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The daily palladium. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1904-1905, March 24, 1904, Image 1

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THE WEATHER.
Indiana Showers, possibly
thunderstorms tonight and Fri
day, -warmer tonight, colder Friday.
Palladium job printing is up-to-date
and at reasonable prices.
Come in and get prices.
WEEKLY ESTABLISHED 1881.
DAILY ESTABLISHED 1870.
RICHMOND DAILY PALLADIUM, THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 1904.
ONE CENT A COPY.
The
.Daily
IBSEN'S
GHOSTS
A BEAL TREAT
THE GREAT EMOTIONAL DRAMA
WITNESSED BY A GOOD
HOUSE
ALBERTA GALLATIN
i J i J .
An Ideal Mother, Shows Her Emo
tional Powers A Delighted
Audience.
It is rarely ever that Richmond
play-goers have the opportunity of
witnessing a production like that at
the Gennett theater last night.
"Ghosts," as put on by Alberta
Gallatin and her excellent company is
certainly a master production of lb
sen's great play. The five people who
compose the cast are all superbly
fitted by nature for the parts they
take. In the first place Alberta Gal
latin, as' the mother, showed the great
love of a mother for an only son. Few
realize just what it means to the
average emotional actress to recite an
ordinarily heavy part, but, when it
comes to holding the center of the
stage for over two hours, in lines that
depict human agony in every woi'd,
it is certainly superb and that is the
word that best expresses our opin
ion of Miss Gallatin.
The play is exceedingly grewsome,
and, while broadly suggestive, con
tains a gi-eat moral lesson. The part
of Manders compares favorably with
that of Miss Gallatin. The carpenter
was a distinctively new character
creation, and the interpretation of the
part was good.
The sins of a father, inherited by
the son, was the part of the piece
that all else surrounded it was a fine
play on heredity. Clans Bogel was
simply great, and, at the climax when
reason fails him, he certainly had
the vacant stare as it was never seen
before.
The pastor is very clever, and, while
he has no real heavy part, his inter
pretation is good and his stage pres
ence elegant.
Rose Curry, as the maid, carried
ont her lines well, and proved herself
capable of acting when occasion re
quired. PITTSBORG
Wrecked at Crestline Engineer Mc
Millan Dying.
(Bv Associated Press.)
Pittsburg, March 24. The Pitts
burg express, eastbound, struck a lo
comotive in the yards at Crestline to
day. The engine was wrecked and
enigneer and fireman were hurt. The
passengers were not injured.
Engineer McMillan is lying at the
point of death at Crestline from
scalds received in the wreck.
COLLAR AFIRE
A Printer's Collar Canght Fire and
Caused Trouble.
Persons who have been under the
impression that printers never wear
collars will have that impression re
moved when they read the following:
"Columbus, ()., March 23. A cel
luloid collar worn by John F. Stone,
a printer, made all kinds of trouble
yesterday.
"Stone wanted to light a gas stove.
The stove leaked, and when he ap
plied the match a flame shot out and
ignited the collar. Stone was tip
stairs in the house at 70 east Rich
street, and, when the circle of fire
about his neck became unbearable, he
made a dash for the stairs. Stone did
not look ahead of him, and he fell
down the stairs, lie called 'Fire!'
and enterprising neighbors turned in
an alarm.
The department responded, but, be
EXPRESS
fore the hose was turned on the man,
the collar had burned itself out. In
falling, downstairs Stone was badly
injured. He was removed to a hos
pital in an ambulance. '
NO MORE INDIANIANS
A dispatch from Washinton says:
"No more Indianians will be ap
pointed Jefferson guards at the St.
Louis exposition. "Word to this effect
was received by Senator Fairbanks
yesterday from President Frances,
who says: "In order not to subject
the exposition management to a
charge of gross partiality in the dis
tribution of positions as guards I be
lieve it will be impossible for us to
appoint any more men from Indiana,
at least for the present." It is stat
ed that more applications were re
ceived for these positions from In
diana than any other state in the
Union."
ALLAN ATMS
FOID DEAD
A WELL KNOWN COLORED
CHARACTER PASSES
AWAY.
DIED VERY SUDDENLY
His Cheery "Good-a-Mawnin' " Will
be Missed The Man With
Two Dogs.
One of the best known old colored
characters of the city, Allan At
kins, was found dead yesterday noon
at his home, on north fifteenth and
G streets. He had worked hard all
morning beating carpets on north
thirteenth street and in general clean
ing up of the yard.
After dinner he left home to re
turn to work, and, after he had gone
a few squares, evidently felt sick
and returned. His wife saw him pass
around the house, and, thinking it was
very unusual for him to return at
that hour, went to the rear of the
house in a few minutes and found
her husband dead. A doctor was
called, but the end had come, and he
was tenderly carried into the house.
"Old Allan" was a well known
figure about the city, and had cut
rrvnaa oitA occicfarl in rrenernl work for
iHOO U11U tl . . i . I v. v . , . .
various families for nearly twenty
years. lie ana ins two uogs,
"Dewey" and "McKinley," were
known to almost every child in the
eastern and central parts of the city,
and he always had a cheery "Good
mawniu' " for everyone. His two
dogs have followed him around town
for the last four or five years, and
the query of many persons, when in
formed of Allan's death was, "What
will his two dogs do now?"
The deceased was married to a
white woman and had several chil
dren. Coroner's Verdict.
Coroner Markley was called, and,
after holding an inquest, pronounced
death due to paralysis of the heart.
The funeral will be Saturday aft
ernoon at 2 o'clock from the North
End Baptist church. Interment at
Earlham cemetery.
A BULL FIGHT
Not in Mexico, but in Rush County.
Rushville, March 23. A Polled
Angus bull owned by Thomas M.
Ochiltree, was attacked by a Jersey
bull, owned by William Dagler, yes
terday. The two animals were fight
ing each other viciously for a while,
but the advantage was all with the
Jersey, as the other was dehorned,
and was gored in two or three places.
When the 'fight was at its hottest
stage, Mr. Ochiltree seized a piece of
timber and managed to separate the
two enraged animals.
KANSAS CITY FIRE.
(By Associated Press.)
Kansas City, March 24. Fire in
the Jones retail dry goods store today
was caused by lightning. Loss $130,
000. Insured.
JAMES QOIGLEY
PASSES AWAY
AFTER AN ILLNESS COVERING
TWENTY YEARS.
DEATH RELIEVES HIM
Remarkable Case of Pamily Devotion
That Has Pew Parallels.
James Quigley, who has resided in
this city for a great many years, died
last night at his home, 224 north
seventh street, after an illness extend
ing over twenty years. The deceased
was about sixty-two years of age,
and a native of county Clare, Ireland.
Besides his wife, Julia, two sons,
Michael and James and three daugh
ters, Anna, Mary and Margaret, two
brothers and three sisters survive.
The funeral will occur from St.
Mary's Catholic church Saturday
morning at 9 o'clock. Interment at
St. Mary's cemetery.
Here is a case of death that de
serves especial mention. The de
ceased, James Quigley, was one of the
most ambitious men s in the city
twenty-five yeai-s ago. He loved to
work and provide for his family, and
did so to a marked degree. About
twenty years ago he was stricken
with palsy, from which he has suf
fered ever since, in a helpless condi
tion. During all these trying years
his good and faithful wife and chil
dren have attended to his every want,
and added every comfort that good
care and kindness could bestow upon
a husband and father. It would seem
that the great care would become a
burden in all these years, but it was
not so; for he was just as lovingly
cared for the last week of his illness
as he was the first. It was a case of
undying devotion that has few paral
lels. Besides this no complaint was
ever heard to escape his lips. Such
devotion 'now days is rare, and the
family are certainly greatful that
they did their whole duty and did
it well.
GILLESPIE
Given the Freed of the Jail An Un
usual Procedure.
(By Associated Press.)
Rising Sun, Ind., March 24. Judge
Downey recognized James Gillespie,
charged with murdering his twin sis
ter to $5,000 bond, granting the liber
ties, but not freedom. The bond al
lows Gillespie to walk about the jail
corridor during the day. Such a bond
is not recognized in law, but the judge
and sheriff say conditions warrant it.
There is much agitation over the
special privileges.
Suffers to Keep up the War.
(By Associated Press.)
Moscow City, March 24. The
budget voted a million of the school
funds for war purposes. Instead of
twenty new schools, only five will be
opened.
RING LEADERS ARRESTED.
(By Associted Press.)
Portsmouth, O., March 24. Sheriff
Ketter has gone to South Webster
on account of renewed troubles be
tween strikers and non-unionists at
the Harbison-Walker Brick company.
No serious trouble is .expected, as all
the ring leaders have been arrested.
RAIN INTERCEDES.
(By Associated Press.)
Hoi dredge, Neb., March 24. A
heavy rain stopped the prairie fire
after it burned over a strip from three
to ten miles wide and twenty miles
long. The loss is estimated at $100,
000. One man lost his life.
BANK WRECKER.
Indianapolis. Ind., March 24. J.
L. Broderick pleaded guilty to wreck
ing the Elkhart bank today.
SCHOOL
FBI
ARGUING
BEFORE MY
IN THE BERTRAM CASE JOHN
SON'S SPEECH.
HIS FINEST EFFORT
Robbins Closes For the Prosecution
This Afternoon.
Yesterday, after Prosecutor Com
stock finished his argument for the
state in the Bertram trial, Wm. A.
Bond began. The arguments were
superior efforts on the part of these
gentlemen. The entire case was gone
over at length. Mr. T. J. Study fol
lowed for the . defense and talked
for nearly two hours. .
The remaining three hours wei-c
taken ip this morning by the Hon.
Henry U. Johnson. It was the clos
ing argument for the defense and was
classed as one of Mr. Johnson's
greatest efforts. His arraignment of
certain persons connected with the
case was severe and searching and his
perforation to the jury was great, so
much so that it brought tears to the
eyes of nearly every one in the court
room. He told of the great mother's
love that Mary Bertram had for her
only child, and that there is nothing
she would not do to shield her. As a
child the mother eared for her tender
ly and the stepfather was devotion it
self to the child. He said that even
now now that Alice Hill had brought
her moti?r into publicity without it
being any fault of her's, he felt sure
that should she need the protection of
a father and mother she would still
find the large heart of her mother
melted sufficient to take her daughter
to her arms and forgive the past.
This is the mother's love for a daugh
ter who had tried to ruin her life and
make her declining days miserable.
Mr. Johnson closed his argument
before dinner.
John F. Robbins began his talk this
afternoon. All who know Mr. Rob
bins are aware of the fact that his
argument was out of the ordinary,
and it was one of the greatest efforts
of his life. He told of the crime of
the stepfather in terms that were not
to be misunderstood. He classed the
crime with which Bertram is charged
as the basest that could be credited
to a man. Mr. Robbins took up the
time allowed him three hours with
one of the most convincing argu
ments ever heard in the court house.
After he finished Judge Fox read
his charge to1 the jury. He cited the
law on the subject in ease of guilt
and the penalty provided for such of
fenses. He instructed tke jury as to
their duties in the premises and what
they were expected to do; that they
should take into consideration all the
evidence, the character 'of the wit
nesses and general bearing, and, from
their summing up of the case, should
come the verdict. It was a splendid
charge and a just charge.
FEBEBALBIEBIG
Commercial Club Asks For Change
of Plans.
A dispatch from Washington reads
as follows:
"The Indiana senators and Repre
sentative Watson have received a
communication from the Commercial
club of Richmond protesting against
the design of the public building to
be erected at that place. Efforts will
be made by Mr. Watson to induce the
ofiicials to modify the plans in accor
dance with the wishes of the people
in Richmond."
INVOLVES $75,000.
Mr. I). W. Kinsey, a banker of New
Castle, was in the citv todav on
siness. He filed the will of his
father for probate and record. The
will involves about $75,000 and the
property is divided between the chil
dren. ; -
BOUGHT GROCERY.
Otis Moore, a hustling young man
of this city, has purchased the Cas
tor grocery on Ft. Wayne avenue.
He is fixing the place up and adding
several improvements.
AS OTHERS SEE US.
(Milton News.)
Several Richmond citizens met in a
talkfest last week concerning the new
bridge the county is going to give
them. Bouquets were passed around
and each fellow wras given a chance
to talk. The meeting was a waste of
energy. They'll get the bridge and
it won't cost them a yen. Nobody's
kicking and everything is lovely. It
is said the south side wants a wagon
bridge. The city promised that for
the Main street bridge, but the prom
ise was only tc verbal.' ' Be careful
gentlemen, to make none but verbal
promises.
ill BEATH
I
ONE OF RICHMOND'S BEST
KNOWN MARRIED
LADIES.
DIED LAST NIGHT
She Was the Wife of Will Ferguson
and Sister of Harry
Brown.
Mrs. Anna M. Ferguson, w7ife of
William Ferguson, died last evening
at her home, 115 north fifteenth
street, aged thirty-five years.
The funeral will take place Satur
day afternoon at 3 o'clock, and the
interment will be in Earlham ceme
tery. Friends may call Friday after
noon from 3 to 5, and in the evening
from 7 until 9 o'clock. Please omit
flowers.
The deceased was one of Rich
mond's best known young women,
and her sudden death came as a shock
to her many relatives and friends in
this city. As a mother she was kind,
considerate and gentle, as a wife, a
model. She leaves a husband and
three small children to mourn her
loss.
The deceased was Miss Anna
Brown, sister of Harry M. Brown,
who is now with the Rock Island.
EARLHAM NOTES
Four of the Students Will be Guards
at St. Louis.
Among the students who will not
return to Earlham this coming spring
term are four young men who will
act as guards at the St. Louis expo
sition. These young men are Clar
ence Clark, of this city, formerly of
Iudiana'polis; Otto Haisety, of Fair
mount, Ind.,; Mr. Wlliams of Carth
age, and A. Thorp.
The last examinations were finished
this morning, and nearly all of the
students have left for their respec
tive homes. A few students who live
too far from Richmond will remain
at the college or in Richmond.
One of the largest classes for the
spring term will be a class for bird
study, under the direction of Prof.
Dennis. Prof. Dennis has been ab
sent from the college during the past
term studying in Mexico, California,
etc.
Fred La Mar, of this city, who has
been attending medical college in
Kentucky, will enter Earlham for the
spring term.
STREET CAR STRIKE.
(By Associated Press.)
Huntington, W. Va., March 24.
All employes of the Camden Inter
State Street Railway struck today.
Not a car is running on the entire line
from Ciuyandott, W. Va., to Hanging
Hock, Ohio, thirty miles. Strikers or
ganized hack lines t convey passen
gers. The cause is the discharge of a
conductor and motorman.
SUDUI
BS
FERGUSON
SCHOOLS OF
WASHINGTON TP
TO HOLD COMMENCEMENT ON
MARCH 26.
A FINE PROGRAM
Invitation Received by County Super
intendent Charles W. Jordan.
County Superintendent C. W. Jor
dan is in receipt of an invitation to
attend the fourteenth annual com
mencement of the Washington town
ship schools. The invitation is artis
tically gotten up in the latest touches
of the printer's art. The cover is of
white parchment, on the front page of
which 1904 is cut out, and under
neath the figures is a piece of yellow
ribbon which make the figures stand
out in bold relief. ,The invitation
reads as follows:
The Class of '04
Washington Township
Public Schools
Requests your presence
at the
Commencement Exereises
Saturday Evening, March 26.
Nineteen Four
Doddridcre Chapel, ,
Eight O'Clock.
The class colors are red and orange,
the class motto. Excelsior.
Following is the program :
Music Orchestra. ' -Invocation
Rev. Jensen.
Music Orchestra.
The Education That Counts Clar
ence Coffey.
The Economy of Time Neva Bai
ley. Character Perry Sorber.
Music Orchestra. ....
The American of Today John Ker
lin. ,
The American of Tomorrow Paul
Hurst.
Solo, "The Old Fashioned Home"
Ada Sorber.
Helen Keller Emory Wolford.
Music Orchestra.
What America Has Done for the
World Ben Doddridge.
Live for Something Rea Wagner.
Music Orchestra.
Oration, Charlemagne, A Light in
the Dark Clinton Bertsch.
Music Orchestra.
Presentation of Diplomas Supt.
C. W. Jordan.
Benediction Rev. Jensen.
Music Orchestra.
Music furnished' by Milton Or
chestra. Class Roll.
High School Clinton Bertsch.
Common School.
Neva Bailey, Clarence Coffey, Ada
Sorber, Rea Wagner, Emory Wolford,
John Kerlin, Paul Huist, t Perry
Sorber, Bennie Doddridge.
Teachers.
Charles W. Jordan, county superin
tendent, Jesse L. Howland, principal,
High school.
Ida McCray, Woode L. Brown, Do
ra Wallace, Mayme Simler, Ross
Lammott.
Wilbur L. Doddridge township trus
tee. .
DR. THDBSTOH
Left His House For The First Time
Is Rapidly Recovering1.
Dr. J. M. Thurston, who was strick
en with paralj-sis while delivering a
lecture at Indianapolis a few weeks
ago, was on the streets yesterday for
the first time since he was brought
home. Yesterday afternoon he walked
to the depot with the aid of crutches
and afterwards around the city for
a, while. Dr. Thurston is improving
with rapidity and will be out and
around by the middle of next month,
his return to this city. His many
friends are very much pleased oAer
his recovery and were glad to sec him
for the first time yesterday eve i:ng.

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