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The daily palladium. (Richmond, Ind.) 1904-1905, March 30, 1904, Image 1

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THE WEATHER.
Indiana: Showers, possibly
thunderstorms tonight and Thurs
day. Palladium job printing is up-to-date
and at reasonable prices.
Come in and get prices.
WEEKLY ESTABLISHED 1831.
DAILY ESTABLISHEU 1878.
RICHMOND DAILY PALLADIUM, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30. 1904.
ONE CENT A COPY.
E. REEVES
DIED THIS 10II1
ONE OF RICHMOND'S OLDEST
AND BEST KNOWN
CITIZENS.
AN OLD PIONEER GONE
President of the First National Bank
For Forty Years Biography.
James E. Reeves is dead. One of
Richmond 'r. best known and highly
lespeeted citizens passed to his re
ward this morning at his home, 222
north tenth street at 11:45.
The deceased was born November
27, 1814, hi the village of Berkley,
Gloucester county, New Jersey, which
was also the birthplace of his father
and mother, Mark and Ann (Ewan)
Reeves, wiio in 1823, came to Rich
mond with their family, consisting of
two sons and two daughters. At this
time the subject of this sketch was
but sine yeirs of age. His tirst busi
ness experience was obtained while
clerking in the drug store of Dr.
James R. Mendenhall, for one year,
and he then went to Liberty, Ind., as
salesman for Dr. Mendenhall in his
dry goods store there. A year later
1 e accepted a position with his broth
er, Mark E. Reeves, who opened a
store in Washington (now Greens-
fork). Mr. Reeves worked m this
ft ore for eight years. At the end
cf that time the brothers formed a
partnership under the firm name of
M. E. and J. E. Reeves.
. This partnership continued for
three years, when the junior member
of the firm returned to Richmond and
opened a general store. This was in
February, 3S40, and the business was
continued for eight years. Daring
this time Mr. Reeves established a
cotton factory, and, for two years,
i uccessf ully conducted it .
In 184S iie went to Cincinnati, O.,
-where he engaged in the wholesale
boot and shoe, hat and cap and straw
poods business. A year later he ad
mitted his brother, Mark, to partner
ship and in another year took in Isaac
Stephens. The business was ;on
linued until 1855, when, on account of
failing health, Mr. Reeves returned to
Richmond.
He purchased one hundred acres of
land west of the river and engaged
:n farming for eight years. Farm
work soon restored him to health and
strength.
In ISO!) he took up his resilience
in this city and with lis brother,
Mark, established the First National
bank, it being the second national
bank in Indiana. -
Mr. Reeves was elected president
of the bank and was annually re
elected until failing health caused him
to retire a year or two ago.
The deceased was twice married.
His first wife was Isabella Cornell,
of Philadelphia. Of this marriage
three children were born, only one of
whom survives, James F. Reeves, of
this city. Mrs. Reeves died in 1862.
His second union was with Mrs. Han
nah More Treland. Of this marriage
two sons were born "William P.
Reeves and Jessie S. Reeves.
The deceased was an ardent Re
publican, his first vote hiving been
cast for William Henry Harrison for
President, in 1836.
Robert Morrisson appointed him as
one of the three trustees to effect the
purchase of what is now the Mor
1 isson-Re-nos library.
In 18G5 Governor Morton appoint
ed him treasurer of the Tn liana Agri
cultural college, now Pur.Iuc univer
sity. Mr. Reeves' life Avas inseparably
connected with the history of this
city.
The funeral notice will be found in
the regular place.
STRUCK BY WHALE.
(By Associated Press.)
"Vladivastok, March 30. One of
the mines in Passiet bay. was
struck by a whale, whose mutilated
body was vashed ashore.
JAIE
JESSE PARKER
Bought Blacksmith Shop at Fountain
City.
Charles Dormer of Fountain City
has sold his blacksmith shop to Jesse
Parker of this city. Mr. Dormer in
tends moving to Montpelier and Mr.
Parker will soon leave here for
Fountain City, with his family.
BASEBALL
A Great Game , at Muncie Next Sun
day. Manager Bobby Hart, of the polo
players' baseball team, which wall
cross bats at the Athletic park, Mun
cie, next Sunday with the Muncie
team, announces that his line-up is
complete and all the players will be
an hand fr the game.
The contest will open the baseball
season in Muncie and is attracting
general interest. Manager Stroup, of
the Muncij team, has had his men out
for several work-outs and the team
will go in the field in good condition.
The line-up of the two teams fol
lows: Polo Players. Position. Muncie
Jessup Catch.. Hall or Wolf
Lewis Pitch Hiatt
Bannon First base Decker
Fields or
Cameron . . Second base Stroup
Hart Third base Bates
Bone Shortstop. . .Richmond
Gardner Left field Eaton
Lyons Center field . .Hawkins
Higgins ... Right field Golliver.
The polo players all have good rep
utations as baseball players, and.
with a little practice together, this
team would undoubtedly prove a
strong 01. It is thought, however,
that they will not be able to put up
ihe game they are capable of putting
up as nona of them have had a base
ball in their hands since last fall.
Jessup wiil make a good backstop for
the polo players, and if Lewis can get
himself in shape, it is safe to say
the Muncie team will not score many
runs.
GREEK OR IRISH
Dan McManus, Ed McNaUy and Geo.
Staubach Couldn't Tell.
A young foreigner arrived in the
city vestertlav who had no knowledge
of' our language. Officer McManus
was approached by the stranger, who
tried to tell his troubles, but the of
ficer couldn't understand him. He
thought he was Irish, and asked Of
ficer McXally's advice about the
matter, but it seems as if Sw couldn't
tell. Officer Staubach decided that he
wasn't German, so McManus was up
a tree. Then the thought dawned up
on him that maybe he was Greek, and
look him around to "John's" place
on north ninth street, and he soon
discovered it was a lucky strike. He
was Greek sure enough, and was soon
at home among friends.
RIAL MEIERS
It Takes $75,000 to Pay Them in In
diana For One Month.
The total salaries to be handed out
to the 1,563 rural mail carriers
throughout Indiana at the end of the
present month is $75,000. Frank L.
Richman, cashier at tbe pes-f office at
Indianapolis, has just finirhed mak
ing out tha checks for the above
amount. The number of carriers on
the Marcii ;y roll exceeds that of
previous months.
DEATHS AND FUNERALS
Brown. The funeral of John
Brown, the old soldier who died Sun
day morning at his room, 23 south
ninth streei, took place yesterday
from the undertaking parlors of Wil
son & Pohlmeyer. Services by Rev.
E. O. Ellis. The interment was in
the soldiers' lot. at Earlham ceme
tery. The pall-bearers were Wil
liam Arnold, William Lemon, Ilenrv
Porter, Joseph Brush, W. K. Young
and William Baumer
Reeve.r Died at his late residence,
222 north tenth street, this (Wednes
day) morning at 11:45, James E.
Reeves, in the ninetieth year of his
age. Notice of the funeral will be
given later.
GRACE METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
ELECTS DELEGATES TO CON
FERENCE AND OTHER
CHURCH OFFICERS.
QUARTERLY
CONFERENCE
Expresses Its Appreciation of the
Pastor, Rev. II. S. Marble, and
Presiding Elder HttL
At a recent election held by the
members of Grace Methodist Episco
pal church Mr. Horace M. Kramer
was elected lay delegate to the lay
electoral conference to be held at
Muncie, Ind., April 8, 1904.
Members of the quarterly confer
ence of Grace Methodist Episcopal
church in Richmond, Ind., for the con
ference year 1904-5:
Trustees T. A. Mott, D. B. Strat
ton, Alonzo Girton, Horace Kramer
and George W. Miller.
Stewards R. M. Lacy, George M.
Worley, F. F. Riggs, Henry Town
send, Alden Mote, Fred S. Butler, J.
L. Garver, Dr. A. E. Price, Clarence
Kramer, Everett R. Lemon and James
A. Turner.
Class Leaders Mrs. George IT.
Hill, Mrs. Anna Dougktj7, George M.
Worley, Mrs. Frances Kelley, Mrs.
Elizabeth M. Haughton, J. Will
Mount, Mrs. Alden Mote, Miss Jessie
B. Dulin, Mrs. Elsie M. Turner.
Sunday-school Superintendent T.
A. Mott.
Epworth League President Clar
ence Kramer.
Local Elder Dr. R. E. Haughton.
Recording Steward Alden Mote.
District Steward J. L. Garver.
Honorary Members.
President of the Woman's Foreign
(Continued on last page.)
THE SOUTHERN
fflDIAHA
TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION WILL
MEET IN INDIANAPOLIS
TOMORROW.
PROMINENT EDUCATORS
From the East and Canada Will Make
Addresses An Excellent
Program.
The custom of Indiana teachers is
to meet in general association once
each year, usually during the holi
days, and in the spring, about April
1st, they meet in two district asso
ciations, Northern Indiana and South
ern Indiana Teachers' associations.
The southern association will meet
tomorrow ivening at Indianapolis and
continue in session until Saturday
morning. The committee who
planned this association and prepared
its program had in mind both the
pleasure and profit, intellectually
speaking, of all the pedagogues who
will be fortunate enough to partici
pate in the exercises.
Among the prominent names on the
program are Bliss Perry, editor of the
Atlantic Monthly; James L. Hughes,
inspector of schools, Toronto, Can.;
Wilbur F. Gordy, Hartford, Conn.;
Florence Holbrook, Chicago, and El
mer B. Bryan, late of the Philippine
Islands.
MINE ON FIRE.
Houghton, Mich., March 30.r
Quincy mine is on fire in No. 7 shaft.
01 HUNDRED
ANO FIFTEEN
CONVERSIONS THE. RESULT OF
THE REVIVAL AT FIRST
M. E. CHURCH.
THE PASTOR,
REV. NETHERCUT
Gratified Over the Result Rev. Reed
;'WiUs,lemigliCdi- "Slum'
'Life' Christian Revival.
The meeting last night at the First
Methodist Episcopal church was the
greatest that has been held since the,
beginning of the series.
The auditorium was packed and it
was necessary to open the Sunday
school room. After a stirring ser
mon by the evangelist the invitation
was given and twenty-three persons
came forward and knelt at the altar
and accepted Christ as their personal
Savior.
Tonight Evangelist Reed will give
his great lecture on "Slum Life." He
was for years engaged in slum work
in Liverpool, England. The lecture
will be illustrated with stereopficon
views, taken by the evangelist him
self. This lecture will be very help
ful. There have been one hundred and
fifteen persons converted during the
meetings. There will be services
Thursday evening.
Christian Church.
. Unusual interest was manifested at
the revival services at the Christian
church last evening when Rev. T. J.
Legg, who is conducting the revival,
addressed his attentive listeners on
the subject, "Conversion of a Na
tional Cabinet Officer," a most inter
esting theme. There were six conver
sions last evening. Tonight at 7:30
Mr. Legg will speak on JJ Wise Man,
Foolish Man."
GAME ROOSTERS
HAVE MEETING
ACCOMPANIED BY THEIR OWN
ERS FROM RICHMOND AND
NEW MADISON.
$350 CHANGE HANDS
Great Sport Carried on and the
"Sports" Are Unmolested.
Monday night a few Richmond men
who are the possessors of game roost
ers with lighting proclivities, with a
like number from New Madison, Ohio,
proceeded to a secluded spot about
fifteen miles away and had a regular
"meet." There was quite a goodly
number in the bunch and the "sport
was carried on high handed, the Pal
ladium is informed, until the hours
grew small.
There was considerable money up
on the results, and one Richmond man
was lucky enough to carry off sev
eral prizes. About $350 changed
Jands. The Richmond roosters wov
every battle.
It was brTd da hchi before the
Richmond contingent reached home.
The Palladium undci-OiMds anothei
meeting is bei ij arra'.grd.
ALL RENOMINATED.
(By Associated Press.)
Philadelphia, Pa., March 30. The
Republicans today renominated the
present congressman inthe first, sec
ond, third, fourth, fifth and ?ixth dis
tricts, r-.ii ! ,:-" A ) . ; ':)
STRIK JY COff ,
Thrown From Track by Train and
Was Killed.
Burnside, Ky., March 30. Norton
Morgan and son, Oscar, aged four
teen years, Avere killed today by being
struck by a cow thrown from a track
by a train on the Queen & Cresent,
near Tateville.
IDElTOlHEN
i
Suit Brought Against an Estate to
Recover $100,000.
Modern Woodmen of this city will
be interested in the following dis
patch from Iowa :
Sioux City, la., March 30. The
Modern Woodmen of America yester
day filed a suit in the United States
court to recover judgment for $100,
000 against the estate of the late E.
H. McCutchen, a former Holstein
banker, aod twenty-one sureties upon
an indemnity bond for $200,000.
The judgment is demanded for
moneys which were on deposit in the
private bank of E. M. McCutchen &
company at Holstein at the time oi
the death of E. II. McCutchen. in
January, 1J04.
"The Modern Woodmen claim to
have been triable to secure the return
of their $100,000, which was on de
posit, and the bondsmen are asked to
stand good for the alleged loss."
A Dull Place on a Rainy Day.
The court house was unusually
quiet today and it is usually so when
court is not in session and the weath
er is bad.
William H. Kelley, attorney, peti
tions court to grant Jacob H. Beckel
and Catharine D. Beckel the privi
lege of adopting Leon Stanley, a mi
nor. They state in the petition that
they are financially able and other
wise competent to care for and edu
cate the child.
Dick Smith, the genial sheriff of
Wayne county, has been very restless
during the last few days of the com
ing spring. A thought struck him.
"I go a ,-hing," and all prepai-a-tions
are made to go tomorrow an
see the end of -March on the silent
banks of some nearby creek or iver.
Clerk Haas is a good wader and will
go along to Avade in to the br.nks
where he can cast his hook in' deep
v.'ater.
The sheriff has so nviny prisoners
now that he wanty them to have some
delicacies from the f'-esh water
streams before the end of J ent. The
i alladium got a scoop on this bit of
news. It will report results on Sat
urday and believes that Mr. Haas can
be relied on for the truth.
BELGRADE LEVEE
' BROKE TODAY
HOUSES WASHED AWAY AND
LIVE STOCK WERE
DROWNED.
WEST PORT ABANDONED
Ohio Southwestern Track Washed
Out For More Than a Mile
Ilain Falling.
(By Associated Press.) -
Vincennes, Ind., March 30. The
Belgrade levee, eight miles north of
here on the Illinois ?idc, broke to
day. Houses were washed avay and
live stock .irowned. West Port was
abandoned. Two-thirds of Lawrence
county is under water. The Baltimore
& Ohio Southwestern railroad traclo
washed oul more than a mile. The
largest trestles are in danger A bard
rain is falling.
OURT
HOUSE
REID MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
BUILDING COMMITTEE MEETS
TONIGHT TO SELECT
FLAN
FROM WHICH HOSPITAL
Will be Bnilt-All the Local Archi
tects Interested.
The building committee of the
Reed Memorial hospital will have a
meeting tonight. The three local ar
chitects Marlatt & Dosier, Haseeos-
ter and Kaufman have each pre
pared plans, and they are certainly as
fine as any architect in the country
would have or could submit. The
committee will look over the plans,
adopt one of them, make what
changes they deem necessary and then
call for detailed specifications. Aftei
this is all done, bids wrill be called
for. ;
SOCIAL EVENT
Rev. Wm. Hogan and Family Eater
tain A Few Friends.
Among our colored citizens there
is none mere wrorthy of recognition
than Rev, Wm. Hogau, his wife and
daughter, "Miss Bertha, whose beaut i
nil home is 520 north nineteenth
street. They have been residents of
Richmond about thirty years, an I,
during that period, by strict econ
omy and industry, have accumulated
several pieces of valuable property,
besides their palatial residence, which
ts equipped wTith all the modern im
provements. Rev, .. Hogan and wife invited a
company of friends to dinner yester
day, which was an elegant spread,
and consisted of all the choice edibles
of the season, and was skilfully pre
pared, tempting the appetites of those
who partook of it. The following
guests were present: Rev. Hypes and
wife, pastor of Akron hotel mission
church; Rev. Winchester and wife,
evangelist, and P. Outland.
After the dinner feast the company
were escorted to the handsome parlcr.
and Rev. Winchester and wife sang a
number of beautiful sacred songs that
would touch the heart of the most ob
durate sinner. Another interesting
feature of the occasion was the Bible
reading from the 21st chapter, Sec
ond Samuei, each person reading a
verse by turn which closed, with sev
eral fervent prayers that kindled a
name of love in the hearts of all pres
ent. The company feeling they had spent
1 very profitable day, thanking Rev.
Hogan and his estimable Christian
wife for their kind welcome and ele
gant dinner, departed.
G. A. R.
Twenty-Second Anniversary of Sol.
Meredith Post Celebrated To
morrow Evening. !
Sol. Meredith Post,' G. A. R.,- will
celebrate its twenty-second anniver
sary tomorrow evening at the G. A.
E. hall. A large attendance is de
sired. A program will
Doors open at 8 p.m.
be given.
WAR NEWS.
(By Associated Press.)
Chee Fojj March 30. The captain;
one passenger and one member of the
crew of th Japanese coasting steam
er Hanyei arrived at Teng Chow to
day, and the wire reported the Han
3'ei was sunk by the Russian fleet
March 27 near Miatae Islands. The
remainder of the crew snd passengors,
numbering seventeen were captured.
Seoul, March 30. The Japanese
advance occupied Haiju sonport,south
of Anju, March 27tb.
New Chwang, March 30. The
United States gunboat Helena wag qi
dered ' to Shankhai.

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