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The daily palladium. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1904-1905, March 16, 1904, Image 1

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WEEKLY ESTABLISHED 1881.
DAILY ESTABLISHED 1870.
RICHMOND DAILY PALLADIUM, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 1904.
ONE CENT A COPY.
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BUTTON, BUTTON!
WHOSE GOT BUTTON
SOUTH SIDE IMPROVEMENT AS
SOCIATION DECIDED TO
ADOPT BUTTON SCHEME
I'M FOR RICHMOND"
Is the Insignia to Appear on Each and
Every One of the 5,000
Buttons Ordered.
For a long: time the business men
of the city, together with the South
Side Improvement association, have
been seeking1 for some scheme where
by they might show their interest in
the welfare and progress of the pres
ent "boom," but no one of the
schemes put forward have been prac
tical. At its meeting last night the South
Side Improvement association decid
ed, in order to arouse enthusiasm, to
adopt the button scheme; that is, of
selling small buttons to be worn in
the lapel of the coat. The buttons
are to be sold to business men and
others avIio wish to show their interest
in the boom. The button scheme was
suggested by the remarkable success
of "the "Anderson 50,000" scheme. At
Anderson the first button and the first
hundred buttons sold for from $15
to .$250, and it is hoped to. sell the
local buttons at good prices. The but
ton scheme is also to help the South
Side Improvement association, the
starters of the present boom, to make
money, as it gets a percentage on
each button sold.
The advantages of this button
scheme are many. Many persons
would buy a button where they would
not buy a share of stock, and the
South Side Improvement association
needs much money to carry on the
present boom.
The real cause of the button
scheme being originated is to arouse
enthusiasm in regard to the boom in
the hearts of all Richmond citizens,
so that the wearer of a button shows
that he is desirous of helping the as
sociation to boom this city and like
wise shows his interest in the pro
gress and welfare of the city, aside
from the boom.
Several samples of buttons were
shown and the button committee was
ordered to get 5,000 buttons an inch
in diameter, which will be white with
"I'm for Richmond" in black letters,
and the buttons will be worn in the
lapel of the coat.
Xo citizen of Richmond, if he has
any interest at all in the booming
and general progress of the city,
should fail to have a button.
RURAL JEL1TOY
A Wide Extension Contemplated For
Indiana.
"Washington, March 16. Plans now
under consideration at the postoffice
department contemplate a wide ex
tension of rural free delivery in In
diana during the next fiscal year. The
emergenc3T appropriation of $300,000
recently made available will be ex
hausted by July 1. On that date the
department will begin work on the
appropriation contained in the pend
ing post office bill. It is expected by
the officials that several general sys
tems promised, including one for
Spencer county, will be installed the
coming year. This applies to systems
that had been ordered b' Machen be
. fore his retirement, but which were
held up by the department pending
an investigation. In nearly every in
stance it has been discovered condi
tions justify the installation of gen
eral systems. The officials are much
interested in the outcome of the fight
that will be waged over the amend
ment in the postal bill relative to the
privileges of the carriers. The be
lief is expressed that whether or. not
"congress prohibits the carriers from
acting as agents or solicitors for hire,
these privileges will be materially;
abridged. In his annual report)
Fourth Assistant Bristow recommend
ed that the salaries of the carriers be
increased to $720 a year, and that
they be required to give their services
exclusively to the government. This
plan will be carried out as far as it
can be by executive action.
EMPEROR AND KING LUNCH
TOGETHER.
Vigo, Spain, March 10. Emperor
"William lunched today with King Al
fonso on board the Spanish Royal
Yacht Giralldau. The -Emperor later
sailed to Gibraltar on the Steamer
Koenig Albert.
. EDMONDS CRAIG.
Yesterday at 3 o'clock at the "Wes
ley an church occurred the pretty
wedding ceremony of Mr. Randall R.
Edmonds and Elizabeth J. Craig,
C. P. Cook officiating. The contract
ing parties are both residents of Rich
mond and have a host of friends who
wish them every success. They will
reside in this city.
RUSSIANlPT
IN PAY OF JAPS
SHOT FOR ACTING IN THAT CA
PACITY. INCRIMINATING
DOCUMENTS
Found on Him When Arrested Jap
anese to Increase Taxes
$34,000,000.
Tokio, March 16. A -conference of
cabinet elder statesmen and leading
political leaders decided to propose to
a special diet, convening next Firday,
an. extension of the tobacco monopo
ly to include "manufactured tobacco;
also the creation of a salt monopoly;
also to suggest increases in many
kinds of taxes and the creation of
new taxes on silk piece goods, wool
ens and kerosene, making a total in
crease of revenue of 68,000,000 yen or
$34,000,000.
Tort Arthur, March 16. Every
thing is quiet here. There is no sign
of the enemy.
St. Petersburg, March 16. Captain
Tokov, of Manchurian eomraissarial
service has been summarily court
martialed and shot for acting as a
spy in the pay of the Japanese. In
criminating documents were found on
ihim when arrested. The announce
ment in the army organ is that the
Captain lias been "excluded" from
the service.
"Washington, March 10. Minister
Allen at Seoul notified the state de
partment that the cruiser Cincinnati
arrived at Chemulpo with twenty
three Americans from Chinnampo. lie
said missionaries near Ping Yang re
fused to send women and children
aboard the Cincinnati, thereby mak
ing it impossible for the government
to afford them protection if military
movements occurred at that point.
WO YEARS' SCALE
Reported to Have Been Adopted by
Mine Workers.
(By Associated Press.)
Indianapolis, Ind., March 10. The
national officers of the United Mine
Workers have advises that the two
years' scale offered by the operators
rhas been accepted by votes of the lo
cal unions, which were taken yester
day in nine states. The official can
vass of the vote will be held tomor
row. PRESIDENT MARTI DEAD.
Newport, K., Y. March 10. Louis
K. Marti, president of the German
National bank, of this city, died to
day from pneumonia, coupled with
Bright's disease. He was formerly a
druggist at Cincinnati.
CANNIG FACTORY
SUGGESTED
AS ONE OF THE MEANS BY
WHICH RICHMOND CAN
BE BENEFITTED.
THE PROJECT LAUNCHED
At Meeting of South Side Improve
ment Association Last
Night.
John Kidwell, of Hagerstown, was
before the South Side Improvement
association last night with the project
of a canning factory, which he is de
sirous of locating in this city. Mr.
Kidwell has been investigating the
canning factories and is promoting
one now, the location of which has
not been decided upon. He made a
short speech to the members present
on this matter, setting forth the bene
fits a canning factory would have,
both to the farmers, city people and
stockholders of it. "I know of ten
or twenty canning factories," he said,
'that have easily paid for themselves
in the first year and no factory here
now has ever done that. The cannery
would enable the farmer to clear from
$75 to $100 per acres; it would-give
employment to children, men, boys
and women, as no skilled labor is re
quired; it would fill a gap in the city's
list of manufacturies and it would
pay larger dividends than any other
factory could possibly do, which is,
after all, the main thing. I have been
promoting factories for the past few
years and seventy-five per cent, have
been a success, which, considering the
percentage of failures in other busi
ness, speaks. Avell for the canneries'
suceess. "Where they have failed,
onh strong competition and bad man
agement have caused them to fail."
Mr. Kidwell has been having great
success in this city, so far, many
i prominent persons having subscribed
for stock, but, he said, they all seemed
to be waiting for the South Side Im
provement association to do some
thing. He gave out histerms, which
are certainly very reasonable, and the
matter Avas taken under consideration,
but nothing definite was settled.
The matter is worthy of considera
tion of all Richmond business men,
since the factory would employ prob
ably one hundred people, and the pay
roil would be larre.
A CALL
Democrats Preparing to do Some
Business.
The Democrats of the second, third
fourth, fifth and sixth and seventh
wards of the City of Richmond, are
hereby called to meet in mass con
vention on the evening of Friday,
March ISth, to nominate candidates
for council to be voted for at the
coming election. The places of meet
ing are as follows:
Second ward at 'Squire Abbott's
office.
Third ward at Kiser's machine
shop.
Fourth ward at Kehlenbrink's wag
on shop.
Fifth ward at Sun-Telegram office.
Sixth ward at Sun Telegram office.
Seventh ward at Kern's machine
shop.
Wm. Rosa, Chairman.
Henry "Walterman, Secretary.
March 15, 1004.
20"MjEN
In Building Trades Idle in New York
More to Follow.
New York, March 10. It is esti
mated there are already 20,000 men
in the building trades idle and more
are being added daily. Ten thous
and lithographers are. expected to be
locked out before nightfall, owing to
a refusal to accept the arbitration
ST. PATRICK'S DAY
BRIDGE DAY
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, CITY
COUNCIL AND CITIZENS
WILL MEET
THURSDAY AT 1 P. M.
For the Purpose of Considering the
BuHding of the South End
Bridge.
The county commissioners have ap
proved Thursday, March 17, at 1
o'clock in the afternoon as the time
for their meeting with the South Side
bridge committee, the city council and
business men at large in regard to
making the appiopriation for the
south side bridge.
This meeting has been hanging fire
for about a month, as several dates
were proposed and none were entirely
satisfactory but this last, date and
time is final.
Council has resolved to accompany
the committee of the South Side Im
provement association in a bod, to
gether with other business men and
merchants.
Last night a committee consisting
of Messrs Beall, Blickwedel, Brinker
and Zwissler was appointed to stir
around among the prominent and in
fluential business men of the city
and to get a large number of these to
attend the meeting, as the number
present and the interest shown among
the, citizens will have a great deal to
do with the amount of the appropria
tion. The members of the committee
named above have promised to be
present and to bring as many, influen
tial citizens with them as possible
and the entire association and all oth
ers interested in the matter of the
bridge are desirous of arousing keen
interest in the meeting among all
Richmond business men. They want
to have at least fifty present to urge
the commissioners to make as large an
appropriation as can be made.
Engineer Weber will present his
plans and specifications and the plans
received by him from other companies
and civil engineers. Some of the
plans are especially fine, and the es
timates as to the cost of the bridge
range from $75,000 to $150,000, one
of which sums the commissioners will
be asked to appropriate..
Much interest is shown as to the
outcome of the meeting, as the bridge
will not benefit the south side alone,
but the whole city, bringing us into
closer contact with the farmers south
west of town. The result of this meet
ing will change the whole part of the
city affected by the bridge, so that
the importance of the meeting can
hardly be underestimated.
Of Special Interest to Richmond
Readers.
Charles G. Ross, of Richmond, has
been named by Senator Beveridge as
an alternate to one of the principals
recently designated for appointment
as a midshipman in the Annapolis
academy.
Representative Watson's popular
ity with the colored population of
the District of Columbia continues to
progress. On the ISth instant Mr.
Watson will deliver an address at the
A. M. E. church in this city. Booker
T. Washington ', will be the orator of
the occasion. 1 In the advertisement
announcing this event the statesman
from Rnshvillelis starred as abead-
FASHNGTON
NOTES
liner, as folloAvs: "James E. Wat
son, of Indiana, the orator of the
House of Representatives, will intro
duce Mr. Washington." Mr. Wat
son has received a score of invitations
to make public addresses during the
past few weeks, but. has been obliged
to decline most of them. lie is
scheduled to speak before the Ameri
cus club of Pittsburg, on April 27,
when Secretary Taft will be one of
the guests of honor. He will also pre
side at an intercollegiate debate in
Washington, Pa., on April IS.
HEALTH OFFICE.
Born, to Mr. and Mrs. John Mc
Klann, 200 south second, a girl,
eighth child; to Mr. and Mrs. John
Rebkel, 1018 north third street, a
girl, tenth child ;to Mr. and Mrs. J.
C. Stevens, 227 south seventh, a girl,
first child.
Mr. and Mrs. Argus Horr, a girl.
Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Ferguson, a
girl.
Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Bridget, a girl.
Mr. and Mrs. Mullholland, a girl.
mstTanF
JULY 1
TERRE HAUTE JURY FOUND
BEN SPRINGS GULTY
OF MURDER.
NEGRO CAUSES .
SENSATION
In the Court Room by Suddenly Leav
ing the Witness Stand While
Being Examined.
Terre Haute, March 16. Ben
Springs was found guilty of murder
of Jessie Case and sentenced to be
hanged July 1.
This case has attracted considera
ble attention not only here but over
the entire state. Yesterday when the
case was about closed Springs
caused a sensation in the court room.
When asked what he committed this
assault for he replied in the most de
fiant tone: "Oh, nothin'; I just hit
her and that's all there is to it."
The murderer at this point was vis
ibly angry and his loss of control was
no surprise to those who knew him.
When pressed further to confess
some of his criminal career, he said,
Avith all the spirit of defiance at his
command :
"I ain't got nothin' more to say:
let me go
As he uttered these words the pris
oner looked at Attorney Wallace as
though he Avere going to fly at him as
he climbed doAvn out of the witness
chair. The deputy sheriffs arose to
their feet, and Attorney Caldwell
stood and gazed wonderingly at his
client as though dumfounded. The at
torneys in the room looked at each
other as though they thought their
ears Avere deceiA'ing them AA'hile the
crowd outside the railing kneAV some
thing unusual had happened and tried
to get a little closer to the railing.
The deptity sheriffs were quick to
act and soon succeeded in getting the
spectators seated. '
After a consultation of three min
utes Avith his attorneys he sullenly
climbed back into the AA-itness stand.
DAN JCOBINGS
Seriously Injured at Ridgeville, In
diana. I). L. Cummings, Avhile returning
home the other day met with quite a
serious accident. While at Ridgeville
he attempted to change cars and in
so doing a sudden lurch of the train
threAv him violently against the side
of the car, producing hemorrhage of
the stomach, from which he has suf
fered severely ever since. Drs. Grant
and Meek, have him in charge, and
they say it will be at least 'two
months before he will be able to-get
out.
111!
BERTRAM CASE
CALLED OP
IN THE WAYNE CIRCUIT COURT
THIS MORNING.
SELECTING A JURY
Took Up the Greater Part of the
Day Large Number of
Witnesses.
The Bertram case was called in
circuit court . this morning. Otto
Bertram is charged by his stepdaugh
ter, now Mrs. Lloyd Hill, Avith in
cest. Bertram is married to the
mother of the woman who brings the
charge. . A full account of the case
has been published before.
John F. Robbins and William A.
Bond are assisting Prosecutor Com
stock, while Thomas J. Study, Henry
U. Johnson and Wilfred Jessun are
for the defendant. Bertram lias been
out on a $3,000 bond since last April.
Besides the regular jury a special
venire of thirty jurors have been sum
moned. The attorneys on either side
will be alloAved to contest the jurors
and, for this reason, a large list of
special jurors Avas called for. There
are only nine on the regular jury at
present. They are as follows: Wil
liam Smoker, Dolan Daugherty, Geo.
W. Klotz, Ennias Kitterman, William
C. Reiser, Harry Fagan, J. Will Cun
ningham and Chas. Williams. The
special Aenire of thirty names is as
follows:
Clayton B. Hunt, Wayne; John J.
JeAvett, Jefferson; Theodore S. Mar
tin, Wayne; John C. Bayer, Wayne;
W. D. Jordan, Dalton; Lewis H.
Hosier, Harrison; Frank E. Huffman,
Jackson; Felix W. Dirk, Jackson;
Williard Williams, Washington; II.
E. Williams, Boston; William A.
Clements, XeAv Garden; James A.
Cranor, Green; William O. Seaney,
Franklin; Ah'is Mendenhall, Perry;
Hamilton Williams, Webster; George
W. Davis, Clay;. R. G. SAvallow Jack
son; Colbert Cronover, Washington;
John SteA-ens, Abington; James P.
BroAvn, Webster; A. M. Harris, Clay;
W. B. Barton, Franklin; Rufus Wil
liams, Perry; John M. Sheffer, Web
ster; Frank -M. Hunt, New Garden;
George F. Paulson, Wayne; Joe W.
i Nicholson, Wayne; William M. Hunt,
Green; Milton Miller, Jefferson.
Sheriff Smith has summoned in all
sixty-six Avitnesses for the case. Thirty-six
Avitnesses Avere called by th-3
state and thirty by the defense.
RET. NAFTZGER
Formerly of This City Urged for
Presiding Elder.
Kokomo, Ind., March 15. Plans
for the Muncie session of the Xorth
7iuv"ana Methodist confer anco, to be
hd next month, are being formu
lated rapidly by the Re. L. J. Naftz
ger, pastor of Grace church, of this
; city, who is secretary of th? body.
It is quite probable that Mr. Naftz
ger, who is closing his third year here,
w-JI be transferred to the Muncie dis
trict and be made preUmr elder of
that district in place of Elder C. U.
Wade, Avho is booked for the presid
ing eldership of a neAv district in
ooi.templation. The new district Afill
be cut out of Kokonio, Fot Wayne
and Warsaw districts. BlulTt.on or
Huntington will be the headquarters
of the neAv district.
It is likely that ha Rev. D. V.
Williams, pastor of Markland ave
nue church in Kokomo, will be as
signed to another place. In that case
both Kokomo congregations will face
new pastors after the conference.
PROFESSOR OF PHDLOSOPHHY
Dr. William Grant Seaman, of Sa
lem, Mass., has been elected to the
chair of philosophy in De Pauw uni
versity. Dr. Seaman is a graduate of
De Pauw and ranks very high as " a
minister. He pursued a course in
philosophy in Boston university and
was ; called from one of the largest
churches in Massachusetts.

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