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The daily palladium. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1904-1905, March 21, 1904, Image 1

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THE WEATHER.
For Indiana: Showers tonight
and Tuesday; warmer tonight.
Palladium job printing is tip-to-date
and at reasonable prices.
Come in and get prices.
ONE CENT A COPY.
WEEKLY ESTABLISHED 1881.
DAILY ESTABLISHED 1876.
RICHMOND DAILY PALLADIUM, MONDAY, MARCH 21, 1904.
POLO SITUATION
I RICRIOi
'S
A LECTURE
TO BE GIVEN
COURT RESUMES
TOTED ABA1IT
FEEGER
OBATION
BERTRA
CASE
AT THE MEETING OF THE EX
ECUTIVE BOARD OF THE
STATE ASSOCIATION.
DEPAUW AND EARLHAM
Did Not Vote Full Context of the
Meeting Article From Earl
ham on the Subject.
Luther M. Feeger, of this city, be
cause of his refusal to modify his
oration, "Gustavus Adolphus," has
I been disqualified to represent Indiana
in the interstate contest to be held
at Notre Dame on May 4. This ac
tion is the result of the meeting held
at Indianapolis Saturday.
This decision was reached by the
executive board of the State Oratori
cal association after it had been in
session at the Denison hotel, Indian
apolis from 11 o'clock Saturday
morning until 8 o'clock' that night,
with only a short. recess for lunch at
2 o'clock. The colleges voting affir
matively on the decision were Butler,
Franklin, Hanover, Notre Dame and
Wabash. Earlham and I)e Pauw did
not vote.
The statements to which objection
was taken by Notre Dame are alleged
by the representatives of the lioman
Catholic institution to be contrary to
the facts of history and derogatory to
the Roman Catholic church. As the
oration will be delivered under the
dome of the Catholic institution, with
the speaker a guest of the school, the
representative of NotreJDame was in
structed to ask the State Oratorical
society's executive board to request
the Earlham speaker to change his
oration in such a manner as to strike
out the objectionable phrases, other
wise the Catholic institution would
feel forced to withdraw from its
membership in the state society.
The resolution adopted by the board
was moved by Paul C. Snyder, Han
over's representative, and seconded
by Thomas I). Lyons, Notre Dame's
representative. It holds that it is the
decision of the board "that Mr. Feeg
er be disqualified to represent Indiana
at the interstate contest unless he
agrees by March 20 to modify state
ments which the oratorical board .con
siders discourteous to Notre Dame,
and which the board holds would not
affect the effectiveness of the ora
tion. "Provided, however, that Mr. Feeg
er be allowed to submit the speech
without change to the judges on man
uscript, but to make the changes for
delivery. The statements to be modi
fied to be selected and indicated by
the executive board, and a copy of the
oration marked and sent to Mr.
Feeger. ' '
It was finally decided that, should
Feeger refuse to speak on the terms
of the board Indiana must be. with
out a representative at the interstate
contest. From this decision of the
board there is no appeal and there is
absolutely no prospect of a reconsid
eration. The members of the executive
board of the State Oratorical associa
tion, which met at the Denison Satur
day are A. Van Nuys, of Wabash,
president: John S. Van Sint, of De
Pauw, secretary; Cloyd Goodnight, of
Butler; Mark IT. Miller, of Franklin;
Paul Snyder, of Hanover; Clyde Ken
nedy, of Earlham, and Thomas D.
Lyons, of Notre Dame.
AD.
The following statement in regard
to the interstate oratorical contest
was handed in this morning by Prof.
W. N. Trueblood:
"The origin of the squabble result
ing in the action taken by the state
board last Saturday emanated in the
stand taken by the Notre Dame
scholastic several weeks ago when it
stated that the oration was historical
ly inaccurate and held up Catholicism
in a wrong light. President Kelly
thereupon wrote Father Morrissey, of
Notre Dame, whether or not the ora
tion could be . delivered there,- on. the
occasion of the interstate contest. The
SAMUEL M'CALL,
Chairman of House Special Commit
tte, Who Died in Alabama on
Sunday.
latter answered negatively and Mr.
Kanaley, of Notre Dame, vice-president
of the interstate association,
presented two plans in writing to Mr.
Feeger. In substance they were,
either change the oration for delivery,
or assume the responsibility of hold
ing the contest at Richmond. The
latter alternative was considered and
accepted and a bond of $500 was sent
as a guarantee. Mr. Kanaley sent
a letter before the bond arrived stat
ing that he believed the contest could
be held successfully at Richmond,
showing that he actually meant the
proposition as a final one.
"Before the bond reached him,
however, a letter was received here
stating that it was not an absolute
fact that the contest could come to
Richmond and this was shortly fol
lowed by another one calling off all
negotiations. Why Mr. Kanaley re
called the contest after granting it to
Richmond has not been explained.
"The solution of the question rested
in this change which Notre Dame at
first agreed to and later on refused.
At the meeting Saturday the histori
cal accuracy was wavered and the
board requested Mr. Feeger to make
changes in the delivery merely out of
courtesy to Notre Dame. In view of
the fact that these changes meant
practically a retraction of conviction
and that Notre Dame had refused a
change of holding the contest either
at Indianapolis or at Richmond, the
easiest way out of the difficulty, Mr.
Feeger stood by the oration.
"In this he was strengthened by
Mr. Kanaley 's open avowal that anti
Catholic speech, even if historically
correct, could not be delivered at No
tre Dame, and also that Mr. Kanaley
would not vouch for the personal
safety of an orator making such an
oration. This seemed to be an in
fraction on the right of free speech.
Mr. Kanaley according to the inter
state constitution has the right of
locating the contest and could have
given it to Richmond without con
sulting the interstate board."
Buys 320 Acjes of Good Land in
Arkansas.
Mr. William T. Walker, who left
last Tuesday for Arkansas, intent on
purchasing land, returned home yes
terday and he informs the Palladium
that while there he purchased 320
acres of the best prairie and timber
land to be found there, paying $25
an acre for it. Mr. Walker intends to
go back there and build a comfortable
house and barn and take a Wayne
county man with him who will run
the farm. A Richmond man will also
build the improvements. The prop
erty is situated about three miles
from Stuttgart and three miles from
Goldman, the county seat, both good,
to-date, progressive towns. The land
is situated on White river, and pro
duces as good crops as any land in
Wayne county. Mr. Walker says the
people are intelligent and sociable,
and he is thoroughly satisfied in every
way.
They also raise as fine crops of po
tatoes, oats and corn as can be raised
anywhere, samples of which Mr.
Walker brought home with him.
Dead at His Home in Greenfield In
diana. Greenfield, Ind., March 21.--Judge
David S. Gooding is dead, aged 80
years. He was a; United States mar
shal and was appointed by President
Johnson. . .- i:, . ...
RICHMOND
HI
JUDGE
GOOMG
IN THIS CITY BY THE INDIAN
APOLIS NEWS' CAR-TOONIST.
i i . i .
RICHMOND
SHETCH CLUB
Responsible for His Coming Talk to
be Ulnstrated With Off
Hand Sketches.
Mr. Bowers ,the clever illustrator
and cartoonist of the Indianapolis
News, has been engaged by the Rich
mond Sketch club to deliver a lecture
that will no doubt be highly interes
ing and instructive to those who are
interested in art in anyway.
Mr. Bowers has a lecture that he
delivers, dealing with his methods of
work and illustrating in general. It
is understood he is a pleasant speak
er and will illustrate his talk with
some off hand sketches, one of which
at least, will be of some well known
citizen of Richmond. It will require
a small sum to pay the expense of Mr.
Bowers' lecture and the Sketch club
will find it necessary on this occasion
to charge an admission fee of twenty
five cents. No trouble is anticipated
in selling a large number of tickets.
Definite arrangements have not yet
been made for a hall in which to
have the lecture delivered. The
Sketch club also has other plans
laid that will be of much benefit and
which will mature in due time.
VETERAN HOTEL MAN DEAD.
Chillicothe, O., March 21.
" Uncle' ' Jacob Warner, the veteran
hotel propi-ietor of this city, is in a
serious condition from a stroke of
paralysis.
ON THE VATEBS
AND IT RETURNS AFTER MANY
DAYS.
CHARLES KIENZLE
Gets Notice of a Nice Balance Due
Him From the Fatherland.
"The mills of the gods grind slow
ly."
In 1846 Charles Kienzle, now of
Greensfork, this county, father of Al
bert and Dr. F. W. Kienzle, well
known here, made up his mind to
leave Germany for America. That he
might be free from his military ob
ligations to the German government
his father deposited $1,000 with the
government to hire a substitute. Of
this amount only $700 was expended.
Only recently he was located by the
German consul at Cincinnati, and,
upon proof of identity, which he is
now making, the remainder of this
original $1,000 will be sent to him in
the form of a draft from the Father
land.
Mr. Kienzle is well known to the
Palladium, and it is a pleasure to
hear of this lucky turn of the wheel
of fortune. Mr. Kienzle was for
many years one of the stalwart Re
publicans of Switzerland county. He
moved to this county only a few years
ago to be near his sons, who had lo
cated at Greensfork, one of whom,
Albert, is a prosperous merchant and
another, F. W is a leading physician
BREAD OWN
at that Pv vVUniy--
THE JURY AFTER BEING OUT
SINCE SATURDAY, RETURN
ED THIS MORNING.
SEVERAL WITNESSES
Examined Today For the Defense and
Cross-Examined by the Prose
cution. The Bertram case was called in
court this morning after a rest since
Saturday noon. It was 9:30 before
the jury filed in. They were dis
missed on Saturday. The first wit
ness for the defense was John O'
Melia, ;of Centerville. Mr. O'Melia,
for some time, was a business partner
of the Bertrams. His testimony dis
closed nothing very startling. He
said Bertram's actions toward his
stepdaughter were always those of a
man who loved his child. He was ex
amined direct by Henry U. Johnson
and cross-examined by Wm. A. Bond.
The next witness vas Mr. Frank
Penny. He stated he was acquainted
with the family and had observed
nothing of an improper nature. Mr.
Johnson conducted the direct exami
nation. Mr;. Seymour, of Center
ville, who worked for the Bertrams,
was next called. He took his meals
with the family and had occasion for
observation, but never noticed any
unbecoming conduct on the part of
father or daughter. Study conducted
the direct and Comstock the cross
examination. Ida- Bertram, of near Milton, a sis
ter of Mr. Bertram, next took the
witness stand. She was at one time
a member of the Bertram household,
and gave a history of the family re
lations. Nothing startling was
brought out in the testimony.
oibk r
WERE IN EVIDENCE IN MAYOR
ZIMMERMAN'S COURT
AND TWO PLAIN DRUNKS
All Were Fined George Elmore and
George Moon.
Police court was the scene this
morning of some business. George
Elmore was arrested for carrying a
dirk knife. He had no particular
need of it, but was just carrying it,
possibly for a tooth pick. The mayor
thought the matter over and fined
him $5 and costs.
Somebody put a razor in George
Moon's pocket without his knowledge,
and he did not like it a bit. He was
arrested, and, this morning, paid $1
and costs for having it on his person.
.
There were two plain drunks.
MONTHLY MEETIH&
Of High School Many Important
Matters Taken Up.
The Richmond High School Ath
letic association held its monthly
meeting this noon and many import
ant matters were up for consideration.
Levi Peacock, the new track coach,
made a short speech to the athletes.
A subscription list was started to
raise money to lift" the1 association
oat of debt. It was-decided to join
the association ef the fiik,, schools in
AND
RAZOR
' PRESIDENT ELIOT,
Of Harvard, Who Celebrated His
Seventieth Birthday Anniver
sary Sunday.
Indiana, which comprises all the
larger schools. The entertainment
for the benefit of the Athletic asso
ciation was announced, and the hearty
co-operation of the boys was solicited.
Track meets will probably be with
Dayton, Piqua, Greenville, Marion,
Kokomo, Anderson, Sheridan, Ind.,
and Walnut Hills high school, Cin
cinnati. GREAT REVIVAL.
Two very large audiences heard
Evangelist T. J. Legg at the Christian
church yesterday. In the evening
both the auditorium and Sunday
school room were crowded. "The
Basis of Christian Civilization" and
"Excuses" were his subjects yester
daj Mr. Legg's style is peculiar to
himself simple and direct, appealing
always to the reason, rather than the
emotions, with a keen mother wit
running through it all. Relying on
no sensational methods, he neverthe
less succeeds in profoundly moving
his audiences, as well as riveting their
attentions. Five confessed their faith
in Christ at yesterday's services. To
night several of these will be bap
tized. "The Great Commission" will
be Mr. Legg's subject this evening at
7:30.
NO OPPOSITION TO AMERICANS.
(By Associated Press.)
Manila," March 21. The Datto
Hassen, who wounded Major H. L.
Scott in Jolo last November in an
engagement, has been killed by pur
suing troops. All other Hattos aided
in finding Hassen. There is now no
opposition to American rule on Jolo
island.
CHINESE CRUISERS
AT CHEE FOO.
(By Associated Press.)
Chee Foo, March 21. Four Chin
ese cruisers have arrived here. It is
understood they will go to New
Chwang as soon as the ice is cleared
from that port.
COLLEGE DEBT
Will All be Paid by April 1 Allen
Jay's Tonr.
Out of a total indebtedness of
$27,000, Allen Jay, of Earlham, who
is now and has been for the past six
weeks at Guilford college, North
Carolina, has raised $23,000 of that
amount. He will return about April
1, when he expects to have the entire
amount.
REVIVAL MEETINGS.
Yesterday was a busy day with
Evangelist Reed at the First Method
ist church. He preached with telling
effect to J three large audiences at
10:30 a. m., 2:30 p. m. and 7:30 p.
m. He held a stirring evangelistic
service in the Sunday-school. Alto
gether there were twenty-eight conver
sions during the day and many mem
bers of the church advanced to a
higher plane of spiritual life. The
day will long be remembered by the
church.
Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Cline and Mr.
H. H. Dean, of Bluffton spent the
day in the meetings and were valuable
helpers. Mr. Cline is one of the prom
inent business men of northern In
diana and a member of the last gen
eral conference. Mr. Deam is the
conference president of the Epworth
League. He lead the Epworth League
services last night and greatly helped
with the music, during the day.Preach
ing this evening at 7:30 by Evangelist
Reed.
Miss Nellie Bruce of Farmland
left this" morning, for Piqua after1 ri
short sit,with, herfvsistr, Miss1 Flor
ence Bruce, of south-B street.".
MANAGER HENLEY DOES NOT
CARE TO BE IMPOSED
ON
LEGAL ADVICE AWAITED
Whether Richmond Has Any Western
League Games or Not Depends
on Results.
There were all sorts of polo rumors
about the city Saturday and Sunday,
and it was a difficult matter to deter
mine the truth. Manager Henley asid
thi morning that the Richmond Ath
letic association would have to be
treated fairly in the polo matter or
else there would be no more Western
league games here.
this morning that the Richmond Ath
of directors of the Western league on
last Thursday, giving the contested
game to Marion, put our people on
their metal, and thy determined to
test the validity of the affair, and
therefore secured the best corpora
tion lawyer to be had anywhere to
render an opinion as to whether the
Western league is liable in the prem
ises. The advice of counsel is eager
ly sought after and the outcome is
anxiously awaited.
An opinion will likely be had this
evening or tomorrow. Polo ads. were
taken out of all the papers while the
matter is in a state of probation.
It looks as if "the matter could be
settled amicably and the sport con
tinued. However, Manager Henley
means business and will stand for no
bulldozing.
AN EMBECILE.
(By Associated Press.)
Cincinnati, O., March 21. Agnes
Massing, a servant in the Bowdle
family, which was poisoned by break
fast food Saturday morning, has be
come utterly imbecile since her arrest,
having had repeated and violent epi
leptic convulsions. Just after recov
ering fro mone fit she said, in answer
to questions, that she put poison in
the food. But afterward denied she
had said it. The police are satisfied
that she is mentally irresponsible,
and that she should be sent to Galli
polis hospital for epileptics.
To a Telegraph Pole in Montgomery,
Texas.
(Bv Associated Press.)
Houston, Tex., March 21. John
Maynard, a negro, was found hanging
to a telegraph pole at Montgomery
Station, one hundred miles from
Houston, today. Maynard had con
fessed that he was one of the party
that robbed the Bohemian laborers
and killed one of them.
STORY CANNOT BE CONFIRMED
(By Associated Press.)
St. Petersburg, March 21. No offi
cial telegrams announcing collisions
between troops have been received and
the government has nothing to con
firm the story of the capture of
eighteen hundred Japanese troops on
Yalu river.
COST OF RICHMOND'S
FEDERAL BUILDING.
' The plans for Richmond's gov
ernment building which are now on
file in the Richmond postoffice do not
call for a structure that will cost all
of the appropriation made for it.
The appropriation was $S0,000 and
after paying for the amount theie re
mains $G5,000. The building for
which plans have been drawn should
not cost half of that amount.
This is the statement of a builder
i,n Richmond. He stated further that
a building the size of the one pro
vided for in the plans could be., built -of
Bedford stone, and . have , a , tile
roof for $65,000. t The :buidiog is U
Hamilton News. ; . ' '
NEGRO
HANGED

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