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The daily palladium. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1904-1905, March 28, 1904, Image 1

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THE WEATHER.
Tor Indiana: Generally fair
tonight and Tuesday, rising tem
perature. Palladium job printing is Tip-to-date
and at reasonable price3.
Come in and get prices.
fT
1 ' V
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1 1
WEEKLY ESTABLISHED 1881.
DAILY .ESTABLISHES U 1876.
RICHMOND DAILY PALLADIUM, MONDAY, MARCH 28, 1904.
.OCT CENT A COPY.
"t Si
BOLD BURGLAR
CAUGHT I ACT
"WILLIAM H. ARTIS, A RICH
MOND. NEGRO, ROBS HIS
FORMER EMPLOYER.
SECURED $21 DOLLARS
Tbree Shots Tired With No Attempt
" at Inja.y Robber Arrested
Arraignment.
- Last evening about 6:30 ihe peace
and quiet of the Sabbath wer3 dis
turbed by the report of a pistol, the
ound comuig from the vicinity of
ninth and Main streets. On investi
gation it was found that the shooting
was done by Harry Alford, manager
of the drug company of the same
r:ame.
For some time past small amounts
of money nave been missed from the
store, from time to time,' and the man
agement has been watching closely the
movements rf a certain party, feeling
sure that in the course of a short
time he would be enabled to loeate
his man.
Last evening he thought would be
a good tim? to do a little detective
work, and, accordingly, Mr. Aiford
and the eleik, Harry Cecil, put them
selves in hiding and abided then time.
They did not have to wait long; for
they soon heard the sound of a key
entering the lock of the side door, the
lock turned back and the tall form
of William H. Artis, a former porter
r.t the stoe, entered, and walked
stealthily toward and to the ca-h
register, with which he became famil
iar when hi worked at the store. He
opened th? register and took there
from about $21, pocketed the anie
and was about to retire, when Mr.
Alford called to him to hold up his
hands, pointing a revolver at him.
Jt seems as if the revolver had little
terror for him; for he rushed at the
two men who were in hiding, and a
deperate life and death struggle en
sued. Harry Alford, who held the pistol
in his hand, fired three shots, think
ing to frighten -the negro into sub
mission. The two men were not equal
to the strength of the powerful negro
and Mr. Green, the livery man, who
heard the shots, came to their assist
ance. A great crowd soon congre
gated and excitement ran high.
Officer Golden was called, and,
pfter a fierce fight, landed Artis in the
city jail. The officer had to use his
lub to a considerable extent before
Artis could be taken.
When he was placed in jail and
, searched a key to the store was
found in his pocket, which he had
evidently stolen while he Avorked at
the store.
Artis is a married man, with a
very bad naraet and lives with his
wife at 421 south fifth street.
Artis Avili have a preliminary hear
ing tomorrow morning before Mayor
Zimmerman.
m CHILDREN
To be Interested in the Music Fes
tival. The following communication was
addressed to Supt. Mott, and the im
port of the same will be of general
interest. It is as follows:
"Richmond. Ind., March 28, 1004.
'Mr. T. A Mott, Supt. of Schools
City.
"Dear Sir: In preparing for the
musical festival to be given in this
city on May 4th and 5th. the direc
tors have kepi in mind that it is
f iven. not as a financial enterprise,
but as a means of education primar
ily. . "It is the desire, therefore-, to rive
as many possible; the opportunity
of hearing tins festival of nstrvmtn(
and song.
"Through the courtesy of Mr.
( has. Beaen, manager of ;he Chicago
Symphony orehcsli-a, the directors of
the Festival association are enabled
to invite tlis fifth, sixth, seventh and
eighth grades of your schools to at
tend the rehearsal of orchestra and
chorus on the afternoon of Wednes
day, May 1, accompanied by their re
spective teachers. We will request
the favor of a reply before April 15,
giving number of scholars and teach
ers in each grade. Further informa
tion will then be given you relative to
hour of rehearsal and plans for seat
ing. Awaiting your favo, we are
"Yours truly,
"Richmond Festival Association,
"Mr. Howard A. Dill, Sec'y."
GARD MADE TREASURER.
S. E. Gard of this city was yester
day elected treasurer of the Indiana
branch of the National Association of
stationary engineers.
ARBOR DAY PROCLAMATION.
Governor Durbin 's annual Arbor
day proclamation,, designating the
dates of State observance of the day,
was issued Saturday. Friday, April
22, and Friday,. Oct. 21, are. set apart
for planting of trees, study of nature
and similar pursuits, especially in the
public schools.
AFFAIRS OF
riNAL SETTLEMENTS REPORT
ED TO COURT IN SEVERAL
ESTATES.
NO MOTION FILED
For a New Trial in the Bertram Case
Other Events of Interest.
The attorneys for Bertram have not
made application for a new trial, but
will likely do so next Monday. Judge
Fox left this morning for Winchester
where he holds court this week.
The final report of the commission
er in the estate of Phebe A. Pyle vs.
Martha W. Pyle, et al., was filed for
record.
Report of commissioner in final set
llement of Franzman vs. Jameson et
al., was filed.
R. U. Johnson filed final settlement
in the estate of Catherine Johnson.
Solomon Bowman filed 3nal settle
ment in the estate of Leatha Wil
liams. Dickinson Trust companv, admin
istrator of James P. Costello, filed,
iinal settlement.
Gaorge II. Eggemeyer fiiea final set
tlement in estate of Margaret Turner.
William 31. Kelley filed settlement
in the estate of Timothy O'Connell.
Final settlement in the estate of
Herman Sanders was filed by the
Dickinson Trust company.
Georgia L. Kabel tiled partial set
tlement in the estate of William C
T,add.
Final settlement was made by
Abram L. ITebble in the estate of
David Hebble. -
Jennie B. Toney filed filial settle
ment in th.i estate of Lenn:e E Toney.
Joshua B. Chenoweth filed settle
ment in estate of McClellan Cranor.
NEW DIREGTORY
Of Central Union Telephone Co. Has
Been Issued.
The Central Union Telephone Com
pany has issued its new directory
with a la rue list of ubseribers.
RICHMOND BOY ON YALE TEAM.
Fielding Jackson, a young man for
merly of this city, is looked upon as
one of the most promising candi
dates for pitcher on the Yale 'varsity
squad. Recently he pitched a game
against Trinity College, and Yaie won
by a' score cf 11. to 0. " -
COURT
HOUSE
TRIPLE BIRTHDAY
CELEBRATED
IN ROYAL STYLE AT THE HOME
OF OITO HUDDLESTON
IN DUBLIN.
A SIX O'CLOCK DINNER
Was One of the Features of the Cele
bration in Honor of the Im
portant Event.
It rarely occurs that three mem
bers of one family, have the same
birthday. But such isthe case in the
family of Otto Huddleston, of Dub
lin, the father, mother and five-year-old
son having been born on March
2S. The many friends of. this prom
inent family decided it was all too
important an event to go by un
l oticed, and. therefore, planned a sur
prise on the happy trio, to take plnee
Saturday evening.
To say it Avas complete in every de
tail goes without saying. The sur
prisers came with wel filled baskets,
and one of those best 6 o'clock din
ners was the result. Everything pala
table was on the table, consisting of
the choicest viands of the season.
After dinner the evening was spent
very pleasantly with music, both vo
cal an instrumental and social con
verse. At a late hour the guests de
parted wishing the happy family
many returns of the day.
DURBllI"
HAHLEY
ARE THEY IN POLITICAL UNION
FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF
EACH OTHER'S INTER
ESTS? GOVERNOR AND
SENATOR
Other Indiana Congressmen Would
Like a Show.
A special dispatch from Washing
ton to the Louisville Herald sajs that
word reached members of the Indiana
delegation in the House of Represen
tatives Saturday to the effect that
Governor Durbin has formed an al
liance with Frank Hanley, of Lafay
ette whereby each will promote the
other's political interests. Durbin as
pires to be Senator Fairbanks' suc
cessor, while Hanley is a candidate
to succeed Durbin.
The combination, says the dispatch,
is invading every district in the state
and is creating perturbation among
other senatorial and gubernatorial
candidates.
Among the former are Representa
tives Hernenway and C. B. Landis,
who are compelled to neglect their
senatorial canvass by remaining in
Washington while congress is in ses
sion. Efforts are being made to induce
Mr. Fairbanks to make a formal dec
laration of his candidacy for the Re
publican vice presidential nomination.
The senator has been a receptive can
didate up to this time. If he makes
such an announcement it wilt have a
tendency to clarify the atmosphere
and perhaps enable Messrs.! lemenway,
Landis" and others to catch up, with
Durbin.
HEALTH OFFICE.
Born to Mr. anrt Mrs. Cha:les
Graham, 723 south eighth stioef, a
girl. ..-;!
WALLACE'S SHOW
PERISHED III FLOOD
SUCH ARE THE FEARS OF THE
OWNER OF THE CIRCUS
BEN WALLACE.
WINTER QUARTERS
AT PERU
On the Banks of Two Rivers, Under
Water No Chance For
Rescue.
Peru, Ind., March 28. It is be
lieved that Wallace's menagerie of
wild animals has perished in the flood
caused by the rising of the Wabash
and Mississnewa rivers. The winter
quarters of the Wallace circus occupy
a farm situated at the junction of the
two rivers and on the opposite side
from this city. There is no means of
attempting to rescue the caged ani
mals, nor is there any way of ascer
taining their fate. From a hillside
half a mile this side of the barns it
can be seen that the buildings are
under at least six feet of water, and
Mr. Wallace believes his valuable col
lection of animals has been destroyed
He is unable to place an estimate on
the loss, as ihe collection includes the
only litter of panthers in captivity
and several baby lions, but he says
it would be heavy.
At 8 o'clock last night the rivers
began to drop slightly, but not before
the Indianapolis Northern Traction
company 's $35,000 bridge over the
Wabash river had been swept away.
The homes of the twelve hundred
residents of"' sou Lit Peru are still un
der water, as well as many homes in
east and wst Peru and Elmwood, be
sides river for a distance of three
miles.
In some instances the flood-bound
people are living in the second stories
of their homes, but for the most part
hey have sought safety in the city
proper.
The C, C. & L. railroad was un
fble to move any trains yesterday.
The Wabash and Lake Erie railroads
ure having no trouble at this city, but
the Peru, Wabash & Logansport trac
tion line is tied up.Many cases of sick
ness have been reported since the
flood swept over the 'city, and it is
feared theri will be a great fatality
among the victims of measles, which
is now an epidemic in this city. There
has been no loss of life, but many
narrow eseines have been reported.
WATSONJPEAKS
To Supervising Architect About Our
Federal Building.
The following dispatch from Wash
ington shows the interest our con
gressman is taking in Richmond's
Federal building:
Congressman Watson had an inter
iew today with Assistant Secretary
of Treasury aylor about the plans
for the Federal building at Richmond,
which are altogether unsaticfactory
to the peop'e there. He made most
vigorous speech against the "dumpy
brick building with a tin roof,"
which he sa?d in a tone of disgust it
is proposed to erect. Taylor suggest
ed that the Congressman and ihe
Richmond people restrain themselves
until the bids for the construction of
the building came in. He said he
hoped for a satisfactory solution.
DEATHS AND FUNERALS
Brown. John Brown, formerly of
the Dayton Soldiers' home, died yes
terday morning at liis room, No. 23
f-outli ninth street. The remains were
taken to Wilson & Pohlmeyer's un
dertaking establishment, whence the
funeral will take place tomorrow aft
ernoon at 2 o'clock. Mr. Brown was
a member of company C, Tenth In
diana cavtdry. Friends of the de
ceased, soldiers and G. A. R. men are
especially i ivited. Interment at Earl
ham cemetery. Rev. E. O. : Ellis
will officiate.'.. '. ;
Miller. John C. Miller, aged 37
years, died 7esterday afternoon at his
l:ome, '1517 north A street. Short
services will be held at the l ouse
Tuesday morning at 9 oVloek, con
ducted by Rev. 'White, after .which
the body will be taken to Cambridge
City on the 10:35 train for further
services and interment. Friends may
call any time this evening.
Davidson The remains of Mrs.
Mary F. Davidson arrived from
Muncie yesterday afternoon and were
taken to the home of her sister, Mrs.
Wm. E. Taylor, 1117 north G street.
The remains will be taken to Eaton,
Ohio, for burial.
ASPARAGUS WILL BE DEAR.
(By Associated Press.)
San Francisco, March 28. Half of
the asparagus crop of California has
been destroyed by the recent floods in
the Sacramento valley. Canneries will
be idle on account of no material.
Mrs. John Morrow, of Anderson;
Mrs. John Butler, of Dayton, and
Mrs. George Corwin, of Arcanum, O.,
are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. W. H.
Sparks, of west Richmond.
ELIZABETH PRICE
PASSES AWAY
ONE OF RICHMOND'S OLDEST
LADY RESIDENTS CALLED TO
HER REWARD.
MOTHER OF M. C. PRICE
She Was the Daughter of a Soldier of
the Revolutionary War Re
markable Lady.
Mrs. Elizabeth B. Price, aged 98
years, one month and twenty-soven
days, widoAv of David Price, died at
the residence of her son, Milville C.
Price, two miles west of the city on
the National road, at 2:45 o'clock
Sunday afternoon, March 27. Fu
ieral services will be held there at
3 o'clock Tuesday afternoon. Inter
ment at B'.ookville, Ind., Wednesday
morning.
The deceased was the daughter of
Rev. John Wilson Langdon, who was
e soldier of the revolutionary war.
She was born in Vershire, Vermont,
inlSOG, and moved to Cincinnati, O.,
the same year, where she grew to wo
manhood. For a number of years the deeaed
has made her home with hei son,
Melville C. Price. She was a kindly,
good woman, greatly belova by a
iarge circle of friends and acquaint
ances. She was well read and loved
to converse about the early times and
make comparisons with the present.
She was of the old school of women
ind retained her memory to a remark
able degree.
YALUABLE FIHD
J. M. Kirkman Discovers a Chunk of
Copper Ore.
About a week ago Mr. J. M. Kirk
man, who lives about three and a half
miles south of the city, picked up a
chunk of something that had shining
spots in it, in his wheat field. The
substance was very heavy and Mr.
Kirkman took it home and lrid it
aside until today when he brought it
to town and weighed it. The sub
stance weighed four and a half
pounds, and on examination proved
to be copper ore. Mr. Kirkman
didn't look any farther, but will do
so, and if a vein is found, the genial
owner of the laud will be a high stop
per. St. Louis, March 28. The jury in
the case of Senator Burton, of Kan
sas, charged with receiving foes from
the Rialto company to protect it be
fore the postoffico department, found
Hm guilty. The punishment is to be
decided by the court. A motion for
a new trial will be herd tomorrow.
Kansas City, March. 28. A special
from Topeka says lawyers, regard the
conviction of Senator Burton as an
immediate vacation of his seat. , -,;
irnmnri n i irnm
1VU1Aj MiilfiO
REPRESENTATIVE
11 l 11 lint ill v
ANSWERS THE STATEMENT
PRINTED IN THE PALLADIUM
FROM EARLHAM.
EARLHAM NOT
RESPONSIBLE
For the Thought in Feeger's Oration,
Says President KeUy.
Mr. Kanaley of Notre Dame, when
asked his opinion of the statement
from Earllt.im, in regard to the con
test said in part :
"If Mr. Feeger has a letter of mine
in his possession which might in any
way be construed to mean that the
contest might be transferred from
Notre Dame to Richmond, the proper
place for him to have produced that
letter was at the meeting in Indi
anapolis before the state board.
"Mr. Kennedy had the letter in his
possession at that meeting and when
Notre Dame's representatives asked
that the letter be shown to the dele
gates, he refused to read it. If there
was anything in my letter that would
compromise Notre Dame, I asked
that it be .submitted to the convention
then and there. Nothing was forth
coming and the insinuation of Earl
ham was seen to be groundless.
"I have written four letters to Mr.
Feeger and sent him the official oaper
in all of which it was clearly stated
that the contest would not be held at
Earlham. Now that the faculty can
assume the position it does seems to
me to be the result of the decision of
i, A 1 3 3 ,-1 IV. 11. e
lue siaie yumu, auu ziul me itr&uu ui
a careful review of the facts of the
case. The circular letter I sent out. I
beg leave to ask the faculty of Earl
ham to examine. It will be seen that
there is.no undermining and that the
letters were fair and conciliatory.
w ."It is another strange fact that ihe
faculty of Earlham now attempts to
defend Mr. Feeger after President
Kelly informed us three weeks ago
that Earlham College could not hold
itself responsible for the thought ex
pressed in the oration. For the re
maining. at!a"cks of the article of the
faculty of Earlham I will pass them
by, as they re purely personal.
"In "conclusion I may state that
Notre Dame was guided in the whole
affair by idoals of justice and fair
ness, and appealed to the state board
only on these grounds.
"Notre Dame as well as every oth
er college in the association, was ex
tremely sorry that the situation arose
nut we believe that, inasmuch as it
did come, the state board was actuat
ed by ideals of fairmindedness, jus
tice and courtesj'.
"I believe that Earlham Is not act
ing graciously toward the state board,
which gav-3 its unanimous decision.
Notre Dame would certainly have ac
cepted the decision of the board un
der such circumstances."
APPELTlTElODRT
To Hear tne Nixon Paper MiU Case
Today.
T. J. Study and John L. Rupe
left this morning for Indianapolis to
argue the Nxon Paper Mill case be
i ore the appellate court. The com-
puiiy some time ago Drougnt, siut
against the C. C. & L. railroad for
damages done their plant by the
building of the bridge across White
water. The court gave them a $900
julgment, hut the paper mill deemed
the amount unsufheient and appealed
the case to the appellate court. The
matter comes up today and will be
argued before that court.
Mr. J. S. Zeller, who has conducted
a galvanized iron, slate and tin works
villi fnranee and furnace works a
specialty for a number of years, has
retired, selling the business to.
Charles R. Woodhurst,. who will take ,
posession about April Jst.; 3 v j v i

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