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The daily palladium. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1904-1905, April 21, 1904, Image 1

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TUB WEATHER.
Indiana : . Fair in the north ;
showers and warmer in the south
tonight or Friday.
Donald Donaldson, Jr., by How
ard Fielding, Page Seven. Don't Fail
to Bead it. ' v
1 y
WEEKLY ESTABLISHED 1881.
DAILY E8TABL1BHE U 1876.
RICHMOND DAILY PALLADIUM, THURSDAY, APRIL 21, 1904.
ONE CENT A COPY.
FINE LECTURE
PYTHIAH TEHPLE
PEOF. SHELDON DELIGHTS
LARGE AUDIENCE WITH
HIS SUBJECT.
CLERKS-BUSINESS MEN
Sharon Jones a Leader in the New
Movement Synopsis of the
Lecture.
The first of the series of lectures on
"Harnessing Science to Business"
was given last evening in the Pythian
Temple by Prof. Sheldon, of the
Sheldon School of Scientific Sales
manship, of Chicago. The hall was
filled to the gallery with clerks and
business men of this and surrounding
towns who were there to learn "how
to better their condition."
Prof. Sheldon was given a hearty
introduction by Sharon Jones, who is
the leader in this new movement.
Slips were handed out with spaces for
questions, which the persons in the
audience were asked to fill whenever
a point in the lecture came up which
they did not understand.
The first part of Prof. Sheldon's
lecture was devoted to a definition of
a salesman. "Everyone connected
with any institution which has for
its purpose the sale of goods for
profit everyone from the office boy
is a saleman. Even the loafers are
partly salesmen. Loafers while they
cannot destroy the item of the bal
ance of profit, can hinder it to a
greater or less degree." "The power
of salesmanship is that power which
enables its possessor to persuade
others to buy goods at a profit to the
salesmen. There are three classes of
salesmen wholesale, retail and spec
ialized, but all clerks, etc., are not
salesmen. As a merchant prince once
said, "I have three salesmen."
"What then are all your other
clerks?" was asked. "Oh, they are
order-takers," he replied.
There is no luck or chance in per
manent and increasing success of any
salesman, it all comes from work and
work alone." said Prof. Sheldon.
There are four elements in any sale;
the customer, saleman, article and the
abstract sale itself, and these four
elements were discussed by the lec
turer as follows: There are many
kinds of customers and a good sales
man has a different method of ap
proaching each of the different kinds.
Some customers must be gently driv
en while others can only be led, and
to try the wrong method on a cus
tomer is to lose the sale. The sales
man is a main factr in the sale.There
is not so much difference in the re
sults of natural ability and of the
effort to bring out what ability the
man has. Either of these qualities
will make a good salesman. The two
foundation stones of the success of a
salesman are character, the real mag-
netic power of a man, composed of
moral, spiritual and intellectual ele
ments, and health, that harmonious
condition of body, mind and soul, as
Prof. Sheldon defined character and
health in their broadest senses. In
tuition has a great deal to do with
the success of a salesman and one
reason for the rise of women lately is
that women's intuition is keener than
men's. A salesman must not be a
talking machine, the day of talking
machines is past He must be a logi
cal speaker and a man who says
something when he speaks. A sales
man must arouse knowledge of the ar
ticle, interest, desire and a resolve to
buy that article in the minds of cus
tomers. These are the four mental
processes through which the mind
travels in purchasing goods. And
last, if a salesman has these qualities
of logical speaking and consequent
abilities to arouse a resolve to buy,
he can not be kept down by any in
justice of his employer.
Mrs. John Jordan, returned yesler
.. day from attending, a funeral in
yJSconomy." "' " ; '
OVERCOME BY GAS.
(By Associated Press.)
New York, April 21. A young man
supposed to be Reed Harlow, of To
ledo, Ohio, and son of Captain W. J.
Harlow, of Cleveland, Ohio, was
found unconscious in a Brooklyn
lodging house today, having been
overcome by gas, left on apparently
with suicidal intent. His condition is
critical.
WABASH SURVEYOR.
(By Associated Press.)
Parkersburg, W. Va., April 21.
Henry S. VanWinkle, chief surveyor
of the Wabash railroad in West Viv
ginia and a prominent politician, died
today of pneumonia.
INDIANA BANK ROBBED.
Clay City, Ind., April 21. The
Farmers' and Merchants' bank was
burglarized last night. Six thousand
dollars were taken from the bank and
the building blown acress the street.
It was insured.
THE FIELD
OF ATHLETICS
EARLHAM AND SHORTRIDGE
WILL NOT HAVE THE
DUAL MEET.
WISHES OF EARLHAM
Cannot he Consistently Complied
With The Situation.
Manager Forsythe, of the Short
ridge High School track team and
field team, Indianapolis, received
word today from the Sheridan High
School that on account of a previ
ously arranged meet, it would be una
ble to meet the North Side team on
May 7, as had been scheduled. Word
was also received from the manager
of the Earlham management that it
would insist upon using a sixteen
pound shot and hammer in the dual
meeting with Shortridge and that it
prefers to have the hop, step and
jump, the standing broad jump and
a mile relay instead of the half-mile.
The Shortridge team is indignant and
will call the meet off, as it has no one
who can do anything with the sixteen-pound
weight, and would simply
have to concede the Quakers' eight
een points. The North Side team al
so contends that the hop, step and
jump and the broad jump are obso
lete and refuses to accept them.
Shortridge is also in need of some
good 440 men, as Patton, on whom
the team had depended to win points
in this event, received a "D" and
cannot participate in athletics this
spring. Allerdice, Schoen and Bos
son are also out with small chances
of reinstatement before the next
marks, which do not come out until
the latter part of May.
MfNECOlTYBOY
Gets "Writ Up" by the Muncie Star.
In a write up the Muncie Star hns
the following to say of a Wayne
county boy:
"E. O. Baldwin, one of Muncie 's
leading grocers, began his business
career as a "pill pounder" in an
apothecary shop at Fountain City,
Ind., at the age of eighteen. Before
that time he lived on the farm of his
father, attending the country schools.
He remained in the drugstore for two
years and then accepted a position in
a grocery store. Later he came to
Muncie and began work for the Jo
seph A. Goddard company, wholesale
grocers. In i891 he embarked in
business for himself. Since then he
has shown remarkable business abili
ty and now, with C. P. Franklin, con
ducts one of the largest retail gro
cery stores in Muncie.' '
ASK A CHANCE.
Residents of Spring Grove have
asked the county commissioners to
change 4 the. election 1 precinct from
Chester to. Spring-Urxjye
COUNCIL
IN SESSION
AND MAKES SOME ALLOW
ANCES FOR BRIDGES.
DAMAGE BY THE FLOODS
Most of the Bridges are in the West
ern Part of the County.
The Wayne county council, H. E.
Robinson, Wm. Floyd, George W.
Cotton, Abram Hebble and Asa Pitts
met at the court house this morn
ing for the purpose of hearing the
report of the county commissioners
in regard to bridges washed awray
and damaged by the recent floods in
this county. After hearing the re
port the council made the following
appropriations:
Simond's Creek bridge $ 500
McGrew bridge 235
Henderson bridge 180
John Levell bridge 600
William Levell bridge 350
General repairs on bridges 500
Cost of flood $2,360
Probation officer . 75
Total appropriation $2,435
The meeting was very harmonious.
CAPTAIN WELLS KNOCKED
DOWN BY SECRETARY
HAYWOOD.
RIOT CALL TURNED IN
Two Soldiers Roughly Handled and
Haywood Clubbed to In
sensibility. Denver, April 21. When Chas. H.
Moyer, president of the Western
Federation of Miners, arrived under
military guard today, Secretary Hay
wood of the Miners' entered the
train to speak to him. Captain
Wells made a move to assault Hay
wood when he knocked the captain
down. Two soldiers attacked Hay
wood who was arrested and taken
with Moyer to the Oxford Hotel
where the trouble was renewed. Hay
wood knocked down two soldiers and
was himself clubbed by the soldiers
to insensibility. A riot call was turn
ed in and the police appeared but the
soldiers refused to surrender Hay
wood. Moyer was brought in to ap
pear before the supreme court.
Of the Norfolk and Western Go on a
Strike.
Portsmouth, O., April 21. Three
hundred shop employes of the Nor
folk & Western road, urged by wives
and boarding house keepers to strike
against the change of hours which
keeps them later in the evening, the
terminal employes wera joined to the
number of 200. Operationo are sus
pended in the shops.
W. T. Shafer, who went to Mar
tinsville three weeks ago to be treated
for rheumatism has returned and has
been almost completely cured. Mr.
Shafer is loud his praise of. the
efficiency of the Martinsville mineral
waters to help those who are afflitfod
COITY
PRESIDENT
MOYEB
UNDER
GUARD
200
Employes
with any form of this disease, j.soh
01
BIDDERS
THE
HIGHEST
KTDS FOR THE FEDERAL BUILD
ING OPENED YESTERDAY.
PORTLAND FIRM LOWEST
Difference Between Highest and Low
est Bidders $24,402.
According to a dispatch from
Washington, D. C, the bids for the
construction of our federal building
were opened yesterday. Two bids
were . submitted from this city. The
Kramer Manufacturing Co., whose
bid .was $83,872 and Louek & Hill
Co., $80,240. v Following were the
other bidders :
W. H. Maxwell, Marquette, Mich.,
$60,920; Dementor W. Company, Ro
chester, N. Y., $61,989; James Row
son & Son, Iowa City, la., $66,000;
H. H. Connor, Cedar Rapids, $64,000;
F. H. Garthwait, Chicago, 111., $59,
695, and Detemore Sanders Sprinkle,
Portland, Ind., 59,470; John C. Rob
inson, Chicago, $61,278; W. D. Spear,
Toledo, O., $59,750.
j It will be seen from the above that
there is a great variance in the bids,
the two Richmond firms being the
highest and the firm of Detemore
Sanders Sprinkle, Portland, Ind., the
lowest. '
IN THE CASE OF THE KILLING
OF MRS. DAVID ULRICH.
FOR SIXTEEN HUNDRED
The Accident Happened at a Grade
Crossing in New Castle Last
February.
New Castle, Ind., April 21. In the
ease of the killing of Mr. and Mrs.
David Ulrich at the 22nd street cross
ing on February 24 by a Panhandle
train, the administrator of the estate
has compromised with the railroad
company for $1,600 and no suit will
now be brought. In the past few
years in damage suits, compromises,
etc., grade crossings of the Panhandle
in this city I have cost that company
nearly $10,000. The company, how
ever, has consented to place watch
men, bells, etc., and crossings in the
city limits.
Ofl DUDLEY
What a Washington Dispatch Says
About Him.
A dispatch from Washington in
regard to William D. Foulko. reads
as follows:
There have been stories to the ef
fect that one of the reasons which
prompted Mr. Foulke to sever his
connection with the Civil-service
Commission was his disapproval of
some of the civil-service policies
of the ' administration. Another was
that Mr. Foulke desired to be free
from the cares of the office in order
that he 'might save Indiana for the
President." Mr. Foulka went to
Indiana shortly after his resignation
but discovered that Indians was fafe,
and thought the Republican of the
via to could be trusted whib he went
lo Europe. It is unde.i.ood that
Mr; Foulke will be ricVy rewarded
for; the Tnissionary w'ork in Indiana in
hfthalf . I the'. President
CAMPAHY
MAKES
COMPROMISE
MRS. CAMPBELL DEAD.
Mrs. Indiana Campbell, a native of
Preble county Ohio, died last even
ing, aged nearly ninety-seven years
at Eaton, Ohio. She was the oldest
person in the county and was the
widow of Archie Campbell, who died
several years ago. She was the moth
er of eight children, six boys and two
girls. All are living except the oldest
boy. Two sons live at Franklin, Ind.
WELL ABANDONED.
Col.' Wiley informed the Palladium
this morning that the well that was
being drilled for oil at Bethel had
been abandoned. There was some
shale gas but not in a paying quanti
ty. AUTO MISHAP.
This morning while Mr. Wilke was
running a new auto down Main street
owing to the wet condition of the
street, the machine was thrown
against the curbing and a spoke or
two broken.
COMMENDS THE TASTE OF
RICHMOND PEOPLE IN
SECURING
SUCH SPLENDID TALENT
For the May Musical Festival A
Tribute to Our Beautiful City.
ATv V TT Tt.-rfioM o nf iha nw
,, , -r
proprietors of the Hotel Westcott,
wnu Auiiiiciij mcu in c-iiu i3
familiar with the musical people and
interests of that city, in talking with
one of our reporters in regard to the
May Musical Festival, said. ;I feel
that the people of Richmond have
shown as much taste and discretion
in the choice of the artists for the
Musical Festival as they have n the
building of their beautiful city. I am
personally acquainted with Mrs Wil
son and know her to bo one of the
most reliable and experienced orato
rio singers in the west. Th fact that
she has for the past few years been
chosen as soloist for the Apollo Club
of Chicago, under the direction of
Harrison Wild at their production of
oratorio is proof of the beauty of her
singing. I have always taken time to
hear her whenever I had the opportu
nity. Mr. Towne has one of the most
beautiful tenor voices in America. He
and Mrs. Kirkman, the contralto and
Mr. Howland, the baritone, stand in
the front rank of singers in the west.
I am confident that if you should go
to any one familiar with musical cir
cles "in Chicago and ask hira to pick
out four principals, he would recom-
mena mis same iour, tor tney are ine
best money could secure in the west.
The people of Richmond and vicinity
have a treat in store for them that
they should fully appseeiate. Such
singers are seldom heard outside of
the largest cities. The Chicago Or
chestra is only surpassed by the The-,
odore Thomas Orchestra and that, in
the opinion of most musical people,
only in respect to numbers." .
11
Tells of a Sun-Telegram Writer Who
Had a "Dream."
Someone who writes for the Sun
Telegram had a dream several monthi
ago in which he saw a union high
school for Milton, Cambridge and
Dublin. It seemed so real that he
was convinced that it was a "crying
need," a thing greatly desired and
that the, people were demanding it.
He has hit the pipe again and it is
the same dream except that Milton
has seceded from the union. Each
of these towns has a goM high
School and r.ei'her would be willing
to "abandon its wn institution; Try
a different brand of dope and smoke
np'.HUton 'News." ' . '
THE
WESTGOTT'S
Iff
PROPRIETORS
HOT
CROP
GOBBLED OP
BY THE CONTINENTAL TOBAC
CO COMPANY.
ENORMOUS PURCHASES
To Date Have Pretty Thoroughly
Cleaned the Field Reports
From Several Places.
Cincinnati, April 21. The opera
tions of the Continental Tobacco com
pany in clearing up the white burley
crop in every section of the district
have attracted attention beyond any
previous action of the company. Re
ports from white burley centers indi
cate that the enormous purchases to
date have pretty thoroughly cleaned
the field, though there are scattered
lots here and there.
A Cincinnati representative of the
company estimates that the pur
chases in this city and Louisville up
to last Thursday aggregated 30,000,
000 pounds, and that 10,000,000
pounds have been purchased since
that day, and that the purchases in
other parts of the district will bring
the grand total to 70,000,000 pounds,
perhaps more. He does not think
there remain in the hands of far
mers and dealers more than 1,000,000
pounds of the ,1903 crop which the
P milieu, UlU
! which it is willing to buy.
j Cynthiana, Ky., April 21. -The
onunenrai looacco oomnanv.
through its agent here Mr. Ed Blair,
has practically cleaned this and ad
joining counties of tobacco. Within
the last two weeks this company has
bought about 4,000,000 pounds, mak
ing its total purchases here about
S,000,000 pounds. The first 4,000,
000 pounds were bought at about 9
cents per pound, while its last pur
chases will average 13 cents, making
the value of the crop handled at this
place close to $900,000.
Williamstown, Ky., April 21. The
Continental Tobacco company's pur
ch ases from dealers to date are as
follows: James D. McMillan, 90,000
pounds; J. D. Cobb, 100,000 pounds;
Cobb & Turner, 112,000 pounds, and
Simpson & Conrad 475,000 lbs. The
prices paid ranged from $10 to $15
per hundred. A number of large
purchases from farmers have been
made by the local representatives of
the Continental, that of John Conrad,
50,000 pounds at Oc, being the lar
gest individual purchase recorded
this year. Two deaiers are still hold
ing out for a big price. Tom Burgess
a Sadievillle dealer, sold his pur
chases of S00,000 pounds to the Con-
tinental at a profit of $7.20 per hun-
idred.
Louisville, Ky., April 21. The
Continental Tobacco company has
purchased about 21,000 hogsheads of
burley tobacco in 4he Louisville mar
ket this year. The average price is
$10, but a great deal of tobacco has
been purchased recently at from $16
to $18 per 100.
Maysville, Ky., April 21.-The
Continental Tobacco company has so
far purchased at this point about
5,000,000 pounds of last season's crop
ui mis ,ouu,uuu pounds were secured
direct from the grower at an average
of close to 8c.
AUTTHEETIi
All Owners of Automobiles Invited to
Get in Line. 1
This evening the Automobile Club
will have a meeting at Omar Mur
ray '9 office in the Colonial building.
Previous to the meeting a run will be
had about the city which will occupy
about a half hour. All owners" - of
automobiles, whether, members of the-
emu or noi, are ,.inyiiea;.tO:.tnrn ouw
The start will, be, made from the court
housed at 17 -.SO? Everybody should be
TOBACCO
there promptly, ,

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