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The daily palladium. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1904-1905, March 18, 1904, Image 5

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RICHMOND DAILY PALLADIUM. FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1904.
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. Western League Standing.
Clubs. Played. W. - L. Pet.
Richmond . ..77 '43 34 .559
Marion 7(5 42 34 .552
Muncie 7G 41 35 .539
Anderson ....75 37 3S .493
Indianapolis ..77 33 34 .429
El wood 77 33 34 .429
(By a Staff Correspondent.)
Muncie, Ind., March 18. Referee
Moran last night lost whatever popu
larity he may have had with Rich
mond rooters, since his "yellow
streak, which was plainly in evidence
to all. Won the game for Muncie.
It will be remembered by "fans"
that Moran was the referee who put
Bone off the floor last year here in
the Lowell game, and he refereed with
about the . same ".yellowness" last
night. Fouls were called on Mansfield
and Doherty for Avhat seemed to be
merely touching Iliggins, but Farrell,
Hart and Holderness tripped, held
and knocked players down and did
everything else deserving the name of
foul in the rule book, and Moran, ex
cept that his insidious rrin grew
slightly larger each time, took no no
tice whatever. If Riclimond had been
given a fair show b3r Moran the result
of the game would have been about
10 to 0 in Richmond's favor, as they
played Muncie off her feet, but, know
ing that the slightest roughness
would be called a foul by Moran, they
Ave re compelled to avoid all of their
usual effective blocking games. Again
and again the three hundred rooters
present from Richmond yelled de
risive names at Moran when some ex
ceptionally flagrant foul on Muncie 's
part was passed by.
The first period was long drawn out
and slow, the players stopping for ten
minutes for a time while a skate or
something was fixed. Richmond
would not play at first until the floor
was chalked, as the Muncieites, well
knowing that the strength of the
Richmond team lies in the players'
swiftness, had not chalked the floor.
The only goal in the first period
was made by, Farrell on a long drive,
which, somehow, got past Jessup. The
second was the fastest period of the
three, and the teams were nip and
tuck throughout. Done made a pretty
short drive which Cusick never saw,
the only goal in 'this period. Dirty
and rough playing characterized the
entire period, Mansfield and .Farrell-,
having several "mixes." Iliggins at
tacked Doherty, and the sight of the
flea attacking the elephant brought
smiles even to the faces of Muncie
rooters. Barney never" budged and
grinned compassionately down on his
puny ad versa iy. Iliggins played a
dirty game, tripping and holding the
Richmond players throughout the
game.
In the third period Cunningham
hooked a pretty pass into the Muncie
-age, and the "fans" from Richmond
vvent wild. It looked like a sure
thing, and several encounters took
place .between Richmond and Muncie
" sports" who had money to bet on
their respective teams.
Shortly afterward, however, Hart
made a long drive which Jessup
stopped, and it looked as though the
whole Muncie team came into the
goal circle and kicked the ball in.
In .the overtime Hart drove one
past "Shorty" in G:23. .Tessup's
work was exceptionally fine, he
blocking the short drives of Hart
again and again, and Doherty and
Mansfield put up a spotless defense.
In the third jK?riod and overtime Cun
ningham, sr., took Bone's place and
put up a swift game. Little Cun
ningham played a good game.
The Muncie players were swift, it
is true, but Richmond had them
played off their feet, and, with Waller
as referee, would have won the
game. Line-up and summary:
Muncie. Position. Richmond.
Iliggins .... First rush Bone
Hart Second rush. Cunningham
Farrell Center Mansfield
Holderness . . Half back . . Doherty
Cusick Goal Jessup
First Period.
Rush. Time.
Iliggins Caged by Farrell 3:52
Bone.
Second Period.
Iliggins Caged by Bone .. 12:54
Bone.
-Third Period.
Higgins Caged by Cunningham.l2:34
Iliggins Caged by Hart :45
Iliggins.
V'iij :- ret;-' i to r.3 nafnral 4atiee
f it'M'tuehe and
Co
;-'-' f yea take
... . . . r. . '
ti 4:. ;.. . v is) & 2i lis if
Overtime. 1
Iliggins-Caged by Hart 6:23
Score Muncie, 3; Richmond, 2.
Stops Cusick, 29; Jessup, 39. Fouls
Mansfield, Doherty, Holderness,
Farrell. Attendance 2,000. . Referee
Moran.
Indianapolis, played at Marion last
night and had their .winning - streak
stopped by the latter team. It was a
good game and was greatly enjoyed.
Score Marion, 9; Indianapolis, 7.
Stops Burgess, 19; Barmon, 31.
Fouls Jean, 0'IIara. Referee Wal
ler. Attendance GOO.
Central League Standing.
Clubs. Played. WT. L. Pet.
Fort Wayne ..77 52 25 .075
Lafayette .. .05 35 30 .53S
Kokomo . . ..07 - 36 31 .537
Danville ..74 30 3S ..487
Terre Haute ..75 3G 39 .480
Loganport 74 21 53 .2S4
Danville had a game last night with
Kokomo, and played under protest,
because Half Back Lyons, of the El
wood team, was with the Kokomo
team. The game was free from any
thing sensational. "
Score Kokomo, 7; Danville, 4.
Stops Weimert, 40; Cashman, 41.
Referee Caley. Attendance 1,000.
Terre Haute played at Logansport
uid won in a good f)mp.
Scori - L"finport. 2; Terre Haute,
7 Foul Hadley. Sipv Suther
land. 17; Mullen, 43. Referee Kil
gara. Attendance 500.
Richmond Loses Protest.
Anderson, Ind., March 18. Manag
er Joe Fox, of the Marion polo team,
was successful yesterday before the
directors of the Western Polo league
in defeating the protest of Manager
Henley, of Richmond, who protested
a game recently Avon at Richmond by
Marion because of the presence on
the line-up of Half Back Lyons, of
Elwood. The directors Avere practical
ly unanimous in turning- down the
protest of Henley. It was decided
also that in case of disability of a
player and no other outside player be
ing obtainable that managers can bor
row' players within the Western
league. LeAvis will be here tonight
on the rush line against Richmond.
The president of the Western league
is satisfied that next season will see
nil the cities now represented in the
league, although some others may be
added to the league.
Xow, what do you think of this?
Anything to beat Richmond. Ander
son has seven" men, but LeAvis is
better man than any of their rushers.
It is very probable that on next Wed
nesday night Richmond, will have. to
play the pick of the other five teams
in the Western league and beat the
referee .in the bargain. With a
square deal from the referee Rich
mond can beat any all star aggrega
tion the Western league can put to
gether, but this certainly is very un
fair. If Richmond has a chance to
draAV out of this league and away
from such managers as comprise the
Western league, they certainly ought
not to lose any time in doing so after
this season is over.
Western League Games This Week.
Friday.
Muncie at Elwood.
Richmond at Anderson.
Saturday.
Muncie at Indianapolis.
Elwood at Richmond.
Anderson at Marion.
REPUBLICAN TICKET.
Congress.
James E. Watson.
Joint Representative.
Richard Elliott.
COUNTY TICKET.
Senator.
Roscoe E. Kirkman.
Representative.
Dr. M. W. Yencer.
For Sheriff.
Richard S. Smith.
Prosecuting Attorney.
Wilfred Jessup.
County Treasurer.
Benjamin B. Myrick, Jr.
County Recorder
Frank C. Mosbaugli.
Surveyor.
Robert A. Howard.
Coroner.
Dr. S. C. Markley.
Commissioner Western District.
Ellwood Clark.
Commissioner Middle District.
John F. Dynes.
TOWNSHIP TICKET.
Township Trustee.
Charles E, Potter,
Township Assessor.,
John M. Winslow.
CITY TICKET.
Mayor.
Dr. W. W. Zimmerman.
City Clerk.
John F. Taggart.
rer$o;qal kid
EDITED
BY
MISS
CHARLOTTE
MYRICK
$odial
SOCAL CALENDAR.
Today.
The Ladies Aid society of east
Main street Friends' church in the
Christian Endeavor room.
Thursday Thimble club with Miss
Mary Harrington, 29 north twelfth
street.
Occult Research society with Mrs.
Anna Beeson, south eleventh street.
Happy Hour circle Avith Mrs.
Charles Haner4 124 south fourteenth
street. . '
East End Whist club with Miss
Edna McGuire, 1903 east Main street.
Entertainment in St. Mary's school
hall by Ladies' Auxiliary of the An
cient Order of Hibernians.
Annual thank-offering service of
the Woman's Missionary society in
the' United Presbyterian church.
Friday.
Ladies' Aid society meeting in the
parlors of the First Presbyterian
church.
Special meeting for the election of
trustees by the Frances E. Willard
W. C. T. U.
''Dime social" by the Ladies' Aid
society of Grace Methodist Episcopal
church Avith Mrs. Joseph Stevenson,
25 south thirteenth street.
Whist party for the ladies in the
Elk club rooms.
Three o'clock service for the ladies
m the First English Lutheran church.
The Tourists with Dr. and Mrs.
Charles S. Bond, 112 north tenth
street.
Saturday.
Nomads Avith Miss Carolyn Salter,
19 north fifth street.
History club with Miss Anna Fin
frock, 115 south eleventh street.
Saturday Cinch club Avith Mr. and
Mrs. Mark Wilson, 126 south thir
teenth street.
The Southeast circle of the Wo
man's Home Missionary society of
the First M. E. church announced to
meet ,Avith Mrs. C. A. Pierson, 47
south eighteenth street, has postponed
its meeting indefinitely. .
Miss Louie Boyd and Miss Kiturah
Parsons Avill have charge of the- pre
gram at the meeting of the History
club held at the home of Miss Anna
Fin frock, 115 south eleventh street,
tomorrow afternoon.
The Occult Research society met
with Mrs. Anna Beespn, south
eleventh street, yesterday afternoon.
The day's paper AA'as upon "Wonfan,
in Education and Business," 13T Dr.
Sarah Morrow, and was a very in
teresting subject, Avell presented. The
current events also Avere upon the
subject, comparing women of our
country with the Japanese and other
foreign nation?. These were followed
by the reading of "A psychological
Sketch of Woman," by Nancy Mc
Kay Gordon.
The club Avill meet next Thursday
evening, March 24, with Mrs. Eliz
abeth Williamson, 10 south tenth
street.
The Thursday Thimble club's regu
lar Lenten Aveekly meeting Avas held
yesterday afternoon Avith Miss Mary
Harrington, 2!) north twelfth street.
Next Aveek the young ladies Avill meet
with Mrs. Timothy Harrington, in the
Wayne fiats.
The annual thank offering service
of the Woman's Missionary society of
the United Presbyterian church Avas
held last evening in the church. The
most interesting part of the serA'ice
was an address given by Mrs. Ad
dison Parker, who talked of her trip
to Korea, made last year. Mrs. Park
er is an able speaker, and told her
experiences in a charming manner.
It Avas an excellent meeting
throughout. The thank offering taken
for missions .Avas encouraging, over
fifty dollars being collected, and the
promise of more has been made.
After the close of the service, a
social hour was enjoyed, and light
refreshments AA'ere served.
Mrs. Charles Haner, 124 south
fourteenth street, entertained the
Happy Hour circle yesterday after
noon at her pretty home. The par
lors and dining room Ave re decorated
in green and white, and the St. Pat
rick's color was used in the table
decorations and the attractive lun
cheon, Avhich Avas served after the
early part of the afternoon had been
spent with thimbles and needles.
Mrs. Walter Nusbaum, of Green
ville, O., who has been visiting Mr.
if
and Mrs. Lee Nusbaum, Avas a guest
of the club.
Next month Mrs. John Bartel, 317
south eleventh street, Avill be hostess
of the circle's meeting.
The East End Whist club Avas en
tertained with' a "St. Patrick's
party," given by Miss Edna Me-
Guire at her home, 1903 east Main
street, last evening. Shamrock favors
served as tally cards for the Avhist
games, and shamrock color Avas used
in the home decorations. " Prizes were
I won by Mrs. Galen Lamb aiid Miss
'Mary Lemon. The next meeting of
the club Avill be with Miss Mary
Lemon, 22 south seventeenth street.
.The annual meeting of the FloAver
Mission was held yesterday afternoon
at the home of Mrs. George Dougan,
1322 east Main street. The business
of the year Avas brought to a elose,
the reports of the committees Avere
heard, and officers Avere elected for
the following year. The neAv officers
are: President, Miss Mae Shiveley;
vice-presidents.Mrs. Livy, Miss Sarah
Coe, Mrs. Thomas Jessup, Mrs. Harry
Lamb, Mrs. Frank Butler and Miss
Ida Peltz; secretary, Miss Ada Had
ley, and treasurer, Mrs. Isaac Jay.
Phoenix society of Earlham college
is having a recital in its hall this
afternoon, beginning n 4:15. Fol
lowing is the program :
Duet Polonaise Schubert Irene
Trueblood, Francis Jenkins.
GaA'otte Moderne Tours Maude
Price.
Tarantella Lomas Caroline Long.
Con amore Beaumont Ruth Mor
row. Song Down they go to the sea in
ships Geo. NeAin Rezin Reagan.
Mazurka, No. 10 Chopin Pearl
Rinehart.
Pilgrim's Chorus Wagner Mabel
Fulghum.
Sherzo Mendelssohn Mabel
Stewart.
Song Because Guy d'Hardelot
Lulu Chamness.
Valse tie Concert Wieniavrski
Louise Boyd.
Symphony in G Minor.
"Allegro mol to. Menuetto. Finale
Mamie Hough, Nina Harris, Gertrude
Le Fevre, Constance Fosler.
T. K. Smith of Newr Castle Avas
here vesterdav.
KIN HUORS
BLOODJUMS
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Economically Cured
by Cutlcura
WHEN ALLH.SE FAILS
Complete External and
interna! Treatment
Price One Dollar
In the treatment of torturing, disflg
uriag, itching, scaly, crusted, pimply,
blotchy and scroftdous humors of the
s!.in, scalp and blood, with loss of hair,
Oiticura Soap, Ointment and Fills have
'een wonderlully successful. Even the
most obstinate of constitutional hu
mors, such as bad blood, scrofula, in
herited and contagious humors, Avith
loss of hair, glandular swellings, ulcer
ous patches in the throat and mouth,
sore eyes, copper-coloured blotches, as
well as boil, carbuncles, scurvy, sties,
ulcers and sores arising from an Impure
condition of the blood, yield to the
Cuticura Treatment, when all other
remedies fail.
And greater still. If possible, is the
wonderful record of cures of torturing,
disfiguring humors among infants and
children. The suffering which Cutlcura
liemedies have alleviated among the
young, and the comfort they have af
forded worn-out and worried parents,
have led to their adoption in countless
homes as priceless curatives for the
skin and blood. Infantile and birth hu
mors, milk crust, scalled head, eczema,
rashes and every form of Itching, scaly,
pimply skla and scalp humors, with loss
of hair, of infancy and childhood, are
speedily, permanently and economically
cured when all other remedies suitable
for children, and even the best phy
sicians, fail.
Sold throughout the world. Cutlcnr Resolvent, fine
fir ortn of Chocolate ( exited Pill. 85c. per r tl of 60).
Ointment, -Vc.. Boan.Z'xi. tH-poui London. 27 Chnrter
. houws Sq. Paris, 6 Rue ie la l'aixi Boston, 1!7 Columbia
' An Potter Drag ft Chem. Corp., Sole Proprietor.
tij- Send tor The Great Humour Car."
Get . Hie Off Otiir
, "fit
Just the thing for this damp, disagreeable weather
They come in long loose-fitting coats.
In modest mixtures, also in stripes and plaid
patterns. Pi ice range
LOEHR
2 EZ
!HMiim tup, i
THE SAILROAID STOBB
SATURDAY SPECIALS FROM OJR
MEN'S WEAR DEPARTMENT
All of our New Spring Suits for men and boys are now opsn and ready for in
spection ;
For Saturday Special we place on sale two styles of the very newt st spring
styles of Men's Suits at a special low price
Regular $10 Suits tor 8.50
We've all the regular sizes, and it will pay you to investigate.
MARKET
Quotations From O. G. Murray's Ex
changeClosing Prices Chica
go Market.
Wheat.
May .....9214
July S7 b
Corn.
May 51
July 49V8
Oats.
May 39
July .. ..3Sii
Pork.
May 13.25
July 13.43
Grain.
(Furnished by F. "VV". Spinning1.)
Wheat, 95c.
Timothy, iew, baled, $11.
Timothy, $9 to $10.
Clover, baled, 68.
Clover, loose, $7.
Clover seed, $5.75 to $G.75 per bu.
Oats, 39c ner bu.
Corn, 50e per bu.
Wool, 17 to 20c lb.
Local Retail Prices.
These are the prices paid for coun
try produce by Meyer Bros., grocers,
J017 Main street.
Cabbage, 5c per pound.
Potatoes, 30c per peck.
Spring chickens, 35c to 45e each.
Old chickens, 17c per pound.
Eggs, 20c per dozen.
Country butter, 20 to 25c per lb.
Creamery butter, 30e per pound.
Beef, S to 10c ier lb.
Fresh pork, 12 2 to 15c per lb.
Sweet potatoes, 15c per x pock.
Smoked ham, 15 to 23c per lb.
Bacon, 15 to 20c per lb.
Yeal, 10 to 15c per lb.
Oats, 40c per bushel.
Corn, 4Sc per bushel.
Grape Fruit, 15 to 25c each.
Malaga grapes 25c lb.
California Celery, S to 10c bunch.
Spinach, 10c bunch.
Radishes, 5 to 10c bunch.
Head Lettuce, 10c head.
Leaf Lettuce, 20e lb.
Cucumbers, 15 to 25c each.
Tomatoes, 5 to 8c each.
Onions, 5c bunch.
Cal. Oranges, 20 to 35c dozen.
Florida Oranges, 50c doz.
Lemons, 20c doz.
Country Produce.
Fggs, 17c dozen.
Butter, Creamery. 20e per lb.; coun
try, 10 to 18c per lb.
Hair Vigor
So young? And hair turning
gray? Why not have the early
rich color restored? It is easily
done, every time. i.2;:
Crave nette
Guaranteed to turn
the rain.
& KLUTE
mm
S3
Potatoes, 85c per bushel.
Poultry.
Young chickens, 15c per lb.
Poultry (dressed.)
Old chickens, 14c per lb.
Ducks, young, 15c per lb.
LIFESIZE PORTRAIT FREE.
COUPON WITH EACH $1.00 PUR
CHASE IN ANY DEPARTMENT
OF OUR STORE. BRING PHOTO
WITH YOU WHICH YOU DESIRE
TO HAVE ENLARGED. SIZE OF
PORTRAIT 16x20 INCHES. COME
EARLY.
KNOLLENBERG'S STORE.
CI
Tomorrow
The great Salvage Sale
at The Big Store. Your
last cliaiice tomorrow.
$50.00 to California and Return.
Via The Chicago, Union Pacific &
North-Western Line, from Chicago,
April 23 to May 1. Choice of routes
going and returning. Correspondingly
low rates from all points. Two trains
a day from Chicago through without
change. Daily and personally -conducted
tourist car excursions. Write
for itinerary and full particulars re
garding special train leaving Chicago
April 20. A. H. Waggener, 22 fifth
avenue, Chicago, 111. ' al
THE NEW SPRING SUITS AND
JACKETS ARE ATTRACTING A'
GREAT DEAL OF ATTENTION
JUST NOW. MANY NEW AND
PRETTY STYLES ARE ARRIVING
DAILY BY EXPRESS.
KNOLLENBERG'S STORE.
A Great Day
Tomorrow is the last
call. The big sale closes
tomorrow at The Big
Store.
BEAUTIFUL LINE OF NEW
SHIRT WAISTS IN A GREAT
VARIETY OF MATERIALS.
KNOLLENBERG'S STORE.
HEALTH OFFICE.
Birlhs.-Born to Mr. and Mrs. Wil
liam Heiger, a girl.
Dr. Davis reports that there is not
a single case of contagious disease in
the city at the present time.

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