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Ottumwa semi-weekly courier. [volume] (Ottumwa, Iowa) 1899-1903, August 11, 1903, Image 9

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86061214/1903-08-11/ed-1/seq-9/

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JAIL DELIVERY
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_,.Four Important Prisoners Escape
From Custody at Columbus, O.
ISSUES HIS FIRST ORDER AT
NOQjN UPON ASSUMING HIS
DUTIES.
COLUMBUS, OHIO, Aug. 8.—JUST AFTER DAYLIGHT THIS MORN-
"'.T ING LEWIS.HARMON, A CONVICTED MURDERER, ROBERT SCHIF-
FLETT AND OTIS KELLER, ALLEGED HORSE THIEVES AND LEWIS
"r EYETING, A FORGER ESCAPED FROM THE COUNTY JAIL BY FILING
OFF A WINIDOW BAR IN THE BATH ROOM. THE WORK IS SUPPOSED
TO HAVE BEEN DONE WITH A POTATO
Praises Commander.
"The commanders of the army suc
ceeding Washington have by their ex
ample, influence and orders engender
ed and maintained the highest de
gree of efficiency, discipline and pa
triotism.
Many Responsibilities.
"Since
(ty
THREE OF THE CONVICTS WERE CAPTURED NEAR THE CANAL
AT WINCHESTER AT NOON. 8HIFLE IS STILL AT LARGE.
MAJOR GENERAL YODNG
S COMMANDS THE FORCES
!:K..
MILES' LAST ADDRESS
.Retiring Commander of United States
Army Issues Address in Which He
.-Expresses Undying Faith in the Ar
my and Its Ability.
Washington, Aug. 8.—At noon today
Lieutenant General Young issued an
order in accordance with the Presi
dent, assuming command of tne army
of the United States. General Miles
•will leave tomorrow for San Francis
co to attend the encampment of the
Grand Army of the Republic.
P-%
tig!
Miles. Gets Present.
The 'Clerks in the office of General
Miles presented him with a handsome
silver loving cup'and -a large vase of
flowers.
Issues Farewell Address
General Miles has issued an address
on the occasion of his retirement from
active service. In it he says: 'i
its organization the army
has been charged with a great variety
of responsibilities, all subordinate to
"defending the country and maintain
ing the rights of its citizens.
"In the discharge or its manifold
duties the army has confronted ene
mies representing every stage of hu
man development from the highest
civilization yet obtained to savagery
and barbarism. It has ever been its
duty to observe in war those chivalrous
and humane principles by which inev
itable horrors are so greatly mitigat
ed, while by unyielding prosecution of
warfare against armed forcesJts valor
has been demonstrated.
Maintain Truth and Honor.
»"A11 honorable activity and life for
the army must exist within the well de
fined lines of patriotism, untarnished
honor, sterling Integrity, impartial jus
tice, obedience to rightful authority,
and incesant warfare against armed
enemies. Always to maintain truth,
honor and justice requires the highest
moral courage, and is equally as im
portant as fortitude in battle. Drill, dis
cipline and instruction are but prepara
tory for the perfection and efficiency
of an army.
"The events of recent years have
placed upon the army a new obligation
and an opportunity for a broader ex
emplification of its country'^ principles.
The United States' army is now
brought into daily comunicatlon with
millions of people to whom its indi
vidual members of every grade are the
exponents of American civilization.
A serious duty and a great honor are
now presented to every officer and sol
dier, namely, to exemplify to those
with whom he comes In contact our
country's principles of equal and exact
justice, immunity from violence, equal
before the law, and the peaceful use
and possession of his own.
Many Changes, .t
"Marked changes at different times
have occurred in the strength and or
ganization of the army, resulting from
diverse influences, and various experi
ments have be-en tried. Time has rec
tified errors in the past and will do so
In the future. The lieutenant general
has faith that under all circumstances
the army will maintain its high charac
ter, and that its future will be as hon
orable and glorious as has been its his
tory In the past His earnest solicitude
and best wishes will ever follow the
fortunes of the army."
STRIKE DECLARED OFF.
Twenty Thousand Textile Workers to
Return to .Work Monday.
Philadelphia, Pa,, Aug. 8 —The tex
tile strike In this city, Inaugurated ten
weeks ago, was this, afternoon prac
tiajtfly declared off by 20,000 strikers
'4«ci(Jjng
to return to work" Monday,
J^v:-
KNIFE FILED IN THE
GIBBONS IS WELL.
Though He Was Indisposed, Corres
pondent Finds Him Almost Well.
Rome, Aug. 8.—The Associated
Press correspondent today saw
Cardinal Gibbons and found him ai
most recovered from His recent in
disposition, which he thinks was
due to over fatigue on Wednesday
when he stood for about three
hours at the
Vatican in
order to
present the American pilgrims to
the pope.
FRIENDLY FOG
LIFTS IN TIME TO ENABLE COAST
DEFENpERS TO DISCOVER
"HOSTILE" FLEET.
Ear Harbor, Me., Aug. 8.—The naval
search, as a problem, which began
Wednesday noon when Rear Admiral
Barker took up the plan of defending
the Maine coast from the "hostile"
fleet which put to sea on Monday un
der Rear Admiral Sands, ended today
when the Olympla, the flagship of the
defending fleet, discovered and inter
cepted the "white squadron" of the
"enemy," headed at full speed for the
winter harbor. The "hostile" vessels
were running in close formation and
had not the fog lifted at a favorable
moment it is thought the "enemy"
would have eluded those on guard.
Ojympia Surrenders.
Bar Harbor, Aug. 8—As it turned
out, before her consorts could reach
the scene in answer to her signals, the
Olympla had been forced to fly a white
flag and consider herself captured or
destroyed by the hostile commander.
The Bloodless Battle.
When the Olympla discovered the
"enemy," Rear Admiral Barker on the
Kearsarge, 25 miles away, was noti
fied by wireless telegraph and general
quarters was soundod. In a remark
ably short time the Kearsarge, Ala
bama, Illinois and a number, of torpe
do boat destroyers and tugs were on
their way to meet the hostile vessels.
As soon as they were within range
the battleships opened fire with the
secondary batteries and a white flag
was run up on the Texas, Admiral
Sands' flagship. After an interchange
of signals the invading and the defend
ing squadrons headed for Bar Harbor.
DEDICATE LINCOLN MEMORIAL.
Grand Army Marks Spot at Dixon, III.,
Where, Martyr Spoke.
Dixon, 111., Aug. 8.—A bowlder to
mark the spot in Dixon where Lincoln
spoke September 8, 1856 has been ded
icated by the Grand Army. The pre
sentation address was made by L. W.
Mitchell of the Chicago board of trade
and the acceptance by Chairman E. C,
Parsons of the supervisors.
SCHWAB HIRES A NURSE.
Ex-President of Steel Trust Evidently
Still in Poor Health.
Williamsport, Pa., Aug. 8.—Charles
M. Schwaib, recent president of the
steel trunt, apparently has not im
proved in. health, for yesterday' a let
ter was received from Yetter Saltz
man, a trained nurse, saying that he
had bee:a engaged to attend the capi
talist.
E A 1
DI8ASTER AT MlfoE.
•f
Explosion in Indiana Threatens Lives
of 200 Workmen.
Linton, Ind., Aug. 8.—An explosion
of oil at the Dickson coal mine this
afternoon destroyed the tipple and the
electric light plant. The flames
spread to the mine where 200 men are
working and it is feared that they
•will perish unless the fire is extin
guished quickly. ,,
RACE WAR
FEARED
BIG MOB AT HILLSBORO, OHIO,
TRIES TO LYNCH AN AC
CUSED NEGRO.
BROKE INTO THE JAIL
The Sheriff, However, Spirited His
Prisoner Away Before the Doortf
Were Opened—Mob is Determined to
Secure the Man.
Hillsboro, Ohio, Aug. 8.—It is fear
ed that a race war between the whites
and blacks is imminent* here, owing
to an attempt early this'morning'by
100 white men to secure and hang
Maynard Hudson, a negro, charged
with attempting to assault Penelope
Hindman, a white girl, aged 12 years,
last Thursday. The mob was well or
ganized and the authorities were pow
erless. After effecting an entrance to
the jail the mob discovered that the
negro had been taken away by the
sheriff. Excitement is intense as the
mob will renew its work as soon as the
negro is located..
Taken to Chillicothe.
Chillicothe, Ohio, Aug. 8.—The sher
iff of Highland county arrived here this
morning from Hillsboro with a colored
prisoner, Maynard Hudson. He will be
held here for safekeeping.
HORSE "DOCKING" FORBIDDEN.
General Miles Issues Order Against
Practice in Military Service.
Washington, Aug. 8.—General Nel
son A. Miles has issued an order with
the approval of the secretary of war to
prevent the "docking" of horses In the
military service. General Miles regards
this practice as brutal, and on this
point he and the President agree, as
President Roosevelt has always refus
ed to allow the tails of his horses to
be docked, despite the fact that the
dictates of fashion favor "docking." In
the orders it is provided: "Any alter
ations in the length or shape of the
-tails, manes or ~fo*eloeli«.®I public,
horses by docking, bamgin£Mr.clipping
is -hereby prohibited' and only such
reasonable trimming and plucking as
may be necessary to prevent shaggl
ness of appearance will be permitted.
GAMBLING MADE A FELONY.
Washington Supreme Court Upholds
Measure Passed by Legislature.
Olympia, Wash., Aug. 8.—The su
preme court has handed down a decis
ion upholding the constitutionality of
the law passed by the last legislature,
making the conducting of a gambling
resort or game a felony. For the pur
pose of testing the law Fritz Deitrich
a Spokane gambler, pleaded guilty to a
charge of conducting a gambling game,
and was sentenced to one year's im
prisonment in the penitentiary. The
supreme court ordered the sentence to
be carried out.
WILL COURT MOSQUITO BITE.
Yellow Fever Immune Does Not'Fear
Malarial Insect,
Norfolk, Va., Aug. 8.—In the interest
of science Dr. F. H. Goodman- of the
United States Marine hospital service
here has consented to let a malarial
mosquito bite him. Dr. Goodman is a
yellow fever immune.
FAVORABLE TO THE CANAL.
Colombian Senate Committee Said to
Have Indorsed the Treaty.
Panama, Aug. 8.—It is reported here
that on Aug. 1 the senate committee
made a favorable report on the Isth
mus canal treaty. Confirmation of the
report, however, is lacking.
Story of the Crime.
Clark, who had been in the town of
Kahoka, Mo., for several days previ
ous left that place on aSturday after
noon, July 25, for Medill, a small sta
tion two miles west of Kahoka going
on foot. When some distance out fin
the country road from Kahoka he over
took Miss Ollie Hess, a 17-year-old
girl and at once laid hold of her. She
struggled to escape from the negro
who drew a knife and cut her slight
ly about the throat threatening to kill
her if she made any outcry or offered
any further resistance to him. He
dragged the girl from the roadway into
some weeds where he assaulted her.
After asking her whether she, would
know him if she saw him again,' to
which the frightened girl answered in
the negative, Clark disappeared. Miss
Hess succeeded in reaching, her home
related her horrible-experi-
VOLUME 55 OTTUMWA, WAPELLO COUNTY, IOWA, TUESDAY, AUG-UST 11, 1903. NUMBER 39
ALLEGED
SWINDLERS
PARIS IS EXCITED OVER THE
TRIAL OF THE NOTORIOUS
HUMBERT FAMILY.
BORROWED MILLIONS
Therese Humbert Says She Will Pro
duce the Crawford Brothers, Myster
ious American Millionaires,Who Fig
ured In Stories of Coming Riches.
Paris, Aug. 8.—Large crowds attend
ed the opening of the trial-of the notor
ious HunSbert family, which began in
the Palais de Justice today on the
charge of having perpetrated what ex
Premier WaldeCk-Rosseat described as
'the greatest swindle of the century,
Maiiy excursions came from distant
points and the scene in the court room
recalled the intense days of the Drey
fus and Zola trials.
The Mysterious Millionaires.
Public curiosity centers In Therese
Humbert who. has promised to produce
at the trial the mysterious American
millionaires, the Crawford brothers ,on
whom she based her story of inheri
tance of $20,000,000 which she put for
ward as security for loans she obtain
ed, amounting to about $10,000,000.
Therese Humbert, her husband, Fred
eric and her brother are charged with
forgery and swindling.
Declares^ She is Honest.
The interrogation of Madam Hum
bert furnishes the chief incident of the
day, but failed to develop any sur
prises or to brlnp out the whereabouts
of the mysterious Crawford brothers,
her statement consisting mainly in
vague declarations as to her honesty.
STRIKE AT BOSTON.
Machinists and Helpers Demand An
Advance ,in Wages.
Boston, Aug. ($.—The machinists
and helpers ,in. $^e Boston: & AI
bany railroad 'shops at Alston,
West Springfield,Mass.,and Ren
saeller, New York, stnuck- today
because the company refused to
grant an advance in wages.
FREIGHT ELEVATOR FALLS.
Will Lowery Has Narrow Escape at
^Friedman's Dry Goods Store.
From Friday's Dally.
The freight elevator at Friedman's
dry,goods store, corner of West Main
and Court streets, fell from the second
story to the basement yesterday after
noon about 4 o'clock. No one was In
jured, but Will Lowery, an employe of
the store, had an extremely close call
and the elevator shaft was stripped of
machinery.
The elevator is an old one and is op
erated by hand. Several boxes of dry
goods, about 1,500 pounds altogether,
were being raised to the third story.
C. E. Wilson was on the landing at the
second story pulling upon the power
ropes and Will Lowery was on the first
landing. Just as the elevator reached
the second story the wire cable,
which supports the c^ge tore out of the
fastening which connects it to the top
of the cage and the elevator and
freight started for the bottom. Wil
son called to Lowery, who was just
able to step back out of danger as the
elevator shot past. The cable became
entangled in the machinery at the top
of the shaft and drums, wheels and
balance weights all fell with a crash to
the bottom of the pit in the basement.
CLARK REPORTED TO BE CAPTDRED
Prisoner at Oklahoma City Said to Hare Acknowledged
Assaulting Kahoka Girl.
Keokuk, Aug. 8.—(Special) -—Frank Clark, the colored man who is accused of having on July 25, brutally
assaulted and nearly murdered Miss Ollie Hess, near Kahoka, Mo., twenty miles west of Keokuk, has, according to
a dispatch received here last night been captured at Oklahoma City, O. T. The dispatch adds that the prisoner
has made a complete confession oTthe crime. He was arrested last evening and is being held at Oklahoma City,
pending advice from the Kahoka authorities.
ence to her mother, a widow living on
a farm. News of the crime was not
learned in Kahoka till a late hour that
night and by morning Sheriff Arnold
at the head of a large posse was on the
trail.
Active Man Hunt.
The greatest excitement prevailed
throughout the county and soon
the posse was increased till more than
two hundred men were searching for
the fiend. The entire country for miles
around Kahoka was thoroughly
searched,and many rumors and reports
were circulated to the effect that
Clark had been seen or captured.
The' search was continued for a
week, when Sheriff Hunolt of Knox
county, Missouri, tracked Clark to Cen
terville in this state, where he ex
changed several pistol shots with
him, but the hunted man. escaped to
the woods. Bloodhounds were put upon
his track and for. several more days
V.
REVOLTERS
INCREASE
INSURRECTION IN MACEDONIA IS
BECOMING VERY ACTIVE IN
CERTAIN DISTRICTS.
DIPLOMATS WORRIED
They Fear That the Activity in Mace
donia Will Encourage Inhabitants of
Neighboring Lands to Follow the
Example of the Revolutionists.
Constantinople, Aug. 8.—The insur
rectionary movement inMacedonia ap
pears to be widening. Bands are re
ported to be active in San Jak in the
province of Uskub and in the district
of Krushevo, where the government
telegraph offices have been dynamit
ed, while In the district of Dibra four
Bulgarian villages have risen, provok
ing a corresponding rising in the neigh
boring Albanian villages. Diplomats
here are uneasy, fearing that trouble
may spread outside the bounds of
Macedonia.
OSGOOD'S NEW VENTURE.
Former Ottumwan Becomes Identified
With Frontier Steel Co.
Denver, Colo., Aug. 8.—John C. Os
good, Julien A. Kebler and Lawrence
Phipps are to be identified with David
H. Moffat In the Frontier Steel Co.
Mr. Osgood and Mr. Kebler have
leased offices and John L. Jerome, who
will also be identified with the new
steel company, will have adjoining
offices.
Moffat is concentrating in the one
building all companies in which he is
interested, and the offices to be had by
the "Osgood crowd" will be those of
the Frontier Steel Co.
FLOATING BUTTON FACTORY.
Big Boat With Sixty Machines to Be
Launched Soon.
Muscatine, Aug. 8.— (Special.)
The largest floating pearl button fac
tory in the vicinity of Muscatine will
be launched here soon, and will, as
soon as the machines can be installed
he- operated aloh& the banks oi the
URBsisBippit.rfrpr. The boat is* seven
ty feet long by eighteen feet wide and
is three feet in depth. Thus it will be
seen that the sixty machines contem
plated will find plenty of room.
LACEY TALKS.
Sixth District Congressman Delivers
Lecture at Clear Lake.
Clear Lake, Aug. 8—The Clear Lake
Chautauqua assembly opened yester
day with the largest attendance in the
history of the Chautauqua. Major La
cey delivered a powerful address on
"Leading Men of the Present Cen
tury." The address was supplement
ed by songs from the Giant Quartet
of Chicago and the Fisk Quartet of
Kansas City. Every tent on the entire
resort Is occupied. Following the
speech a steam launch race took place
on the lake.
JUDGE DECLINES APPOINTMENT.
Clement Smith Refuses Place on New
Mexico Supreme Bench.
Las Vegas, N. M., Aug. 8.—Judge
Clement Smith of Michigan has de
cllned his appointment by President
Roosevelt to the supreme court of
New Mexico.
WOMAN FATALLY HURT.
Drives Onto Track and is Struck by
Train.
Valparaiso, Ind., Aug. 8.—Mrs. Frank
C. Clifford, a resident of Wheeler, was
run down while driving across the
railroad tracks here, and fatally injur
ed. The horses attached to her rig
were killed.
the search continued In the neighbor
hood of Centerville, but was finally
given up there, the hunters concluding
that Clark had succeeded In boarding
a train and leaving that part of the
country.
Big Reward.
A reward amounting to $1,000 made
up by private subscriptions among the
citizens of Kahoka and offered by
Clark county and the state of Missouri,
was offered for the capture and con
viction of Clark, and it has been
known that the search for him had
never been entirely given up.
Officials Notified.
Kahoka, Mo., Aug. 8.—(Special)-r
The sheriff of this (Clark) county this
morning received a telegram from Ok
lahoma City announcing the capture of
Frank Clark and saying that he has
made a full confession. He will be
brought back to Missouri.
I
1
me -v ..
FROM AIR TO WATER
Langley's Flying Machine Starts Well
Bat Dives Into the Potomac. '-)$
Windewater, Va., Aug. 8.—A partly successful experiment with the fif
teen foot Langley airship was made this morning from a house boat in the
Potomac river off this point. The Aerodrome started well in a straight line
south with a velocity of seventy feet per second and flew for a distance va
riously estimated at from 400 to 600 yards. Some deflection of the wings
soon after the launching caused it to take a downward course which was
followed rapidly'and was impelled into the water under the full power of her
engine. The machine disappeared from view and when recovered it was con
siderably damaged,
END OF ANXIOUS WEEK
VALUABLE HORSES BURN.
Barnaldo and Delba Perish in Flames
Near Yonkers, N. Y.
New York, Aug. 8.—Two trot
ing horses, Bernaldo, owned
by W. B. Chisholm of Cleveland,
Ohio, and valued at $7,000 and
Delbar owned by J. S. Smith of
White Plains, N. Y., were burned
to death in a fire which destroyed
the Empire Trotting Stables near
Yonkers early today.
BAD STORMS
MISSOURI AND KANSAS
ARE DAMAGED BY
AND HAIL.
Death at Pittsburg.
Pittsburg, Kans., Aug. 8.—A heavy
wind and rain storm passed over this
section early today wrecking many
small houses occupied by miners, kill
ing one person and injuring twenty-five
or thirty others.
Hail Damages Colorado Crop.
Denver, Colo., Aug. 8.—Reports com
ing in from the farming region of
northern Colorado show such a great
destruction of crops by the hail storm
Wednesday night that the total damage
is conservatively estimated at more
than $500,000.
WOMAN SPECULATOR FAILS.
Slump in Mining Stocks Results in
the Failure of Miss Sarah S. Piatt.
New Haven, Conn., Aug. 8.—Miss
Sarah S. Piatt, a young woman who
has dealt in stocks for several years,
WRECK NEAR CAPRON.
WRECK VICTIM DIES.
The Total Number of Dead Reaches
Twenty-Four.
Detroit, Aug. 8.—John Thompson of
Peru, Ind., who was injured in the
grand trunk wreck at Durand yester
day, died today, making a total of
twenty-four dead. The others who
were injured are reported to be com
fortable.
E A
WIPED OUT BY FIRE.
pouer D'Alene, Idaho, Suffers From
Fierce Conflagration.
Spokane, Wash., Aug. 8.—A hot fire
has been raging in Couer D'Alene, Ida
ho, since 8:30 o'clock this morning
The entire town and part of the Spo
kane's fire department are fighting the
flames. Couer D'Alene and a lumber
company's planing mill and yards were
destroyed and the flra is now threat
ening the sawmill.
t\lX
ON STOCK EXCHANGE
FARMS
WIND
Parsons, Kan., Aug. 8.—A wind
Storm early today caused heavy dam
age here and at Abilene. Several
stores and houses were damaged and
six persons^'ere slightly" hart: The*
hail destroyed much corn.
Missouri Counties Suffer.' i.
Carthage, Mo., Aug. 8.—A wind
storm before daylight destroyed thou
sands of dollars' worth of fruit and
shade trees and caused more or less
damage to small buildings and min
ing property here and at Jasper, La
mar and Seneca, taking in three coun
ties along the Kansas line.
cVkV?$
N
mm
TODAY WITNESSES WILD DISOR*
DER AMONG BROKERS IN
WALL STREET. -il
SELLING* IS ACTIVE
.v^S6
Publication of Weekly Bank Statement
Causes Uneasiness)—Some Stocks
Decline From 3 to 5% Points—Slight
Rally at the Close. -a
New York, Aug. 8.—In the absence
of support and with extremely- bearish
rumors from abroad the stock market
here opened with prices down a point
or more in a number of active issues.
The declines became more marked to
ward the end of the first hour in the
course of which some specialties were
raided. The attendance of brokers was
comparatively small because the con
servative element deems it best to keep
out of the market at this time and
leave the fight to the trading element.
Weekly Banlc Statement.
The weekly bank statement shows
that loans have increased $3,832,600
deposits have increased $2,414,800 re
serve has decreased $1,S69,300 sur
plus has decreased $2,473,000 ex-U. S.
deposit has decreased $2,469,625.
Many Stocks Fall Low.
The publication of the bank state-*
ment was the signal for increased pres
sure and further selling. The greatest
losses were suffered by the Pacifics,
the Baltimore & Ohio, Reading Com—,
mon, Union Pacific, Northwestern pre
ferred, Atchison and St. Paul, declining
all the way from 3 to 3% points amid
the wildest disorder.
MfS
Partial Recovery.
There was a partial recovery in soma
issues in the final dealings, due large
ly to a short covering. The close was
active and weak. W
Commission Firm Suspends.
Omaha, Aug. 8.—The Merrill Com
mission Co., a grain and stocks con
cern with branches in a number of
Iowa and Nebraska towns, suspended
today. No statement was given out.
AN IMPORTANT CAPTURE.
has filed a petition in bankruptcy. She] whom they will probably keep for
is said to be the first »woman in this I some time.
state to take advantage of that law. He is George Miller, rather ad
Miss Piatt's liabilities are about $10,
000. A slump in mining stocks is said
to have caused the trouble.
With
Milwaukee Passenger Collides
Light Engine.
Capron, Aug. 8.—A Milwaukee & St.
Paul fast passenger train running 30
miles an hour, collided with a light
engine near here this morning. Both
engines were demolished and the en
gineer of the passenger train was
slightly hurt. The passengers were
uninjured, although many were badly
shaken up.
Burlington Police Think They Have a-5
Bad Man.
Burlington, Aug. 8.—Burlington po
lice have in charge a desperate man
vanced in years, who was caught after
a desperate struggle, in which he
fought with an open clasp knife.
Find Postoffice Keys.
On him were found a set of keys to
the postoffice and some other things
which he had stolen from the postof
fice building janitor's room.
Miller was found sneaking about
the postoffice corridors and a running
fight followed, ending in Miller be
ing knocked into the gutter by VIM
Chief Blank who headed him off.
The police believe they have a bad
man as the prisoner answers the de
scription of a William Powell, who
was arrested some time ago at Leaven
worth, Kan. as,- .yi
CHURCH FUNDS GONE.
Treasurer of Preachers' Aid Society
Confesses to Embezzlement.
Boston, Aug. 8.—Caught In the re
cent slump of the stock market, Wil
lard S. Allen, treasurer of the Preach
ers' Aid society of the New England
conference of the Methodist Episco
pal church, has fled to Canada, a con
fessed embezzler of more than $70,
000. Almost the entire permanent Wi
fund of the society Is gone. For forty ST
years Allen, who is 62 years of tge,
has been a prominent resident of flaat
Boston.
REMEY RETIRES MONDAY.
Rear Admiral Ranking Officer of His
Grade Leaves Active Service.
Washington, Aug. 8.—Rear Admiral
George C. Remey, ranking officer of his
grade will be retired Monday. He was
appointed to the navy from IoWa in
1855, and reached the grade of rear ad
miral in 1898. As a result of Remey's
retirement, Captain Sigsbee, command
ant of the League Island Navy yard,
and Captain Chester, superintendent
of the naval observatory, will b«oome
rear admirals.
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