting Chairman Good
rich will probably announce his ap
pointment of members of the state
executive committee for this cam
paign. II. C. Starr of Richmond;
Adam L. Beck, of Huntington, and
William Geake, of Fort Wayne, ac
cording to the Indianapolis Journal,
are3 said to be slated for three of the
five positions.
TOMORROW.
The Palladium has a communica
tion from the state tax commissioners
ort hand today that is too lengthy for
publication in this issue. It will be
printed tomorrow. It was sent to
Mr. A. G. Compton.
WASHINGON'S BIRTHDAY.
(By Associated Press.) -
Washington, Feb. 22. The day is
being generally observed as a holi
day. Washington's farewel laddress
was read in the senate.
A
AFTER TEDDY
THE PRESIDENT'S PRESENCE
SOUGHT BY A SUSPIC
IOUS MAN
FROM THE WINDY CITY
Revolver and Cartridges Found on
Him The Man Was Ar
rested. (By Associated Press.)
Washington, Feb. 22. Edward
Relgar, giving his residence as Chi
cago, was arrested at the White
House today. He called to see why
his letters to the President were not
answeret. A loaded revolver and
cartridges were found on him. His
letters contained a suggestion that
people be named according to occu
py tion. His mental condition will be
investigated.
BIRTHDAY
Observed Very Quietly About the
I City.
This is Washington's birthday,
and it is being observed in a quiet
Avay about the city. All public build
ings are closed for the day the court
house, postoffiee and banks.
Schools are mostly closed, and, at
some, programs appropriate to the
occasions were rendered.
A Few Items Gathered at the Temple
of Justice.
Robbins & Starr and William H.
Kelley have filed the suit of Mather
Bros, company vs. George B. Harris
and James M. Jarrett, on account.
A marriage license was issued to
William J. Jeffery and Margaret E.
Hines.
The county commissioners will
meet two Aveeks from today. v
All the offices closed at noon today
on account of Washington's birth
day.
TAKEN TO HOSPITAL.
Henry Bass, a colored man, was re
moved to St. Stephen's hospital yes
terday to be operated upon. Some
persons were under the impression
that some one was injured in the
Chessman & Schepmann fire, but
such was not the case.
RANK
WASHINGTON'S
COURT
HOUSE
DEATH BY
THE ROADSIDE
A YOUNG MAN OF ELDORADO,'
DRINKS TOO MUCH
WHISKEY.
FROZEN TO DEATH
During the Ccld Weather of Last
Week Eldorado Shocked 'by
the Occurrence.
J
Four or fh e Eldorado, Ohio, boys
recently came into possession of a
jug of whiskey and proceeded, with
out ceremoi-y to consume th,i fire
water "that looked good to them and
tasted better."
The weaiher of last week was
pretty cold and the boys got about
the jug and got away with its con
tents in a manner that would do jus
tice to Commanche Indians. But it
proved too much for one of the boys
Warren Deen aged 22 years, who
was found by the roadside eold 'in
death, where he had fallen while un
der the influence of the liqnuor and
could get no farther.
The young man is of good parent
age, and his people have the sym
pathy of the community in the afflic
tion that has befallen them. The
family are members of the Society of
Dunkards, and are highly respected.
It is understood the whiskey' was -stolen.
POPULAR LECTDRE
TEMPLE QUARTET CONCERT
COMPANY HERE TONIGHT.
EAST MAIN
STREET FRIENDS'
Church Miss Victoria Lynn Reader
Will Assist on Program.
Tonight at East Main Street
Friends' church the regular number
of the Popular Lecture Course will
occur. It will consist of the Temple
Quartette Concert Company, H. S.
Tripp, first tenor; E. F. Weber, sec-
Lond tenor; P. F. Baker, baritone and
accompanist; C. Steele, basso,
with Miss Victoria Lynn, reader. .
Following is the program :
March, "On Gallant Company
Becker--Temple Quartette.
Reading, "The Marquis de Lan
tenac" Victor Hugo Miss Lynn.
Song, "Only a Withered Rose"
Thomas Mr. Baker.
Part Song, "Autumn Twilight "
Goring Temple , Quartette.
Reading, "Over the Mending Bas
ket" Irene S. Capwell Miss Lynn.
Song, ii Was Ever a Maid so Fair"
Cantor Mr. Tripp.
. Quartette, "The Phantom Band"
Thayer Temple Quartette.
Song, "The Bells of St. Mary's"
Rodney Mr. Steele.
Reading, "The Insurance Money"
Mary E. Wilkins Miss Lynn.
It takes about three minutes to
render" the last selection. Persons
Avho are obliged to leave' before the
programme is finished, will please do
so at this time.
Quartette, "Abide With Me"
Potter Written for the Temple
Quartette.
Program subject to change.'
Richmond lodge of Masons will
have work in the Fellowcraft degree
tonight on three candidates.
COURE
f

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