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The daily palladium. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1904-1905, June 11, 1904, Image 1

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Tie
Pallat
THE WEATHER.
Indiana Fair tonight and
Sunday.
Call on the Palladium for Fine
Stationery.
WEEKLY ESTABLISHED 1881.
DAILY ESTABLISHE O 1878.
RICHMOND DAILY PALLADIUM, SATURDAY, JUNE 11, 1904.
ONE CENT A COPY.
ML
n
t 1
V
A
?
HE SUFFERED A
PARALYTIC STROKE
ALLEN M. HARRIS STRICKEN
WITH PARALYSIS WHILE
WALKING ON STREET.
IN A PRECARIOUS
CONDITION
His Whole Right Side Affected Tak
en Home by Joseph
Gilbert.
Allen M. Harris, who resides on
north thirteenth street, was out in
the woods and fields yesterday, as is
his custom when the weather is fine.
He was returning home in the after
noon in company with Joseph Gil
bert, when he suffered a slight stroke
of paralysis. Mr. Gilbert helped him
home and he was able to walk into
the house unaided. This was nearly
five o'clock. He had not been in the
house very long until he suffered an
other stroke, which completely af
fected his right side. A physician
was called and every possible aid
rendered. This morning Mr. Harris,
owing to his advanced age, is in a
precarious condition.
MIffl III
Meets With Accident While Attend
ing Convention at Louisville,
Kentucky.
Louisville, Ky., June 11. Suffering
from severe lacerations of the scalp
and covered with bruises, Sylvester
Rapier, a New Haven, Ky., banker,
who was with the party of Knights of
Columbus visiting Mammoth Cave
yesterday, was brought to Louisville
last night on a cot and taken to St.
Joseph's Infirmary. Mr. Rapier slip
ped and fell while exploring the ap
proach to Echo river in the cave yes- j
terday afternoon and received his in- :
ii' t i n
juries in tailing down an incline or
some thrity feet.
With a party of about sixty
Ivniglils of Columbus Mr. Rapier and
his Avife were walking along a foot
path at the approach of Echo river.
The footway was slippery on account
of having been overflowed by a re- j
cent rise of the river and Mr. Rapier
was unable to maintain his balance.
He rolled down thirty feet to ther!
foot of the incline, coming in violent I
contact with many sharp projections
PRO
of rocks. He was picked up at once I honor to his native city and honor to
and attended to by Dr. N. Casper, j'e association that elected him. He
Dr. Irvin Abell and Dr. T. II. Mul- i is a son of the late Col. William Starr
vey, who were members of the party, j and a representative "Knight of the
In the party besides the physicians j Crip," and stands very high with
were Spalding Coleman and the Rev. ! bis brother travelers and business
Father Charles P. Raffo. ! houses all over the country. The Pal
It was stated last night that the in-'ladium predicts that under his guid
.iu red man's chances for recovery arejance the affairs of his office will be
good, although it will take some j judiciously administered,
time for the wounds to heal. j Lewis T. Lebeaume has been ex-
empted of the charges made against
! 1 1 1 1 . i i - 1 XT-
PEACE
COMING
To Cripple Creek Through the Ex
pulsion of Unionists.
(By Associated Press.)
Cripple Creek, June 11. Peace is
coming to Cripple Creek if General
Bell, the military commander jof Tel
ler county can accomplish all he has
planned to do. Peace will come
through the forcible expulsion of all
persons avIio owe allegiance to tne
Western A-deration of Miners or ex -
press smypathv with miners' union.
press smyi
The union miners who renounce the
federation will be permitted to re
main in company if they have satis
factory records. The miners are rap
idly resuming work and on Monday
all except the Portland will be in full
operation employing only non-union
men.
GREY SUCCEEDS MINTO.
(By Associated Press.)
London, June 11. It is announced
that Earl Grey is appointed to suc
ceed Earl Minton as governor general
of Canada.
I
MPROVEMEHT
Committee Held a Business Meeting
Last Night.
The committee on civic improve
ment of the Retail Merchants' Asso
ciation met a.t Cash Beall's store
yesterday evening at 7:30 p. m., the
meeting was for fhe purpose of or
ganizing and coming to a better un
derstanding of the definite line of
work entrusted to its care. Leo. H.
Fihe was elected secretary and in
structed to correspond with similar
organizations to get the benefit of
their plans and experience. The re
cent arrest of an unlicensed vender
at the instance of Cash Beall came up
for discussion and while it was
thought to be somewhat outside of
the duties of this committee, the ac
tion of Mr. Beall was given hearty
approval. The committee is made up
as follows:
Adolph W. Blickwedel Chairman.
Leo. II. Fihe Secretary.
E. K. Shera.
C. Y. Miller.
S. M. Rutherford.
H. C.
ELECTED PRES
OF THE NATIONAL TRAVELERS'
PROTECTIVE ASSOCIATION
SAVANNA, GA.,
NEXT MEETING
Richmond and the Oredr Honored
by the Convention The Other
Officers Elected.
The National Convention of the
Travelers' Protective Association,
held at Springfield, Illinois, at which
John B. lfegger and Horace C. Starr
represented Post C. T. P. A
of this !
city, adjourned yesterday.
One of the most important transac
tions of i he convention was the elec
tion of Mr. Horace C. Starr of this
city as national president. The other
officers elected are:
STARR
First vice-president, Thomas S. j west to the Hollandsburg and Pales
Beckwith. Petersburg Va.: second tine llike- then into Hollandsburg.
vice-president, B. M. Marsh, Win-
ston, X. C; third-vice-president, B.
R- Cunningham, Birmingham, Ala.;
national chaplain, Homer T. Wilson,
San Antonio, Tex.
It was decided to meet next year
at .Savannah, Georgia.
The election of Mr. Starr brings
i iii in arui nas oeen reinstated as ia
Itional Seeretarv.
LAST DAY
Of School Yesterday Programs
Different Schools.
at
Yesterday was the last day of
school for the year 1903-190$. A large
; class was graduated from High school
!aml one of the 1:ir?est classes er
ilett "arlield High school. At Gar-
tieid a program or excellence was
given and short programs were given
in nearly all the grade schools.
FOUR KILLED
(By Associated Press.)
Chicago, June 11. By an explosion
in the huge sewer constructed atSOth
street, four men were killed. The ac
cumulation of sewer gas apparently
caused the explosion.
HATHAN LAMAR
PASSED AWAY
ONE OF RICHMOND'S BEST CITI
ZENS GONE TO HIS
REWARD.
A FAITHFUL SERVANT
And a Kind Father As a Soldier
Placed in Andersonville
Prison.
Nathan Lamar, one of Richmond's
best citizens, passed away this morn
ing after eleven weeks' struggle with
pneumonia and its after effects. In
his last momonts he was surrounded
by his faithful wife and those of his
family who were at home. His was
a hard battle for life, as no one loved
to live better than did Mr. Lamar.
He had everything to live for a lov
ing wife and family, a comfortable
home and friends by the score but
his time had come, the
Master had
called, and he must
mons.
obey the sum-
Nathan Lamar, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel Lamar, was born Sept. 1,
1843, in Henry county, Indiana. His
parents died when he was but a child,
and he never fully realized parental
love and affection, although as a par
ent he was the very personification
of that quality. He enlisted in . the
(Continued on eighth page.)
FREE DELIVERY
A New One Worked Up and Petition
Sent In.
Walter Peden of Hollandsburg has
just completed the working up
a rural free delivery route, and
'ie petition was sent to the depart
ment on Ihursday. Itie route runs
south from this place to the Jose
White road, East to the Payne road
and north to the Hollandsburg pike.
Then east to the old Pitman farm,
then north to the Miller road, then
This is the forenoon drive.
In the afternoon the carrier starts
north from Hollandsburg to Col.
Wood's, then west to Dobson school
house, then north to the Tampico road
then Avest to Pin-hook, then south to
Bethel and back to Hollandsburg.
TO ST. LOUIS
A Party of Fifteen From This City
Went This Morning.
G. II. Knollenberg and family and
Richard McMullen and family, of
Connersville, together with a number
of relatives formed a party who
went to St. Louis this morning on 21.
There were sixteen altogether in the
party among whom were the follow
ing: Misses Aice Steen, Viola Steen
and Irene Steen, Ella Knollenberg,
G. II. Knollenberg and entire family
and Mr. and Mrs. McMullen and
family..
Are
Cut Out of a Great Deal of
Trade by Loss of Journal.
The Indianapolis Journal's popular
ity is shown by one fact, namely, that
the profits of newsboys in central In
diana, and all over the state, for
that matter, have fallen off consider
ably. The Journal was Hie fastest
selling morning paper in Indiana and
the Star's sales are not nearly so
large. Vic Mantell, the newsbov at
the Union Station here, is hunting a
city to be transferred to and will
probably go to Chattanooga, Tenn.
NEWSBOYS
STRAWBERRY
MEETING
success
AT THE PLEASANT COUNTRY
HOME OF STEPHEN
KUTH.
A LARGE ATTENDANCE
Paper by Hon. Isaac Jenkinson a
Splendid One Strawberries.
The regular June meeting of the
Wayne County Horticultural Society
was held today at Stephen Kuth's on
the National road. It was the straw
berry meeting of the year and was
largely attended.
At noon the guests ate dinner on
the beautiful grounds in picnic style,
and there was enough and a plenty
for all. The best of Wayne county
chicken and other good things was on
tap and there was a feast spread fit
for a king. After dinner the Hon.
Isaac Jenkinson made a well-prepared
paper on the subject assigned him.
which was greatly enjoyed by all
present.
There were strawberries galore and
excellent ones too. Mr. Kuth is one
of the leading fruit raisers in this
part of the country and as an enter
tainer is a great success. He and his
estimable wife added every comfort
possible to the guests within their
gates.
SPECIAL PROGRAM
Will be Rendered at St. Paul's Sun
. 3 day Night.
At the Sunday evening service at
St. Paul's Episcopal church there
will be some special music by the
choir, and it wil also be assisted in
its program by Miss Renee Peters, of
Whitehaven, Pa. Miss Peters is a sin
ger of considerable abilitv, having
had the advantage of thebest of vo
cal instruction in this country, and
the past year has been spent in Paris
under the famous Bough ey. Her
voice has a very pleasing quality and
she sings with a feeling and thor
ough understanding of her work that
would be expected in a much older
and more experienced singer. Miss
Peters is preparing herself for grand
opera and will return to Paris in
August to resume her study. The out
look for Miss Peters is indeed bril
liant and there is every reason to be
lieve she will advance rapidly and
with credit to herself and her profes
sion. She will sing Gounod's "O Di
vine Redeemer" Sunday evening and
to this song her voice is particularly
suited.
IS
(By Associated Press.)
Somerset, Pa., June 11. Abner
MeKinley, brother of the late Presi
dent, was found dead at his home
this n irnin.
Bright 's disease, which was of
long standing, was the cause of the
death of Mr. MeKinley. He was born
at Canton, O., and practiced law
the-e previous to coming to New
York. Burial at Canton Monday af
ternoon. FIRST EXCDRSION
Of the Season to Indianapolis Sunday
The first Pennsylvania excursion of
the seasoii occurs Sunday, June 12th.
The train starts from here at 8:35 a.
m. and returns at 9:30. The fare
will be one dollar for the round
trip.
ABHER
MKILEY
DEAD
ANOTHER SUIT
Filed Against Baker the Former Rich
mondite, Who is Now Al
most Dead.
(Special to the Palladium.)
Elwood, Ind., June 11. A. J. Bak
er, who is now in jail here awaiting
his second trial, is having hard luck.
His former cheerfulness has aband
oned him, and his physical condition
as well as his mental one, is some
thing shocking. He is not expected
to live until his second trial.
The latest blow is the suit for $200
filed against Baker by his former
partner, Charles A. Diltz, in the su
perior . court yesterday.
Before Baker committed the crime
(or before the crime was committed),
he and Diltz conducted a meat mark
et here. Baker bought out his part
ner and had paid all but $200 at the j
time of his arrest. This is the second
case filed against Baker for fraud.
He is almost gone.
(Baker formerly lived in Richmond
and had many friends here.)
FOR FAIR
PENNSYLVANIA NEEDS MORE
FINE TRAINS FOR ST.
LOUIS.
FINE EQUIPMENTS
All Modern
Improvements Limited
Trains Popular French En
gine Here Notes.
The St. Louis Limited (No. 27)
and the New York Limited (No. 20)
which were installed on the Pennsyl-vania-Vandalia
Lines about the open-
ing of the Exposition, have become
so long by the addition of the neces-
sary extra sleepers and so heavy and
yet withal so crowded with passengers
that the road has decided to probably
add two more trains like these, the
new ones to be running by July first,
when the greatest travel to the fair
will commence. These trains will be
made up entirely of Pullman, obser
vation, dining and sleeping cars (no
coacnes at ant, me enure iram
painted red and lighted by elec-
tricity. J.iie service inciuues
hat lis, libraries, reading lights in
berths, reading rooms and official
stenographers and typewriters and
many other modern conveniences.
They will be nearly like the limited
now running, with the exception of
(Continued on fourth page.)
Will Be Connected "With New Castle
By Interurban.
Michael Gleason of this city, the
leading promoter in the proposed
Richmond and Northwestern Trac
tion line, was in New Castle yester
day to close up the deal as far as he
is concerned. All of the right of way
has been secured with the exception
of land belonging to five farmers east
of town, and this land will be con
demned, so that the road will no
doubt be built anyway. Mr. Gleason
will send his report at once to the
New York capitalists who are back
ing the project.
If
Is being held at the Glen this af
ternoon. The membership is well rep
resented and a general good time is
being had.
1
The county commissioners are tak
NEW
LITERS
RICHMOND
AFTERMATH
PICNIC
RAD
USE
ing up road claims today.
AN ENTRANCE
TO CHICAGO
BY C, C. & L. IN A FEW WEEKS
COURT'S DECISION NOW
ANXIOUSLY AWAITED.
i
ONLY NINE MILES
TO BE CONSTRUCTED
Pamphlets Describing Summer Re
sorts Soon to Be Issued by This
Road Notes. 1
Before another forty days have
passed passengers may ride from Cin
cinnati to Chicago in the C, C. & L.
trains without changing cars, if ev
erything comes off as now expected.
The officials of the road, said Vice
President Christy, have strong hopes
of being able to accomplish the long
expected and long delayed entrance
into Chicago before the first of Au
gust at any rate, and mayhap before
that date.
The blocking of the C, C. & L. in
its entrance into Chicago has been
chiefly caused by the proceedings
brought by the state of Illinois
against the C, C. & L. to prevent the
latter from crossing the Illinois ca
nal by a bridge. The result of the
proceedings in court will be known
in a few days and a favorable' deci
sion is expected although, of course,
there is the possibility of an appeal
being taken.
In the event of a favorable deci
sion the C, C. & L. will begin to lay
the necessary nine miles of track be
tween its pjesent terminus and Ham-
mond, Ind., from which point every-
(Continued on fifth pag3.)
BY I. C.
(By Associated Press.)
Indianapolis, June 11. It is an-
; nounced that the Illinois Central rail
j road purchased the Indianapolis
j Southern Railroad now building
from here to the Indiana coal fields
I and Bloomfield, Greene county,
j
f-r jccn:(oj v
Svraeu:e? Kan June n.A spec.
jaj u.a;n
carrying 76 deported miners
i from Victor, Colo., in charge of mil
J itiamen, deserted on the prairie near
I the Colorado line todav. Thev were
left on the prairie practically desti
tute. LETTERS ISSUED
Letters of administration were is
sued on the estate of Samuel Wright
to Wm. G. White. Bond $400.
Letters testamentary were issued
to Wilhelmina Tate on the estate of
William Tate deceased.
SIMONS' CASE
The evidence was all in last even
ing and some briefs are to be exam
ined by attorneys on both sides and
after these are presented to Juudge
Fox he will render a decision.
The divorce case of Browman vs.
Browman is on in circuit court today.
BANK FAILED.
North Manchester, Ind., June 11.
The baife of North Manchester failed
to open and notice was posted. Af
fairs are in the hands of assignee.
The bank is a private institution with
a capital of twenty-five thousand and
was owned by D. W. Kirsher and the
- Ilarter family. No statement was is-
I sued.
PORCH
DESERTED
DIYORCE
CASE
'tKni. . A

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