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Ottumwa semi-weekly courier. (Ottumwa, Iowa) 1899-1903, September 10, 1903, Image 9

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86061214/1903-09-10/ed-1/seq-9/

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RUMOR THAT MASSACRE
IS FEARED IB LEBANON
BEDOUINS REPORT THE DRUSES
ARE IN ARMS IN THE ARIAN
REGION. i,
TDEKS JOIN MCSSELMEN
Make Common Cause Against Chris­
tians—Fear Landing of Marines
Would Precipitate Crisis—Vali of
Damascus Ordered to Take Charge.
Paris, Sopt. 9.—The following tele
gram was received from Cairo, Egypt:
•'Disquieting rumors are current with
regard to the situation in Syria. Be
douins arriving here from the Arian
deeert say that the Druses are in arms
and fep.r is entertained of a massacre
In Lebanon.
Situation Grave at Beirut.
The official reports from Beirut
Bhow the growing gravity of the sit
uation there. Another Christian was
killed yesterday.
Turks Unite With Musselmen.
The Turkish soldiers are making
a common cause with the Musselmen
during the attacks on the Christians.
Houses Molested.
A number of houses were pillaged
one French shop was completely de
stroyed and the French residents be
coming terrified at these depredations
abandoned their homes and sought
refuge at the French college, where
between four and five hundred refu
gees are now gathered.
Might Precipitate Crisis.
The American naval commander, it
Is asserted in dispatches received here
as proposed to land marines at Bie
(•lit, but the foreign consuls believed
ihat the step is inadvisable at this
iime as it might lead to an increase
in the excitement prevailing and pre
cipitate a crisis.
Ordered to Beirut.
The vali of Beirut has proved him
•Self weak and incompetent to deal
with the situation, therefore the vali
of Damascus has been ordered to
assume the direction of affairs at Bei
rut.
Turkish Minister Hopeful.
Rome, Sept. 9.—A communication
received from 'the Italian ambassador
at Constantinople says the Turkish
minister of foreign affairs has assured
him that most energetic measures will
be taken to punish those who are re
sponsible for the recent conflict at
Beirut The minister added that there
need be no fear that such incident will
re-occur and asserted that the porte Is
confident that the insurrection in
Macedonia will be "sujiprossed in a
week."
Washington, Sept. 9.—The navy de
partment has received a cablegram
from Admiral Cotton, dated Beirut,
yesterday, saying that there were no
serious disturbances in Beirut Monday
night The situation is improving and
public feeling is growing quieter-
THE PICKET A WONDER.
Derby Winner Gallops Away From
Africander.
New York, Sept. 9.—The Picket, the
winner of the American Derby, met
and defeated the best 3-year-old in
the east yesterday, when he galloped
£'J. -home a winner in the September han
dicap a length and a half in front of
Africander. The eastern turfmen who
lost their money on the eastern horse
are endeavoring to find excuses for
Africander but apparently there are
.. none. He was beaten decisively and
those who saw the race are confident
that should the two horses meet at
time at equal weights the result will
be the same.
TOWNS FIGHT FOR COURTHOUSE.
An Error of County Clerk Makes Elec
tion Impossible.
Stronghurst, 111., Sept. 9.—An error
by County Clerk Lukens in the official
notice makes it impossible to hold the
election on November 10 for the re
moval of the Henderson county court
house from Oquawka to Stronghurst
The petition for the election was sign
ed by 1,700 voters and a large amount
was subscribed by the citizens of
Stronghurst toward the erection of the
new courthouse. It is alleged the
county clerk was in a conspiracy to
defeat the election. A renewed at
?'lt- tempt next year is certain.
RUSSIAN HARVEST IS SMALL.
Decrease From Last Year's Yield Is
8hown-by Government.
St. Petersburg, Sept. 9.—The finance
ministry estimates the grain harvest in
million poods (a pood is forty pounds)
as follows: Winter wheat, 300 spring
ftrheal, 480 winter rye, 1,250 oats,
650 batley, 375.
Tho harvests exceed the poor aver
ages of the years 1897 to 1901, being
about fiv&feixths of last year's yield
wfaioh was an improvement over for
met ones.
TO BUY BATTLEFIELD.
Carnegie Said to Be Trying to Pur
chase Bannockburn.
London, Sept. 9.—It is reported that
Andrew Carnegie is negotiating for the
purchase of the famous battlefield of
Bannockburn, near Stirling, Scotland,
In order to save it from falling into the
hands of builders,
-t"
SCORNS VICE PRESIDENCY.
George H. Maxwell, Irrigation Leader,
Would Reject Nomination.
Omaha, Neb., Sept. 9.—"I am not a
candidate tor vice president and would
not accept the nomination if tendered,"
said George H. Maxwell, "the apostle
of irrigation," in this city yesterday.
"My duty is to look after the national
irrigation movement. To do this I
must be strictly nonpartisan, as we
have powerful friends In both parties.
It is the work to which I have devot
ed my best energies and in which I
am too much interested to be diverted.
However, I appreciate the honor of be
ing mentioned in this connection."
POPE'S FIRST OFFICIAL LETTER.
Board Appointed by Leo XIII Con
firmed by Pius X.
Rome, Sept. 9.—The pontiff publish
ed yesterday his first official docu
ment, consisting of a letter addressed
to Cardinals Vannutelli, Rampola,
Ferrata and Vives Tuto, confirming
their appointment by Pope Leo as a
commission to commemorate the fif
tieth anniversary of the dogma of Im
maculate Conception.
The letter, which is very brief, is
followed by a prayer to the Virgin
Mary, which will acquire importance
as being the first to bear the signa
ture of Pius X.
CHINA WOULD AMEND TREATY.
Clause Demanded Compelling Suppres
sion of Seditious Papers.
Shanghai, Sept. 9.—The Pekin gov
ernment proposed to insert an article
in the American commercial treaty in
structing the United States consul gen
eral at Shanghai promptly to suppress
any newspaper published in the for
eign settlement containing seditious or
offensive articles. The Supao affair is
still deadlocked between the consular
and diplomatic bodies, each leaving the
decision in the matter to the other.
RIOTERS TO PRISON
CONVICTED DANVILLE MOB MEM­
BERS ARE GIVEN SENTENCES
BY JUDGE.
Danville, 111., Sept. 9.—The argu
ments for new trials in the cases of
the eleven men and one woman found
guilty of attempting to enter the jail
with intent to kill certain inmates on
July 25 were heard in the circuit
court yesterday and overruled in each
instance by Judge M. \V. Thompson.
The court then sentenced each defend
ant, giving the eleven adults indeter
minate terms in Chester penitentiary
and Thomas Bell, a minor, a sentence
in the Pontiac reformatory.
The court made a long talk to the
defendants, giving them advice, con
cerning their future conduct. He
said in part:
You men may thank God you are
not here on a charge of murder in
stead of an attempt to murder, and
that I am not sentencing you to be
hanged instead of to the penitentiary.
For as sure as you live, had yoii gain
ed entrance to the jail that night, you
would have committed murder, not
once, but probably a dozen times. If
the right man had not been sheriff
you would have succeeded."
The court complimented the county
officers for upholding the laws. At
torney G. W. Salmans, counsel for the
majority of .the prisoners, said the
jury had evidently rewarded Richard
Roberts for his confession by finding
him not guilty, and had constituted It
self a sort of court of equity.
Mrs. Bessie Dodge wept most of the
time while in court. William Pettis
and Cicero Davis, indicted on similar
charges as those sentenced, were yes
terday allowed to plead guilty and
were fined $200 each.
CRESCEUS MAKES RECORD.
ftiltti
Famous Trotter Establishes New Rec
ord on Half-Mile Track.
Lincoln, Neb., Sept. 9.— Cresceus,
the trotting stallion, driven by George
H. Ketcham, his owner, broke all rec
ords for a half-mile track yesterday
afternoon at the state fair grounds,
lowering his own best previous time
of two weeks ago at Dayton, O., a half
second. He covered the mile yester
day in 2 rt)81/4- Twenty-two thousand
people saw the feat.
SUICIDE IN AMISH SECT.
Youth Kills Himself For Love and Es
tablishes Record in Colony.
Arthur, 111., Sept. 9.—Sam Sclirock,
18 years old and son of Jonas Schrock,
a wealthy Amish farmer five miles
southeast of here, committed suicide
by hanging yesterday. A love affair
is said to be the cause. This is the
first case of a suicide known among
the Amish sect, whose people are
thrifty, frugal and care nothing for
society or dress.
IOWAN FORTUNATE.
May Get Part of Riches of Late Mrs
Fair.
Waterloo, Sept. 9.—-(Special.) —Jo,e
Harvey of this city believes he is an
heir to a part of the fortune of Mrs
Fair, wife of the multi-millionaire, who
was killed In Paris not long ago. Mr.
Harvey is a cousin of Mrs. Fair and
according to the terms of the will re
cently found he would receive a portion
.01
A'
8TT VOLUME 55 OTTUMWA, WAPELLO COUNTY, IOWA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1903.
TO PUSHCASESIOWA FEDD'S
TRAGIC END
PROSECUTIONS IN POSTAL CASES
WILL BE SPEEDY.
INDICTMENTS RETURNED
Seventeen Bills Turned Over to Gov­
ernment Attorney, Including Those
Against Beavers, Machen, Driggs
Lorenz, Miller and McGregor.
New York, Sept. 9.—Seventeen ad
ditional indictments against persons
said to be implicated in the postoffice
frauds were turned over to Charles J.
Bonaparte of Baltimore, who was re
tained by the government to aid in the
prosecution of nearly two scores of its
employes.
Indictments Received.
He received the formal drafts of the
indictments against Geo. W. Beavers,
August W. Machen, Congressman Ed
mund H. Driggs, Maurice Riunkle. Geo.
E. Lorenz, George F. Miller and Thos.
W. McGregor.
Will Push the Cases.
He declared the cases in which the
indictments have been returned by the
grand jury will be pushed as rapidly as
the evidence at hand will permit.
Charge May Be Conspiracy.
One person- was indicted yesterday
by the federal grand jury in connection
with the postal investigation. He was
George W. Beavers, formerly chief of
the bureau of salary and allowances.
It is understood that the charge is con
spiracy.
Another indictment is against Au
gust W. Machen on a new set of facts
involving him with Beavers. The
charge! is conspiracy.
The Remaining Four.
While the officials refuse to disclose
the names of the four remaining per
sons indicted yesterday it is said none
of them is or has been connected with
the postoffice department. One is a
man of some prominence.
Prominent Man Indicted.
It is stated at the city hall that
the climax to' the investigation is to
come shortly when a person not con
nected with the department but
equally well known as is the postmas
ter general himself, will undoubtedly
be indicted for complicity in the post
office frauds. The grand jury began
hearing- evidence in this particular
case today and it is stated that when
the report is made it will in all prob
ability conclude the investigation in
Washington.
Stern Under Arrest.
Toronto, Canada, Sept. 9.—Leopold
Stern surrendered himself to the po
lice this afternoon. It is understood
he will fight extradition proceedings.
He is wanted in connection with the
postoffice scandals in Washington,
D. C.
NEW TRAIN ORDERS.
Change in System is Being Considered
By Illinois Central.
Waterloo, Sept. 9.—(Special.)—The
result of the terrible wreck on the
Central near Raymond some three
months ago is likely to lead to the
establishment of a new system of
train orders for use on the Illinois
Central. The order to the freight con
ductor was misread and led to a col
lision. Justice Kuhns, who heard the
evidence, acting as coroner gave the
opinion that too much brevity was
observed in the wording of train or
ders. It is understood that a new
system will be put into use and
where two sections of one train are
running each section will be spoken
of by number and distinctly men
tioned.
PIONEER PASSES AWAY.
Charles E. Flamdrau, Long a Citizen
of Minnesota, is Dead.
St. Paul, Sept. 9.—Charles E. Flam
drau, one of the most prominent pio
neer citizens of Minnesota, died at his
home in this city early today, after
a lingering illness. He was a mem
ber of the first constitutional conven
tion and later became associate jus
tice of the supreme court.
TO POSTPONE EVACUATION.
Russian Minister Would Put Date Lat
er Than October 8.
Yokohama, Sept. 9.—A Pekin tele
gram which is semiofficially confirm
ed at Tokio says the Russian minister
has proposed a postponement of the
evacuation ow the Kirin and Amur dis
tricts of Manchuria, which was set for
October 8.
DEPOT BURNS.
Wabash Station at Shenandoah Con
sumed by Flames.
Shenandoah, Sept. 9.—The Wabash
depot was burned here Monday morn
ing. It is thought that the flames
originated from a spark from an en
gine. The loss is considerable, as the
depot was the best between Council
Bluffs and Maryville.
LUCAS COUNTY FARMER SHOOTS
HIS NEIGHBOR, WHO MAY
NOT RECOVER.
CLAIMS SELF DEFENSE
Jesse Caviness, During a Quarrel Over
a Long Standing Difference, Inflicts
Wounds Which May Result in the
Death of C. E. Dowe.
Chariton, Sept.
9.—(Special.)—At
about 5 o'clock last evening, while in
a quarrel over a difference of long
standing, Jesse Caviness, a well-to-do
fanner residing two miles south of
Lucas, shot and probably fatally
wounded a neighbor, C. E. Dowe.
There were no witnesses to the shoot
ing and the exact details leading up
to it will probably not be known until
the case comes to trial, but Caviness
claims that he did the shooting in self
defense.
Caviness Surrenders.
Caviness used a revolver and shot
but once, the bullet entering Dowe's
body at the top of the abdomen and
coming out under the right shoulder
blade. Caviness at once went to Lu
cas, where he gave himself up to Jus
tice Nichols. He furnished bonds in
the sum of $1,000 and was released,
returning at once to his home.
Dowe in Serious Condition.
The injured man is in a serious con
dition, and although he is still alive
at last accounts the physicians in at
tendance fear that the wound will
prove fatal as he had been in poor
health for some time. He has not re
covered sufficiently from the effects of
the wound to make a statement regard
ing the tragic occurrence.
TO TEST LAWS.
Odd Insurance Case Will Be Filed Soon
in Waterloo.
Waterloo, Sept. 9.—(Special)— One
of tfae..pLeculiaritieSr.of-the Iowa..insur
ance laws will soon be tested by Mel
vina Smith of this city, who will sue
the Maccabees for the face of a policy
of insurance on the lif? of D. J. Bantz,
a fireman on the Illinois Central who
was killed In a wreck near Raymond.
Miss Smith is a cousin by marriage of
the deceased and the state laws say
that only blood relatives can become
beneficiaries of life insurance policies.
The lodge is ready to pay the money
but dares not do so for fear of prose
cution under the state law. The only
way of adjustment is to sue and have
a decision of the court on the law.
CRITICAL SITUATION IN CHINA.
French Troops to Be Hastened on All
Ships for the East.
Paris, Sept. 9.—A dispatch from Mar
seilles to La Presse asserts that the
government has requisitioned all the
steamers on the far eastern service of
Messagerius Maratimes and Chargeurs
Reunis companies for-the conveyance
of a large number of troops of all arms
and a quantity of supplies. The dis
patch adds that this step confirms tho
report that a critical situation prevails
in China.
PREACHER RUINED BY DRINK.
Toledo Minister Saved From Work
house By Promises to Reform.
Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 9.—*Rev. Frank
E. Ratton was yesterday sentenced to
fifty days in the workhouse and fined
$50 and costs for neglecting his family.
Sentence was suspended on his earnest
promises to do better. He said that
his downfall was the result of drink.
He formerly held city and town
charges, but lately has been itinerant.
BOAT MAY BE LOST.
Fears Entertained for Safety of the
John Duncan.
Cleveland* Sept. 9.—The steamer
John Duncan, which left Kelly's Island
for this port last evening is missing
and it is feared that she has founder
ed. The vessel carried a crew of eigh
teen men. It is said the boat was leak
ing badly when she left for Cleveland
in a heavy sea.
OLD POLITICIAN DEAD.
Stephen P. Yeoman Expires at Mar
shalltown Soldiers' Home.
Marshalltown, Sept. 8.—Dr. Stephen
P. Yeoman, one time prominent in
Iowa politics, is dead at the Iowa Sol
diers' Home, aged 81 years.. He was
a member of the lower house in the
fifties.
EARTHQUAKES REPORTED
IN COLORADO TOWNS
DENVER, SEPT. 9.—SPECIALS FROM THE NORTHWEST HERE
TELL OF EARTHQUAKE SHOCKS FELT IN BOULDER, LOVELAND,
LONGMONT AND FORT COLLINS. NO DAMAGE IS REPORTED. THE
8HOCKS CAUSED THE DOORS AND WINDOWS TO RATTLE AND AT
BPJUJLDER J.tiE hfiWS&S SflfiPK. AWTE PERSEJlTjSL.Yj,^'
CALLFOR HELP
SERVIAN OFFICERS ISSUE PROC­
LAMATION TO SOLDIERS
E A N N IS E N
Say Murderers of King and Queen
Must Pay Penalty—Declare They or
the Murderers Must Leave—People
Take Sides in Controversy.
Belgrade, Sept. 9.—The Servian
army officers, recently arrested, suc
ceeded today in publishing a new pro
clamation calling on all officers to
stand together in demanding the most
severe punishment for the murderers
of King Alexander and Queen Draga.
One Side Must Leave Servia.
The officers declare that either they
or the murderers must leave Servia.
The proclamation concludes by call
ing for cheers for King Peter.
People Take Sides.
The Servian public now openly
takes sides with the arrested officers
and demands their release. Great
dissatisfaction prevails on account of
the appointment of General Gynkics
one of the chief conspirators to com
mand the army division of Nish.
HAVE RIGHT TO DISCHARGE
C. D. Wright Says Operators May Let
Men Go.
Scvanton, Pa., Sept. 9.—That the
owner of a coal mine has the right to
discharge an employe for any reason
other than membership in a
union, and is not compelled to give the
causfc of the discharge is the decision
of Carroll D. Wright, the umpire to
whom was referred the disputes be
tween the anthracite miners and oper
ators before the board of conciliation.
Mr. Wright in making this decision,
calls attention to the fact that the em
n'oye is free to leave his work for any
reason he may have, and. the same
holds good with the employer.
THREATEN A GENERAL STRIKE.
Workmen at the St. Louis Exposition
Grounds Make Trouble.
ef'*
fSff^
St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 9.-For an hour Chief Kiely's order is a knockout
yesterday a general strike among the ft?1'
union artisans at the world's fair! sided over by Charles Naughton, as
Uie "difference"^1 b^t^eenaS carpenters S tTe^=y
and the Neyers Construction Co.,which ^"Hast
night.'
is building the intramural railway
.Two
thousand employes quit work because
of the employment of several men at
lower than the union scale. A truce
was reached when the contractors sus
pended the men who were objected to.
HORSE IS KILLED.
Man
Animal Belonging to Eldon
Jumps From Bridge,
Eldon, Sept. 9.—(Special) —While
William Mcintosh, who lives just east
of Eldon was coming to town with a
load of coal this morning his horses
ran away and at a bridge in the busi
ness portion of town they ran off in
to the ditch. One of the animals was
killed and the other was injured. For
tunately Mr. Mcintosh was out of the
wagon before the accident occurred,
and he is uninjured.
FIGHT UNION
CHICAGO CANDY MANUFACTUR
ERS INSTITUTE A LOCK-OUT
—THOUSANDS IDLE.
Chicago, Sept. 9.—Acting upon the
advice of the Chicago Employers' as
sociation, fourteen candy manufactur
ing concerns closed today and be
tween 1,500 and 2,000 persons were
thrown out of work. The move is
the result of the strike action taken
by the candymakers' union yesterday
The employers say the lockout will
continue until the candymakers dis
solve their union and return to work
as individuals.
CORN PROSPECTS GOOD.
Taylor County Farmer Has Several
Ears of Corn 16 Inches Long.
Bedford, Sept. 9.—That the entire
corn crop in Taylor county this vear
is not going to be a failure was de
monstrated the other day when Roy
Hardenbrook a prosperous young far
mer living near here, brought to town
several ears of corn measuring about
sixteen inches in length. Although
these are exceptions he says the en
tire crop will be excellent.
Farmers all over this section report
that corn is doing well and although
the acreage will be smaller than in re
cent years the yield will average up
very well.
TRIES TO BURN A FAMILY.
Agent of Secret Society Uses Torch
as His Weapon.
St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 9.—With a torch
as his weapon some person, supposed
to bo the agent of a secret society
sought revenge yesterday upon Joseph
Bova, a saloonkeeper, and endangered
the lives of thirty persons. Their es
oape was due solely to Carl Dalraght,
years old, who awakening, aroused his
mother. The alarm was sounded in
stantly and the lnmtaes of the blazing
building escaped just in. time. The
.building, a two story structure of
wed* was destroyed with its.contents^Ga&t-
..-"V
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mttm mm
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MORE TROUBLE.
Former Ottumwa Colored Preacher Ac
cused of Bigamy.
Des Moines, Sept. 9.—Rev. F. C. Lo
mack of the First African Baptist
church, who was arrested on a charge
of bigamy, sworn to by Mrs. Julia Lo
mack, spent a night in the city jail. He
was released yesterday on ?300 bonds
after a preliminary hearing gefore Jus
tice Duncan, in which he pleaded not
guilty. His bond was signed by I. M.
Jones.
•Mrs. Lomack claims that her hus
band had not been divorced from his
former wife, Mary Garlan, nee Lomack,
at the time he married her December
18, 1902. It is claimed that he was mar
ried to Mary Garland of Council Bluffs,
in Ottumwa, was divorced from her
and married her again in Des Moines
in 1894, and that she afterwards left
him.
RUNAWAW HURTS MOURNERS.
Trappings on Hearse Scare Horses Be
hind and Nine Persons Suffer.
Denver, Colo., Sept. 9.—Frightened
by the flashing of the black trimmings
on the hearse at Valverde yesterday,
the team attached to the next cariage
in line ran away, the carriage was ov
erturned and nine persons were injur
ed. The most seriously hurt are
Sedbrook, Mrs. Ora nose broken
and face and head bruised.
Sedbrook, Mrs. Ellen badly bruised
about body and arms.
Sedbrook, Mrs. B. L. scratched and
bruised about head and shoulders.
Sedbrook, Alice, age 9 years badly
labor I bruised about face and knees.
White, D. H., driver, both knees bad
ly dislocated and one leg fractured.
MUST FIGHT NO MORE.
St. Louis Authorities Will Allow No
More Pugilistic Encounters There.
St.. Louis, Mo., Sept. 9.—Prize fights
have been held in St. Louis at regular
intervals for the past year, received
their quietus last evening when Chief
of Police Matthew Kiely ordered the
captains of all districts to' prevent
boxing contests or prize fights unless
they were conducted within the strict
letter of the law.
cl
1 ub'
Ar *'.'.vyi
BROTHERS ARE REUNITED
AFTER LONG SEPARATION
wnich. is P^e-
ABRAMS AFTER SALOONS.
Is Endeavoring to Close Only One Left
st Coon Rapids.
Coon Rapids, Sept. 9.—The chances
are that Coon Rapids is likely to be
a "dry" town soon. Mr. Crabil, own
er of the saloon in the Charles build
ing, has recently bought the Miller
saloon in the Bengfort building and
has closed the doors of that building
and Coon Rapids has but one saloon.
Now Rev. Abrams has been in town
and served notice for this one to close.
As to what the outcome will be yet
remains to be seen, but the temper
ance people think they have ample
evidence to convict.
GETS FIRST CAMPAIGN BADGE.
Sound Money League Presents Presi
dent Gift.
Oyster Bay, Sept. 9.—The Sound
Money league committee yesterday de
cided to give a dinner in Washington
later in'the fall instead of New York
in order to insure the presence of
President Roosevelt. The President
said he could not attend the dinner if
given in New York but would if given
in Washington. The committee pre
sented the President a handsome cam
paign badge of the organization for
next year. It is probably the first 1904
campaign badge issued.
DROPPED DEAD ON STREET.
Sudden Death of Henry Moore, a
Wealthy Farmer.
Osceola, Sept. 9.—Henry Moore fell
dead on the street here yesterday. He
was in town on business and while
walking about fell without a word or
a struggle after anyone reached him.
He was a wealthy and highly respect
ed farmer, living a few miles west of
town, and had been a member of the
boa id of supervisors two terms. He
was probably about 65 years old. His
wife survives.
MILLIONAIRE'S SON IN JAIL.
Boy is Held For Robbery, While Fath
er is Convicted of Boodling.
Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 9.—Carey
Snyder, son of Robert M. Snyder,
Kansas City millionaire, is under ar
rest in Billings, Mont. He will be re
turned to Kansas City for trial on the
charge of holding up and robbing O
H. Stevens, a pawnbroker, and his
wife of jewels valued at ?5,300 in
front of their residence in Troost
avenue the night of May 1, 1902. Two
men, both wearing masks, were the
robbers.
NEW RECORD MADE.
Boston Woman Cyclist Rides 1,000
Miles in 96 Hours.
Boston, Sept. 9.—The world's 1,000
mile cycle record for women was
broken by Miss Sadie Knowlton of
this city today. She finished the clr
cuit of that distance in ninety-six
hours and five minutes, which is three
hours and ftfteefc minutes lower than
that formerly held-by Miss Margaret
MMbi
31
4
NUMBER 48
IfV
C*"
CHARLES F. NOBLE FINDS KiNS
MAN HE HAS NOT SEEN FOR
ALMOST FIFTY YEARS. -jl
HAD GIVEN UP HOPE
4 cS
Chariton Man, After Hearing Nothing
From Kinsman for Thirty-two
Years, Advertises in Newspaper and
is Rewarded by Letter from Brother.
Charlton, Sept. 9.—(Special)—A few
words in the advertising columns of
a Chicago daily paper, which chanced
to reach the eyes of those for whom
they were intended, has reunited Chas.
F. Noble of Chariton and his brother,
who have been separated for forty-sev
en years and have not, until the past
few days, known of each other's exis
tence since thirty-two years ago. Last
night the Chariton man left for Fish
Creek, Mich., where he will visit his
brother and the two men will bridge
the long period of separation with
many a dear conversation. From now
until the end of
f-
ytheir
lives they will
hold dear the moment when, after
knowing nothing of each other's where
abouts for over thirty years, their
hands shall clasp and they shall again
feel the joys of brotherly love which
have been denied them so long. The
Chariton man will make all possible
haste to reach Fish Creek, having been
urgently enjoined in a letter from his
brother to lose no time in renewing the
relations that began in the knicker
bocker days, were so rudely broken al
most half a century ago and are now
about to be begun again to brighten
the declining years of the two men,
both of whom are on the down-hill side
of life.
Reads Like a Book. .$]
The story of how the brothers were
reunited is much like a story in a
book but that it is a solid fact Chari
ton people know. The boys were rear
ed together, Charles F., being the
younger but soon after they had grown
to youth they separated eachvto make
his own way in the world. For some
years they kept up a correspondence
but gradually the letters began to pass
more and more slowly -between them,
the distance became widened with the
passing years and fifteen years
after they left the family
home they ceased writing to each other
not because of any estrangement but
merely because other matters began to
be of more interest and importance to
them, as they thought, than the busi
ness of correspondence. They had no
diea that they could not find each oth
er when they did not want to write.
However, after seme months had pass
ed without a letter from his brother,
Charity F. Noble wrote to the latter's
old address and failed to receive an
answer. Another letter was returned
to Mm unanswered and unopened ,and
after several fruitless attempts to
again get in communication with his
kinsman, the Chariton man gave up. |C||
Inserts Advertisement.
The matter weighed on his mind,
however, and he made other attempts
to learn the whereabouts of his broth
er. In the meanwhile he had moved
from place to place and it may be that
his brother was making the same ef
forts to communicate with him and
finding them fruitless. Finally, about
two months ago, the Chariton man,as a
last resort, inserted in a Chicago daily
paper a small "personal", asking for
information regarding his brother, giv
ing the name, last place of residence,
and, fortunately, the name of his broth
er's daughter, which he happened to
know. This was the part of the ad
vertisement that accomplished the pui
pose for which it was intended.
Receives an Answer.
A friend of the advertiser's niece,
who happened to see the advertise*
ment while reading the paper in a
Michigan town, recognized the namC|1
and called the attention of Miss Nobis
to it. She immediately wrote to her
uncle, asking him for proofs of the re
lationship, which he promptly gave.
The other brother had meanwhile been
notified and there immediately came to
Chariton an urgent request for a visit.
Mr. Noble, overjoyed by his good for
tune, left last night for his brother's
home.
Y0RKERSLEAD1®
t&i
EMPIRE STATE RIFLEMEN PASS
NEW JERSEY MEN IN BIG
CONTEST.
Seagirt, N. Y., Sept. 9.—The pick ot»
the riflemen from the states of the un
ion, the District of Columbia and the
three branches of Uncle Sam's fighting I
service are striving heje today to cap
ture the coveted trophy provided by S
congress iu a national match. Today
the marksmen began the second half'
of the competition, ten shots by eachj
man at each of the longer ranges, 800,4
900 and 1,000 yards, A.t the conclusion
of the firing at the 800 yards stage New 'b
York passed New Jersey and headed
the list of competitors with a grand to*1
tal for the four ranges covered of 2,060
out of a possible 2.4Q0.
mm
t!
4,

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