OCR Interpretation


Ottumwa tri-weekly courier. [volume] (Ottumwa, Iowa) 1903-1916, November 08, 1904, Image 8

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86061215/1904-11-08/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

I
y-
"v*
:0#m
&
Tf -Vi": ,o-
V*
I"'
L'
...
*3i
,'t-
fc.'Ar
I*
s-\i'
wJ'
•si:
I
-Ir
TUESDAY,
.-•v ,•'.••••.•.••»•
Washington, D. C., Nov. 5.—In tho
following signed statement given out
last night, President Roosevelt an
swers the charges made agamst hini
sell and Mr. Cortelyou in public
speeches by Judge Parker, democratic
candidate tor the presidency,
"Wmte House, Washington, D. C.,
Nov. 4, 1904.—Certain slanderous ac
cusations as to Mr. Cortelyou and my
sen nave been repeated time and
again by Judge Parker, the candidate
ot his party lor the office of president.
Ho neither has produced nor can pro
duce any proof ot their truth yet he
has not withdrawn them and as his
position gives them wide currency I
speak now lest the silence of selt- re
spect be misunderstood.
Recites Parker's Charges of Blackmail.
"Mr. Parker's charges are in effect
that the President of the United
States and Mr. Cortelyou, formerly Mr.
Cleveland's executive clerk, then Mr.
McIOnley's and my secretary, then
secretary of commerce and labor, and
now chairman of the republican na
tional committee, have been in a con
spiracy to blackmail corporations, Mr.
Cortelyou using his knowledge gained
while he was secretary of the depart
ment of commerce and labor to extort
money from the corporations, and I,
the President, having appointed him
for this especial purpose. The grava
men of these charges lies in the as
sertion that the corporations have been
blackmailed into contributing, and*in
the implication, which in one or two
of Mr. Parker's speeches has taken
the form practically of an assertion,
that they have been promised certain
immunities or favors or have been as
sured that they would receive some
kind of improper consideration in view
of their contributions.
"That contributions have been made
to the republican committee, as con
tributions have been made to the demo
cratic committee, is not the question
at issue. Mr. Parker's assertion is in
effect that such contributions have
been made for improper motives,
either in consequence of threats or in
consequence of improper promises, di
rect or indirect, on the part of the re
cipients. Mr. Parker knows best
BALLOT IS MIGHTY
ELOQUENT SERMON BY REV. A. E.
CRAIG AT FIRST METHODIST
CHURCH.
Right to Vote Is a Sacred Thing—Cost
of the Ballot and Dangers That Be
set It—The Responsibility of
Suffrage.
From Monday's Daily.
"The ballot is a little thing yet a
mightier weapon than the sword, it is
as sacred as a leaf torn from the Bible,
it is the agency v.'hich secures our
liberty, it is our power to protest
against' iniquity, it is the agency un
der which all our rights are protect
ed," said Rev. A. E. Craig in an elo
quent address at the First Methodist
Episcopal churcn last evening. Rev.
Craig took for his subject "The Bal
lot" and remarks were heard with
the closest interest and attention by
the large congregation present.
Rev. Craig said that it would be a
wonderful sight next Tuesday when
10,000,000 free men would go to the
ballot box, for the purpose of register
ing their preference as to the men
who should rule over them and spoke
in part as follows:
Cost of the Ballpt.
"Do we realize the cost of this bal
lot. It has been estimated that 4,000
battles have b2en fought to secure for
this generation the right of suffrage.
It had a beginning in the thirteenth
century when the barons of England
faced a weak king and forced from
him the Magna Charta. A surly king
granted its provisions with reluctance
and it became necessary for Cromwell
to lead forth as resolute a people as
ever faced royalty to insist that their
rights be maintained. Through the ef
forts of Gladstone in 1872 the English
people were given more fully the right
of ballot. We have the French revo
lution resulting from the oppression
of the people by the privileged class.
In Russia today the peasantry is the
football of Czarism and no one can
tell what the outcome will be.
America the First.
"America was the first to assert the
right of manhood suffrage, giving the
same right to the laborer as to the
millionaire, the same power to the
ignorant as to the intelligent,
and although there were many
expressions of ridicule and pre
dictions of disaster from other nations
we have stemmed every tide and our
institutions are firmly established.
Right of Suffrage.
"What is the right of suffrage? It
has been suggested that only property
owners should be allowed to vote.
This is an illogical proposition as the
man who has nothing but his labor is
a*: much a property owner as anyone,
as property is but the accumulation of
labor. It has also been suggested
that the right of franchise should be
determined by the educational advan
tages of the voter. This would be to
say the least, a doubtful experiment
as there could be no greater danger to
America and our free institutions than
to have a sub stratum of unrepre
sented manhood where the principles
ia ELSE FAILS.
Best Vcugh Syrup. Tustes Good,
'.n time. Sold by druggist*
u* ti,.
wi«sp -wwm*
November 8, 1904"*"•
jj ROOSEVELT ANSWERS CHARGES
The President Brands Judge Parker's
Accusations As False and Monstrous.
whether this is true of tlie contribu
tions to his campaign fund which have
come through his trusted friends and
advisers, who represent the great in
terests that stand behind him.
Accusations False and Monstrous.
"But there is not one particle of
truth in the statement as regards any
thing that has gone on in the manage
ment of the republican campaign. Mr.
Parker's accusations agamst Mr. Cor
telyou and me are monstrous. If true
they would brand both of- us forever
with infamy and inasmuch as they are
false, heavy must be the condemna
tion of the man making them. I chose
Mr. Cortelyou as chairman of the na
tional committee after having failed
successively to persuade Elihu Root,
W. Murray Crane and Cornelius N.
Bliss to accept the position. I chose
him with extreme reluctance, because
I could ill spare him from the cabinet.
But I felt that he possessed the high
integrity which I demanded in the
man who was to manage my cam
paign. I am content that Mr. Parker
and I should be judged by the public
on the characters of the two men
whom we chose to manage our cam
paigns—he by the character of his
nominee, Thomas Taggart and I by the
character of Mr. Cortelyou.
Wicked and Atrocious, He Says.
"The assertion that Mr. Cortelyou
had any knowledge gained while in
any official position whereby he Was
enabled to secure and did secure any
contributions from any corporation is
a falsehood.
"The assertion that there has been
any blackmail, direct or indirect,
by Mr. Cortelyou or by me is a false
hood. The assertion that there has
been made in behalf and by my au
thority by Mr. Cortelyou or by any
one else any pledge or promise, or
that there has been any understanding
as to future immunities or benefits, in
recognition of any contribution from
any source, is a wicked falsehood.
"That Mr. Parker should desire to
avoid the discussion of principles I
can well understand for it is but the
bare truth to say that he has not at
tacked us on any matter of principle,
of treason and anarchy flourish. There
must be an equality of right before the
law, tne light to say who shall rule
over us.
Sacred to Vote.
"It is a sacred thing to vote. When
a man enters the booth, he should do
his righteous duty as his conscience
and God direct. Much has been done
to interfere with the sacred right ot
the ballot, by intimidation, the use of
'repeaters' to cheat honest people out
of their rights and social conditions
in the south. An English lord once
said: 'When Great Britain is power
less to protect the humblest Hindoo
on the Ganges, then the highest noble
man is not safe in his palace on the
Thames' and I believe that when the
United States cannot guarantee to ev
ery colored man the right to vote
without fear, the institutions of our
country are not established on the
firm basis they should be.
Regarding Woman's Suffrage.
"The ballot is more than a right, it
is a responsibility. The advocates of
woman's suffrage say much about
natural rights. When the ma
jority of women of America shall say
that they are ready to assume the re
sponsibility of the ballot I shall be the
last to oppose it but the question I
wish to give to you is. has the minor
ity the right to force the responsibility
upon the majority against their will?
Dangers to Ballot.
"Among the dangers that beset the
ballot I mi?ht mention the apathetic
voter and the ignorant voter. By the
ignorant voter I do not mean the uned
ucated man as he may be better pre
pared to vote intelligently on the ques
tions at issue than the brightest grad
uate of a college because he has given
careful thought to them. There is
also a danger from the solid social or
national vote, such as a solid German
vote, or solid Irish vote. But the
danger from the venal vote is greater
than all the others combined. There
should be no need of great campaign
funds.
"The ballot has its limitations in its
power, influence and what it is able
to do for society. L-et us not think that
when we have cast our vote we have
done our ultimate duty. We have the
church and t-^e school and through
these may work for the uplifting of
humanity and the bringing in of the
kingdom of God."
BLOOMFIELD.
Bloomfleld ,Nov. 5.—The republican
campaign closed here Saturday with
an address by Senator J. P. Dolliver,
delivered to one of the largest audi
ences that ever gathered in the court
room on a similar occasion. "Hold on
to the fortunate business conditions
now existing" was declered by the
speaker to be the paramount issue of
the campaign. For nearly two hours
Senator Dolliver held the interest of
the people while discussing the Ameri
can form of government, good citizen
ship, the tariff system, trusts and cor
porations. A vein of humor running
through the address drew from the au
dience continual outburts of laughter
and at intervals hearty applause. Af
ter paying a beautiful tribute to the
memory of President McKinley. he
passed to President Roosevelt, saying,
"We will not only elect him president
but we will give him a congress to help
him." With most sanguine statements
regarding the re-election of Major
Lacey, Senator Dolliver closed the ad
dress which was one of intellectual
pleasure to all.
The first hurrahs of the campaign
were heard Saturday afternoon when
the only political demonstration of the
campaign were made by the republi
cans in honor of the presence in the
city of United States Senator J. P.
Dolliver. About thirty mounted ronyh
riders with flags and banners marched
around the square and. excellent- music
.•••....*••
or upon any action of the government,
save after first misstating that prin
ciple or action. But I cannot under
stand how any honorable man, a can
didate for the highest office in the gift
of the people, can take refuge not
merely in personalities, but in such
base and unworthy personalities.
Refers to Parker in Hill Campaign.
"If deemed it necessary to support
my Hat denial by any evidence I would
ask all men of common sense to pon
der well what has ben done in this
campaign by Mr.Cortelyou, and to com
pare it with what Mr. Parker himself
did when he was managing Mr. Hill's
campaign for governor and to com
pare what has been done as regards
the great corporations and moneyed in
terests under this administration with
what was done under the last demo
cratic administration while Mr. Olney
was attorney general I would ask all
honest men whether they seriously
deem it possible that the course this
administration has taken in every mat
ter from the Northern Securities suit
to the settlement of the anthracite
coal strike is compatible with any
theory of public behavior save the
tneory of doing exact justice to all
men without tear and without favorit
ism.
Denies Pledges of Any Kind.
"I would ask all honest and fair
minded men to remember that the
agents through whom I have worked
are Mr. Knox and Mr. Moody in the
department of justice, Mr. Cortelyou
in the department of commerce and
labor, and Mr. Garfield in the bureau
of corporations, and that no such act
of infamy as Mr. Parker charges could
have been done without all these men
being parties to it.
"The statements made by Mr.Parker
are unqualifiedly and atrociously false.
As Mr. Cortelyou has said to me more
than, once during this campaign, if
elected I shall go into the presidency
unhampered by any pledge, promise,
or understanding of any kind, sort or
description, save my promise, made
openly to the American people, that
so far as in my power lies I shall see
to it that every man has a square deal,
no less and no more.
"Theodore Roosevelt."
was furnished by the Bloomfleld Cor
net band.
Ralph Stafford, of Muscatine, arriv
ed Saturday for a short visit with his
parents, Rev. and Mrs. C. L. Stafford.
Ed. Bezzenberger has purchased the
Robert Boyd residence property in the
west part of the city. The considera
tion was $2,000. Mr. Boyd and family
are moving into the Cook property
northwest of the square.
Senator Harper, o£ Ottumwa, ad
dressed a large audience at the court
house Friday evening, filling the va
cancy caused by the absence of N. E.
Kendall, who, was unable to meet his
engagement, being sick at his home in
Albia.
Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Turpin have re
turned from Des Moines, where Mr.
Turpin has been attending college dur
ing the past year.
Mrs. J. R. Haney and little son of
Ottumwa, spent Saturday and Sun
day with Mrs. G. Hazlewood.
Earl Plank, of Pulaski, has returned
from the world's fair, where he has
been acting as a guard in the agri
cultural building.
Carl Wolf left Saturday for Chicago
to spend a short time on business and
visit his sister who has recently ar
rived from Germany.
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Mendenhall,
who have been spending the past few
weeks with relatives returned Sat
urday morning to their home in Boise
City, Idaho. They were accompanied
by Miss Fannie Mendenhall, who will
remain a month with them.
The chrysanthemum sale and church
social given by the Women's Home
Missionary society Friday evening in
the lecture room of the Methodist
church was a unique little affair which
was quite successful. The display was
very attractive. Light refreshments
were served and the receipts of the
venture were about $12.
Roy Swlnney.has returned from the
Keokuk Medical college to spend a
week in the city and cast his vote at
the polls Tuesday.
HERVEY'S BODY REPLEVINED.
Des Moines. Nov. 7. The sensa
tional death of Harry Hervev was fol
lowed with a sensational disposition
of the remains. For several hours the
body lay at the undertaking parlors of
L. F. Shank. During the same hours
the relatives of the young man were
at the undertaking rooms of Henry
Gray trying to get possession of the
remains of their brother who had
been found dying in a Chestnut street
house.
Early Saturday morning a writ of
replevin was asked for in a west side
justice court and it was summarily is
sued. It demanded that Coroner
Beck deliver at once the body into the
hands of the relatives. The writ was
served and after considerable legal
wrangling and the body transferred to
the Gray undertaking room.
The relatives left the city Saturday
at noon, taking the body with them
The funeral was held at Charition on
Sunday from the home of the father,
J. H. Hervey.
Mrs. Maybrlck Shows Sufferings.
New York. Nov. 7. Deserted by
her children, who believe their mother
was guilty of poisoning their father,
destitute and with only the solace of
the sympathy of her mother, whose
fortunes were also reduced through
her contest for her daughter's liberty,
Mrs. MaybricH has portrayed the suf
ferings of fifteen years in one English
prison in a book soon to be published.
From it she expects to receive
enough to maintain her in comfort
while the suits for her North Carolina
and Virginia property against Mr.
Armstrong are being contested. At
present Mrs. Maybrick is a guest of
Rev. Dr. E. M. Densmore of Brook
lyn.
'V
I
V- I Vi
THE OTTUMWA COUBIRB
-m? at,
SIX WEEKS? MORE
The Piano and Sewing (Machine Contest will close Dec.
,17, '04, by Rewarding Six Young Girls with.
Suitable Christmas Presents.
Concentrate all of your Spare Time on Gathering Votes
Only six more weeks until the close of tho Courier's great Piano con
test—six of the best weeks in the year to secure subscriptions. This is the
time of year when people renew their expiring subscriptions for the com
ing year. Many of your friends would be glad to subscribe and help you
along if they only knew you were in the contest. So one of the necessary
things to do is to let them know about it.
In the thirty-six days remaining there is sufficient time for any one, no
matter where located, to place themselves at the top of the list if only the
proper amount of effort is put forth and surely the reward Is sufficient. As
mentioned above the next six weeks "is the best time to make a success
ful effort."
Only minor changes are noticeable this week. In a general way the list
of contestants are the same as during the preceding week, the vote being
such as to prevent any change of importance.
It should be remembered that the result of an hour's work might put you
in a different position and a day's attention to this contest would possibly
bring surprising results, both in the number of votes you secure, and posi
tion on the list it will enable you to occupy.
The Courier will take pleasure in rewarding this extraordinary effort with
three Arthur J. King pianos, the quality and tone of which is unquestioned,
and as second prizes three first class Singer sewing machines, the value ef
which is known to everybody.
The standing of the contestants up to a late hour Saturday night is
as folows:
CITY OF OTTUMWA
1—AMY TEARNEY, 227 NORTH WAPELLO STREET.
2—-EVELYN FIELD, 1201 NORTH WAPELLO STREET.
3—RUTH BLANK, 926 HACKBERRY STREET.
4—DENA HEATHER, 317 WEST PARK AVE.
5—KATHRYN MATHERS, 321 NORTH JEFFERSON STREET.
6—BERTHA WELCH, 709 NORTH ASH STREET.
7—CECIL KELLEHER, 629 WEST MECHANIC STREET^
8—-DAISY FOWLER, 911 PLUM STREET.
9—VERA CAUGHLAN, 110 SOUTH COURT STREET.
10—VERA OLDHAM, 640 EAST SECOND STREET.
11—MAMIE STARK, 420 CENTER AVE.
12—EVA GIBBONS, 210 ROEMER STREET.
13—NELLIE PEARL PRICE, PARK AVENUE, FAIRVIEW.
14—BLANCHE HOURIHAN, 712 EAST MAIN STREET.
15—
MARIE PICKENS, 640 WEST SECOND STREET.
16—FREDERICA MILLER, 640 WEST SECOND STREET.
17—GOLDIE CADE. 118 WEST SECOND STREET.
18—ETHEL PASNAU, 205 NORTH MARKET STREET.
19—BONNIE SAYLES, 411 CHURCH STREET.
20—AMY LOVING, MOWERY'S ADDITION.
21—LUCILE HASTY, 104 NORTH DAVIS STREET.
22—JUNE STATER, 426 MABEL STREET.
23—GENEVIEVE VAN GENT, 1025 PLUM STREET.
24—CLARA T1NSLEY, 209 SOUTH ADELLA STREET
25—NELLIE EGAN, 903 EAST MAIN STREET.
26—EDITH EDMUNDS, 530 FELLOWS STREET.
27—ZANA TABLER, 921 SOUTH ASH STREET.
23—STELLA MINTONYE, 411 SOUTH WARD STREET.
29—MAUDE BAKER, 1535 EAST MAfN STREET.
30—ANGELINE GILTNER, 1202 NORTH COURT STREET.
31—EDNA BUCE, 118 NORTH WELLER STREET.
32—MYRA BATES, 211 NORTH ASH STREET.
WAPELLO COUNTY OUTSIDE OF CITY
I—GERTRUDE FUHS, KIRKVILLE.
2—EDITH CARR, KEB.
3—FRANCIS MILLER, EDDYVILLE.
4—AUDREY SAPP, ELDON.
5—ETHEL SIMPSON, AGENCY.
6—BERTHA HULL, ELDON.
7—MAUDE WILLARD, DAHLONEGA.
8—LEORA BYRUM, DUDLEY.
9—NELLIE M'CUNE, R. F. D. NO. 7, OTTUMW/:.
10—VASHITI BELLES, BLAKESBURG.
11—ROXIE M'MAHAN, EDDYVILLE.
12—ALICE PETERSON, DUDLEY.
13—BLANCHE ZENTZ, KIRKVILLE.
14—MAR'iARET M'COY, AGENCY.
15—PEARL HOLLINGSWORTH, R. F. D. NO. 2, OTTUMWA.
16—SYLVIA SMITH, BLADENSBURG.
17—MYRTLE JOHNSON, MUNTERVILLE.
13—MINNIE FINK, R. F. D., NO. 5, OTTUMWA.
19—DELLA SMITH, R. F. D. NO. 2, OTTUMWA.
20—NOTA THOMPSON, FARSON.
21—MABEL M'MASTERS, R. F. D., NO. 2, OTTUMWA.
22—RHETTA LONG, DAHLONEGA.
23—MAY URICH, R. F. D. NO, 5, OTTUMWA.
24—
NELLIE CALVIN, EDDYVILLE.
25—PEARL SAUNDERS, EDDYVILLE.
26—BERTHA HALL, DUDLEY.
OUTSIDE OF WAPELLO COUNTY
1—FLORENCE TAYLOR, ATAVIA.
2—KATHLEEN M'GILL, DOUDS-LEANDO.
3—LENA GRIFFIN, ALBIA.
4—CORA GONTERMAN, COUNTY LINE.
5—JENNIE DAVIDSON, MYSTIC.
6—BESSIE THOMAS, HITEMAN.
7—PEARL WORTHAM, EDDYVILLE.
8—LENA DRUMMOND, RICHLAND.
9—FRANKIE SWINNEY, R. F. D. NO. 1, FLORIS.
10—ALICE NELSON, MONROE COUNTY.
II—NORA VICKROY, CHARITON.
12—EMMA BRUNS, SIGOURNEY.
13—GLADYS LACAMP, PULASKI.
14—EFFIE BECK, JEFFERSON COUNTY.
15—HELEN WOLF, BIRMINGHAM.
16—BEULAH SMITH, SIGOURNEY.
17—ERILLA WOLF, MORAVIA.
18—EUNICE MILLER, UNIONVILLE.
SOLD ON ITS MERITS
O'MALLEY'S K? Kl 5C CIGAR
UNION MADE
1
4
1*
.V
Anf
There is considerable mystery at
tached to his method of accomplishing
these marvels, as it is known that he
does not use the drastic drugs and
medicines that doctors depend upon.
He claims to have discovered that a
certain law of nature has peculiar
1 i*11
And I may as well tell you right here
that I mean to keep on curing anyone
who asks me of any disease they may
have as long as I am willing and able.
What other men do, what they fail to
do or what they charge makes no
difference to me. I feel that it is my
duty to carry out my own plans in my
own way, however much it costs me
I cannot bear to think of men and wo
men and little children continuing to
suiter and die when I have the power
to save them and restore them to life
and health so easily and quickly. And
there is no disease I may not cure.
"You may think that a broad state
ment? Well, maybe it is but no
P°fYer
ody ^a Pat'e1t
?nyfnitP nfnTtreCdoctorsthinking
»Bii5^^iBiffiiaisi^6is^isai6eiiitiaii^$4imi^iaii!tisatiSiaBa&aiias?Si<BSsSs6a^^s^S!Mtie6e!l
?Ut
1
in spite of all the said made in** me."
COLLEGE GIRLS ENACT THE PIKE.
Students of Missouri University Give
Startling Reproductions of Show.
Columbia. Mo., Nov. 7.—The girl stu
dents of Missouri University have
given a reproduction of the world's
fair. All leading features of the Pike
were presented.
The Boer war was the most sensa
tional feature. Dressed in uniforms
borrowed from the cadets, the girls
enacted a sham battle. Dressed as
firemen they gave a representation of
Hale's firefighters. A small house
was erected on tho front portico of the
main building and occupied by a num
ber of girls. Afire was started in the
basement and in less than a minute
the girl firemen, dragging a miniature
engine, and hose cart, were on the
sccne. A hose broke and the audience
was deluged, but the girls kept at
work until all the occupants were car
ried out.
Hagenbeck's animal show was an
amusing feature, girls dressed in ani
mal skins acting the part of the ani
mals. Several girls disguised as mon
keys climbed ropes and did some high
air "stunts" that made the people in
the audience hold their breaths. Only
women were allowed to see the show.
.n.•'- f--* .y"' •-"•tut-- ,& ?.
The Blind Made to See- The Lame to Walk
Invalids Restored to Health When Given Up to Die B^
Doctors.
NO DISEASE HE MAY NOT CURE
Stops Pain, Heals Sores, Removes Cancers and Tumors, and Performs Mar
vels that Upset Modern Medical Practice and Defy Explanation.
Wowaii's Startling Statement!
SAYS SHE WAS RAISED FROM THE DEAD BY THIS MAN'S MYSTE­
Rochester, N. Y., Nov. 7.—The al
most miraculous cure of hopeless in
valids made by Prof. Thomas F. Ad
kin of this city, have been of such a
startling character that they have
aroused wide-spread wonder, admira
tion and curiosity. Time and again he
has taken cases pronounced hopelessly
Incurable by the medical profession
and restored the patients to life and
health in a most phenomenal manner.
RIOUS MIGHT.
REMARKABLE OFFER OF FREE SERVICE
ri
1
To the Sick and Afflicted—Cures Them in Their Own' Home'r as1 Eastly'^as
Though They Called in Person—Physicians Invited to Send Him
Cases Pronounced Incurable.
Dut thP flSp^6K vnd
rirHin-, J?.a
a^ay
c° a,
gives him he has made the b-nd see agT me I took ML not dweour
and the lame walk. He has revived
the flickering spark of life in bodies
on the very verge of the grave, and. re
stored to life men and women, given
up to die b-- doctors and. specialists.
He seems to have absolute control
over human life and diseases that at
tack it. Notwithstanding what might
be considered a most favorable oppor
tunity, he does not extort money from
those he treats, saying:
"Carnegie chooses to give libraries
I prefer to give life and health. I am
not a millionaire, but I am well able
to afford to give my services free to
the sick and afflicted. My discovery
is my own, to do with as I please, and
I could charge every patient a thous
and dollars if I wanted to. But I don't.
And I know of no law to compel me
to take money for restoring a man to
health. I do not care what the dis
ease is, I am just as ready to cure con
sumption, cancer, paralysis, Bright's
disease or any one of the so-called in
curable diseases as I am to cure rheu
matism, stomach trouble, catarrh,
blood disorders or any otl.er ill that
flesh is heir to. I am just as ready
•'nd willing to give my services free
to a poor man as I am to a rich man.
When it comes to a question of life or
death, sickness or health, the amount
of money a man has makes no differ
ence to me.
"A prince or a pauper, I treat them
just the same. To me as to the law,
all persons are equal. I see and admit
of no difference between patients as
far as I am concerned. If I choose to
help all who are 111 without pay there
is nothing to prevent my doing so.
0f
v*
§rrow
Str0«sr
and
on her
wasted body.
Ordinary medical treatment, seldom,
if ever, cures cancer. The surgeons
uay °ut
again and again, but
back every time and brings
death with it. But I cure it, and I do
"ot to resort to the butchery of
the knife, either I do not have to cut
flesh and scrape bones. My treatment
J?
ea?.y'
properties "heretofore unsuspected, and another^n^DDOs?dK-e?nMir!ihiaraIqISiS "l8
that by the application of this law A Mr E A WnSit !S" icm
there is no disease he may not cure, been na'ra^^ fnr- UM°".ha?
And it is a matter of proof that with
an(j
the mysterious power this discQvery him any relief That sii* Jr°
gentle and gives no pain, but
the disease disappears. One of mv
patients—Mrs. M. W. Noien, of Cov
ington, Ga.—-was having her life eaten
^way by a cancer. She saw nothing
but a terrible death before her when
I took her case but I cured her, en-
nothing tho rtnotnr i^iU/i ^ea
S&V9
their verdict, and today The mantis
1
ay me llicill ia
walking around as well as you or I.
So it was with Mrs. L. A. Phillips, of
Trawick, Tex. She had been bedridden
for five years, in twelve different hos
pitals and under the treatment of
various doctors, who all failed to cure
her of the complication of diseases
from which she was suffering, includ
ing kidney trouble, catarrh of the
bladder, gravel, female weakness,
ulcers, chronic indigestion and extreme
nervousness.1 The medicine that doc
tors gave her did her no good, but my
treatment did. I cured her, and she
says, 'I raised her from the dead.'
These are only random cases from tha
many hundreds I have cured, and I
mention them merely to show you that
it is a mistake to say any disease is
incurable. They may have been in
curable before I made my discovery,
but they are so no longer."
"But how do you make these mar
velous cures? What is tho power that
you possess?" asked the reporter.
"It would take too long to tell vou,
but here Is a copy of a book I hav«
written describing my discovery and
my method of treatment. I do not sell
it. I had it printed for distribution
among my friends and patients and
those who might be interested in this
study of a new science. To them I am
glad to give it upon request. If read
ing the book does not satisfy you and
you want to know more of how I cure
my disease tell some one who is sick
to write to me. I will go even fur
there—tell anyone who is attacked by
any disease, no matter what it is, to
write to me telling me the name of
their trouble or their principal smyp
toms, age and sex, addressing Prof.
Thomas F. Adkin, Office 260 H. Roch
ester/ N. Y., and I will prove my power
to do all that I claim, and I will give
the proof without charging a cent for
my services."
"Do you mean that anyone can ao
cept this offer?"
"I mean it for anyone who is 111,
from any cause, and who feels that
the doctors do not understand the case,
or who does not want to pay doctors'
and druggists' bills."
"But how about those at a distance
—can you cure them, too?"
'Just as easily, and just as surely
i- li ,—" oust aa easily, ana iuj
broader than the truth. I know the as though they came to mv office,
toot'olf'tt
}ve because I have Whether they live one or thousand
tested it in thousands of cases. You miles away, it's all the same. A letter
'f ,supposed
t0 be
incurable. Well, not long ago I had personal visit"
?r^wn^1Seal,aCove,
MiRs H- L-
Kelly, of Maine. The doc- any money?" "Liuse
t11?-1
sh®
had
C.Ured
me does just as much good as a
"And they do not have to inclose
consumption "Not a single cent. Simply write me
and could not live, that her case was and ask to be cured."
incurable. And to them it was. The "But it seems strange"—
poor girl was in despair, her "Strange or not, I menn lust what
her
Sa''to
aS
an-V
0ne
^lJ
ca«
OUt by
AGENCY.
Agency, Nov. 7.—Mr. and Mrs. Nor
ton Reynolds, o£ Howard Lake, Minn.,
stopped here ior a few days while on
their way to St. Louis and visited Mr.
and Mrs. W. H. Reynolds Sr.
Mrs. Eliza Reynolds and Mrs. J. D.
Newell left today for St. Louis for a
week's visit at the fair.
D. W. Johnson and Lon Cremer
have returned from St. Louis, where
they have been visiting the fair.
Chester Reynolds is home after a
three weeks' visit at Kansas City, Mo.
Mrs. Ed Brown, of Pueblo, Col., who
formerly lived here, is visiting friends
here.
RUSSELL.
Russell, Nov. 1, Mrs. HJv?rett
returned to her home at Allerton Mon
day after a few days' visit with her
daughter, Mrs. H. H. Nelson.
Mis. Genevieve Butts and children
of Mexico, arrived Friday on No. 4,
for an extended visit with her aunt,
Mrs. Jas. Grayson, and other relatives.
The apron bazaar and chicken pie
supper given by the Presbyterian la
dies aid society, was a decidcd suc
cess. They took in' about $45.
E A E
Eye, Ear, Nose, Throat and Lun£
SPECIALIST ..
Glasses Scientifically Fitted.
-Leighton Block. Phone 422. OTTUMWA
vf

xml | txt