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The daily palladium. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1904-1905, March 07, 1904, Image 1

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WEEKLY ESTABLISHED 1881.
DAIL.Y ESTABLISHED 1876.
RICHMOND DAILY PALLADIUM, MONDAY, MARCH 7, 1904.
ONE CENT A COPY.
EARLHAI'S
0HAT0RI0
ONE OF THE IMPORTANT
EVENTS THAT ARE
BUILDING.
A MUSICAL STANDARD
Tor Richmond, That Will Make Her
i
The Enviable Cynosure of
Neighboring Cities.
This has been a remarkable year,
musically speaking, for Richmond.
The Musical Club has been sponsor
for some very attractive artist reci
tals, including the concerts by the
Spiering Quartet and by Mr. Marien
and others. Schumann-lleink has
just departed in a blaze of glory and
now Richmond is looking forward to
two of the most important events of
all The May Festival in a couple of
months and the conceit by the Earl
ham Oratorio Society next Thursday
evening. The importance of the kind
of work done by the Earlham Chorus
can hardly be overestimated, for
great as it the value of virtuoso
concerts, there is no stronger test of
the real musical life of any city than
the choral or oratorio work done
there.
Following the high standard set
last year, by their rendering of Hay
dn's famous oratorio, "The Crea
tion," by a well drilled chorus and
the best soloists obtainable, this so
ciety will present this year a famous
composition by the same composer,
which is as great a musical master
piece in its field, as was "The Crea
tion" in its. Those unacquainted
with the classics of religious music
may have a wrong conception of the
beauty of such music. The fact is
that most of the great composers put
the best efforts of their lives into
such music, and, while Haydn's Im
perial Mass can not be called showy,
the interest is wonderfully sustained
throughout and appeals profoundly
and directly to all avIio love good mu
sic. This is not confined to the cho
ruses, but applies to the solo parts
as well; it is hard to find in the realm
of sacred music, oratorio or otherwise
any more beautiful or touching solo
than the "Qui Tollis," for the bass.
We understand in this case that the
English words are to be sung. It
would be hard to find a production
of about an hour in length more sat
isfactory to both singers and audi-
once. The selection from Gounod's
"Messe Solennelle" is distinctly dif
ferent in nature, being much more
modern; however it is not the mod
ernity of the overwrought or florid
style, but represents, us well as any
composition of the composer, what
Gounod could do. This has been sung
in more than one church in the city
and to hear it with a large chorus
and with a tenor possessing such a
voice as Mr. John Miller of Chicago,
would of itself attract a large audi
ence. The contrast presented in the sec
ond half of the program by Liza Leh
mann's "In a Persian Garden" is
most marked, and yet, perhaps, few
additions to the program could afford
more delight to an audience. The
moment the first strains of the incom
parable "Wake, for the Sun Who
Scatter'd Into Flight" are heard,
the audience will be transplanted as
if by magic into another atmosphere.
And for something over half an hour
they will be under such a spell that
it will take hours and perhaps days
to get away from it. At a first hear
ing one waits and waits in expectant
dread, for the first sign of a drop in
""the. music, for the almost inevitable
spots of slightness or dullness, but
waits in vain. It stands almost uni
que in its sustained freshness and
loftiness. It is no wonder that it was
welcomed in this country, as its ap
pearance a few years ago, with a ver
itable wave of enthusiasm, and that
the best artists in the country have
vied with each other in giving it a
fitting reading. The spirit of Omar-
Fitzgerald (if one may be permitted
the term) breathes in every note and
it is one of the most marvelous ad
aptations of music to poetry that the
world has seen.
There is no time to comment in
this edition upon the personnel of
the quartet of soloists engaged by
Prof. Chase for this performance.
Miss Blamere, of Chicago, so favora
bly received here last year, Mr. John
Miller, of Chicago, and Mr. Jahn
and Miss Charlotte Callahan, of Cin
cinnati; other than to note that they
are artists of reputation and experi
ence, most enthusiastically received
in the various larger cities. A word
of approval might be added for the
plan of putting all tickets, including
reserved seats, at the popular price
of 50 cents. The plat opened this
morning at the Westcott Pharmacy.
THE
PAVILION
TALKED ABOUT
INTERVIEWING OF THE MER
CHANTS CONTINUED BY
THE PALLADIUM.
OPINIONS AS TO COST
Differ Some Want it to Cost $8,000
and Others $12,000 to $15,000.
A representative of the Palladium
this morning interviewed a number
of the most prominent merchants and
business men of Richmond in regard
to their views on the pavilion to be
erected at the Glen. All were in fa
vor of a pavilion and all thought
that a good pavilion would be a good
thing in the way both of advertise
ment for the merchants and for the
city at large. The chief difference in
the views of the different men was
concerning the cost. The business
men of this city seem to be di
vided into two classes one of which
thinks that the pavilion should be
erected, that it should be a good,
plain substantial building, one that
will be an honor to the city and to
the Glen, but .$S,000 is all that should
be paid for the pavilion as that
amount is sufficient to erect as good
!a building as may be desired, the
other, that a good pavilion should be
erected but that $12,000 or more
should be for the building as a really
fine one cannot be built for less and
no building should be . erected unless
it is a fine one. As to the
trade and the conventions, which
wil1 Probably meet here on account
ot the iact that we have a pavilion,
will bring in the merchants say that
if new people come in from some dis
tance away from here that trade will
be bright and that these persons will
buy. Iut last year at the Chautau
qua only persons came into the city
who comes every week or so and thus
not much new trade was brought in.
If the new pavilion brings in new
trade the merchants will lie more in
favor of expending a large amount
on it but as it is with the probabili
ties both of having new trade or of
not getting any trade at all, a num
ber of the merchants are not in fa
vor of spending a great sum of money
on anything that is uncertain in its
benefits. A good pavilion should be
built but not an extra fine one, as
for all practical purposes the former
will be as good or better than the
latter.
HORSE SALES
At Cambridge City Begins Tomorrow.
The Lackey Horse Sales begin at
Cambridge City tomorrow. These
sales are always looked forward to
with a great deal of interest and
horsemen gather there from all parts
of the country. The sale closes on
Saturday.
PROHIBITION ALLIANCE.
The Prohibition Alliance will meet
this evening at 7:30 at the residence
of Dr. and Mrs .J. A. Walls, south
tenth street. Rev, Conrad Huber will
speak.
C
HON
INT
PROVED FATAL
THOMAS WILCOXEN, OF WEB
STER, FALLS FROM A
TREE AND
DIES IN TWO HOURS
He Was a Rural Carrier and Was- a
Soldier in the Civil
War.
Thomas Wilcoxen, of Webster, and
a man well known in this city and
county, was killed Saturday night
while coon hunting. Early in the
evening, in company with Penn Bond,
a neighbor, Mr. Wilcoxen started for
the woods in search of coons.
After being out some time they
scared up a coon, and, thinking they
had him " treed," Wilcoxen attempt
ed to climb the tree to shake the
animal down. He got along all right
and reached the fork of the tree, but,
when he attempted to climb out on
a limb of the tree, his weight broke
the limb and he was precipitated to
the ground, a distance of about thirty
feet, breaking his back. lie was taken
home and lived for about two hours
and a half, and was conscious all the
time, realizing thoroughly what had
happened and knowing fully that
death was at hand.
The deceased was about sixty years
of age, was a member of the G. A. R.
and a rural mail carrier. He leaves
a wife and five sons to mourn his sad
demise. One son, George Wilcoxen,
resides in this city, and is employed
at the Morris grocery on Main street.
The funeral occurred this afternoon
from his home, and the burial was at
Greens fork.
LYCEUM THEATRE
AND AUDITORIUM
DESTROYED BY FIRE IN ELMI
RA, NEW YORK UNDER
CONTROL
TOTAL LOSS $200,000
Origin Not Known, But Supposed to
Be Incendiary.
Elmira, New York, March 7. Fire
starting in a cigar factory under the
Lyceum theatre last midnight, was
under control at 4 a. m. The theatre
was entirely destroyed and the fire
spread to a realty building in which
is the Auditorium theatre. It also
burned. The total loss is .$200,000.
The origin of the fire is not known,
but indications of an incendiary were
observed.
MARF BOATS
Destroyed by Ice on the Ohio River.
Cincinnati, O., March 7. The big
Sandy wharf boat, which was sunk
by ice some time ago, today broke
loose and tore from its Moorings the
steamer Cincinnati at Main street.
The two floated down to the suspen
sion bridge, where it struck a pier
and the wharf boat floated in a com
plete wreck. Steamer Hurcules Car
rel towed the Cincinnati back to the
landing. A dozen passengers were
thrown into a panic by the apparent
destruction of the steamer. The wharf
boat is one of the largest on the river.
Mrs. Jessie Grant is a guest of her
uncle, Benjamin E. Wallace, in Peru.
AN APOL OBY
IS OFFERED
BY THESE MAIN STREET MER
CHANTS TO THEIR CUS
TOMERS. MANY TURNED AWAY
Only Eecause They Were Not Able to
Reach Them at the Satur
day Rush. ,
It is the dream of the live, present
day merchant to have his house full
of buyers and to hear the merry song
of the cash register as it tells of the
dollars dropping into the overflowing
till. '
In the case of the sale now going on
at Iiost, Marshall & company's main
street store, this dream is being real
ized and with much to spare. In fact,
Mr. Kost takes this means to offer
an apology to those (and there were
hundreds of them), who came to the
store on Saturday and were not able
to get waited upon.
There were thirty clerks on the
floors, but this number proved totally
inadequate to handle the great multi
tude of buyers who are literally
flocking to this great salvage sale;
and, to make the matter worse, Mr.
Rost says that many of those who
had to leave the store disappointed,
but, he hopes, not offended, were old
customers. He wants to assure these,
as well as others, that it was due to
sheer inability to reach them, and,
as the sale is to continue for two
weeks, he hopes that they will forgive
the discomforts of the rush and come
again, being assured that they will be
amply repaid for the trouble.
LIQUOR LICENSE
CASES ARE DP
BEFORE THE COUNTY COMMIS
SIONERS TODAY.
A REMONSTRANCE FILED
Against Caldwell, Applicant From
Cambridge Other Court News.
The county commissioners are hav
ing liquor licenses as their chief topic
today. There are several applications
before that body, also a remonstrance
against Caldwell, applicant from
Cambridge City. This will come up
tomorrow morning.
Marriage licenses have been issued
to the following:
Clydus A. Riegel and Olive Eshel
man, East Germantown.
Andrew Jackson and Jennie Hor
ner, Centerville.
.
Letters testamentary have been is
sued to Charles A. Ankenny in the
estate of Elizabeth Strickland. Bond
$7,000.
The Dickinson Trust Company,
guardian of the estate of Anna Davis,
files report f sale of real estate.
Charles Haner and Joseph Schep-
raan, administrators of the estate of
Elizabeth Oehl, filed final settlement
Harriett Valentine filed an addi
tional bond in the sum of $1,000 in
the estate of Fletcher Valentine.
Powell Slade filed final settlement
iu the estate of John T. Huntington
Miss Blanche Kerr, of Greensfork,
was a gxiest of friends here Satur
day. . . :
PRISONER ESCAPES.
(By Associated Press.)
St. Joseph, Mo., March 7. Mark
Dunn, sentenced to be hanged on
March 11th, escaped from jail here.
Two revolvers were smuggled into his
cell in an oil can, with which he over
came the death watch and jailer and
locked them in a cell. A posse is
searching for him.
FIRE SATURDAY.
The fire Saturday afternoon was in
the barn owned by James Martin, in
the rear of his residence, on north
fifth street. The roof was burned
off, also considerable hay was de
stroyed. The barn and contents were
insured.
INTER-STATE
ON THURSDAY, MAY 5, AT THE
COLISEUM.
BIG THING FOR CITY
Notre Dame Gave the Affair Up on
Account of the Subject of
Luther Feeger.
The interstate oratorical contest
will be held in Richmond on Thurs
day, May 5, 1904.
This contest was to have occurred
at Notre Dame, but, owing to the na
ture of the subject of Luther Feeg
er 's oration, which would sound
better without the walls qS. a Catho
lic institution, so .Earlham was in
vited to have the contest here, and
President Kelly informed the Pal
ladium it would occur here on May 5,
and it will probably occur at the
Coliseum.
This will bring a large number of
people to this city as the interstate
contest usuallv draws large crowds.
AL. JONES DEAD
Once a Resident of this City About
Forty-Seven Years Old.
Albert M. Jones, one of Center
ville 's most prominent men died this
morning at his home, about half past
10. The deceased was about forty
seven years old, and was a prominent
Odd Fellow and Red Man, the mem
bers of which orders will attend the
funeral in a bodv. Mr. Jones, or
'AL," as he was more familiarly
cnown, has many relatives both in
Centerville and this city. His wife
survives. The news of Mr. Jones'
death caused a great sadness among
lis many friends here and in the sur
rounding country, as he has lived in
Wayne county all his life, and gained
many fast friends.
He Avas the son of Louis Jones and
a cousin of John K. Jones, and leaves
a wife and two grown daughters.
The funeral will occur Wednesday
afternoon and the burial will be in
Centerville cemetery.
FINAL DECISION
Will be Left to a Vote of the Miners
in the Several Districts.
(By Associated Press.)
Indianapolis, March 7. The Unit
ed Mine Workers in national con
vention today voted to leave the final
decision in the acceptance of the
wage offer of the operators to the
different unions. Voting will be done
by miners of Pennsylvania, Ohio, In
diana and Illinois, Kentucky, western
and central Pennsylvania, Michigan,
Maryland and West Virginia. The
vote will be cast March 15, and count
ed here on March 17.
Miss Florence Smith has returned
to Tudor Hall seminary, Indianapolis,
after a short visit with her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. P. W. Smith, of east
Main street.
CONTEST
HERE
A PIONEER
OF THIS CITY
PASSES AWAY AT HIS HOME ON
NORTH NINTH
STREET.
CHARLES SINEX AGED 80
Came to Richmond in 1859, and Was
Prominent in Business in
Early Days.
., - j
Mr. Charles Sinex, aged eighty-one
years, died Saturday afternoon at his
home, 320 north ninth street, of sen
ility. The deceased was one of our
oldest and best citizens, having
moved to Richmond in 1S59. In early
life he was a prominent business man.
He was the manufacturer of plows,
harrows, etc, and conducted the busi
ness for a number of years.
The funeral will take plaee from
the late home Tuesda afternoon at
2 o'clock, Rev. Nethercut officiating.
Friends will be welcome to call any
time. Kindly omit flowers. Inter
ment at Earlham cemetery.-
VLADIVOSTOK
BOMBARDED
FOR NEARLY AN HOUR AND
ONLY FIVE RUSSIANS
KILLED.
! !
SHIPS IN HIDING
Fleet Storms the Fort Without Do
ing Any Great Dam
age. (By Associated Press.)
Vladivostok, March 7. Aside
from killing a woman and wounding a
few men yesterday's bombardment
did no material damage. One wooden
cottage was destroyed. One shell went
through the house of Colonel Shukoff
and exploded in the court. Russian
batteries are silent to conceal their
position.
DoTrfi
The Time For Paying it Will beup
May 1st.
Township assessor Swain says there
1 1 T 1 L Xl
is a misunaerstanaing aoout me
time for paying dog tax. The time"
limit is up on May 1st. After the
assessor calls once the tax will have
to be paid at the assessor's office in
the court house and nowhere else.
Parties owning dogs would do well to
remember this and save the penalty.
DAY OF PROFIT
Wayne and Boston Teachers Visit
New Garden and Franklin.
Saturday the teachers of Wayne
and Boston townships met at the
court house and had a very interest
ing meeting. The teachers of New
Garden and Franklin townships were
also in session in Fountain City.
Prof. Trueblood lectured before the
latter body on Ivanhoe. The teach
ers of Wayne and Boston visited the
latter place, heard, the lecture and
greatly enjoyed the afternoon.
Mrs. Charles Smart has returned
from Florida and Louisiana, where
she has been spending the wiriterv

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