OCR Interpretation


Evansville daily journal. (Evansville, Ind.) 1863-1866, October 14, 1863, MORNING EDITION, Image 1

Image and text provided by Indiana State Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86059181/1863-10-14/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

TERMS IX "ADVANCE.
FOE DAILY.
One year... 6 00
Six months I 00
three months 1 SO
Supplied by carriers at 12 ceuta per week.
FOR WEEKLY.
hree months 8
x months .. 85
n Year 1 60
FOR TRI-WEKKLY.
i.v mouths 2 00
One year 4 00
DRY GOODS
KEEN &
PRESTON
; K JUST RECEIVED
A LAKUE AND
A A ireiteral i
;i r( Mfiil of
Desirable Dry Goods,
W liirh tl
amine pr
iuvite tho "trade" to call and ex
I and qualities : believing, knowing,
can -V'- dealers additional freight and ex
1-. .i-,'b iii Knhig further Eastward. janl5
A. C. PU SH E E,
"iin in
f 'vn & American Fancy Goods,
iiMB8, fe RUSHES, PURSES, WALLETS,
;.i -Ju is. Toilet Soajis Rubber floods,
i.A.HKS. YANKEE NOTIOKS,
Latsfia? " nkcts, Clitldreiiii Caba, Ac.
No. 20, Main Street,
A: ANSV1I.1. 1-. .... INDIANA
LAW
CARDS
W . H. WALKER, Jr.,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
EVANSVILLE., IND.,
Oilice on Third Street.
. i 1 -T jt,......l... f ...... . II,.,,..
H k RLE S DE NBY,
Attoi'ney at Law,
m resumed the practice of Law. Office on Third
t!r. f. mill. He nf Ball's Block, up stairs. feb2
JAMES
. Vt t orny
RE I D ,
at Law
AND
C 0 LLECTING
AGENT.
OFFICE
J :.:. Street
-On Thini Street, third door from
i ti the Crosrent City Bank Building,
EVANSV1LLE, INDIANA
Ieb25,ly
Jus. T. Walker,
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE
AND
Agent for obtaining Pensions,
Back Pay and Bounty
MiR DISC HASHED SOLDIERS, AND FOB
the Widows and other legal representatives of
wDo die m tne service of the t inted states.
ce on the orth-vest side of Third Street,
ear the Washington House ind nearly opposite
. ii' nun h i , i.uoiinr, luumihi.
AH bnsiness entrusted to him will be promptly
attentat t... jyl8-ly
. 1. . . . XI.... . L',- .. :i T.. I . . .
NOTICE.
NOTICE TO SHIPPERS.
O F
Tallow, Lard, Grease & Oils.
the undersigned pay their
Particular Attention
To the sale of tho above articles, and
SOAP STOCKS GENERALLY,
Consignments sent to them will be
PROMPTLY DISPOSED OF
and
Q,uick Returns Made
on very advanced terms. We mail our 'Weekly
Circular gratis to all sending their address
I.. ABRAM KNIGHT fc SONS,
23 Water-Street, N. Y. City.
iyloJOm
V Attiril I OXUxvUi.
PUSHEE'S VARIETY STORE,
TT M x n rxi I lllllfl . I
No. 20 Main Street,
t S THE PLACE TO FIND FANCY GOODS,
I I'i'Uibs, Brns; es, rocket Wallets. Card Cases,
Tablets, Scissors. Knives, Watch Keys, Guard
(Htaius. Thimbles, Needles, Pius, Tape Measures,
Head. Belt Clasps, Goggles, Spectacles. Ther
moBiet.irs. French Harps, Pop Units, Ivory Bat
tles, Marbles, Chessmen, Dolls, Corset Clasps,
Steel Pen. Pencilea. Games, Bubbar Balls, Toilet
Simp. Jewtrrj . Vi.din Strings, Work Boxes.
Writing lfce.k. Feather Dnsters, Bird Cages,
tiil.!r-s' t'arri;t2es, Ladies' Fancy Work and
Traveling is ,!:.!,, Ae ., Ac., at wholesale and re
tail 7 ep21
MEDICAL.
b. J. DAY,
PHYSICIAN &
M. D..
SURGEON.
EXAMIKIG SURGEON FOB PENSIONARY.
OFFICE On Second Street, between Main and
t.ii. !18t.
l'.F-JID8NCK At Sherwood House.
Kvansville, Jan nary G, IS43.
S. wrTLOMPSON, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON
Orricx akd Ri Mo. 35 Walkct Stkut
(At Dr. Ronald's Old Stand.)
EVANSVILLE, INDIANA.
Bov29-ly
IVORYTYPES,
PHOTOGRAPS
AXD
Ortx-ci Pictures.
I.
ALSO.
WEDDING CARDS.
Mounted in Beautiful Style,
AT
.liiu's I'liotographle Gallery,
OVER P0ST-0I1C.
SOAP AND CANDLES.
1 i. ; 1 ; i
I ecker.
(Sixceator to Decker ft Kramer),
Manufacturer of Lard
Oil
SOAP AND CANDLES.
Also, aa extra article of
BVMmima, kmhihs, and cab oil
Dealers in Roein, Soda, Ashes, Ac. Also
Pure Catawba Win
i our nWi, raising, fn quantities to suit par
chasers,
111 ..?. Fir and Second,
iLVAXkviLLS, IaoLaaa.
Terma cash, or 60 days' paper negotiable iu
assBMf
INTELLIGENCE OFFICE
JU1E PHI
I llitellifH
ei of the V
strict and prt
KRSiCNKD HAS OPENED AN
nee Omrc. on Third Street, ftmrdoors
aeliiugtvn Hotel, where he will give
uipt attention to all busiotes in thai
tine.
Zeituog copy
John watman.
ap!5
PICTURE GALLERY.
SrS lUM LhI
3w- 2. 3 . a i
E. 2. F J
i :i l qH
EVA
VOLUME XVI.
DRY GOODS.
NEW AND "ELEGANT GOODS
'V '
E A . COOK & 00.
It K
It HVIMl A M' ( I K N I N t! AT
lllt.t&T STREET
A i. , I Eleirant Stnok ot
Dry Goods, Fancy Goods
AND
iT O T X 3 M S,
Their Goods have I teen selected with great care
by experienced hands, with special reference to
the trade of this city ; were bought for CASH and
will bo sold very low to Cash Customers only.
Their stock comprises all the most
ELEGANT STYLES
Required to co titute a first class
Dry Goods House,
EMBRACIIfa
Black, Plain and Fancy Silks,
Foulard Silks,
Fine Mozambique Dress Goods, plain
and Check;
Bareges, Organdies and Jaconets,
Lawns, Mourning and .Summer
Dress Goods, of every description.
Point Lace Collars,
Collars of every Variety,
Mourning Setts,
Mourning Collars,
Silk Talmas Sacques, and
Circulars of all kinds,
Lace Mantles,
Summer Shawls,
Silk Parasols, a beautiful assortment
just received.
Marseilles Quilts and Spreads,
Cloths,
Cassimeres,
Staple Goods of every description.
NOTIONS.
Our steck in this line is large, and of the finest
qualify, to which particular attentiou is directed.
Remember the place for bargains
NO. 7 FIRST STREET,
EVANSVILLE, INDIANA.
CIGARS & TOBACCO.
JOSEPH FENDRICH & BROS.
No. 155 Forest Street, a. 40 Kmil It
BALTIMORE M I .
JOHN FENDRICH & BROS..
COLT'MBIA, PA .
AND
f. FENDRICH & BROS
Evansville, Ind ,
Brnneliis of the Baltlntare Ilonae,
TOBACCO.
ARE NOW THE MOST EXTENSIVE
Manufacturers, in our lino, in the State. We
offer the following Tobacco and Cigars, of our own
manufacture, for sale:
SO Boxes of Five Lump per pound .V) Cta.
SS)0 Boxes of 10 Lump per pound 00 Cts.
200 Boxes Frank's Orange Lump ;b R5 Cts.
300 Boee Bud, in Caddies, per pound CO Cts.
.sj boxes Boron n, iu Catluies.
300 Caddies Peach Leaf, per pound CO Cta.
200 El Dorado, Light, per pound SI 00
300 Caddies Pancake, Light, per pound 80 Cta.
100 Boxes Sun Cured Tobacco lb 55 Ctt.
4,000 lbs Home Spun Twist Tobacco ;
1,000 Barrels Smoking Tobacco ;
200 boxes Bond's Scotch Snuff;
50 Half Barrels Fine-Cat Chewing Tobacco ;
100 Merschaum Pipes ;
100 Gross Briar and Wood Pipes ;
200,000 Clay Pipes, assorted ;
100 Gross Rubber Pipes ;
10,000 assorted Pipe Stems ;
25,i) Cenha Cigars ;
24,000 Henry Clay Cigars, first's ;
2,000 Henry Clay Cigars, Second's ;
28,1X10 La Napoleon Cigars :
30,000 El Brutus Cigars;
200,000 Half Spanish Cigars ;
200,000 Segareets ;
220,000 La Salvadina Cigars ;
408.000 Packs Smokinz Tobacco :
50 Drums Turkish Smoking Tobacco ;
1,000 Bales Kinnicanick Smoking Tobacco ;
50 Drums Shanghie ;
2,000 Pounds Mackaboy Snuff ;
2,000 French Scuff.
Merchants and St ore-Keepers, look to their
interest ; exam i ue our large stock.
TVo. 37
Main Street, Sales Room
factory, Cor. Locust fc Water Sts.
1
We manufacture all the above goods, and will I
30 per cent, elu-apcr than any House iu our State.
We would call the attention of Merchants who
deal iu our line, to buy from the manufacturers,
where they can save 30 per cent.
f. KENDRlCH k BROS.,
ap'21 Evansville, Indiana.
STOVE WORKS.
r. W. BBIKXMRVKB. a. Mi;
SOUTHERN STOVE WORKS.
BRINKMEYER &,
CO.
Manufacturer of
Stoves, Hollow Ware, Iron Railings,
House, Fronts, Verandas,
Balconies, Castings In General,
COPPEB, TIN AND SHEET IRON WARE, Ac
' Sales Room Main Street, opoite Court
Honse
sF" Foundery Near the Mouth of Pigeon Creek
EVANSVILLE, IND.
W0BDXB3 S0IJCIXID.-SW my9
M M 'I' M TI KKU- OF
SVILLE DAILY JOURNAL.
MORNING EDITION.
PUBLISHED BY
I AM IB 11. MeNEELY.
F. M. THAYER.
JNO. H. McNEELY.
UNDER THK I1RM or THE
Evansville Journal Company.
Journal J$ailclingss,
LOCUST STREET,
BETWEEN FIRST AND WATER.
WEDNESDAY.
.OCTOBER 14
What you Swallow when yon Vote
the so-called Democratic Ticket.
To show what doctrines men profess,
endorse and encourage, when they voted
the false Democratic, or Copperhead
Ticket, we select a few specimen sen
tences from Copperhead authorities.
No honest man can read them without
shttme that such doctrine can be pro
fessed in America:
"Negro slavery is the foundation of
Liberty and the Essence of the Democ
racy." New York Day Book.
" There never has been anything call
ed for by the South, and there never can
be, that I would not willingly consent
to." Speech of State Senator Clark, of
Wisconsin, March, lsou.
" History, will relate that we (the
North) manufactured the conflict, forced
it to hot-bed precocity, nourished and in
vited it." Detroit Free Press, AprillQ,
1862.
"Well, tell them (Congress) that a
Cromwell will rise in their midst before
they progress too far, who will bring
their head to the block without delay or
mercy." Free Press, March 24
" I say to you, my constituents, that as
your representative, I will never vote
one dollar, one man, or one gun to the
administration of Abraham Lincoln to
make war apon the South" D. W.
Voorhees, M. C. 1th Dtil Ind., April,
1861.
" The Democracy will yet teach Abe
Lincoln and his co-usurpers that the
way of the transgressors is not easy."
Hon. A. C. Dodge, of Iowa.
"This is a damned Abolition war, and
we believe Abe Lincoln is as much of a
traitor as Jeff. Davis.' Ashland, (0.)
Democratic Union.
" The President and his cabinet were
never worthy of the confidence of the
nation. The Democratic party should
never have given his assent to the ap
peal to the sword, after the affair at Fort
Sumpter." Detroit Free Press.
"The Ashland, (O.) Union, a Demo
cratic Organ, speaking of dur soldiers,
calls them hired Hessians going to the
sunny Southern soil to butcher by whole
sale, not foreigners but good men, as ex
emplary Christians as any of our men."
" The Crawford Co. Forum, referring
to our soldiers says:
" It (the Administration) has put arms
in the hands of outlaws, thieves, murder
ers and traitors."
"The Democratic Press, Taylorville,
111., speaking of the Republican party,
and the army, says:
"In power lesa than a year, it has
spent millions of the people's money,
and five hundred thousand men are em
ployed to steal negroes from their South
ern masters."
"If the North and Houth are ever uni
ted, we predict it. will be when the Con
federate States North shall adopt the
new constitution, (of Jeff. Davis,) or
something very near it. There's a good
time coming boys." Van Buren Co.
Press at Paw Paw.
" Why this expenditure of more blood
and treasure in a hopeless enterprise
why blame men for being traitors? We
cannot see why." Detroit Fre$ Press.
"There, sir, is the damnable abolition
ist who administers the Government.
The people ought to rise up and by
physical force hurl hira from the ehair
of the Government In the eyes of God
and men, the people would be justified.
They should do it ; and I will go with
them." Judge Pratt s speech in the
Michigan Legislature, Feb. 12, 1863.
" George W. Peck, of Ohio, in a
speech before the Lansing Democratic
Association, March, 1863, said:
You black Republicans begun this
war. You have carried it on for two
years. You have sent your hell hounds
down South to devastate the country
and what have you done? You have
not conquered the South. You never
can conquor them. And Why? Because
they are our brethren."
" John H. George, N. H., Democratic
nominee for Congress declared."
" I won't do anything to sustain the
President, Congres, or any of the Pi
ratical Crew that have control of this
Government. I won't do anything that
can, in any way, be interpreted as sup
porting this war."
From the Cincinnati Gazette.
Gen. Lee's Report.
We may reasonably suppose that Gen.
Lee has not set forth in his official re
port all his plans and objects in his
Pennsylvania campaign, but he shows
plainly that they were all defeated. He
speaks of "other valuable results to be
attained by military success," but as the
military success was not attained, the
others did not appear ; and we doubt if
he saw the signs that he expected.
He says he undertook to draw Hooker
north for the purpose of attacking him.
Hooker marched north, but Lee says he
pursued the roads near the Potomac,
and no favorable opportunity was offered
for attack. Purely there were all the
battlefields they had fought over before.
But it seems from this that Lee expected
Hooker would fol ow his march west
ward into the Valley of Virginia, and
leave Washington and the North open.
Iu this he reckoned without his host
Lee's march began on the 3d of June.
It as promptly discovered, and he ad
mits that Hooker's dispositions discon
certed his plan. A national force
crossed the Rappahannock, and threat
ened the rear of the rebel column. A
cavalry force crossed higher up and at
tacked'. Lee says it was repulsed, but
these operations must have delayed his
movement.
Lee's forces captured Winchester,' of
course. The place was indefensible, and
the only alternative ottered to its com
maudcr, upon the advance of a heavy
force, was to run in advance, or wait to
retreat with honor, and be cut up. The
court martialinsr of the commander at
Winchester is only a diversion to cover
the incapacity that placed him there.
It is mlbciHI to see any rationality in
Lee's plans as he describes them. It is
strange that he should have expected to
draw Hooker into any more favorable
opportunity for attack than was offered
in the country east of the mountains,
and between the Rappahannock and Po
tomac. There was but two other possi
ble places; one in the Shenandoah Val
ley, if Hooker had followed Lee's march.
But this Lee could hardly have expected.
The other was in case Hooker could have
hurried into Maryland in advance of Lee.
Hut wis he could not have expected, af
ter his efforts to get the start of Hooker
in the march North. It would appear
EVANSVILLE, IND., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14 1863.
that Lee began the campaign without
any definite idea, and that when begun
he found it too much for him.
Lee's advance had reached the Poto
mac, and still Hooker was marching
North covering Washington. To draw
hjm forth from hii-JJbase, Lee ordered
Longstreet's corps to march east of'lilue
Ridge, and occupy the gaps in Bull Run
Mountains, and a heavy cavalry forca
was thrown out beyond. This was at-
tacked by our cavalry, and after a severe j
fight driven back. A part of Ewell's
corps entered Maryland, and Jenkin's :
cavalry penetrated to Chambersburg. j
It is interesting to rad the statement j
of General Lee that these demonstra- i
tions did not have the effect to cause our
army to leave Virginia, and that neither
did Hooker seem disposed to advance on
Longstreet. Therefore he was with
drawn and the whole army pushed for
ward in pursuance of its undertaking to
draw Hooker out of Virginia and away
from his base.
Lee marehed to Chambersburg, and
on the 29th was about pushing on to Har
risburg, when he heard that Hooker had
crossed the Potomac. No sooner had
he accomplished his object of drawing
Hooker from Virginia and farther from
his base, than he found his own base
threatened. He therefore found it ne
cessary to concentrate his forces, and
the various corps took up the march to
Gettysburg. By a singular fatality Stu
art's cavalry, which was left behind to
harass our crossing of the Potomac, be
ing unable to effect anything serious,
marched to join the main body, by such
a route that our column was interposed
between it and Lee's army, until it reach
ed Gettysburg, so that Lee derived no
information from that
Lee knew little of the movements of
our army, and he says his march
towards Gettysburg was more leis
urely than it would lave been had he
known. Two of Ewell's divisions and
two of Hill's, came upon the advance of
Howard's corps beyond Gettysburg.
That affair is well known to our readers.
On our part it was rare, rash and disas
trous. Our leading division, coming
suddenly upon the enemy, deployed into
line on the double-quick, and went into
the fight without stopping to find out the
force they had to encounter. The result
was a severe and heavy repulse, and a
heavy loss in prisoners; but, as was sup
posed at the time, and as Lee now says,
this success encouraged the enemy to
make the attack which resulted in their
total repulse and the defeat of the whole
campaign.
Lee says: "It had not been intended
to fight a general battle at such a dis
tance from our base, unless attacked by
the enemy; but finding ourselves sud
denly confronted by the Federal army,
it became a matter of difflcultv 'to with
draw through the mountainsjjwith our
large trains." It seems that he was
pushing north to draw Hooker from his
base, so as to attack him, but did not in
tend to attack him so far from his own
base. In short, in marching North to
draw Hooker, he caught a Tartar
Lee shows, also, that the anticipations
of drawing unbounded supplies from the
agricultural stores of Pennsylvania,
were disappointed. The transferring of
the scene of hostilities north of t,li Po
tomac, did not answer the expectations.
He says we were able to restrain his fo
raging partion l.y qoruij.yi 114? the liasses
in the mountains with regular and local
troops, and a battle thus became a meas
ure unavoidable. "There were also val
uable results that would ensue from the
defeat of Meade's army." The first con
flict was on the morning of July 1 ,u In
stead of following up that great success,
the attack was not made until the after
noon of the 2nd. Lee says of this delay:
" The attack was not pressed that after
noon, the enemy's force being unknown,
and it being advisable to await the arri
val of the rest of our troop3."
This was remarkable prudence on the
heels of such a success. But this ena
bled our troops to come up also, and to
take up strong position, strengthen it,
and make all its dispositions for a pitch
ed battle. The operation was deliberate I
rather tnan .Napoleonic. All things be
ing duly prepared, Lee attacked at the
mature hour of the afternoon of the 2d.
Alter severe hgiiting he had some suc
cess on his right, where his plan was to
get hold of a commanding point in our
position, which encouraged him to re
new the attack next day, in which he ad
mits a decisive repulse. He magnani
mously says, more may have been re
quired of his troops than they were able
to perform, and gives the highest praise
to their valor and fortitude.
Lee's account of his retreat will not
tend to mitigate the public disappoint
ment that he was not attacked. ' Nor
will his showing that his campaign was
completely foiled by the movements of
Hooker soften the public contempt for
the carpet generalship that raised a dif
ference with him about the adding of the
Harper's Ferry garrison of 12,000 men
to his army, after their position had been
rendered of no importance, and which,
for this, caused a change of commanders
in the face of the enemy, ard then gave
the point up to his successor.
The Greek Fire.
A recent letter from Morris Island
gives the following account of the prepa
ration of Greek fire, and some experi
ments therewith:
Your correspondent yesterday wit
nessed some experiments with this new
incendiary agent, calculated to deter
mine if it would cause premature explo
sion of shells containing it NinS shells
were fired from a aU-pounder Farrott
c,un into the sea. Of these two con
tained each IU 01 the small tin tubes in
which the Greek tire is packed, in addi
tion to the bursting charge of powder.
The other seven had each four tubes of
the inflammable article. The first shot
had a charge of ten tubes. This had a
wooden plug instead of a fuse. It fell j
into the water without exploding. The
second, containing ten tubes, with a five-
second fasft exploded 150 feet from the
gun and was deemed an evidence of pre
mature explosion by the Captain of Ord
nance in command, who declared that
the shell should in five seconds travel at
least 1,200 feet To this Mr. Short, the
proprietor of the Greek fire, objected
that the fuse might have been defective
or imperfectly adjusted. Accordingly,
he was invited to see the remaining fuses
placed in the shells. The Sergeant per
forming this duty carefully filled them
in with white lead to prevent leakage of
gas into the shell from the chamber of
the gun by the ignition of the powder
therein. The seven remaining shells
were discharged at various elevations,
with 5, 10 and 12-second fuses, most of
the shells exploding into the air when
their fuses had burned through, the
others falling unexploded into the sea,
owing to the depressiou of the gun. The
fir it shot and the seven last tired prove
that the Greek fire did not, as charged,
e vplode the sheila prematurely. This
was all that was required to be proved
by the experiment.
Of the incendiary power of the Greek
fire your correspondent was enabled to
judge by igniting some himself, and
thrusting it alternately into water and
sand. Several seconds' immersion in
either was ineffectual to extinguish the
flame.
Another tube thrown under water on
the beach, was exhausted of its contents.
The thick pitchy smoke that bubbled up
through the water, continued two minutes
to prove that combustion still went on.
A third tube was fired and buried on the
beach, the wet sand being pressed and
stamped on all sides of it, so that the air
was excluded from the flame. In four
minutes it was dug up and found to have
quite burned out. A substance that will
burn two minutes, inextinguishable by
any of the appliances ordinarily at hand,
must be a very dangerous incendiary
agen. -.Chemists know how to compound
several such mixtures; but, as all those
heretofore made have been liquid or gas
eous in their form, the danger of using
them has been very great. Mr. Short has
reduced his compound to a solid body,
inexplosive and notliableto spontaneous
combustion. He packs it in tin tubes
three inches in length and three-fourths
of an inch, in diameter. These are lined
inside and out with pitch. The solid
compound is tightly packed into them, a
fuse being inserted at one end. They are
then covered with brown paper and de
posited in wooden boxes of 250 each,
ready for use. It would seem that they
might be made available for the same
purpose as hand grenades are used for.
Mr. Short might, with advantage, cause
them to be packed in sheet iron boxes
instead of wooden ones. Indeed they are
so very liable to aggravate dangerous
fires when kept near other articles of
ordnance that it would be well to set our
patent fire-proof safe makers at work to
devise light and portable packing cases
for them, intended specially to preserve
them, for a time at least, from contact
with fires accidentally kindled.
Rebel Reports - Bragg's Loss set
down at 30,000 -He was shame
fully Worsted.
The Richmond correspondent of the
New York Daily News, under date of
September 20th, has the following in re"
lation to the late battles in Georgia:
Bragg has fought a battle, and Bragg
has reported to the Department that ho
gained a great victory. But Gen. Bragg
does not mention what his losses were,
although we know that, according to tho
accounts of the sanguinary conflict, tho
battles near Chattanooga may be called
drawn fights both opponents as terribly
used np. To a great extent Gen. Bragg
had lost the confidenae of the people,
from the fact that he has so often de
ceived them by false dispatches, credit
ing himself with victories when he actu
ally suffered a most disasterous defeat
for instance, at Shiloh. But the public
is credulous, and any rumor of a victory
sets them ablaze, and no matter who is
the leader, he is at ouce exalted.
The list of killed, wounded and mis
sing will not fall short of 30.000. Among;
the latter is Brigadier-General Adams,
of Texas, who was reported badly wound
ed and in the hands of the enemy. Thir
teen Generals have been put hors de
combat in the last engagement, and have
been either killed, wounded or captured.
The brave General Kemoer, who has re-
cuutly I"' i escU&uiQjil for tho ' -lornl
General Graham, remains still in this
city. He is in very feeble health, but
expects soon to assume active duties.
His promotion is earnestly solicited by
his numerous friends, and as soon as he
is able to take the field, it will be as Ma
jor General.
Robert E. Lee, Com;nander-in-chief of
the army in Virginia, has been in town
for two days past, consulting with the
authorities as to future movements. It
is understood that the army is about to
go into winter quarters, but this infor
mation is imparted merely as " Court
gossip." The general impression, how
ever, is, that General Lee will not move
f. ojs I, is fortified positions on the Rapi
dan and Gordonsville, unless sorely
pressed by Meade's army, in which case
he can readily fall back on the intrench
ments around this city.
The flower of his army is at present
with Bragg. General Longstreet, on
being ordered to reinforce the army on
the Tennsesee, received permission to
pick his men. He selected his favorite
Generals, the lamented Hood and Gen
eral Jenkins, who was the terror of tho
foe on the Nansemond last spring, and
a number of others well and favorably
known. Having such veteran troops to
fight with men of Mars, and distin
guished themselves in every battle from
Bull Run to Gettysburg, Bragg was ex
pected to annihilate the Union army,
and not only to re-capture Chattanooga,
but also pursue the flying enemy, and at
once take possession ot iNashvilie, and,
in fact, of all Tennessee. Longstreet
feels the disgrace badly, and only his
great patriotism and devotion to country,
cause him to serve under an officer who
is greatly inferior to him a man and a
soldier. It will astonish no one to hear
very soon that Braxton Bragg has been
relieved, and General Longstreet ordered
to assume his command. Such a result
would give general satisfaction.
BOILER MAKER.
- JOHN P. LAURENT,
Boiler Mals.er,
Corner of Pine and Water Streets,
EVANSVILLE, INDIANA.
1 AW
1 of
ALL KINDS
Steam Boilers, stationary or portable. I
have every facility for doing good work that good
machinery and good workmen can give, and all
work entrusted to me will be made under my per
sonal supervision.
Workmen sent to any part of the city and
ccnutry to do repairing. oclS-lm
SHIRT MANUFACTORY.
J. SMITH'S
SHIRT MANUFACTORY,
No, Soooud St,
(in bbat's block.)
OHIRTS MADE
TO ORDER FROM MEAS
i fit warranted. A stock o
ij urment and
ready. made Shirts and Collars always on hand, and
at prices that will suit the purchaser. Tncking
uta. etic.hitig Bosoms, Ac, done with neatness
and despatch.
Thankful for past favors, the subscriber respect
fully solicits a coutuauce of the patronage bo
liberally bestowed for the past five years.
oc(S J. SMITH.
SEGARS, &c.
SCHROEDER & LEMCKE,
WHOLESALE DEALKBS IN
Cigars, Smoking, Chewing Tobacco,
Snuff, Pipes, &e.
"Nrr. BO ivaictixx a!-,
EVANSVILLE, IND.
rfetitra now, ami wiil keep, on hand a complete
ml wet l ABorted stock ef
CIGARS & TOBACCO,
AND OFFER THE SAME TO THE PUBLIC
LOW FOR CASH.
t- Siii!.ts will lit,. I it to their interest to call and
examine our prices. We are enabled to sell to
them as low as auy house in the West.
octl7-dw SCHROEDER A LEMCKE.
MANTUA MAKING.
HEADQUARTERS FOR
CLOAK, MANTILLA
AND
Dt OSS TMflr ing
MRS. ELIZA SPEIGLEEERG,
IN THE OLD POST OFFICE BUILDING, ON
First Street, has just received fresh supplies
from the East, of the richest fabrics, and m now
prepared to make up to order on the nioitt reasou
able terms. Cloaks, Mantlas, Circles, an d Sacques
of the best material aud of the mo t beautiful
styles.
Her stork is so complete, that with the assist
ance of the most competent Dress and Cloak
makers in the country, she is able to defy all com
petitors in both stye and prices.
Mrs. Spiegelberg also has bought a Urge as
sortment of Silks, Head Dreesses, Hair Braids and
Curls, Ladya' Pocket Handkerchiefs of every style
and a great many other articles for the conve
nience of the Ladies of Evansville and vicinity too
numerous to mention.
The best Sewing Machines of Orover A Baker
manufactory for family use, for sale by
Mrs. ELIZA SPIKOELBERQ,
No. IS First Street bet Main and Second.
sep22
MUSIC STORE.
WARREN & CONYNGTON'S
Bazaar of Fancy Goods.
PIANO FORTES, MEL0DE0N8, HARMONI
UMS, Accnrdeons, Violins, Guitars, Flutes,
Clarionets, and everything usually kept in Music
Stores. The only stock of
Sbcet Music and Instruction Books
For all instruments will be found here. The very
best Italian Violin, Guitar, Violincello and Banjo
Strings always on hand.
Fancy Goods, Toys and Notion at Wholesale
aud Ret-H.
Old Tianog taken in exchange for new ones.
Instruments of all kinds repaired and tuned,
sept No. 1 MAIN STREET,
Evansville.
DENTIST.
.f . HAAS,
nKLiNu IT THANKFUL FOB THE
A1 liberal pat i nge received during the past four
years, and beinj; i permanent resident of this city,
desires all persot (whether they need his profes
sional services or t) to visit his rooms and see the
Various Stylo ot work Manufactured
Improvements and Inventions
Are being made, and everything that will subserve
the interests of his patients is secured by him. H i
Establishment and Faclllti s
Are equal to any in
E1STBRN CITIKS.
He has Several Anaesthetics
ro
Alleviating Pain when Kxtractlng
Teeth.
Cheeks that are sunken can be restored to nearly
heir ori ginal contour. All desirable styles of
ARTIFICIAL TEETH,
made anywhere In the United States, are nude by
him. Irregularities of Children's Teeth success
fully corrected. Those havinx
I)p; A Y KI) TEETH
Should either have them Extracted or FilloTI, (the
latter if possible) The health of the parties and
the remaining Teeth demand it.
NEURALGIC AFFLICTIONS TREATED.
ALSO CLEFT PALATE
Office on First St , Near Post Office.
HARBWAfiE, Sec.
WEILS, KELLOGG & CO.,
DKALERS IN
H j Tt 1 W ARE
CUTLER?
No. 13
FIRST STREET,
(SIGN BIO MILL. SAW,)
Have received a complete
stock of
FOEE GN AND DOMESTIC
Hardware,
Purchased aud Imported direct from the
Manufacturers
Enabling us to offer inducements to Pur
chasers rarely found in the West. We
call the special attention of Dealers to
our large and well selected Stock, con
sisting in part of
Axes All the celebrated
brands,
Chains Log, Trace and
Halter,
Table and Pocket Cutlery,
Shovels and Spades,
Cotton and Wool Cards,
Wheel Heads,
Weaver's Reeds,
Spinning Wheels,
Locks, Latches, Butts and
Screws,
Gun Trimmings,
Brass Kettles,
Shot Guns,
Rifles and Revolvers,
Chain Pump Fixtures,
Hollow Ware,
Dog Irons,
Gum Belting,
Japanned Ware,
Notions Large Stock.
WELLS, KELLOGG & CO.,
No. 13 First Street.
ESTABLISHED, 1831
MACHINEST.
IViairtTIAN K.KATX.
WX. HF.I1.MAX.
KRATZ &L HEILMAN,
City roixrxclry,
Manufacturers and Ruilders of
Steam Engines and Rollers,
Saw ana Grist Mill Ma
chinery, Tobacco Screws,
Gumming Machines,
ChineselSngar Cane
THRESHING MACHINES. &c,
EVANSVILLE, IND.
TH
E PROPRIETORS OF THE CITY FOUND-
public in general,
kinds or
that they are prepared to do all
Macnine & Finishing Work
And everything appertaining to the Foundry bus
iness. They are manufacturing Steam Engines
and Boilers of any size and pewer required. Saw
Mill Machinery and Mill Gearing of any size; Dis
tillery aud Mining Machinery, Tobacco Screws,
Gumming Hachiuee, Threahiug Machines, Malt
BI ills. Horsepowers, Corn Shelters, Machinery oi
all kinds made and repaired ; Iron and Brass Cast
ings of every description. Iron House Fronts, Cel
lar Grates, Ac. Cooking and Heating Stoves of the
latest improved patterns ; Hollow Ware, Dog
Irons, Ac.
Brewers, Distillers, Rectifiers, &c.
upplied with every description of Copper and
iheet Iron Work, Brewing Kettles, Refrigerators,
Attemporatora, Sparges, Stillheads and Worms on
sn improved principle, Columns for Alcohol Stills,
Yeast Jugs, Cans, Syphons, Ao. ; Copper, Lead and
Iron Pipe ; Copper, Brass and Iron Pumps of every
variety, for Deer, Spirits, Oil, Ac. Brass Cocks ai d
Valves, steam Whistles, Ac.
Werkmen sent to all parts to fit up work and do
repairs on Steam Boilers, Copper and Sheet Iron
Work, Ac.
Old Metals Bought.
They are deaUng in and selling Allen's imprev
ed Steam Guage, Wrought Iron Welded Pipes and
Tubbing, Hiram Hopkins' Improved Smut Ma
chines, Stephen Hughes' Flour Separators, German
Bolting CIsth, Gnm Elastic Belting, Packing,
Hose, Ac of the best kind ; Tinplate, Sheet Iron
Block Tin, Pig Iron, Babit Metal, Spelter, Fire
Brick.
They bsve every facility of the best Machinery
and workmen, and will give all work entrusted to
tbem, their individual attention, filling orders
promptly, warranting their work, and are satisfied
with reasonable prices.
Office and Sale Rooms, Foundry, Boiler-yard
Machine Shop on Pine street, between First and
acond stveets, Evansville. Ind. dee 7
HARDWARE.
GEO. S. WIG & CO.,
Jobbers and Importers.
Hardware and Cutlery.
Our Fall Stock being very
large and complete, we can
offer to our Customers and
tne Trade, Goods that can
not fail to please in Style,
Quality and Price. Our
Stock is now bought for
Cash, and pPices reduced.
We offer the following in
large quantites:
TABLE CUTLEBT, English
TABLE CUTLEBT, American.
TABLE CUTLERY, English.
TABLE CUTLEBT, American
POCKET CUTLEBT.
POCKET CUTLEBT.
POCKET CUTLEBT.
POCKET CUTLEBT.
CHOPPIXG 4JBM.
CHOPPING AXES."
CHOPPING AXES.
CHOPPING AXES.
SHEABS AND SCISSOBS
SHEABS AND SCISSOBS
SHEABS AND SCISSOBS
SHEABS AND SCISSOBS
TABLE AND TEA SPOONS.
TABLE AND TEA SPOONS.
TABLE AND TEA SPOONS.
TABLE AND TEA SPOONS.
MILL AND CUT SAWS
MILL AND i CUT SAWS
WOOD AND HAND SAWS.
WOOD AND HAND SAWS.
BUILDER'S nABDWABE.
MECHANICS TOOLS.
BUILDER'S HABDWABEi
MECHANICS TOOLS.
GUNS AND PISTOLS.
CABTBIDGES AND GUN CAPS.
GUNS ATD PISTOLS.
CABTBIDGES AND GUN CAPS
PLATEOBM AND COUNTER SCALES.
PLATFORM AND COUNTER SCALES.
SCALS BEAMS AND STEELTABDS.
SCALE BEAMS AND STEELTABDS.
GEO. S. SONSTAG Ac CO.,
No. 10 main Street.
STEAM BAKERY.
Bread for the Hungry !
NEW STEAM BAKERY,
No. XI
WATER STREET,
EVANSVILLE, INDIANA.
w
E DESIRE TO INFORM THE CITIZENS
of Evansville, and the community in gen-
eral, that our
NEW STEAM BAKERY,
NO. 11 WATER STJUKKT,
Is now in successful operation, and ws shall keep
sonstantly on hand and make to order, on short
! notice, all articles made at like manufactories ;
such as Bread. Cakes, Pies, Crackers, Ac, Ac.
Being supplied with all the modern machinery
to facitlate us in onr business, we flatter ourselves
that wo can give the most ample satisfaction in
. the quality of our goods and iu prices.
We will also keep on hand a large and choice
! stock of Confections, Fruits, Nuts, Cigars, Ac., to
j which we call attention.
Orders for public or private Parties, Festivals,
' Balls, Ac, Ac , promptlv filled on reasonable
terms. sei lifff " A. WBLD A CO.
FOREIGN LIQUORS.
El'OEKK KAPPLIS. WSJ. H A1 1 :N 1-1 li...
KAPPLER A SCniAKEXBlRfi,
Importers and Dealers in
Whiskys, Brandies, Wines,
Gins, &c, &c, &c.
Alt.,, ftsctiflers :tud Manufacturers of
Domestic Wiuco nd Liquors.
NO. 4 WATER ST., bet. Main and Sycamore,
augU
EVANSVILLE. IND.
ADVERTISING RATES Iff DAILY.
Business cards (5 linee or leas), one year.. fi2
- ?iXith- 7
three 4 sn
Oae square (10 lines or less) one insertion "' 74
J.' thne " Z I 25
one week 1 75
one month e to
IN WEEKLY.
One square, on insertlan ' 1 j qq
For each sabneqnent insertion v.
Special Notices retained on inside of paper, wiU
he charged 20 per cent, additional on above rates.
MARBLE WORKS.
UHLHORN & BR INKMAN,
(Successor to M. A. Lawrence,) Dealers in
AMERICA AjfD ITALIA MARBLE.
Main Street Near Court House.
EVANSVILLE, - . . IKDIAHA.
JSTHfil 5L Tomb. . "
kinds of Furniture W ueatly and promptly ex
ecuted in the latest aa 1 est styles. d
Direct from the Quarries, the
The Finest Stock of Marble
Ever brought to this market, and for sals at
STREET ft YOUNG'S
American and Italian
Marble Manufactory,
WARE AND SALES ROOM
MAIN STREET,
Near the Canal.
Our facilities for furnishing these wishing
MONCMKNTS,
GRAVESTONES,
TOMBS,
MANTLES,
?ifathin Uwin onr line, are unsurpassed la
too est
Our Stock of Marble is complete, having been
selected-with great care at the Quarries. myodAw
GROCERIES.
HENRY LUTZ,
Dealer in
iROOERIHS
AUD
PROVISIONS.
Cor. Chesnut Street and the Canal
EVANSVILLE, INDIANA.
I HAVE RETURNED HOME FBOM THE
army, and am ready to see my old customers,
and the public generally, at the old stand.
The highest market price paid for PRODUCE.
I am also prepared to accommodate people attend
ing Market with board and lodging, and will also
take care of their horses and wagons, having a
good stable and wagon-yard. My Bar is also open
for customers. h LUTZ
octC-lwdAlmw
FRESH FAMILY GROCERIES.
STEPHEN H. S. COOK,
1.5 Main Street,
Between Sixth and Severn h,
Is the place tcTobtain the Cheapest and best
f- A ftti I I Vy rnAAPniPr
1 iti'i 1 u 1 urvvvcnito
Good Sugar 7 pounds for 91.
Excellent Coffee 3 pounds for tl.
Everything else (n proportion. Eatables ef all
kinds kept constantly on hand. Call and examine
artii lesand prices before pur- hashing elsewhere.
"Good Freeh Bntter received every Saturday
aag8
WM. GLENN & SONS,
Wholesale Grocers,
70 and 7 Vine Street,
Bet. Second and Pearl St .
CINCINNATI, O.
HAVE ALWAYS ON HAND AND FOR
sale at the lowest market prices, a large and
well selected stock of Groceries, Tobacco, Cordage,
V ooden Ware, Ac, to which we invite the atten
tion of Merchants. sep!9
4AMCEL E. Gilbert. William R. B
S. E. GILEERT & CO.,
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
Sycamore Street, bet. Water and First,
Etabsvtllx, Inn.
A foil assortment of Groceries always on hand,
od tor sale at I he lowest prices
NEW SALOON.
SHAEFER S SALOON.
BILLIARD AND RESTAURANT,
On Third Street between Main
and Sycamore.
EVANSVILLE, INDIANA
octS-lci sj
CHANGE OF EXCHANGE
A NEW ARRANGEMENT.
SAM GRAMMER & HARRY JOHNSON
having purchased
Theodore's Exchange,
ABE FITTING IT UP IN EXCELLENT
j. A style for a first class
BILLIARD SALOON and RESTAURANT.
They will keep at the bar the best brands o
Liquors aud their larders will at all times be filled
with the richest dainties from the animal and
vegetable kingdoms, and the waters of the vasty
deep will be made to contribute of their richest
stores.
Especial attention will be given to tbs enitm.-,
which will be under charge of the most competent
aitists.
Their Billiard Boom is large and their TABLES
FIRST CLASS.
The establishment will re-open on Tuesday next.
A liberal share of public patronage is respectfully
glicited. mv303m
SASH AND DOORS.
JAMES STEELE,
(Successor to Stxilx A Hcasjat,,)
SECOND ST., BET. CHESTNUT AND CHEBBT,
EVANSVILLE, INDIANA.
SASH, DOORS, WINDOW BLINDS
Dressed Lumber
Boards, Laths, Ac, of every description constantly
on hand. Packing Boxes of all kinds made to or
erder. Sawing of every kind done en the shortest
notice. - aplS-ly
W. HUNNELL,
CORNER WALNUT STREET ANs CANAL,
EVANSVILLE, IND.,
Has on hard the largest lot of
Sashes, Doors, Blinds, Frames, Ac,
Ever Manufactured in the West.
f HEY ARE OF MY OWN MAEE.
I have also a fine lot of White Pine, and Popular
Floorinc Moulding: of all kinds madeand sawing
j of all descriptions done at the shortest notice.
GROCERIES.
SUNDRIES
Strawberry and Lemon Syrup, Almonds,
Brar.il Nuts, Essence of Cofte, Wooden Bowls,
English Walnuts. Figs, Raisins. Currants,
Rock Candy, Oysters, Shoe, Horse and
Scrubbing Brushes, Lobsters, Sardines, AInm,
Epsom Salts, RoU Brimstone, Sulphur, Copperas,
Madder, Extract of Logwood, Indigo, Cream Tar
tar, Soda, Bed Con's of all kinds. Tobacco of all
kinds, Bl'acMiig, Batting, Nutmegs, Cigars of all
kinds. Ginger, Camphor, Carolina and Wagon
Tar, Brooms, Cotton Tarn, Ground Ginger, Castile
lioap, piavinc Cards. iSlassJara, Lanterns, Tum
blers and Flasks, Tepper Sauce, Matches. Pickles,
Mustard, Fih of all hinds, Tomato Catsup, Powder,
Safety F". Soaps of all kinds. Starch, Teas, Vin
egar," Letter, Note, i'jii. and Fancy Paper, Wrap
ping Paper. Envelopes; Salt Petre, Gum Drops
Wooden Bowl- .lui;!e Paste, Cinuamon, Coal Oi
Clothes Pins. British Lustra, Bonnet Boards, Ink
Clevei. V-.ils. Salt. Oi;-.-. Spirits Turpentine, all
spice. Sa) Soda, Pain Killer, Licorice, Ac , Ac., Ac
A supply of the nlwive kept constantly on hand
and for sale low by S. B. GILBERT A CO.,
iy9tf ' No. 4 Sycamore Street.

xml | txt