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The daily palladium. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1904-1905, June 21, 1904, Image 6

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SIX
RICHMOND DAILY PALLADIUM, TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 1904.
Many women are denied the1
happiness of children through
derangement of the generative
organs. Mrs. Beyer advises
women to use Lydia E. Pink-
ham s Vegetable Compound.
i Dkab Mrs. Pctkham : I suffered
with stomach complaint for years. I
got so bad that I could not carry my
children but five months, then would
have a miscarriage. The last time I
became pre.tnant, my husband pot me
to take Lydia E. Pinkham's vege
table Compound. After taking the
first bottle I was relieved of the sick
ness of stomach, and began to feel bet
ter In every way. I continued its use
and was enabled to carry my baby to
maturity. I now have a nice baby
girl, and can work better than I ever
could before. I am like a new woman. "
Mrs. Frank Beyer, 22 S. Second St.,
Meriden, Conn. $5000 forfeit if original of
mbooe letter proving genuineness cannot be produced.
FREE MEDICAL ADVICE TO
WOMAN.
Don't hesitate to write to Mrs.
.Pinkham. She will understand
your case perfectly, and will treat
you with kindness. Her advice
is free, and the address is Lynn,
Mass. No woman ever xegrretted
having written her, and she has
helped thousands.
The Road Mia
Choe
By SARAH COMSTOCK
.Copyright, 1908, by T. C. McCluro
WHEN IN
CINCINNATI
GO TO THE.
ZOOLOGICAL
GARDEN.
LARGEST ANIMAL COL
LECTION IN AMERICA.
MERRY GO ROUND,
PONY TRACK AND OTHER
AMUSEMENTS.
BAND CONCERTS DAILY
AFTERNOON AND EVENING.
SPECIAL RATES TO LARGE PARTIES.
J
The creatst money making inventions
have been suggested by minds familiar with
the needs of the age.
THE AMERICAN. INVENTOR will
keep you in touch with subjects of current
interest in the line of new inventions and
experiment. It will aid you to develop ideas
of practical value. Issued on the 1st arid 15th
of every month. -
. Twenty-eight paces each issue. Sold at
all newt stand 10c per copy or sent by mail $1.50 per year.
THE AMERICAN INVENTOR.
Sample copy sent free. Washington. D. C
Don't Be Fooled
The market Is beta; f!oo-d
with worthless imitation o
ROCKY MOUNTA'N
... TEA ...
To protect the public e call
especial attention to our tradr
mark, printed oa every pack'
age. Demand the genuine.
For Sale bj all GruiCKUtt
Evory Woman
IS interested ana inouia mow
about the wonderful
MARVEL Whirling Spray
Tn new Tiol Syrtecc Injec
tion ana tsuetxon. new rai-
eit M oat convenient.
It CicaoiMS la.lmulij.
Ask rear IranM for It.
If he cannot iiidpIv the
niBVIX, accept no
other, bat send ataniD for
illustrated book !. It Rives
fall mrticulars and directions in-
valuable to ladies. MARVKLCO.,
Times llldff., new lork.
f la I to I daytA I
M rJ Guaranteed A
not to atrlciure.
i lSJj PrTat. rmi.rloa.
, y7aTHVAHSCHEMICALC0.
i V"CIftClNllATI,O.I " I
MEN AND WOMEN,
Cm Big U for unnatural
diachargea.inflauimationi,
'rritationa or ulceration
of mucoua membranes
Painless, and not aatrin
gent or poisonous.
Sold fcy Dinnrtata.
o. sent in plain wrapper
by eznreaa, prepaid, for
1 .00. or 3 bottles $2.75.
Circular sent on requet
dC CHICHESTER'S ENQtlSH
fpEflNYROYAL, PILLS
1 1 -LrfE-V OHclmal aad Only !..
yNSBAFE. Alwa.T.reiiabl. Ladle, wk Druivtm
tor i;niuiir.M - r?Mii?':
la KEI and iiold metallla bom. waiat
with b ribbon. Take otaer. BefiiM
Uniunat HabatHatlaaa aad Inalta
tltma. Bay of joar Drangiat. or lead 4c ia
snpa fcr Frtlalara, Teattaaanlali
-ad "Relief for l,.dlcVn Uttmr, by r.
taps Mall. 1 0.OOO Taatimooials. S.ld b
all Draff in. Chichester Chenleal Cav,
Sfaoiswa saaara. rniLA. rt.
A WEEK Oil Burner,
Heats stoves or furnaces ; barns erode
oll;o 'ittFKEK. WrTteNntlenmlMrsr.
Col alto JE. Sew York At. f .
831
Reduced Fares to Vermillion via
Pennsylvania Lines.
Low fare excursion tickets to Ver
million (Linwood Park), Ohio, ac
count Religious Meetings, -will be
sold via Pennsylvania Lines June 17
to September 17, inclusive.
"How slow you are, Candida!"
"Yes." It was entirely good tem
pered. Therefore the other voice be
came crosser.
"What's the use primping two hours
for that mere nobody of a Filiberto?"
"To be sure, what is the use?" Cam
dida's good temper was maddening.
Her mother was at the remote end of
the house, but she could see mentally
the smiling, tantalizing face that she
knew so well.
Candida's mirror smlldd back at her.
It was a tiny mirror with a shabby
frame, but it held the loveliest and
most famous picture in all Alta Cali
fornia. The portrait was that of a
sixteen-year-old girl, strongly built and
exquisitely rounded, as those Castilian
girls of old California were the com
plexion a pure Castilian olive without
a tinge of rose; the eyes a sparkling,
vivid black; the hair as black as the
eyes, a splendid mass coiled high and
caught with a comb.
"Ah, but it is of use, even if Filiber
to is a mere nobody. What do you
think, lovely senorita?" she said to the
face in the mirror. The face laughed
back at her.
Candles were fastened to the wall oh
each side of the mirror, so that a
strong light was thrown on the faee
therein. Candida could watch it to
good advantage as it grew lovelier un
der her skillful touch.
A lock of hair did not suit her. She
brushed it, pulled it, unfastened it, re-
fastened it, "finally pulled down the
whole mass of hair in a heap and be
gan coiling it all over from the begin
ning.
"You're the slowest of all my girls,"
fretted her mother in the dining room
It made no difference to her whether
Candida was slow or not on this occa
sion, but she Avas out or sorts witn all
the world. She had expected that the
comaudante would invite her daugh
ter to accompany him to the fandango
tonight. She had watched in vain for
the message. She saw her match
making blighted after being brought to
a critical point.
"Where's the girl?" growled a ter
rific voice. It was that of her husband
"She's dressing."
"What for, when she's going with
nobody but Yorba? She had as well
wear her working gown."
"Ah, Dios after all our hopes!"
Senora Barrajas wrung her fat hands
"It's of no avail to whimper about it
The girl's been a fool, you may count
on that, no matter what she says
She's done something to annoy the
comaudante it's like her. Stubborn
as her mother. She will reap as she
sows."
. "My stubbornness made me marry
you," put in the senora.
"And you got better than you ever
deserved." He strode out of the room
grumbling like a thuuderstonm.
Candida, adjusting her comb, heard
it all and smiled.
"Ah, madre mia, how blind you are
in spite of your lynx eyes," she said
a ad took a note from her bosom.
"Contrary to custom, I send this to
you instead of to your mother," she
reread with satisfaction. "For it is
your answer I desire. Will you accom
pany me to the fandango? If not I
shall go to Santa Barbara on business,
for the fandango without you would
hold no charms."
Below was what any girl in Califor
nia would have given her black eyes
for the signature of the popular co
mandante. No member of the family had seen
the messenger ride up and deliver this
note to Candida. Nor had any one
seen her send back her answer which
read:
"I must beg to be excused from this
fandango, for my ankle is still weak
since Pero threw me, and I dare not
risk a dance."
Nor did any one know that she sent
another message to a certain "nobody."
"The coast is clear. The eoman
dante is going to Santa Barbara, so he
will never know that I go to the dance.
Father will let me go with you for the
once, for he thinks I have no other in
vitation." Candida's conscience shook off fibs
as a duck shakes off water. There was
not a cloud on her brow as she made
herself lovely for the ball. Her father
had given a grumbling "yes" to Fili
berto' a invitation. He had refused
over and over to let the girl accompany
this young man, whose fault was pov
erty, but now pique played its part,
and as he realized that the coman
dante was not Inviting Candida after
all his promising attentions he re
solved that she should not be left at
home.
"I don't care; take her to the dance
if you want to," he said to Filiberto
Yorba. Then he went off muttering
curses on the head of the coman
dante. They had gambled together
many a time, and they had lain side
by side in their cups when the aguardi
ente was plenty. "Now the man is
Jilting my daughter, is he?"
Candida tucked the note in her bos
om again. It would be fun to show
it to Filiberto when they had a little
time alone.
"Tell Filiberto I'll be ready in rt
minute," she called as she heard the
light hoofs of Mia.
She moved the comb to the other
side, then back to its original position
Behind her ear she fastened a great
crimson rose.
"You are lovelier than ever," Fili
berto whispered as she gave him a
glimpse of the picture she was. Then
tuie uu-ew a white mantilla over ner
head and shoulders, her face and the
rose peeping out from the snowy lace.
"Good evening, Mia," she said, pat
ting the little horse's nose. It gave
a happy whinny, for it knew Candida.
Her father and mother came from
the house and said a surly good even
ing to the handsome young Spaniard.
To them he was entirely objectionable
in that he had no property; no influ
ential father, nothing but his own
cleverness and courage to depend up
on, b urtnermore, they strongly sus
pected , their daughter of preferring
him to the shrewd old political fox to
whom they were trying to marry her.
"Permit me to thank you both for
intrusting your daughter to my care
tonight," he said blithely in spite of
the frowns that greeted him.
Candida patted the restless pony
again. "Are you In a hurry, Mia?
she said. "Come, Filiberto, we must
start. Mia says she will not wait."
The girl put her little red slippered
foot into the stirrup. Filiberto helped
her as she sprang, and she was perch
ed aloft in the gala day saddle, all
carved and besilvered. With a bow
to the old people he sprang up behind
her. as was thie Californian custom.
He reached forward to adjust the
reins. Mia fumed to be off. But the
word had not been given when a clat
ter of hoofs sounded beyond the house.
All turned to see who the arrival
was. The hoofs clattered more sharp
ly as the gallop slowed. Up rode the
comandante.
At the sight of Candida about to
ride away he turned white with anger,
as his way was.
"Ah, senorita, may I inquire who
your physician may be that your ankle
heals so quickly?"
The father and mother stood silent,
looking from one to the other. Sus
picion, fear, rage, were creeping upon
them. It was no time to parry, the
girl knew.
"There Is but one physician who can
heal every hurt," she replied. "He is
love. I am in his charge. Off, Mia."
And the pony was away with them.
"You mean it?" said Filiberto.
She only tossed him a teasing laugh
now. "How Mia flies!" she said,
dodging his question. "There are the
lights of the fandango."
Far away glittered the brilliant
lights in a great rancft house. Sudden
ly the road divided. At the end of one
branch were the lights of the gay ball;
at the end of the other, one lamp shone
from the mission.
"Listen!" said Filiberto and stopped
the horse. A strange blending of
sounds came to their ears; guitar and
violin sounded faintly from the left;
from the right came the faraway
chime of the mission bell.
"To the left lies the dance," he said
slowly. "After it borne again, a
storm of wrath, you and I separate
forever."
"Yes," she said, the merriment gone
out of ber eyes.
"To the right," he went on, "Father
Juan, our old priest and friend. He
knows us and loves us. He will marry
us tonight."
"Oh!" she cried with a little shud
der. "Shall it not be the right road?"
"Oh I'm afraid I eau't"
"Say the right."
Ske hesitated, perplexed. Then she
ocied: "1 know, I'll let Mia deckle. We
shall see which way she chooses."
She pushed his hands from the reins,
drew Mia to the middle of the fork
and stopped her. "Now go, Mia," she
said.
The horse flung up her head and gal
loped into the dark road on the right.
"Mia, you shall feed upon sugar
lumps for the rest of your life," Fili
berto said.
It was not for many years that Can
dida made a confession to her hus
btind. "I tweaked the right rein," she
owned then. "I was , so afraid Mia
might make a mistake."
THE bnNANA.
Fruit Tlint Alpen on tlte Plant la
Not Suitable For Food.
There is a vast amount of ignorance
prevailing among Intelligent people of
the north concer.n!ng the growth, pro
duction and marketing of bananas.
Many people imagine that the natives
In tropical climes step out of their huts
in the early morning and pluck and
eat bananas from the plant, the same
as they would orange3 and other fruits.
Bananas ripened on the plant are not
suitable for food v and would be much
the same as the pith which is found in
the northern cornstalk or elder. Ba
nanas sold in the United States, even
after traveling 3,000 miles in a green
state, are every bit as good as bananas
ripened under a tropical sun. This is
probably true of no other export f rult.
The plant of which bananas is the
fruit is not a tree, nor is It a bush or
vine. It is simply a gigantic plant,
growing to a height of from fifteen to
twenty feet. About eighteen feet from
the ground the leaves, ofttimes eight
feet long, come out in a short cluster,
from tiie center cr wuicu springs a
bunch of bananas. These do not grow
with the bananas pointing upward nat
urally, and if the stem grew straight
they would hang exactly as seen in
the fruit stores and grocers' windows.
This, however, is not the case. The
stem bends under the weight of the
fruit, and this brings it into directly
the opposite direction, with the largo
end of the stalk up and the fringes
pointing toward the sun.
A word of explanation concerning
some banana terms. Each banana is
called a "finger," and each of these lit
tle clusters of fingois surrounding a
stalk is called a "hand." The quality
and value of each bunch depend on the
number of . hands it has. Some may
wonder how the fruit is cut from the
top of a plant fifteen feet from the
ground. The native laborers cut the
stalk part witfr up its height. The
weight of the fruit causes the stalk
to slowly bend over until the bunch
of bananas first nicely readies the
ground; then the bunch is cut off with
the ever ready machete and carried
to the river or railroad for shipment.
The plant at the same time is cut
close to the ground. The banana is a
very prolific producer of itself, and
at every cleaning of the land it is
necessary to cut down many of the
young plants, or "suckers," as they are
termed, in order that they may not
become overcrowded up to a certain
limit. The fewer suckers on a given
area the larger the fruit they will pro
duce. Chicago Chronicle.
X
Sued by His Doetor.
"A doetor here has sued for
$12.50, which I claimed was excessive
for a ease of chojera morbus," says
R. WhiU, of Coach ella, Gal. "At
the trial he praised his medical skill
and medicine. I asked him if it
was not Okamberlain 's Colic, Cholera
and Diarrheea Remedy he used as I
had good reason to believe it was,
and he would not say under oath that
it was not." No doetor culd use a
better remedy than this in a case of
thokra morbus, ft never fails. Sold
by A. G. Luken & Co.; W. H. Sud
hoff, 5th and Main Sts.
CASTOR I A
Por Infants and Children.
The Kind You Have Always Bought
Willing to Repeat.
The office boy to a large firm of pub
lishers was a smart lad, and when he
was sent to one of the operative de
partments with a message he noticed
at once that something was wrong
with the machinery. He returned,
gave the alarm and thus prevented
much damage. The circumstance was
reported to the head of the firm, be
fore whom John was summoned.
"You have done me a great service,
my lad," he said. "In future your
wages will be increased $1 weekly."
"Thank you, sir," said the bright lit
tie fellow. "I will do my best to be
worth It and to be a good servant to
you."
The reply struck the chief almost as
much as the lad's previous service had
done.
"That's the right spirit, my lad," he
said. "In all the years I have been in
business no one has ever thanked me
in that way. I will make the increase
$2. Nov, what do you say to that?"
"Well, sir," said the boy after a mo
ment's hesitation, "would you mind if
I said it again V Philadelphia Ledger.
Bears tke
Signature of
A j
1
i
The Kind Ton Have Always Bought, and which has been
in use for over 30 years, has borne the signature of
mm and has been made under big per
sonal supervision since its infancy
Allow no one to deceive yon in this.
All Counterfeits, Imitations and" Just-as-good" are but '
Experiments that trifle with and endanger the health of
Infants and Children Experience against Experiment
What is CASTORIA
Castoria is a harmless substitute for Castor Oil, Pare
goric, Drops and Soothing: Syrups. It is Pleasant. It
contains neither Opium, Morphine nor other Narcotic
substance. Its ag;e is its guarantee. It destroys Worm
and allays Feverisliness. It cures Diarrhoea and Wind
Colic. It relieves Teething; Troubles, cures Constipation
and Flatulency. It assimilates the Food, regulates the
Stomach and Bowels, giving- healthy and natural sleep
The Children's PanaceaThe Mother's Friend
GENUINE CASTORIA ALWAYS
Bears the Signature of
The Kind You Have Always Bought
In Use For Over 30 Years.
THC CENTAUH COMPANY. TT HURMV STRICT. NEW TOM CITV.
Every
Wide-A wake
Farmer
who is interested in the news of his
town and county should subscribe
for a
Good Local
Weekly Newspaper
to keep him in touch with the do
ings of his neighbors, the home
markets, aad all items of interest
to himself and family.
The PALLADIUM
Richmond, Ind.,
will admirably supply your wants
or county news and prove a wel
come visitor in every household.
Regular Price. $1.00 Per Year
Every
CJp-to-Date
Farmer
NEEDS
A High Class
Agricultural Weekly
to give him the experiencr of others
in all the advanced methods and
improvements which are an invalu
able aid in securing the largest pos
sible profit from the farm, and with
special matter fcr every meeiber of
his family.
The New York V
Tribune Farmer
Haw York City
will pe-t you every week on all im
portant agricultural topics of the
day, and show you how to make
money from the farm.
Regular Price. S 1 .00 Per Year 2 i
Low Fares to Chicago via Pennsyl
vania Lines
June 16, 17 18, 19 and 20, excur
sion tickets to Chicago, account Re
publican National convention ,will be
sold from all ticket stations on the
Pennsylvania ines. For information
regarding rates, time of trains, etc.,
call on local ticket agent of those
lines.
Both of these papers for one year for $1.25 if you
send your order with the money to
The Richmond Palladium
ELECT BOARDING
Home like Menu. Rates Reasonable
iMesda'es Smith S: Conley
30 X. Eleventh St.
3D
15- B. ZEIEIC
TiM Crown ni Bride crk. 721 COLONIAL.
Dentist
J.
S. BRTJMLEY
. I m s m m t
Dins uistriDutea
Phone 312 So. 171. CtM WORK fiURlSTEED. BATES BEJS'JJIBLB
Novel Advertisement.
That sentiment can be used with
good effect in an advertisement the
Germans evidently believe; otherwise
it is difficult to account for the follow
ing letter, which appeared among the
business notices In a German paper:
My Dearest Charlotte My heart Is al
most broken because your father has for
bidden me to call on you, and I know the
only reason is because I am not wealthy.
I cannot, however, live without you, and
so we must meet somewhere.
Meet me tomorrow morning about 10
o'clock at in street. I mean that
large store where they sell men's cloth
ing. ' You know it's such a popular place
that it's nlways crowded, and therefore
no one will be able to spy on us. Resides,
I Intend to buy an overcoat, and I'd like
to have your advice. In this store they
have clothes of all colors and styles, so
that I could never make up my mind if 1
were alone. Now, remember, my darllngr,
I'll expect you at 10 o'clock, and I hop
you won't disappoint me.
Garden Plows.
oooooooooooo oooooooooooooooooooooooo
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
I
Jnnfis Hantaan! Go. 1
Oooooooooooo ooooooooooo ooooooooooo
Beats all the Garden Tools.
Plow pays for .Itself. $2.50t
One person can do Work of Three.
& It Cultivates, Hoes, and Rakes.

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