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Ottumwa tri-weekly courier. [volume] (Ottumwa, Iowa) 1903-1916, November 26, 1904, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86061215/1904-11-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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jBOCUMENT, ARRANGING FOR COM
.,., MISSION OF INVESTIGATION
IS NOW COMPLETE.
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O A S A E
"f*h «s*
ir-m
fj report Says Japanese Have Been Or
dered to Renew Final Attack Today
Vv
ACKEBIKM 10U MIRTH
SEA SETTLEMENT SIGNED
and Dispatch Hints That Capture
,( Will Now Be Easy Activity in
Manchuria Augurs Battle.
t~
St. Petersburg. Nov. 25. The
North sea convention was signed at
tjie foreign office this afternoon by
Foreign Minister Lamsdorff and Brit
I '.lsh Ambassador Hardinge.
Russian Phrase Included.
«,J The text will not be published be
fore Monday but the Associated Press
is able to say the convention contains
eight articles on the lines already pub
lished, embodying the amendment re
quested by Russia providing that the
commission shall determine the de
gree of blame, by the addition of the
words "Subjects of either power or
either state."
Austrian Emperor Named.
The convention designates the em
peror of Austria to appoint the fifth
commit 3ioner in case the four naval
officers disagree.
5 Attack Re-Opens Today."
Washington, D. C., Nov. 25. The
Associated Press learns on excellent
A authority, that the Japanese army has
been ordered to reilew its attack on
Port Arthur today and to take the
main fortifications at any cost.
/J, Last Preliminary Step.
Tokio, Nov. 25. It is reported that'
I the Japanese parties directed against
Rihling, Sungshu and the Bast Keq
wan mountains have reached the
base and center of the ditches and de
fensive works outside the parapets.
Rihlung apd Sungshu mountains have
been capttired, leaving the Russians in
possession of the parapets only. The
Japanese guns are shelling,-the para
pets and inflicting heavy .damage. The
occupation of the farts is expected
shortly and if the forts are taken the
capture of Port Arthur proper seems
assured within a short time
wyr
Reports Denied.
Kurokl's Headquarters in the Field.
Nov. 24. —(Delayed.)— The reports
circulated during the past week in the
eastern papers that Kuropatkin is
I making a general advance and had
pushed back the Japanese left a dis
'S3 tance of three miles, are wholly un
founded.
Both Armies Stronger
tlfe§l§The situatl6n remains entirely utf
efeiii'1'
-1
mas
changed during the last month, except
TODAYS
CO
46%
46%
Oats—
Dec. ...
May ...
•July ...
Duluth
that both armies have doubtless 2 white [email protected] No. 3 white, 31%@32
strengthened their defense and accu
mulated supplies in that time.
Activity in Manchuria.
Field Headquarters of Oku's Army,
Nov. 25.—The Russians are showing
some activity in front of Oku's army.
At dawn Wednesday detachments at
tacked in two places. The center re
pulsed the attack immediately and the
left did also after a hard fight. As the
result of the repulse the Japanese oc
cupied Poutuen. The Russians left
many dead on the field.
Japanese Gain Ground
Toklo, Nov. 25.— The Manchurian
headquarters, telegraphing yesterday,
said: "During the night of November
23 the enemy's infantry made a series
of attacks against our outposts at La
mutun (Lamutlng) but retreated north
ward before our fire. Simultaneously
the enemy's artillery bombarded the
neighborhood of the Shakhe railroad
bridge, firing thirty rounds with no
damage to us."
This market Is furnished by th*
Cassldv Commission Comparv, mem
bers Chicago Board o- Trade. Local
ofHce rooms 28 ai. SO, Hofmann block,
E. C. French, local manager.
Wheat—Oneni Hijrb '.™.
Dec. 1.09% 1.10% 1.09%
1.11 1.09%
99% 99
1.10%
99%
May
July
Corn
Dec. ...
May ...
„May ...
if
50% 49%
46% 45%
46% 46
29',i
31%
31%
Pork—
Dec. ..
Jan. .. 12.65
May .. 12.77
49%
45 %i
46
29%'
31%
31%
28%
29%
31%
31%.
31%
31%
11.40
12.82
12.95
12.82
Lard—
.'Jan. .. 7.00
May 7.17
Short Ribs—
Ian. ., 6.50
ay .. 6.67
12.65?/
12.77'
12.95
7.07
7.25
7.00
7.17
7.07
7.25
6.60
6.50
6.67
6.60
6.75
6.75
Northweitern Receipts,
Today. Last wk. Last yr.
255 190-.:- -,' 248
Minneapolis ... 863 817
Receipts Todnv.
Wheat, 24 cars corn, 509 cars oats,
107 cars.
Estimated Receipt* Tomorrow
Wheat, 78 cars conn, 456 cars oats,
,138 cars.
Primary Receipts.
Wheat today 1,358,000 bushels and
last year 1,609,000 bushels corn today
832,000 bushels and last year 393,000
bushels.
Shipments,
Wheat today 547,000 bushels and burned,
'»£££,1
Sfvr.js^r.v:-
GERMANY IS FOR PEACE.
The Emperor Will Send Representa
tive to The Hague.
Washington, D. C.f Nov. 25.
Secretary Hay has received from
the German government a cordial
note accepting in principle Presi
dent Roosevelt's suggestion for an-*
other conference at The Hague
APPROVE
OF PLAN
NAVAL. AND POSTAL OFFICIALS
TALK OF MERCHANT
MARINE.
Washington, D. C., Nov. 25.—The
merchant marine commission, com
posed of five representatives of each
house of congress, resumed its ses
sion today. Naval and postoffice of
ficials were present, the former to
submit their opinion as. to the desir
ability of a merchants' marine as an
auxilliary to the navy and the latter
to speak of the benefits to accrue to
the postal service as the result of im
proved merchant marine.
last year 841,000 bushels corn today
328,000 bushels and last year 134,000
bushels.
Clearances.
Wheat, 33,000 bushels corn. 300
bushels oats, none.
Liverpool Cables.
Opening—Wheat, higher corn,
lower.
Closing—Wheat, 1 higher corn,
higher.
Hog Market.
Receipts today, 35,000 left over,
4,000 estimated tomorrow, 1,700.
MARKETS BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Chicago Live Stock Market.
Chicago, Nov. 25.—Cattle—Receipts,
,8,00ft steady gooi3. ,to»spr|pe, $6X0
7.00 poor to medium, [email protected]
stockers, [email protected] cows, [email protected]
Hog*'—Receipts,' 35,000 steady to
weak mixed butchers, [email protected]
good to choice heavy $4.7([email protected]
rough heavv. [email protected] light, [email protected]
4.65 bulk sales, [email protected]
Sheep Receipts, 12,000 steady
[email protected] lambs, [email protected]
Chicago Produce Market.
Oats—No. 2, 29%@30 No. 3, 29 No,
Dec. opened, 29% highest, 29%®
29% lowest, 29% closing, 29%@29%
May, 31%.
Pork—Jan., $12.82 May, $12.95®
$12.97.
Lard—Jan., [email protected] May, $7.25.
Ribs—Jan., [email protected] May, $6.75.
Rye—Nov., 78.
Timothy—$2.63.
Clover—[email protected]
Flax—Cash, $1.11® 1.19.
Barley—Cash, [email protected]
Chicago Butter and Egg Market.
Chicago, Nov. 25.—Butter —Steady
creameries, [email protected]% dairies, [email protected]
Eggs—Firm 18% @22%.
Ch'Clflo Poultfv Market.
Chicago, Nov. 25.—Poultry—Steady
turkeys, 13 chickens, 8 springs, 8%.
New York Produce Market.
New Tork, Nov. 25.—Wheat Dec.,
$1-17%.
Corn—Dec., 68%.:
Peoria Produce Market.
Peoria, Nov. 25.—Corn—No. 3, 44%@
46.
St. Louis Produce Market.
St. Louis, Nov. 25.—Wheat Dec.,
$1.09%.
Corn—Dec., 45%.
Oats—Dec., 29%.
rirft
1.09%
,1.10%
99%
New York Butter Market.
New York, Nov. 25.—Butter—Reno
vated, [email protected]% imitation creamery,
15%@20
New York Poultry Market.
New York, Nov. 25.—Poultry—Chlck
es, 11® 15 fowls, [email protected]% turkeys, 15
@21.
MANY"SUFFER
SURVIVORS OF SASSUM MASSA
CRE UNDERGO AWFUL
TREATMENT.
Washington, D. C., .Nov. 25*—A
story of sickness, hunger and starva
tion has come to, the state department
from Consul Norton at Harnut, in a
report upon the condition of the Sas
sun population In Kush district. The
consul says that out'of 1,000 survivors
of the recent massacre very few have
saved anything but their lives. Nearly
every house Las been ransacked and
PJlJV-i
,oS
25r"W?eat_:Noi,2^
were at the
iVh1
?4i ®^Sv,
«. {fTm
Cvl
3
OTJT^
«»0V
x«V| vWAPELLO

"KILLED
INSTANTLY
MRS. H. C. HOLLINGSWORTH OF
ALBIA MEETS DEATH IN
RUNAWAY. Vi
HUSBAND IS 1NJ0RKD
fSt-M,
X,' I
Mr. Hollingsworth, Who Is Superin
tendent of the Albia Public Schools,
May Be fatally Hurt—Horse Fright
ened By Approaching Train,
Albia. Nov. 25. —(Special) Mrs.
family
ilin 2 loiffli 12*''n? Parents met with the accident which
1.14%. wo. nara, «i.iu%(Bi.i4, ko.
3 hard, [email protected] Dec. opened, $1.09%
@1.09% highest. $1.1014 lowest,
$1.09% closing, $1.09% May, $1.10%.
Corn—No. 3 and No. 3 white, [email protected]
47% No. 3 yellow, 47%@48 Dec. open
ed 49%@50% highest, 50% lowest,
49%@49% closing, 49% May, 47%.
wh th
ened at an approaching train. The an- Precautions are being taken toelimin
imal started down the street at break-!a
acflde°ts.
neck speed throwing the occupants of' *ro1? Washington to Pittsburg was
the buggy to the ground. Mrs. Hol
lingsworth fell upon a wheel of the
vehicle and was thrown with much
force against a tree into which the
but in falling he sustained a fracture
of both arms and jawbone and It is
feared he was injured internally.
Woman Dies Instantly.
buggy crashed. Mr. Hollingsworth sylvanla crowds assembled at the sta
was fortunate enough to miss the tree tions to greet the President, but they
Mrs. Hollingsworth was dead when
friends arrived at the scene of the ac
cident, drawn by th« cries of the in
jured man. The woman's body was
badly mangled, nearly every rib on
the left side being crushed. Drs. Pow
ell and Gray were called immediately
and Mr. Hollingsworth and the body of
his wife were taken to the family
home.
Mr. Hollingsworth has been superin
tendent of the Albia schools for four
teen years and is well known and
highly respected by everyone in the
city. His wife was very popular and
her sad death is sincerely mourned by
everyone. She is survived by her hus
band and three sons. Two of the lat
ter, Leigh and Don, live at Albia and
MADE HEAVY LOANS.
Big Bend' National Bank of Daven
port, Wash., Is Ordered To Close.
Washington, D. C., Nov. 25.—The
Big Bend National bank of Davenport,
Washington, has been closed today by
direction of the comptroller of the
currency because of insolvency. The
failure, according to the comptroller
is due to losses sustained upon exces
sive loans to mining interests.
NO BLAME FOR MURDER.
are gv.mblers.
NO
AT
Who
OF SHOTS HAS BEEN
•.••• •'••.•
A TOUR OF
TRIUMPH
CROWDS OF ADMIRERS GREET
PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT IN
V, PENNSYLVANIA.
ON WAY TO THE FAIR
Special Presidential Train Pauses at
Pittsburg While Mr. Roosevelt
Makes Short Address, Thanking the
H. C. Hollingsworth is dead and her train bearing President Roosevelt and
husband, superintendent of the Albia party en route to St. Louis, reached
schools, may be fatally injured as the Pittsburg at 10:45 o'clock and left this
result of a runaway accident of which morning ten minutes later. Quite a
they were the victims at about 5:30 crowd greeted the President here and
o'clock Thursday afternoon.
Mrs. Hoi-1
Train Frightens Horse.
lingsworth's death was almost instan- the rear platform and made a short
taneous. Yesterday was almost the speech.
first time she had been able to leave Thanks For Big Vote,
her room after partially recovering He said: "I am mighty glad to get
from the effects of a runaway accident to Pennsylvania for several reasons,
of about two weeks ago. especially to thank you for the large
Mr. and Mrs. Hollingsworth' were
driving late yesterday afternoon and
just as they approached the Iowa Cen
tral tracks, near the residence of Ol
lie Mock, their horse became fright-
People for Their Splendid Support
Pittsburg. Nov. 25. The special
just before leaving he came out upon
majority given me here. I will do all
that within me lies to show you that
you, have made no mistake."
Care to Prevent Accidents..
Throughout the trip the greatest
I5WS£®'.-"
which $17,500,000 is for ship building.
LOST VESSEL FOUND
The Schooner Judge Boyce, Thought
To Have Sunk, Is Located.
Philadelphia, Nov. 25. The report
that the schooner Judge Boyce was
sunk off Delaware capes November 15
and the crew drowned is untrue ac
cording to the statement of Capt. Blair
of the schooner Marcus M. Uran. The
captain states that the Boyce was at
anchor in the Kennebec river on the
night of November 14. Vs
DR. R. C. CORBU8 DEAD.
Dr. M. Bannister Received News of For
mer Ottumwa Dentist's Death.
From Friday's Daily
New York Gambler Says Man
Shot Him Did Right.
New York, Nov. 25. Guy Roche,
who was fatally shot lase evening,
today identified Frank Felton as the,
_j, -o prominent dentist of this city, which
man who did the shooting. Roche said
Dr. M. Bannister this morning re
ceived word from Hull, Iowa, of the
death of Dr. R. C. Corbus, formerly a
occurrea
they had quarreled and that Felton o'clock. Death was caused from ap
was justified in shooting him as he pendicitis, with which he was troubled
would have done the same thing. Fel-| while a resident of Ottumwa. The
ton denies shooting Roche. Both men! many friends of Dr. Corbus will be
DEATHS
ZEIGLER
SHERIFF SCOTT SAYS EXCHANGE Presbyterian church, will conduct the
HARMLESS.
funeral.
-.",••/
Wednesday morning at 9
grieved to hear of his sudden death.
A SUDDEN DEATH.
Mrs. Johanna Fisher Passes Away of
Heart Disease at Home on Gara. ..
From FrWay's Dnllv.
Mrs. Johanna Fisher, aged 76 years,
died suddenly this afternoon at 1:30
o'clock of heart disease at her home
on Gara street. The funeral will be
held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock
from the residence of Mrs. John Mar
tin, corner of Green and Gara streets.
Dr. F. F. Stoltz, pastor of the First
Cecil Rhodes Scholars Honor American
London, Nov. 25.—The Cecil Rhodes
scholars at Oxford University held
Springfield, 111., Nov. 25. Adjutant' their first annual banquet last night.
General Scott and Lieutenant Colonel Henrv White, secretary of the Ameri
Shand returned today from Zeigler.lll., can Embassy, was the guest of
where? they left fifty of the
state's
General Scott contends that the
union miners' camp at Christopher
three miles distant from Ziegler, is a'
honor.,
rifles and 5,000 rounds of ammunition I-".'
with the sheriff. Scott says the re-1
W E A E
E
ports of trouble at Zeigler have been
greatly exaggerated and that no one
has been killed by the interchange of
shots between nonunion miners in the Iowa—Generally fair tonight and
Leiter stockade and persons outside. Saturday. Cooler in the west and the
ce
The
4
COUNTY, IOWA, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1901
OBSERVE
GLAD
The run
made at an average speed of not more
than twenty-five miles an houi
Makes Few Stops.
At several places in western Penn-
were afforded no opportunity to
him .as.no stops were made.
see
TO SPEND
MILLIONS
•'•'(A.
PRUSSIAN ARMY AND NAVY BUD-
GETS NAME C0L083AL
SUMS.
Berlin. Nov. 25. The Prussian
army budget for the coming year is
home when their estimated at $116,0^0,000, an increase
0f
,,
may cost both their lives.
Related to Ottumwans.
Mr. Hollingsworth is well known in
~r ___ I
Hollingsworth, who resides on Hamil-1 iaying steamer. The sum of $375,000
ton street li. South Ottumwa. Prof.| js asked for submarine experiments'.
Hollingsworth owns property in and The appropriation totals $59,000-000.of
near Ottumwa and makes frequent
visits to that city. Mr. and Mrs. Hol
lingsworth of Ottumwa arrived in Al
bia this morning.
$11,250,000. The naval budget, be-
4
Local Weather.
menace to peace and should^ be abol- 9 o'clock last night 40 went to the hotel. She had been
isbed, but rae ^matter ii iji the hands 7 r'-'ock this morning 38 seeking work in Brooklyn factories
of the sherif£,f%i#:|%isjp V^ ig o'clock this afternoon 55!and this led to her identification.
AMERICANS IN VARIOUS EURO
PEAN CAPITALS CELEBRATE
,,c
THANKSGIVING
m*-
CRITICISE NEW ORDER
Sir Edward Clarke, Speaking at the
American Society's Banquet in Lon
don, Derides Custom of Calling U.
S. Representatives "Americans."
does not possess and Is not entitled to
as Great Britain is territorially a
larger power on the American contin
ent than the United States. Clarke
suggested a more suitable title would
be Usona, signifying the United States
of North America. This is the first
public criticism here of the state de
partment's order that embassies here
after shall be called "American" and
thus stands as a "respectful protest"
against the assumption of the larger
name.
Clarke Hlt« American Pay.
Clarke proceeded to refer to the mis
erable underpayment of American
Judges and the American's waste of
energy in providing for survivors of
the civil war, and in building Iron
clads which she could never use.
Ambassador Choate, replying, said
Americans were quite satisfied with
their name and then referred to the
recent election in the United- States as
a splendid tribute of devotion and af
fection to a gra»t man. Having re
marked upon the .regeneration of pub
lic life "in Amerlpfc regardless of the
party now in progress, Choate ttlltided
to the ever-growing friendship between
Great Britain and Ainerica as a reason
for thanksgiving. He paid a high
tribute to Archbishop of Canterbury's
"Rediscovery of America."
sides two battleships, provides for one
armored cruiser, two small cruisers,
two gunboats, one of them for river faced problems greater than the world
wuv 44
Ottumwa. He is thj brother of T. W. 1 service in the far feast and one mine has ever seen, but by a stroke of gen-
Celebrate Day In Germany,
Berlin, Nov. 25.—Thanksgiving day
was dbserved by 200 American resi
dents of Berlin with a banquet at the
Kalzerhof. Consul General Mason pre
sided and addressed the company on
the prosperity of the United States. A
telegram of felicitation was sent to
President Roosevelt. ,•
Thanksgiving Day In Turkey.
Constantinople, Nov. 25. Thanks
giving day was generally observed by
legation and consulate buildings.
There was a dinner party last evening
at Hissar, Charge Jay and other mem
bers of the American legation attend
ing.
Reception At Vienna.
Vienna, Nov. 25. Ambassador and
Mrs. Storer held a Thanksgiving Day
reception yesterday afternoon. The
ambassador's residence was crowded
with members of the American colony
of Vienna and American tourists.
lOWAtlRL
SUICIDES
MISS JESSIE VOIT CHOOSES
DEATH A8 LE88ER OF
EVILS.'
New York, Nov. 25.—A young wo
man who turned on the gas and killed
herself at a Williamsburg hotel on
Monday night, was today identified as
Miss Jessie Volt, who before her death
said she came from Iowa,
"WW'
h*
Vcik-v
:.-\A
CAR CUT
IN TWAIN
London, Nov. 25. The annual
Thanksgiving banquet of the Ameri
can society at Hotel Cecil last night
was marked by the presentation to
Ambassador Choate of a portrait of
himself painted by Hubert Herkomer
and paid for by subscriptions by mem
bers of the society. An unusual note
for such a gathering was introduced
by Sir Edward Clarke, who proposing
Choate's health, sarcastically derided
the title "American" ambassador, de- Cleveland, Nov. 25. A fast Pennsyl
daring the word American implied vania passenger train collided with a
domination over the whole
western
hemisphere. which the United States
TRAIN STRIKES ELECTRIC CAR
LOADED WITH PASSENGERS
—MANY INJURED.
south bound electric car on the North-
ern
Praise for President. fj'\'
The'archbishop of Canterbury,' pro
posing President Roosevelt's health,
expressed his sincere thanks for the
great hospitality with which he was
treated in America. He said America
'j latou piuuicuio 51 vaivi luau 1110 wviiu
ius had found the man to conquer the
difficulties.
"We, on this side," said the arch
bishop, "no less than brothers to you
across the Atlantic, thank God and
take courage because the ^destinies of
America are safe In Roosevelt's
hands."
°hio Traction railway with terrific
force, near Bedford suburb this morn-
lng-
Car Cut In Twain.
The electric car was cut in twain
and everyone of the fifteen to twenty
passengers was injured to a more or
less extent. Several people were taken
out in a dying condition. Doctors were
sent immediately to the scene from
this city and other nearby, points.
Train Was Going Fast.
The trolley car was struck by the
passenger train while the latter was
running fully fifty miles an hour. A
freight train had just cleared from
the crossing and hid from view the
passenger train. The trolley conduc
tor threw the derailing switch but was
too late to prevent the collision.
RYDER IS FINED
PLEADS GUILTY TO BREAKIffe
AND ENTERING AND WILL
Ryder is the man who it is allaged,
after having serious trouble with his
wife In the Bast End of the city some
weeks ago, drove to the home of
Jesse Spurgeon on East Maple avenue,
entered the house and fire three shots.
The Hill Case.
W. R. Warren, city clerk, and Geo.
Miller, city stenographer, were on the
stand this morning in the Andy Hill
case. Both testified to the fact that
city warrants drawn payable to D.
Murphy and W.McCune had been paid
to Hill. The Murphy warrant was for
$15 and the McCune warrant for $10.
Neither of these parties were known
to either the clerk or the stenographer.
In each om the warrants the word or-
.. der had been stricken out and the word
the Americans here by a short church substituted Mr Warren tea-,
service in the foreign ^nd a holiday at! I3.®"?
th
the American colleges at Hissar and tn wv Vr mrm with the business
Scutari. Flags were hoisted over the
named Murphy and that immediately
after Hill cashed the Murphy warrant
he paid to Warren $9 for the harness.
ROBERT PORTER INTERRED.
Funeral of Pioneer Merchant Took
Place This Afternoon
From Friday's Dailv
The funeral of the late Robert Por-
PREY TO FIRE
FLAMES CONSUME VALUABLE
PROPERTY NORTH OF HAR.
LEM, MONTANA.
Harlem" Mont Nov 25
•4M
JffiE
FATHER JOHN O'FARRELC
DIES VERY SUDDENLY
JIMMY MICHAELS DEAD.
Sp
ccdy Little Bicycle Rider Passes
Away on Ocean Trip.
New York, Nov. 25. A wire
less telegraph dispatch received
here today reported the death of
Jimmy Michaels, the professional
bicycle rider, on board the steam
ship Lasavoie.
!v
PAY CASH FINE, i-•
From Friday's Dally
A fine of $250 was assessed against
Karl Ryder this morning in district
court by Judge F. W. Eichelberger
upon the withdrawal of the plea of
"not guilty" made In court some days
ago and the substitution of one of
"guilty." The charge upon which
Ryder was held by the grand jury was
that of breaking and entering.
&DAY.
1
NUMBEB 94
PASTOR OF ST. PATRICK'S CATHO*
LIC CHURCH SUCCUMBS TO
'-v.!'
HEART DISEASE. V/.
A SHOCK TO COMMUNITY
4
tbWi
Though Well Known Priest Had Beert
In Poor Health for Some Months H*
Was Thought to Be Improving—At»
tended Social Event Shortly Before
His Death.
fj
AUt
From Friday's Dnllr.
Rev. Father John O'Farrell, for th#
past four years pastor of St. Patrick's
Catholic church, passed away this
morning at 3:45 o'clock at the paro
chial residence on Church street.
Death wad* due to heart failure, re»
suiting from some stomach trouble,.:
with which he had been afflicted for
the past year.
The sudden demise of Rev. Father
O'Farrell came as sad news to the peo»
pie of this city, both of the Catholio
and Protestant 'faiths, when learned
this morning. Wednesday evening h«.
delivered in a vigorous manner an ex
cellent address to the members of DI«
vision No. 2, A. O. H., ana only last
night he attended a small spread given
by the same organization, returning to.
his home about 11 o'clock, apparently
in a healthy state. This morning,
shortly after 3 o'clock, his sister, Mis*
Catherine O'Farrell, was attracted to
his room by a noise. Entering, she
found her brother lying on the floor,
having left his bed to call her.
Miss O'Farrell immediately called
Very Rev. F. W. Hoppman and Dr. J.
F. Herrick. Father O'Farrell breathed*
his last at 3:45 o'clock.
Born In 1848.
Father"O'Farrell was born April 18,
1846, In County Longford, Ireland. He
attended the schools there and in 1869
when he was but 23 years old, he wan
ordained a Roman Catholic priest at
All Hallows college in Dublin. He
was Immediately sent to this country
and assumed his first charge in tftft..
same year at St. Therese, near Du«
buque. Ho .remained there seven
years and was then transferred to
Deep Creek in Clinton county. During
his three years at that place, he had
charge of the Maquoketa and Delmar
parishes. From Deep Creek, he was
transferred to Mt. Pleasant, where he.
remained three years. Brooklyn was
his next charge. Victor, Grinnell and
Searsboro were also under his charge
while passing nine years at Brooklyn.
Iowa City was his next charge, h.-.ving
been pastor of St. Patrick's church
there for seven years prior to coming
to this city four years ago.
Father O'Farrell is survived by
three sisters and one brother. They
are Mrs. Francis Erady, of Longford,
Ireland Mrs. John Barrett, of New
York City, Miss Catherine O'Farrell,
of this city, and Francis O'Farrell, Of
Longford, Ireland.
Was Pioneer Clergyman.
Rev. Father O'Farrell was a learned
student of his faith, a close admirer
of all that is good and a very pious
man. He has studied much and equip*
ped himself well for the work of ai
Catholic priest. Since his ordination
in 1869 and his subsequent removal
to this country, he has studied the peo
ple thoroughly and has become one of
that great body of patriotic Irish born:
citizens who reside in this republic.
In every charge he held prior to com*
ing to this city, he was loved by Cath«
olics and Protestants alike, and in tha
few years he spent here, his many
man
and
^r- ^2 acquaintances include every
church
dixies
ter took place this afternoon from the patrick's church, Rev. Father O'Far
family residence, 506 West Fifth street. 1 cloaelv identified with tha
Dr. A. E. Craig, pastor of the First
of this city.
aiM]
,is
Ottumwa cemetery. which is at the disposal of the stud*
ents of the university. While in Iowa
City, Father O'Farrell very often gave
lectures to the students in this hall
and it was used on numerous occa
sions to hold debates between different
societies of the university.
nrairlo
Kariem, Mont jnov. i5. A prairie
waysby
|flre has been raging for several days university.
It Is believed that, starving and des-] forty miles' north of Harlem, and is Was to Dedicate Church.
titute, she chose death rather than live still burning fiercely. Thousands of upon next Sunday Rev. Father
a life of shame, having driven from acres of grazing lands have been O'Farrell had arranged to dedicate St.
her presence the man with whom she swept, and over thousands of dollars' Patrick's church. The ceremony haB
worth of property destroyed. The been Indefinitely postponed. As yet
sheep men in the path,of the lire will, no arrangements have been made for
be heavy losers, I the funeral.
He
waa
prominent in the celebration of holt*
days here, bei&use of his eloquenca
and his brainy views. Since his resi
dence here he $as particularly inter*
ested in the Ahcient Order of Hi*
bernlans, of which order he was chap*
lain.
Popular In Iowa City,
During the seven years which h#
served in Iowa City, as pastor of St.
t)ec
I
a
1
Methodist Episcopal church, conducted State University of Iowa. He was
the services. A quartet composed o£.a great friend of tne students and th®
Mrs. E. C. Pierce, Mrs. Louise Johnson, faculty of the university. St. Bren«
Edward Weeks and Grant Keyhoe sang., dan's hall in Iowa City, was erected
The pallbearers were C. E. McDaniels.! by Rev. Father O'Farrell. This struo»
George Capell, W. H. Boston, W. (.ure j8 being used as a school for boys
Neasham, W. B. Moore and W. S. ..
Hogue. Interment was made in the,
cutely laenunea witn tn«
ltlJ a.
,rge
When the Right Rev. Henry Cos
grove, bishop of Davenport, transfer
red Rev. Father O'Farrell to this
city, the faculty of the university .after
making a strong plea to the bishop to
allow Father O'Farrell to remain,
tendered him a farewell banquet, at
which the testimonials of this beloved
priest were remarkable. He was al-
considered a intellectual
man thoBe ln h,strong,
gh authority at tho

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