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Ottumwa tri-weekly courier. [volume] (Ottumwa, Iowa) 1903-1916, February 07, 1905, Image 4

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86061215/1905-02-07/ed-1/seq-4/

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TODAY'S MARKETS.
'.'This market Is furnished by th*
Cassidy Commission Co.. mpmberi
Chicago Board of Trade. Local offlc#
rooms 28 and 30, Hofmann Block. E
C. French, local manager.
Wheat— Open. High. tow. Close
May 1.17% 1.17% 1.16% 1.16%
1.02% 1.01% 1.01%
95 .94%, .94%
1.02%
May
Sept.
Corn—
Feb. ..
May ...
July ...
Sept. ...
.. 95
45%
46
46%
Oats—
May ...
July ...
Sept. ...
30%
30%
29
Pork—
May
Lard—
May .. 6.95
July .. 7.07
Short Ribs—
Feb.
May .. 6.90
July .. 7.05
sm
,y
Estimated Receipts Tomorrow.
.Wheat, 33 cars corn, 452 cars oats,
114 cars.
Primary Receipts.
'"sWheat today 625,000 bushels and last
year 760,000 bushels corn today 699,
000 bushels and last year 744,000 bush
els.
Shipments.
Wheat today 187,000 bushels and last
year 299,000 bushels corn today 313,
000 bushels and last year 407,000 bush
els.
Clearances.
4
Wheat, 31,000 bushels corn, 137,000
bushels oats, none.
Liverpool Cables.
Opening—Wheat, %'higher corn,
higher.
Closing—Wheat, higher corn,
higher.
Hog Market,
Receipts today, 33,000 left over,
4,415 estimated tomorrow, 33,000 offi
cial receipts yesterday, 16,554.
MARKETS BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Chioago Live Stock Market.
^Chicago, Feb. 6.—Cattle—Receipts,
22,000 steady good to prime, [email protected]
6.25 poor to medium, [email protected]
stockers, [email protected] cows, [email protected]
Hogs—Receipts, 33,000 [email protected] high
er: mixed butchers, [email protected] good
to choice heavy, $4.90®5.05 rough
[email protected] light, [email protected] bulk
sales, [email protected]
Sheep—Receipts, 6,000 steady $4.15
@5.65 lambs, weak, [email protected]
Chicago Produce Market.
Chicago, Feb. 6.—"Wheat—No. 2 red.
$1.20 No. 3 red, $1.13%@1.16 No. 2
hard, [email protected]% No. 3 hard, $1.06®
1.15 July, $1.10% @1.10% may open
ed. [email protected]% highest. $1.17% low
est, $1.16% @1.16% closing, $1.16%
1.16%.
Corn—No. 2 and No. 2 white, 43
43% No. 3 and No. 3 white, 43%@
43% No. 2 yellow, 43%@44 No. 3 yel
low, 43%@43% July, 4o%% May op
ened, 45%§4B% highest, 45% lowest,
45% closing, 45% @45%.
Oats—No. 2, 30% No. 3, 30% No. 2
Vk'hite, 32%@f32% No. 3 white, 31%@
31% Jtily, 30% @30% May opened,
30% highest, 30%@30% lowest, 30%
Closing, 30%§!30.%,
•"Pork—May, $12.95 July, $
13.00.'
'. Lard—May, $6.97 July, $7.10. ".
Ribs—May, $6.90 —July. [email protected]
Rye—Feb., 75.
Timothy—$2.85.
'Clover—$12.60.
Flax—Cash, [email protected]
Barley—r
Chicago Poultry Market.
Chicago, Feb. 6.—Poultry Firm
turkeys, 14 chickens, 12 springs, 12.
Chicago Butter and Eg? Market.
Chicago, Feb. 6.—Butter Firm
creameries, [email protected]% dairies, [email protected]
Eggs—Firm, 24 @30.
New York Butter and Egg Market.
New York, Feb. 6.—Butter—Cream
ery, [email protected] held, [email protected] renovated, 17
@24 imitation, [email protected]
Eggs—Firsts, 33 seconds,
refrigerators, 22 @28.
New York Produce Market.
•New York, Feb. 5,—Wheat May,
»1.16%@1.16%.
Cprn—May, 50%.
St. Louis Produce Market.
St. Louis, Feb. 6.—Wheat May,
$1.15%@1.15%.
Corn—May, 43%.
,Oats—May, 30%@30%.
New York Poultry Market.
New York, Feb. 6.—Poultry—Chick
ens, 11%@14 fowls, 13%@14 tur
keys, [email protected]
Peoria Produce Market.
Peoria, Feb. 6.—Corn—No. 3, 42%.
LOCAL MARKETS.
The local wholesale markets are
changed this morning in several de
partments. Choice hogs and choice
sows have advanced, as have butter
and eggs.
WHOLESALE PRICES.
Live Stock.
Choice hogs, [email protected] lbs... 4.25
Choice hogs, [email protected] lbs... 4.40
Choice hogs, [email protected] lbs... 4.45
Choice hogs, over 250 lbs...
^a
4 TUESDAY, February 7, 190k
'30%
30%
12.92
30%
30%
29
12.95
12.90
Eggs, per dogen
Separator butter
Hides, Wool and Feathers,
Utiles, cured, No. 1 ..............
£urcd. No, 3
wrcen, No. 1
n«een, No. 2
Wool, tubwashed
Medium, unwashed
Coarse, unwashed
Fine, unwashed
Beeswax. No. 1
beeswax. No. 2
I'allcw, No. 1
Tallow, No. ....
42%
45%
45%
46%
45%
46
46%
45%
45%
46%
30%
30%
29%
12.95
6.97
7.10
6.95
7.05
6.97
7.10
9.77
6.90
7.02
6.92
7.05
4.50
Choice sows 4.00 @4.26
Packers 4.10
Stags 2.70
Calves, per cwt 1.50®4.50
Heifers, per cwt [email protected]
Sheep ...: 2.00®3.00
Lambs [email protected]
Poultry.
Hens 8%
Springs 8%
Cocks 2
Stags 8
Turkeys 13
Ducks 8
Geese S
Guineas 15
Grain and Hay—Street Prices.
Wheat, new
Onts, new ....
Rye, new 65 @60
New corn [email protected]
Hay [email protected]
Oats straw [email protected]
Timothy seed, per bu [email protected]
Clover seed, per bu [email protected]
Butter and Eg'js.
Butter, packers pay 2
S O E
O'MALLEY'S Kl Kl 5C CIGAR
23
23
0
8:
0
[email protected]
23® 24
19020
23*325
ia§20
8%
RETAIL PRICE8.
Flour and Feed.
Flour, nor sack 1.4B®l.7r
Corn meal. 10 IT) sack 1B®20
Graham flour, 1(1 ft sack 80
torn, chops, per owt 1.00
Shorts, per cwt 1.21
Corn nnd oat chop, per cwt .... l.Ofl
Bran, per owt .. 1.05
Bar corn, per busuel 43
Shelled corn, per bushel 43
Wheat,
Tier
6.90
7.02
Northwestern Receipts,
"'•'.V'
Today. Last wk. Last yr.
Duluth 14 6 35
Minneapolis ... 382 477 441
Receipts Today.
.Wheat, 22 cars corn, 275 cars oats,
117 cars.
bushel 1.0(1
Oats, pur bushel 85
Chiclcen feed (sronnd) 20 Ih sack 30
Oil meal, per cwt 1,50
Oyster shell, per cwt 75
Hay, per cwt 80
Straw, per cwt
1
45
Butter and Eftgs.
Butter, sep. cream, per lb 32%
Countrv bulter »)er ......... 22%@2&
Eggs, per dozen 27%
Poultry.
Spring chlokeng. dressed, per lb 15
Old hens, dressed, per tt...... 15
Ducks, dressed per lb ... .. 16
Vegetables and Fruits.
Cucumbers, eac:» 20
Radishes, bunch, 2 for IS
Green onions, per bunch .... 7%
Lettuce, per head [email protected]%
Leaf lettuce [email protected]%
Apples, per peck [email protected]
New beets, per peak 20
Beets, per bunch 10
Potatoes, per peck 15
Onions, por peck ..... 83
Lemons, per dozen 25
Oranges, per dojsen 95 @50
Bananas, per doien 85® SO
California grapes, per pound 20
Cocpanqts ... 6010
Cabbages, per pound 2
Sweet potatoes, per peck 80
Summer Mjwstfc B01O
Carrot*, per peck 20
Celery, per bunch [email protected]
Cranberries 10®15
Parsnips, per peck 20
Coal and Wood.
Selected lump, per ton 8.80
Regular lump, per tos 8,25
Selected nut, per top '8.00
Mine run, per tog 2.50
Steam, per ton ....... 2.00
Slack, per ton 1.25
Hard coal, per ton ..... 10.00
Slack, per top 1.26
Cord WQod 4.5005,00
CHIGAGO MARKETS.
Saturday's Livo Stock Market In Brief.
Week's total: Cattle, 61,700 hogs,
184,500 sheep, 76,800. Cattle aye fairly
OTTUMWA'S FAVORITE SMOKE
iiwwmiw
bought up this week values in the regret were heard on all sides when
main same as week ago steers around
$5,00 considered 10 to 15e chbaper
lower and best grades are fully steady
liberal supply of Monday's trade ia
anticipated good butcher stock 10 to
15c higher for week canning grades
generally neglected only steady:
outlet for thin cows continues very
narrow stockers and feeders show a
higher averag^ colli weather bad for
veals—prices 2Sc lower hog trade ac
tive—prices mostly 5c higher packers
all in the market, but 5,000 left most
of them, however, in second hands
bulk pf sales $4.75 to $4.90—good heavy
$4.85 we.ekte average price $4.77—
previous week $4.78 today's sheep
supply small—rprices steady market
back to high point of season export
lots steady with best time lambs sell
on firm basis with yesterday prices
steady with high time of year.
Receipts.
Chicago's receipts this week, com
pared with the preceding week, de
creased 8,900 cattle, 28.500 hogs and
2,200 sheep, Compared with the same
week of one year ago-there was an in
crease of 11,700 cattle and 24,600 hogs,
and a decrease of 6,0000 sheep.
Representative Saiec,
Following are some of the jr*pre*«n«
tative sales made in Chicago yesterday
prices paid:
No. Av. Price.
Hogs (butch) ...71 210 4.80
Hogs (butch) ...62 230 4.85
Hogs (butch) ...75 219 4.87%
Hogs (heavy) ... 7 286 4.65
Hogs (heavy) ...84 283 4.80
Hogs (heavy) ...56 334 4.85
Hogs (light) ...37 142 4.55
Hogs (light) ...76 156 4.65
Hogs (light) ...74 186 '4.77%
Pigs (rough) ... 3 1?5. 1.50
Pigs (rough) ... 1 120 8.80
Pigs (rough) ...13 125 4.60
Sheep (ewes) ... 2 90 3.75
Sheep (buck) ... 1 160 4.00
Sheep (ewes) ...13 203 5,35
Lambs ...92 61 5.50
Lambs ...263 69 6.85
"Lambs ... .150 79 7,65
.. Westerns.
CHICAGO HORSE MARKET.
mm
Some
Week's Supply Excessive and
Left Over Unsold,
Chicago, Feb. 6.—Commission deal
ers generally report the most unsatis
factory wfeek's trade thus far this Sea
son. Receipts were again excessive,
and following a run of 3,344 horses last
week we?e too heavy to maintain
stable prices. tJnfortunately, the bulk
of the offerings were of common qual
ity, which were taken on rural orders,
The bulk of the week's trade was con
sumed in the distribution of horses
in farming districts that are short of
agricultural classes for farm opera
tions. The big storm last week de
layed many buyers, as the blockade of
transportation prevented their ship
ments reaching their destination in
time to meet the dates of their adver
tised sales. Many buyers have not
been represented in the general trade
of the week that are usually constant
operators in the market. General con
ditions have been unfavorable to an
active and steady trade, with th# oon
sequence that the receipts have moved
slowly and at unevenly lower prices.
The decline on account of the storm
and severe weather will average
around [email protected] In two weeks, working a
great hardship to country shippers and
precipitating serious losses. It is pre
dicted that the low vitality of trade
and the declining prices will be fol
lowed by conservative reaction as the
more urgent movement of the spring's
demand materializes. Trade closes
slow, with a large number of holdovers
at the following quotations:
Poor Good
to fair to best
Drafters [email protected] [email protected]
Jiggers and feeders [email protected] [email protected]
Chunks [email protected] 75
Expressers [email protected]
Farms, mares and
small chunks ... [email protected] 70
Light drivers [email protected]
Actors and coach'rs [email protected]
Carriage pairs [email protected]
Western (branded) 30
[email protected]
130(g) 165
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
50 75
Plugs and scrubs [email protected] 15 [email protected] 40
Mules- [email protected] [email protected]
Receipts and Shipments.
Following is the movement of horses
at tho Chicago Stock Yards for dates
mentioned, Yesterday's figures are
estimated
Reoelved. Shipped.
Saturday, Jan. 28 170 184
Friday, Jan, 27 4101 647
Monday, Jan. 30 ...... 1,343 220
Tuesday, Jan. 31 ...... 492 418
Wednesday, Feb. 1 .... 299^1'" 326
Thursday, Feb. 2 291, 887
Friday, Feb,3 358 J, 474
Saturday, Feb.' 4 100-250
Total this week 2,883 2",575
Total previous week .. 3.344.V 3,039
Cor. week 1904 2,458'i 2.388
Cor. week 1903 2,786 V-- 2,872
Shipment of Horses.
Carloads of horses shipped from
Chicago Saturday
J. G. Olney 2
M. Abrams .... 1
Towrisend &S... 2
II, Davenport 1
G. A. R. I. Page ....... 1
H. F. Spencer 1
F. Sweet 1
Crandall, H. Co 1
H. W. Bright 1
Nugent Bros 2
Horter & Co 2
Spencer & Co 2
Smith Bros 1
C. Homer 2
Other shippers '... 9
Total 27
"SCOTTY" MITOHELL DEAD.
Lifeless Body Qf Shepp Salesman
Found on Lake Shore Railroad.
Chicago, Feb. 6.—"Scatty" Mitchell,
one of the well known sheep salesmen
at the yards, is dead. His lifeless body
was found Friday night beside the
tracks of the Lake Shore & Michi
gan Southern railroad. From the re
ports of the police the body was not
mangled In any way, and it was
thought he might have attempted to
jump from the train, and, stunned by
the fall, may have frozen to death be
fore he recovered from the shock.
The South Chicago police found the
lifeless body Saturday of William
Mitchell at Eighty-second street. His
home Is said to have been at 6918 Win
chester avenue. How he came to his
death could not be learned, as no one
whn sn.w tht fntni nwMoTit /.nniH v,
who saw the fatal accident could be
found.
fi^r^ab'ou^the'ya?diewhGre h™ was
known by bis intimate friends as
"Scotty." Years ago he attained con
siderable local fame as a jockey in
the old Dexter Park races. Words of
the news cf his death \yas reported at
the yarda.
STOESSEL DENIES STORY.
Surrender Imperative—General Indlg
nant Over Statements in London.
Colombo, Ceylon, /Feb. 6.—General
prematurely. He was especially indig
nant over the statements made by a
London newspaper January 25 in a dis
patch from Peking that there were at
Colonel Reiss, who was amrng the
negotiators of the surrender of the
fortress, said:
"The garrison could not have held
out a moment longer, It4would have
been murder. Only fifteen rubles re
mained in the military treasury out of
1,500,000 rubles at the beginning of
the siege. Four hundred men were
dying daily at the hospitals, principally
from wounds and scurvy. General Kon
dratenko was the hero of the siege."
Colonel Reiss declared further that
the Japanese were "admirable soldiers,
but poor in the use of the bayonet
compared with the Russians and
French."
General Stoessel and others of his
party will tranship at Port Said for
Odessa.
FALLS ON SIDEWALK.
William Byers Near Death in Snow on
West Second Street.
From Monday's Daily.
William Byers, a cigar maker, liv
ing in the West End of the city, Im
bibed too freely Saturday afternoon
and evening and about 8:30 o'clock
fell on the sidewalk on West Second
street, just west of the Ottumwa Tele
phone company's building. He must
have been there for some time for he
was nearly frozen when found by pass
ers bye. He was taken into the Sullivan
und«rtaking parlors where Dr. Wil
liams was called and succeeded in re
to the Ottumwa hospital.
WILL SELL RACE HORSES.
Rex Amerious, P. E. O., and Iowa to
Go Under the Hammer at Sale.
Rex Americus, P. E. O. and Iowa, the
three speedy horses in which Sheriff
J. H. Cremer is interested with Harvey
Woods of Eldon, are to be consigned
to the auctioneer's hammer in the big
Chicago horse sale held In the Union
Stock Yards February 20-25. These
horses are said to have been good
money-makers during the past season.
Mr. Cremer states as his reason for
the sale that he considers the animals
too valuable for a man of his means
to own.
KEOKUK BILL SIGNED.
House and Senate Attach Names tp It
—Goes to President Today.
Washington, P. C., Feb. 6—The pre
siding officer of the house and sen
ate signed the Keokuk dam bill Sat
urday. It goes to the President to
day. The President will ask the war
department if it is all right anfl sign
it, probably Tuesday,
mm®
days
THE OTTUMWA COUR1BB.
O I A
Frances Helen Smith was born In
Minoka, 111., April 17, 1871, and passed
to a better life in Ottumwa, Dec. 24,
1904. She received her education in
the Sisters' convent at Morris, 111.
came to Ottumwa with her mother in
1888, was married to C. A. Boltz Nov.
9, 1891, and has resided here up to the
time of her death.
Surviving near relatives are: Her
mother, Mrs. A. A. Wilder, of Ottum
wa: one brother, Jas. F. Smith, of Se
dalia, Mo. her husband, C. A. Boltz,
and two children, Frederic G. and
Rhoelne F., of Ottumwa.
Her general character was above re
proach and many fine floral tributes to
her memory were paid. She was quiet,
good, truthful, outspoken and forgiv
ing, If an offense was enacted by a
friend she would overlook it and wel
come them back to her love again.
Her love for her family seemed un
bounded and It made her happy to love
and be loved. She had many friends,
both young and old and those that
knew her best loved her most. It was
her delight to make some one happy,
often denying herself in the interests
of others, always looking on the bright
side of most everything. She met mis
fortune with a calm, sweet smile. As
a wife she was kind, faithful, loving
and true, as a mother all the word
mother can imply. She was a devoted
church member and took a great inter
est In the work. She was conscious
nearly to the last and met the death
messenger with a smile on her face
and it remained there as she lay in
her casket attired in the habiliments
of the grave. She had no fear of death
and will certainly join In the happiness
beyond this life. Contributed.
WRITES FROM CUBA.
Party of Ottumwans Bound for Isle of
Pines Has Enjoyable Trip.
From Monday's Daily.
An Interesting letter lias been re
ceived from Mrs. Clara Graces, who
was one of the party of Ottumwans
wh°
left a. few 'weeks ago for the Isle
of Pines. All had a very pleasant trip
to Havana, where they remained a few
viaitlnS
Polnts °f M^oric intereat.
They spent one afternoon at Morro
Castle and Cabahas fortress. Regard
ing this historic i)lace Mrs. Graves
says: "The building of the foundation,
which Is of coral rock, was begun In
1859 by order of King Phillip II of
Spain. It took 1,500 men eleven years
to complete the work and the cost was
$24,000,000 in Spanish money. We saw
the gun that fired on the Texas and
we also visited the underground dun-
Stoessel, formerly commander of Port ler. We saw the place called the I Main street. The robbery occurred be
Arthur, and the Russian officers ac-, Sharks' nest, where the Cuban pris-! tween the hours of 8 and 10 o'clock,
companying him, arrived here Satur- loners were thrown into the sea. Hav- Entrance to the shop was secured by
day from Japan by way of Shanghai on ana
is
board the French line steamer Austra-1 before, with its numerous parks and
lien. In an interview with the corres-' public gardens, and houses built of
pondent of the Associated Press the brick, plastered over with cement. The
general denied the published state-j windows have heavy iron bars, but no
ments that Port Arthur was surrended! glass, and the main streets are not
any wider than our alleys. We have
visited Colon cemetery, Botanical gar
dens, the old cathedral and many other,
places of interest. On our arrival in
the time of the surrender 25,000 able- the harbor we were anchored near the
bodied men in Pert Arthur capable of bent and twisted wreck of the Maine,
making a sortie, hundreds of officers,: from which wreaths and floral offer
all well-nourished, plenty of ammunl-! Ings are often hung in memory of the
tion, the largest magazine being un- battleship and her heroic dead. The
touched and full to the roof, and an one-mule cart ana string team of six
ample supply of food for three months mules, a la tandem, and even teams
even if no fresh supplies were re- with chains and ropes through their
oeived. The general characterized noses, do all the heay dray work,
these statements as not supported by
facts.
WILL UNVEIL WILLARD STATUE-
W. C. T. U. Makes Preparations to
Honor Illinois Woman's Memory.
Washington, D. C., Feb. 6. The
Women's Christian Temperance union
is making an elaborate preparations
for the unveiling of the statue of
Frances E. Willard in the Statuary
hall February 17. This statue is the
gift of the state of Illinois to the Na
tional Hall of Fame in the capital
building. It is expected that many
state presidents of the W. C. T. U. as
well as the national officers of the or
ganization will be present at the un
veiling and every member of the organ
ization in Washington has been re
quested to be present at the exercises
wearing a white badge.
One thousand children are also be
ing organized to march through Stat
uary hall, each wearing a white rib
bon and deposit at the base of the
statue a white carnation. A mass
meeting will be held in the Metropoli
tan Methodist church on the night of
February 17, when prominent national
speakers will be heard. A reception
to the national officers of the W. C. T.
y. is also being planned.
TO ENTER NEWSPAPER WORK.
John Gannaway, Former Grinnell Boy
And Graduate of Iowa College.
Grinnell, Feb. 6. Another Iowa
boy has recently been the recipient of
a flattering offer of a prominent posi
tion as a journalist. This is John W.
Gannaway, formerly of Grinnell, where
he graduated from Iowa college in
1902. For the past two years he has
been a student of economics in the
University of Wisconsin, where his
work has attracted favorable comment
from prominent students. He was re
cently offered the position of editorial
writer on the Milwaukee Journal an
independent paper with the largest cir
culation of any paper in Wisconsin.
Mr. Gannaway has been preparing to
teach, and at first refused the position
but he was made sucfi excellent offers
by the management of the paper that
he has accepted the place and will do
the editorial work. Mr. Gannaway had
an excellent article in the Iowa Jour
nal of History and Politics last year
on the history of early party organiza
tion in Iowa, which attracted much
favorable comment at the time.
UURES WHtfiE ALL ELSE FAILS
Best loujfh Syrup. TuteB Good
druggists
m&m
WILL TRY ROSEBUD.
Miss Lottie Rogers of Ames to Claim
Her Quarter Section.
Nevada, Feb. G.—Miss Lottie Rogers,
a well known young society woman of
Ames, who has served some time as a
reporter on the local papers, Is about
to leave her home for a life on the
Rosebud Indian reservation, where she
was fortunate enough to draw a choice
quarter section of land during the
drawing at Bonesteel. The land which
Miss Rogers drew Is within two miles
of Gregory, a thriving village of 200
souls, which has sprung up since the
opening of the country.
Miss Rogers will be accompanied by
her father, who will remain with her
until her cabin is erected and a place
for the small amount of stock and her
team. He will then return to his work
at Ames. Miss Lottie has taken the
claim in her own name, and .she pro
poses to "homestead" it alone, nothing
daunted at the life of loneliness and
danger she will place herself In.
She does not Intend to farm exten
sively the first year, but will put in a
sufficient amount of grain that her har
vest will equal the needs af the stock
that she has. This she intends to do,
and do alone.
One would naturally conclude from
this decision that Miss Rogers is a
large, masculine sort of an agricultural
girl, but on the contrary, she is deli
cate and refined in every way, small
of stature, weighing little over 100
pounds, handsome in face and figure
and modest and retiring in her every
day life. Her friends, however, insist
that she has a sufficient amount of
the quality known as self-reliance that
whatever
she
She expects to leave Ames within a
short time, going to Bonesteel, from
which place she will stage it to Greg
ory, which will be her postoffice.
ROBBERS ON EAST MAIN STREET.
geons. Many dark stories are told of articles were the proceeds of a robbery
things that happened at this fortress which took place last evening at
under the command of General Wey-1 Elliott Brothers tailor shop, 226 East
Elliott Bros., Tailor Shop and Cowles
Jewelry Store Entered.
From Monday's Daily.
Two suits of clothing, two pairs of
opera glasses and a number of other
unlike any city I ever visited removing a pane of glass in a rear
door. From the tailor shop depart
ment of the room the robbers took,
two full suits of clothes, one a black
worsted sack suit, one a double
breasted coat, a pair of trousers, and
a vest. From the Jewelry store of N.
W. Cowles in the same room two pairs
of opera glasses are missing.
CHURCH IN BIG SUIT.
Amana Mennonite Society Sued In Be
half of Taxpayers.
Iowa City, Feb. §.—A sensational
suit has been begun againstthe Amana
Mennonite society. Judge S. H. Fair
all, of Iowa City, in behalf of the tax
payers, alleges that the organization is
one of the greatest communistic bodies
in the United States not paying taxes,
As a result of this complaint Judge.
Byington, of Iowa City, has ordered
County Attorney Wallace to bring ac
tion involving from $2,000,000 to $4,
000,00.0.
The suit resembles the famous Mor
mon church and Puliman car company
cases and will cost the Mennonltes a
small fortune if they lose it.
1
M:
undertakes she will go
through with. Her experience will be
a novel one. And her many friends in
this city and Ames are .wishing her all
of thp good luck Imaginable.
Miss Rogers has had no experience
in farming and .stock raising, even
though she was raised within a stone's
throw of the great Iowa Agricultural
college, but her friends say that if she
succeeds in her agricultural pursuits
as well as she does in playing a piano,
writing a choice bit of society gossip,
handling a chafing dish, pounding a
typewriter, doing a bit of Battenburg,
work or a hundred of other little ac
complishments that are hers, she will
make a capital farmer and stock
raiser.
ELDON. ..'
Eldon, Feb. 6. Mrs. Charles Finney
was an Ottumwa visitor on Friday.
Mr. and Mrs. Alec. Davis of Alva,
Oklahoma, left Friday for their home
after a visit with relatives and friends
in this city."
The remains of Mrs. J. J. Conrad of
Chickasha, I. T., were brought here
Thursday evening for interment" and
the funeral was held from the Metho
dist church. Mrs. Conrad was former
ly a resident of this city and had many
friends who will regret to hear of her
death.
Marve Jacques left yesterday for
Packwood to accept a position In the
Packwood bank. Mr. Jacques, it
will be remembered, met with
an accident In Fairfield, November 6,
which resulted In the amputation of
his right leg below the knee. He has
had a new cork leg shipped from New
York and is getting along nicely with
it. The many friends of Mr. Jacques
will be glad to hear he is getting into
a good position.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Davis enter
tained the Fortnightly club at a 6
o'clock dinner at their home on Friday
evening. Games were played and a
most enjoyable evening was spent.
DOUDS.
Douds, Feb. 6. Snow fell here to
the (jepth of about six Inches Saturday
night and Sunday.
Presiding Elder A. Z. Kendrlcks de
livered an interesting sermon on Sun
day evening at the Methodist Episco
pal church and assisted by Rev. J. A.
Sinclair of Mt. Pleasant and Rev.
Frank Seeds of Leando, administered
the sacrament of the Lord's Supper.
A half hour song service led by Prof.
R. B. George of Chicago was taken part
in by the large congregation in an ap
preciative manner.
Mr. and Mrs. George Bowers were
Ottumtte visitors last Wednesday.
Miss Sadie Hi3sem and Miss Jennie
Ferris closed a five months' term of
school here on Friday. An interest
ing program was rendered in the after
noon by the pupils in both rooms.
The women of the Methodist Episco
pal church will serve dinner in the
new Nicklin building oqf Wednesday.
MFor
Blakesburg, Ia.
JCerr, Toronto, Kans.
JCerr, Toronto, Kans.
&•:
the want of a nail you might lose
a shoe,"
For the want of another you might
lose two
But that doesn't matter—it depends
on you— vp y*
Use Courier want ads and learn what^
jthey can do.
4
FOR SALE.
FOR SALE—BEFORE- MARCH 1ST,
4o-acre farm *ln Davis county on the
Bloomfleid and Moravia road, 3V4
miles northwest of Belknap, 28 acres
FOR SALE—BEFORE- MARCH 1ST,
4o-acre farm *ln Davis county on the
Bloomfleid and Moravia road, 3V4
miles northwest of Belknap, 28 acres
In cultivation, 2-room house out
buildings, some fruit. For terms adr
dress W. H. Coftman, Hedrick, Ia.
In cultivation, 2-room house out
buildings, some fruit. For terms adr
dress W. H. Coftman, Hedrick, Ia.
FOR SALE OR RENT—THE FOR
rest place In Pleasant township- For
particulars see or address, Jno. For
rest, R. R. No. l, ottumwa, Iowa.
FOR SALE OR RENT—THE FOR
rest place In Pleasant township- For
particulars see or address, Jno. For
rest, R. R. No. l, ottumwa, Iowa.
FOR SALE—CHEAP 320 ACRES
fine land, near good town in the ar
tesian belt, Spink Co., South Dakota.
FOR SALE—CHEAP 320 ACRES
fine land, near good town in the ar
tesian belt, Spink Co., South Dakota.
Easy terms and long time if desired.
Geo. Talcott, Prophetstown, 111,
Easy terms and long time if desired.
Geo. Talcott, Prophetstown, 111,
FOR SALE OR TRADE—160 ACRES
good farm land In Cusrter county.
Oklahoma. Will be priced at a bar
gain. Ottumwa National bank.
FOR SALE—A FARM OF 440 ACRES,
composed of bottom and ridge land
well improved and nicely -located. C.
E. Riordan, Woodman, Wis.
FOR SALE—CHEAP—320 ACRES. 3
miles from small town on R. R. fair
improvements, land good and nearly
all smooth, 75 now under plow, bal
ance finest of hay and pasture land
100 acres more just as good can be
broken out on this place. Price, $15
per acre if sold by March 1. A. C.
FOR SALE—CHEAP—320 ACRES. 3
miles from small town on R. R. fair
improvements, land good and nearly
all smooth, 75 now under plow, bal
ance finest of hay and pasture land
100 acres more just as good can be
broken out on this place. Price, $15
per acre if sold by March 1. A. C.
FOR SALE OR TRADE—STOCK OF
tailoring goods formerly owned by
Goldberger Bros. Worth about $300.
FOR SALE OR TRADE—STOCK OF
tailoring goods formerly owned by
Goldberger Bros. Worth about $300.
FOR SALE OR TRADE—STOCK OF
tailoring goods formerly owned by
Goldberger Bros. Worth about $300.
L. E. Stevens.
L. E. Stevens.
FOR SALE ONE 2-TEAR OLD
Galloway bull also two early spring
bull calves. Hamilton Wilson, Route
5, Ottumwa.
1823 East Elm Street.
Blakesburg, Ia. FOR SALE—347-ACRE FARM, TWO
miles southeast of Bourbon, Mo.
about 50 acres in cultivation water
ed by three springs excellent tim
ber 4-room house and other build
ings family orchard good fruit,
grain and stock farm $3,600. Wm,
VACANT GOVERNMENT LAND
917,135,880 Acres Open to Homestead Entry and Purchase.
25,000 Copies of This Book Have Been Sold.
Full information to land seekers' about United States Vacant
lands and how to secure them, giving each land office and number of
acres in each county, of every public land state. ........
Free Homesteads, Free Timber Lan s,
Free Grazing Lands Free Mlnera Lends,
Free Stone and Coal Lands* Located By Counties.
URGES GARIBALDI'S CREMATION.
Son of Liberator Asks That Father's
Wish Be Respected.
One Hundred pages, paper cover, sent postpaid, 25 cents.
J. PYATT,
Rome, Feb. 6.—Ricciotti Garibaldi,
the last surviving son of the Italian lib
erator, has addressed a petition to par
liament to settle the question of the
final disposition of his father's re
mains. It was the dying wish of Gen
eral Garibaldi that his body shouM be
cremated and the ashes dispersed, but
the government authorities forbade it.
Ricciotti Garibaldi feels that his last
days are near, and demands that re
spect be shown for his father's de
sires.
ROB GROCERY STORE.
Edgar L. Keyhoe Loses Side of Meat
and Two Boxes of Cigars.
From Monday's Dally.
A side of meat, two boxes of cigars
and some other goods were the pro
ceeds of a robbery perpetrated Satur
day evening at the grocery store of
Edgar L. Keyhoe, 535 West Fifth
street. Parties saw two men enter the
store through a window and notified
the police station but before the po
lice could reach the place the robbers
had disappeared and no trace of them
has yet been found.
VETERAN RAILROAD MAN DEAD.
Mason City, Feb. 6.—Word was re
ceived today of the death of George W.
Sanborn at Los Angeles, Cal., Satur
day morniner. He was the first super
intendent of the Milwaukee road when
it came to Mason City and continued
in that capacity here for twenty years.
The town of Sanborn, Ia.^was named
for him.
Asks Injunotlon Against Opening Head
Sigourney, Feb. 6.—Senator Brooks
of Hedrlck has filed a petition with
the clerk asking that the court enjoin
the road superintendents of Steady
Run township from opening up a high
way through his land in the northern
part of that township. He claims that
while the county board of supervisors
several years ago ordered this road es
tablished, that their order was not le
gal and that he had never been noti
fied of the proceeding. Recently the
road superintendent notified Mr.
Brooks to open the highway and that
if he did not comply in thirty days
the same would be opened at his ex
pense. Mr. Brooks now asks an injunc
tion,
7
Wfc,
FOR RENT. FOR SALE.
FOR RENT—A NEW HOTEL 13
rooms, centrally located, newly
painted and papered. The right
party, can do a good business. Have
a livery barn in connection. Will
rent If desired. Wm. Fritz, Prop.,
FOR RENT—A NEW HOTEL 13
rooms, centrally located, newly
painted and papered. The right
party, can do a good business. Have
a livery barn in connection. Will
rent If desired. Wm. Fritz, Prop.,
NOTICE—THIS IS TO COME AND
see. I have 50 farms for sale from
20 to 300 acre tracts. Call or writ*
me. S. S. Grler, Stafford, Greeq
county,. Mo.
FOR SALE—347-ACRE FARM, TWO
miles southeast of Bourbon, Mo.
about 50 acres in cultivation water
ed by three springs excellent tim
ber 4-room house and other build
ings family orchard good fruit,
grain and stock farm $3,600. Wm,
FOR SALE—347-ACRE FARM, TWO
miles southeast of Bourbon, Mo.
about 50 acres in cultivation water
ed by three springs excellent tim
ber 4-room house and other build
ings family orchard good fruit,
grain and stock farm $3,600. Wm,
FOR SALE—347-ACRE FARM, TWO
miles southeast of Bourbon, Mo.
about 50 acres in cultivation water
ed by three springs excellent tim
ber 4-room house and other build
ings family orchard good fruit,
grain and stock farm $3,600. Wm,
M. Chapman, Bourbon, Mo.
M. Chapman, Bourbon, Mo.
M. Chapman, Bourbon, Mo.
M. Chapman, Bourbon, Mo.
FOR SALE—ONE ANGUS AND
Short-horn bull calves, 12 months
old, weighing 700 pounds. George
FOR SALE—ONE ANGUS AND
Short-horn bull calves, 12 months
old, weighing 700 pounds. George
R. Giltner, Ottumwa, Ia. R. -R, No. Xt
R. Giltner, Ottumwa, Ia. R. -R, No. Xt
FOR SALE—270 ACRES, 4 JP&EJS OB"
city splendid 2-story house (teleT
phone), large barn, orchard all in
cultivation except 20 acres In tim
ber $40 per acre. Address 3. H.
FOR SALE—270 ACRES, 4 JP&EJS OB"
city splendid 2-story house (teleT
phone), large barn, orchard all in
cultivation except 20 acres In tim
ber $40 per acre. Address 3. H.
Piper, Mt. "Vernon, III,
Piper, Mt. "Vernon, III,
FOR SALE OR TRADE—160 ACRES
good farm land In Cusrter county.
Oklahoma. Will be priced at a bar
gain. Ottumwa National bank. FOR SALE—440 ACRES IN ALEX
ander county, IH. partly valley and
partly hilly land all very productive,
near two railroads 85 acres in eul
tlvatlon small buildings fine well
and springs excellent stock faroil
only $10 per acre part time. Fltbian
FOR SALE ON ACCOUNT OF
sickness. Six farms easy payments.
Missouri, 4 Minnesota, 1: South:
FOR SALE ON ACCOUNT OF
sickness. Six farms easy payments.
Missouri, 4 Minnesota, 1: South:
Dakota, 1. Inquire Herman Lois,
Streator, 111.
Dakota, 1. Inquire Herman Lois,
Streator, 111.
FOR SALE—440 ACRES IN ALEX
ander county, IH. partly valley and
partly hilly land all very productive,
near two railroads 85 acres in eul
tlvatlon small buildings fine well
and springs excellent stock faroil
only $10 per acre part time. Fltbian
FOR SALE—440 ACRES IN ALEX
ander county, IH. partly valley and
partly hilly land all very productive,
near two railroads 85 acres in eul
tlvatlon small buildings fine well
and springs excellent stock faroil
only $10 per acre part time. Fltbian
Land Co., Newton, 111.
Land Co., Newton, 111.
Land Co., Newton, 111.
FOR SALE 1,000 ACRE STOCK
ranch fine grazing land, good water,
plenty of timber about 600 acres
bottom (land, could be irrigated at
slight expense might exchange for
improved Iowa farm. Address Box
47, Hatton, North Dakota,
WANTED,
L. E. Stevens. WE OFFER PAYING POSITIONS
everywhere. Free pamphlet explains
the greatest system in the world for
borrowing moniy or selling your
property quickly. E. N. Cook & Co*
WE OFFER PAYING POSITIONS
everywhere. Free pamphlet explains
the greatest system in the world for
borrowing moniy or selling your
property quickly. E. N. Cook & Co*
Sioux City, Iowa.
Sioux City, Iowa.
DR. A, J. MUMMERT
EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT.
P| A QCCC Correctly Fitted.
A Of O N S a re ISSTINE
1
He has 20 acres for $800. One-half
cash, balance on time.
One-half acre on South Walnut ave
nue, in bottom, for $100, $10.00 cash,
balance $3.00 to $5.00 per month. Buy
It now and build a house in the spring
Beats paying rent.
3 room house pn Hayne Street $650.
$50 cash and $7.50 per month.
Want to buy five to seven room cot
tage. Must be priced right.
Lowenberg & Co. L\
Court Street.
MISSOURI FARM LANDS.
Do you want a farm for stock rais
ing, poultry and bees, lands which .pro
duce good crops of small grain, hay,
alfalfa, corn, potatoes, gardeq and
fruit orchards, where lumber and fuel
is cheap, .the winter mild and short,
with good water and healthy climatef?
You will find this in southeastern Mif
sour}. We have over 50,000 acres of
agricultural lands for sale in small and
large tracts at from $8 to $12 per acre.
Improved farms at from $15 to $30 per
acre, sold on easy terms. We refund
railroad fares to purchaser. Write to
day for our sectional map and state
ment of Missouri products. Address,
John P. Applequist, Mgr. Dept. S.
217-20 Manhattan Bldg. Chicago,
III.
LEGAL.
Notice—Proof of Will,
6^
:vsi
A
IS?"1
Des Moines, Iowa.
HAVE YOU SEEN LOWENBERG7
He wants to see you.
He wants to sell you lot 12, Aren
schield's sub. He will take flOO for
it, $10 down and* J5.00 per month. Or
if you will build a house on It will give
you time on the whole price.
At
1
State of Iowa. Wapello county, as.
To all whom it may concern: Notice s-ki
is hereby given that an Instrument In
writing purporting to be the last will rl
and testament of Enoch Rupe, da- t-'
ceased, was this day produced, -opened
and read by the undersigned, and that
I have fixed Tuesday, the 21st day of
February, 1905, as the day for hearing
proof in relation thereto.
Witpess my official signature, with 1
the seal of said court hereto affixed
this 24th day of Jan., 1905. 1
Edwin Dungan,
*}t
t-
~-J
I
Clerk District Court. 1
Laura Mytten,
Deputy.
PRUDENT PEOPLE
read the fresh, live, up-to-date
advertisements in the Courtea
and save monex.
,r
4. *5?
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