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Ottumwa tri-weekly courier. [volume] (Ottumwa, Iowa) 1903-1916, March 25, 1905, Image 2

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SATURDAY, March 25, 1908,
BOTH PHONES 684.
Nos. 209-211 West Main St.
ft *$*§*
LOCAL MARKETS.
Eggs advanced one-half cent in the
local wholesale markets this morning
WHOLESALE PRICES-
Live Stock.
Choice hoe^a [email protected] lbs..
Choice ho?s, 200(g)250 tbs..
Choice hogs, over 260 lbs..
Choice sows
Packers
Stags
Calves, per cwt
Heifers, per cwt
Sheep
Lambs
Poultry.
Hens 9
Springs 9
Cocks
Stags 8
Turkeys 14%
Old turkeys 12
Ducks
Geese
Qnlneas
Grain and Hay—Street
Wheat
Oats
Rye
Corn
Hay
Oats «tra»
Timothy deed, per bu
Clover seed, per bu
Jhlcben feed (ground) 20 lb sack 80
Oil meal, per cwt 1.50
Oyster rtiei., per cwt 78
Jar. per cwt B0
fltraw, per cwt 43
Butter and Eggs.
Butter, sep. cream, per lb.. 30
Hand sep. butter 27%
Renovated butter 27%
Country butter, per pound 25 @27%
Eggs, per dozen
nalected lump, per tvn
Regular lump, per ton
Selected nut, per ton
Mine run, per ton
Steam, per ton
Black, per ton
Hard coal, per ton
•lack, per ton
S.
if
mk*7,
STF
,. TF-TL
One of the Most Profitable Farm Tools
Is everywhere recognized in a good Disc Harrow. I have in the
John Deere, one with double levers, oscillating flexible steel scrap
ers and equipped with weight boxes and polished disc blades. Rigged
for 3 or 4 horses. They make the earth boil. See my Reliable Disc]
Sharpener.
JAS. H. SHEPHERD,
4.90
4.95
5.00!
[email protected]
4.10
2.70
1
.1.50(^4.50
.2.2.T83.00
.2.0fi®3.00
..4.0064.50
9
7
IS
Prices.
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
W(®40
6.0 [email protected]
.. .J..J0«4.r0
JO @1.00
6.^0(3)7.00
Butter and Eg'js.
Butter, packers pay 15
Eggs, per dozen 14
Separator butter 15
Hides, Wool and Faathers.
Hides, cured No. 1 8
Cured, No. 2 8
Green, No. 1 7
Green, No. 2 6
Wool, tubwashed [email protected]
.Medium, unwashed [email protected]
Coarse, unwashed [email protected]
Fine, unwashed 19 @20
Beeswax, No. 1 23025
Reeswax, No. 2 [email protected]
Tallow, No. 1 4%
Tallow, No. 2 .... 4
DETAIL PRICES.
i*iour and Feed.
Floor, per sack 1.4BQ1.7T
Corn meal, 10 lb sack [email protected]
Graham dour, 10 lb sack 80
L'orn, chops, per cwt l.oo
Shorts, per cwi l.ac
Corn and oat chop, per cwt .l.OO
Bran, per cwt 1.05
Bar corn, per but-el 40
Bhelled com, per bushel 45
Wheat, ?er bnshel 1.00
Oats, per bnsnel 85
15
Poultry.
tsprlng chickens, dressed per lb 17
Ola hens, dressed, per lb 15
Ducks, dressed per lb 17
Vegetables and Fruits.
Cucumbers, eac .... 20
Radishes, bunch, 3 for .... 25
Green onions, per bunch .... 7%
Lettuce, per head 10012%
Leaf lettuce
Apples, per peck .... ...
Beets, per bunch
Potatoes, per bushels
Onions, per peck
Lemons, per dozen
Oranges, per dozen
Bananas, per dozen
Malaga Grapes, per pound
Cocoannts
Cabbages, per lt
Sweet potatoes, per peck ..
Asparagus, per bunch ..
Rheubarb, per lb ..
Carrots, per peck
Celery, per bunch
Cranberries
Parsnips, per peck
[email protected]%
[email protected]
10
[email protected]
50
25
35(0)50
25030
25
B01O
S
35
20
15
20
10
10(315
20
Coal and Wood.
8.50
8.25
8.00
2.50
2.00
1.25
10 00
1 25
'HORSE TRADE GOOD.
Liberal Receipts Find Easy Outlot on
Broader Outside Orders.
Chicago, March 24.—The market for
the current month promises to estab
lish several new records for daily,
weekly and monthly receipts. Arrivals
have been in excess of anticipation, but
the extraordinary movement has been
promoted by the unexpectedly broader
outside demand for all commercial
classes. In the heavy draft offerings
the animals of show class have not
been as numerous as reported last
season, although the general demand
has held nominally steady. A few
fancy offerings of extreme weight
and extra quality have been reported
that changed hands at $3500400, but
not until yesterday did the $500 show
animal feature the market this season,
when two fancy pairs were taken by
an eastern dealer at the previous rec
ord price of $1,000 each. The sale
demonstrated that fanciers were ready
to pay last season's prices for drafters
for exhibition and general utility pur
poses. Good to choice drafters are
free sellers at nominally steady prices,
the bulk of sales being around $1700
LGGAL,
Proposals for School House.
Sealed Proposals will be received by
the board of directors of Mount Tabor
school No. 4, Highland township up to
2
o'clock Tuesday, April 11, for the
construction complete of a one-story
school house. Each bid must cont-.iin
cash or check for $25, payable to W.
H. Robertson, secretary, said check or
cash to be forfeited as damages on
failure of successful bidder to enter
Into contract and furnish satisfactory
bond within eight days after being no
tified of the acceptance of his bid.
Plans can be seen at the residence
of W. H. Robertson, secretary, or at
the offices of Miss Nye. county super
intendent, or Frank Fiedler, architect.
Ottumwa, on and after March 18, 1905.
The board reserves the right to re
ject any or all tilds and to waive de
fects in any bid if deemed to the in
terest of the district,
I. E. Robertson,
.. ... ...... Highland Center. R. R.
"New Shepherd's Ranche."
OTTUMWA, IOWA.
Expressers ruled active at [email protected]
with bulk of sales at [email protected] All
classes hold fairly steady at the fol
lowing prices:
Toor Goo3
to fair to best
Drafters ..$1250165 $1750225
Loggers and feeders [email protected] 1500195
Chunks .? [email protected] 85 [email protected]
Expressers [email protected] 1300175
Farm mares and ..
small chunks .. [email protected] 70 750125
Light drivers .. .. [email protected] 1550856
Actors and coach'rs 1150140 1600375
Carriage pairs .... 2250275 2900670
Western (branded) 12® 80 400 70
Plugs and scru'is 50 15 20 0
40
Mules 600135 1450195
Receipts and Shipments.
Following is the movement of horses
at the Chicago Stock Yards' for dates
mentioned. Yesterday's figures are
estimated:
Recelvpfl Shipped.
Thursday. March 16 .. 399 1,024
Friday 'March 17 363 604
Saturday, March 18 .. 96 i20
Monday, March 20 .... 1 646 205
Tuesday, March 21 ... 814 659
Wednesday, March 22. 430 639:
Thursday, March 23 .. 400 800
Week thus far 3,290 2,303
Cor. time week ago .. 3,698 3,1201
Cor. time 1904 3,921 2,5231
Cor. time 1903 3.157 2,373!
Total last week 4,157 3,944
Shipment of Horsss.
Carloads of horses shipped from
Chicago yesterday:
B. Hall 1
Stuckman Bros 1
M. C. Flvnn 1
W. F. Notley 1
J. Farelly 1
Hess &B 1
Bailey & 1
Wallock 1
Winkler 2
Frick 1
Piso 1
Other shippers 35
Horse Gossip.
The following shippers arrived with
consignments of horses: F. M. Han
ley, Rensselaer Ind. J. Schnair & Son,
Jollet, 111. J. H. Geyer, Milo, Iowa A.
L. Mahon, Loeb & Hammel, Appleton,
Wis. J. C. Kelly, Bloomlngton, 111.
H. P. House, West Liberty. Iowa Wil
liam Fink, Verona. 111. T. A. Donald
Lincoln, 111. F. Barrett, Eureka. 111.
H. B. Eshbach, Aledo, 111. N. Graber,
Mine^l Point, Wis. Berry Bros.,
Mitchell, S. D.
CHICAGO MARKETS.
Thursday's Live Stock Market in Brief.
Better tone to cattle trade under
small run market more active—most
lots at better prices some considered
10 to 15c above yesterday general de
mand stronger than yesterday med
ium to good kinds sold quite freely
weaker demand for good cows—prices
10c lower commoner classes, how
ever, hold at steady range canners
and cutters more active—bulls steady:
good to choice calves strong—medium
dull sale feeders trade has fair tone—
values steady hogs mostly 5 to 10c
lower than yesterday trade dull most
of the day but finish strong shippers
took 11,000—few left in first hands
receipts 30,000 as against 13,768 a year
ago bulk of sales $5.20 to $5.35—
light mixed $5.20 sheep trade some
what uneven—mostly steady prime
104-lb western ewes went at $5.80
Mexican yearlings averaging 76 lbs
make $6.85 choice lambs brought
$7.65—trade steady general market
higher than week ago.
Receipts.
Chicago's receipts thus far this week
compared with the corresponding per
iod last week, decreased 4.600 cattle.
Increased 4,000 hogs and decreased
9,300 sheep. Compared with the same
period a year ago there was an in
crease of a few hundred cattle and 29,
500 hogs and a decrease of 13,500
sheep.
Representative Sales.
Following ar* some of th« r«pr«s«n
ihowlng lowest. medium and h«ch»»l
prlcca paid:
h«ch»»l
No. Av. Prlc».
Cattle (beef) .. 8 863 3.65
Cattle (beef) .. .23 1093 4.75
Cattle (Her.-Sh.) 14 1520 6.15
Cows 1 850 1.50
Cows 2 980 .2.95
Cows 2 1455 4.50
Heifers 2 570 2.40
Heifers 8 880 3.65
Heifers 6 928 4.50
Bulls 1 890 2.15
Bulls 2 1340 3.00
Bulls 1 1890 4.00
Stags 1 1050 3.00
Stags 1 1290 4.00
Stags 1 1250 4.50
Calves 2 350 2.00
Calves 7 100 4.75,
Calves .25 90 7.00
Hogs (butch) .58 234 5.22%
Hogs fbutch) .59 248 5.27%
Hogs (butch) .67 243 5.30
Hogs (heavy) .15 2S7 5.10
Hogs (heaw) .59 264 5.25
Hogs (heavy) .57 272 5.30
Hogs (light) .. .69 133 5.00
Hogs (light) ..
103 149 5.17%
Hogs (light) ... .83 180 5.25
Pigs (rough) .. 1 140 2.00
Pigs( rough) .. 1 220 4.50
Pigs (rough) .. .26 122 5.00
Sheep (buck) .11 190 3.50
Sheep (bucks) 4 95 5.30
Sheep (yearl'gs) 71 98 6.70
Lambs 9 60 6.00
Iambs 3 135 6.75
Lambs .84 79 7.65
TODAY'S MARKETS.
Thl« market Is furnished by th«
Cnssidv Commission Co., m»-nber*
Chicago Board of Trade. Local ofllr*
rooms 28 and 80. Hofmann Block. IS,
C. French, local manager.
Whe.if— Open. Hicrh. T.-nvr
Mav $1.12
July .. 90%
Sept. .. 84%
Corn—
May ...
July ...
Sept. ..
48%
45%
48%
Clou*
1.12%
l.i:
90%
84%
1.11%
89%
84%
90%
84%
48%
48%
49%
Oats—
May ....
July ...
Sept. ..
Short Ribs
May .. 6.92
48%
48%
48%
30%
30%
29%
48%
48%
49
30%
30%
29%
Pork—
May .. 12.80
July .. 12.97
Lard—
May .. 7.10
July .. 7.25
30%
30%
29%
30%
30%
29%
12.85
12.97
12.80
12.S2
12.95
12.95
7.12
7.27
7.10
7.25
7.12
7.27
6.92
6.92
6.92
July .. 7.12 7.15 7.10
".i Northwestern Receipt*.
"7 Today. Last wk. Last jrr,
Duluth .... .. 2 19*. 53
Minneapolis .. 816 229\ 285
Receipts Today.
Wheat, 42 cars corn, 281 cars oats,
148 cars.
Estimated Receirts Tomorrow.
Wheat, 24 cars corn, 410 cars oats.
222 cars.
Primary Reoeiots.
Wheat today 467,000 bushels and las1
year 415,000 bushels corn today 605,
000 bushels and last year 227,000 bush
els. i-
5.'.
Shiements.
•Wheat today 213,000 bushels and last
year 295,000 bushfels corn today 620,
000 bushels and last year 203,000 bush
els.
Clearances.
Wheat, 179,000 bushels corn, 280,000
bushels oats, none.
Liverpool Cables.
Opening—Wheat, lower corn,
unchanged.
Closing—Wheat, unchanged corn,
higher.
Hog Market.'
Receipts today, 19,000 left over,
1,300 estimated tomorrow,- 15,000.
MARKETS BY ASSOCIATE!- PRESS
Chicago Live Stock Market.
Chicago, March 24—Cattle Re
ceipts, 15 000 steady good to prime,
$5.1506.25 poor to medium, $3.80©
5.00 stockers, [email protected] cows, $2.80
@4.50.
Hogs—Receipts, 19,000: 5010c high
er mixed butchers, $5.2505.40 good
to choice heavy, $5.3005.45 rough,
[email protected]: light, $5.1505.35 bulk
sales. $5.2005.35.
Sheep—Receipts. 6.000 steady $4.80
@6.30 lambs, $5.50 0 7.65.
Chicago Produce Market.
Chicago. March 24.—Wheat No. 2
red, $1.1201.14 No. 3 red, $1.0501.12
No. 2 hard, $1.1001.12 No. 3 hard
$1.0201.09 July. 90%©90% May op-1
ened. $1.1201,12% highest. $1.12%
lowest, $1.11% closing, $1.12%.
Corn—No. 2, 47%048 No. 3, 470
47% No. 2 white, 47%©48% No. 2
yellow, 48% ©48% No. 3 white, 47% 0
47% No. 3 yellow, 47%048 July, 48%
©48% May opened, 48% 048% high
est, 48% lowest, 48% closing, 48%©
48%.
Oats—No. 2, 81 No. S, 30%©30%
No. 2 white, 32% 032% No. 3 white
30%©31% July, 3O%08O% May op
ened. 3O%03O% highest, 30% low
est, 30% closing, 30%.
Pork—May, $12.82 July, $12.05.
Lard—May, [email protected] July, $7.27
@7.30.
Ribs—May. $6.9206.95 July, $7.15.
Rye—March 78.
Timothy—$2.90.
Clover—$13.85.
Flax—Cash, [email protected]
Barley—Cash, 40 @49.
Chicago Butter and Ego Marty*'!
Chicago, March 24.—Butter —Firm
creameries, [email protected] dairies. [email protected]
Eggs—Steady, 15%.
Chicago Poultry Market.
Chicago, March 24,—Poultry—• Firm
turkeys," 13 chickens, 13, springs, 13.
New York Poultry Market.
New York, March 24. Poultry
Chickens, [email protected] fowls, [email protected] tur
keys, [email protected]
New York Butter and Egg Market,
New York, March 24— Butter
Creamery, 20 @28.
Eggs—Firsts, 17% seconds, 17.
New, York Produce Market
New York, March 24.—Wheat—May:
$1.10%.
Corn—May, 54%.
St. Uouts Produce Market.
St. Louis, March 24.—Wheat —May.
$1.04%.
Corn—May, 46%.
Oats—May, 29.
Peoria Produce Market.
Peoria, March 24.—Corn—No. 3, 47%.
T5 FIX PRICE OF EGGS.
Most Important Meeting in World Held
At Des Moines.
Des Moines. March 24. The lobby
of the Chamberlain hotel was tempor
arily converted into the biggest egg ex
change in the world yesterday morn
ing. more business being done there
in a few hours with the product of the
hen than is frequently transacted on
many big grain exchanges. The oc
casion was the annual meeting of the
Iowa Car Load Egg Shippers' associa
tion, which is being attended by nearly
100 leading shippers of the state. In
addition over seventy prominent rail
road cold storage commission men of
Chicago and the east are at the meet
ing, having come in two special cars
over the Great Western.
The principal object of the meeting
is to fix the price of eggs for cold stor
age the coming year. This is a most
perplexing problem at the present
time, but eggs are now much higher
than they have been in a number of
years. Last year the association fixed
its price on storage eggs at 16%c in
Chicago and 17% cents in New York.
Butter and egg shippers and fruit
commission men are much exercised
over .a report received in Des Moines
yesterday during the progress of their
meeting to the effect that the Illinois
Central railroad has declared war on
the private car lines and announced a
reduction of almost 30 per cent in the
rate on all iced shipments over its
lines.
The information is to the effect that
the rate has been reduced from New
York to Missouri river points from
$1.10, old tariff, to 74% cents per hun
dred weight, and that intermediate
points will receive a corresponding
reduction. This reduction is claimed
to amount to the cancellation of all
charges for icing.
Sioux City advices are to the effect
that the schedule has been made pub
lic there and that the Illinois Central
rate is a reduction of 36 cents on iced
shipment charges formerly made by it
from that point.
The Illinois Central operates its own
fruit dispatch and refrigerator car
service.
HUNT DEAD MAN'S RELATIVES.
Tipton, March 24.—The officers of
this place have vainly endeavored to
locate the relatives of Chas. Christ,the
horse trader who was found dead in
the house occupied by him and his
companions. It was said that he had
relatives livi.ig near Manson but tele
grams to '..hat place disclose the fact
that there was no such man known
there. He came here with a party of
horse traders and some days ago
was. found dead by his friends, lying
across the stove.
THE OTTUMWA COURIER
MRS. M'EIM DIES
11
WELL KNOWW
SOUTH
DRES8ED
O¥TUMWA
WOMAN PASSES AWAY AFTER
SHORT ILLNESS.
SA
and
Death Resulted From the Grip
Complications—'The Funeral Ar
rangements Are Not Yet Com
pleted.
-{,?*
1
Mrs. Almina C. McElroy, widow of
the late R. N. Mcttlroy, and one of the ,can
most highly esteemed women of the
city, died this afternoon at 2:30
o'clock, at the home of her daughter.
Mrs. McElroy was formerly Miss Al
mina Clementliie i»lead and was born
in Greenfield, Ohio, forty-eight years
ago. She was united in marriage with
R.N. McElroy December 23, 1874, at
Greenfield, where they resided for
fourteen years, coming to Ottumwa in
1888.
Mrs. W. C. Sharp, 303 Hamilton street, land black sandy soil 86 acres in
after an illness of only a few days.! cultivation 2 acres in grass small or
.fibout two weeks ago she returned 1 qhard good 4 room house cistern 2
from a trip in-the south and had been good barns school and church 1^
ill since last Saturday from an attack miles good inland town 2% miles
of the grip with resultant complica- vi-uion, railroad town, 10 miles the lm
tions.
Mr. McElroy was engaged in the 'lmder K°od fence a good house °f
grocery business while Greenfield,
and in the restaurant business in!
church, and earnest Christian woman, £ood
and was held in the highest regard-by I
Fist's fur store, back to Ottumwa. He
forget to tell, however, that he was
4 4
OBITUARY.
*4
Sophia C. Johnston wa3 born in
LovettRvllIe, Louden county, Va.. Jan.
17. 1S23, and died March 18. 1905. At
the age of 12 years she moved to Jer
ferson county, Ohio, and in 1819 came
to Eddyville, Iowa. She united with
the Presbyterian church in Virginia
during her childhood and later was a
member of the Presbyterian church a1
Eddyville. She was married to Dr.
Samuel P. Johnston. June 5, 1845, at
Amsterdam, Ohio. To this union were
born nine children, two of whom have
passed to the better world. One child
died in infancy and Zlna P. Johnston
died May 22, 1902. She leaves to mourn
her loss seven children, Mrs. Leonard
Waddington, Des Moines Lizzie John
ston, Chillicothe Mrs. Helen P. Webb,
Hebron, Neb. Fremont Johnston and
George W. Johnston, Sheridan, Wyom
ing Mrs. Jennie B. Kane, Chicago, 111.
Rose Johnson. Harbon, Neb. She was
a faithful loving mother to her chil
dren and a kind counselor to the many
friends with whom she associated
Her last request was that her children
might lead Christian lives and meet
with her in the' life beyond. She has
exchanged this world of care and sor
row for a land which is resplendent
with eternal joys. She has entered an
enlarged sphere, taken on new powers
and new glories of which her f6rmer
life was only a suggestion and we are
glad that "Because He lives, we shall
liv* also."
FARMS
FOR SALE
IN ARKANSAS
The most conservative land buyers
are
now
turning their attention toward
Arkansas for the reason that the cli
mate, productiveness of the soil, the
present low prices of land, all are so
attractive that they can not do other
wise. Our next excursion to Arkan
sas will be on April 4. Round trip about
$17.00. We have some tracts which
we exchange for city property.
f.
Easy terms you wlsh Uiem
Lands In Independence Co. Arkansas.
No. 131 (BBEE)—120 acres of valley
provements on this place are all in good
state of repair the farm will rent for
?200. Price $1,500.
No. 123 (LEEE)-r-160 acres of good
limestone land right on public road,
also on new railroad and right at New
Batesville and Pfeifer's marble quar
ries over 100 acres in cultivation andi
a
sPriDS
this city at the time of his death, Au- outbuildings there is also one tenant
gust 9, 1903. Mrs. McElroy WRS a'11011,3®! A nice orchard in bearing, good
members of the First Presbyterian
all who knew her. She is survived by| No. 143 (AKE)—83 acres of gbod
one son and one daughter, T. George level upland, free from stone 36 acres
McElroy, proprietor of the McElroy In cultivation, balance in good timber
restaurant, and Mrs. W. C. Sharp, good 4 room log house, log barn and
arrangements for the funeral services other outbuildings small orchard 3
have not yet been completed.*
HIS PRISONER.
Sheriff J. H. Cremer Had Interesting
Time Securing Noah Bradford.
Sheriff J. H. Cremer quietly told
some of his friends on his recent re
turn from Peoria of the troubles he
had had in bringing Noah Bradford,
the man accused of robbing E. S.
follows:
Mr. Bradford, the gentleman sus
pected of being a fur robber who has
been occupying a bunk in the city
prison for some days, is much in love,
not only with his quarters in the city
hall, but also with Peoria and the
whole state of Illinois.
"In fact, so deeply has he become
enamored of this vicinity that when
an Iowa sheriff arrived on the scene
this morning and announced that he
was going to take him to Ottumwa,
Iowa, on the 7:15 train Bradford flatly
refused to go. He announced that he
was very well where he was and that
if anybody took him to Iowa it would
have to be a bigger man than the sher
iff of Ottumwa.
"The sheriff tried persuasion and
then tried profanity, but the fellow
was impervious to both. Then the
sheriff called for reinforcement and
between them they got Bradford Into
his socks, but at this point he vas
again overcome with the thought of
four
.. nnr\m• enrinff nr firm wntor alert, 1 ..
sPrin&
of
wate/
f'so
h°use a good barn and other
yar^fty
of fruit not over a mile from
BC^9°J ai^
J0 1*^,1
we^
A
*arm *a
located. Price $2,600.
springs 1 well church, school and
postofflce, all at a good inland town,
just of a mile from farm Bates
ville, nearest railroad town, 16 miles.
Cheap at $650.00.
No, 108 (ABE)—80-acres 1% miles
from Moorefleld, a railway town right
on public road right at a good school
only mile from church 40 acres
in cultivation and under fence a few
fruit trees well of good water one
house, also barn and other outbulld-
ln8s
compelled to dress his prisoner by|only $600.00.
force with the help of Peoria police- No. 110 (COKE)—205 acres of fine
men and haul him a most unwilling land, 5 miles of county seat is in a
passenger to the train and dump him good neighborhood and 150 acres are
aboard just as the train was starting, in cultivation has one good 2 story
The Peoria Star tells the story as house 2 tenant houses, good barn and
.other outbuildings 2 wells and one
this place Is well located. Price
cistern this farm is right at postof
flce, mill, school and church part of
this land Is very fine land and is a
choice farm. Price, $5,200.
No. 138 (BEE)—40 acres farm lies
slightly rolling 30 acres tillable and
free from rock black soil, clay sub
soil this is good productive land log
house with side rooms log barn and
other outbuildings school and church
2 miles a good town on the railroad,
12 miles there are a small number
of fruit trees on this place. Price $300.
how humiliating it was to have to gojance in timber, but when cleared can
back to a country town like Otturiwaj be put in cultivation 4 acres in fruit—
after having enjoyed the dizzy eas-1 apples, peaches, cherries and plums
ures of a metropolis like Peoria, and
onse more he rebelled. It took half a
dozen to wriggle him into his tro is ers
and he came very near strangling a
few of them with his suspenders be
fore they got those properly adjusted.
"And then, just as they were about
to tie his four-in-hand for him with all
that graceful elegance for which the
police force of Peoria Is noted, Brad
ford had another fit and backing to
the furthermost corner defied nnybody
to put on his coat and vest.
"By this time it was fifteen minutes
to train time and the sheriff was froth
ing at the mouth. But finally the com
bined efforts of the force overpowered
the obdurate one and he was thrown
into the patrol wagon and rattled to
the station just In time to be hauled
on the moving train.
"Bradford is wanted at Ottumwa for
stealing a quantity of furs and ship
ping them to this city, where the furs
and the man were both bagged by the
police. He is also suspected of rob
bing Faber's store of more than a hun
dred mink skins, but as they have a
clear case against him in Iowa he will
go there for trial. Iowa is much hard
er on its offenders than Illinois, hence
Bradford's reluctance to trust himself
to the leniency of its laws."
No. 147. (LEE)—160 acres 1
&
miles from church, school and postof
flce 9 miles from Sulphur Rock, a
railroad town 40 acres in cultivation,
balance in white oak and red oak tim
ber log house and barn this land has
some gravel on it, but no rock, and is
good tillable land. Price $450.00.
No. 140. (BEEE)—120 acres of level
upland slight sandy soil with clay
subsoil 40 acres In cultivation, bal-
good large log house with side rooms
extra large barn other outbuildings
everlasting spring of good water the
orchard on this place has never known
a failure this place would make a
magnificent fruit farm it is located 2
miles from church and schools, 12
miles to railroad. Price $1,300.00.
No. 135. (AEE)—120 acres of good
level upland 20 acres under cultiva
tion, balance in fine timber this land
is all free from stone except about 20
acres and produces good crops of cot
ton and corn 2 room box house with
porch and hall log barn and box
stables, all in good repair 3.00 young
fruit trees—peaches and apples 2
springs, 1 well school and church
mile good town on the railroad, 12
miles. This Is a very cheap place at
$650.00.
No. 146. (BCEE)—360 acres of lev
el land 100 acres in cultivation and
under fence good clay subsoil will
produce one-half bale of cotton and
40 bushels of corn to the acre 2 good
frame houses, one 4 room and one 3
room 2 good barns good spring of
water 2 acres In apples and peaches
there are 260 acres- of this place In
virgin timber, mostly white oak and
red oak. that will soon be very valu
able the farm is located 1% miles
from church, school and postofflce
nearest railroad town Is Batesville,
which is 14 miles. Place rents for $200
per year, and it just takes $1,900.00 to
buy it.
No. 145. (BKE)—40 acre farm in the
famous Oil Trough bottom, mile
from church and school, 4 miles from
postofflce and 7 miles from good rail
road town 20 acres under fence and
12 in cultivation black, waxy soil that
produces one bale of cotton and 50
bushels of corn to the acre one log
house and barn, also cow shed well of
good water 200 apple trees, part bear
ing the land that is in timber is a
good growth of white oak and when
cleared tip can be put in cultivation.
Price $400.00.
No. 149. (KEE)—80 acres of good
upland 1% miles from railroad sta
tion 35 acres in cultivation, balance
In good oak timber small orchard
double lis house log barn fine spring
of good water this is level land and is
a nice little home. Price $800.00.
No. 129. iAEEE)—210 acres upland
limestone soil: 150 acres in cultiva
tion 2 story, 6 room house 2 tenant
houses. 2 rooms each good spring,
smoke house, cribs, etc. this place
is located 3 miles from railroad
church and school 1 mile, Batesville 8
miles. Price $3,300.
Norton
Contributed.
Sttitth.
St
First National ptank Bunlding.
O N E A
A O I E W A N A W I
PAY TODAY. SMALL INVESTMENT
BIG PROFIT -i%JUICK RETURNS -^EN
TIRE SATISFACTION,
FOR RENT.
FOR RENT—160-ACRE FARM,
5
miles west of Ottumwa. Fair build
ings, barn, good water. AddrssB
Mrs. Mike Sweeney, South Ot
tumwa, Iowa.
FOR 8ALE.
FOR SALE—EGGS FOR HATCHING.
Either single or rose combed "Rhode
Island Reds." Enquire of A. W.
Slaught, M. D., Ottumwa.
FOR SALE—SILVER LACED WYAN
dotts eggs. Pure blood. $1.00 for
15 eggs. Address Sam Sparks, Ajbia,
Iowa.
KA^NSAS
farm homes and ranches in south
east sunny Kansas, at bargain
prices, and favorable terms. We
have lived here over 26 years, and
know .the eountry and its adaptabil
ity to growing different crops. We
will treat you right, and court in
vestigation. Write for description
and prices. T. W. Gardner & Co.,
Neosho Falls, Kansas. (Woodson Co.)
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE FINE
improved farms and wild land $10
to $50 an acre easy terms the
country of big red clover. Address,
Success Land Agency, Pine City
Minn.
FINEST INVESTMENT IN NORTH
Dakota. The Hope Land and In
vestment company has 111520 acres
of land in western North Dakota for
sale 4 miles from town good soil
rich grasses and fine water. Write
for terms to B. C. Shaw, Secretary
Hope, N. D.
SNAP IN PRAIRIE LAND ONE
thousand acres of fine prairie land
in Winnebago county, Iowa can be
broke up and put into flax this year
and will pay back half the purchase
price, $37.50 per acre. A fine im
proved quarter, one mile from town
a snap at $42.50 per acre easy
term s. W. H. DIcklrson, Thomp
son, Iowa.
LANDS FOR SALE-CHEAP W.^L.°Stewart,eRoute Nof^l^clty.^"'
DR. A. J. MUMMERT
EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT.
GLASSES
AGENCY.
Agency, March 24.—Mrs. Mary Elkln
of Tulsa, Oltla., is here visiting her
son T. Elkin.
Mrs. J. F. Newell and children have
gone to Los Animas, Colo., where the
doctor has located Dr. Newell and
family will be missed from Agency, as
they were highly esteemed by their
many friends here.
Miss Emma Davidson is sick.
B. D. H. Baker, of Omaha, is here
visiting his daughter, Mrs. J. A. Rey
nolds.
Mrs. Daniel Foster, who was re
cently operated on In Chicago, and
who was apparently getting along
nicely has had to have one of her eyes
taken out. She waa very •weak after
the operation, but seems to be gaining
and her many friends here hope for
her speedy recovery. Her daughter,
Mrs. S. F. Action and brother-in-law
S. R. Foster, went to Chicago this
week to see her.
Phillip McSplrn, a Mexican soldier,
is critically 111 here.
The meetings at the Congregational
church closed Wednesday evening.
Several united with the church as a
result of the meetings.
Mrs. E. A. Wing is visiting friends
In Davenport.
Rev. and Mrs. Chas.. nankins, of Mt.
Pleasant, are here visiting Mrs. Hank
ins' parents.
CHILLICOTHE.
Chillicothe, March 24k—Miss Iva
Stevens, of Dudley, came down Tues
day for a visit with relatives.
Mrs. Elizabeth Allen, of near Albia,
spent one day last week with friends
here.
Ed Nye is having a new stock scale
Installed on his farm.
Rev. and Mrs. Geo. Monkman are
visiting relatives In Bloomfleld this
week.
Chas. Allen has been confined to his
bed since Saturday with appendicitis.
Mrs. Johnston, aged 82 years,
died at her home last Saturday even
ing at 9 o'clock. Mrs. Johnston was
one of the old settlers who are fast
passing beyond and was held in high
esteem by a large circle of friends.
The funeral was held Tuesday at 3
o'clock at the M. E. church, conducted
by the pastor, Rev. Monkman. The
floral offerings were beautiful. The
relatives who,-were in. attendance from
a distance were Mrs. Helen Webb and
Miss Rose Johnston, of Hebron, Neb.
Mrs. J. E. Waddington and son Claude
of Des Moines.
Mrs. A. J. Jenkins, who has been
confined to her home with rheumatism
is somewhat improved.
Miss Minnie Clark has been quite
sick the past few days with the grip.
FORESTERS OF IOWA MEET.
Iowa Chiefs Holding Sessions In Des
Moines. •,
Des Moines, March 24. Iowa Chief
Forester association is now in session
and holding their meetings at Central
Hall, Eleventh and Locust. This meet
ing is composed of captains of the Mod
ern Woodmen degree teams in the
state of Iowa. Gen. J. H. Mitchell,
major general commanding Foresters
will be present and take part in the
meeting. Thursday morning at 8
o'clock the entire delegation, upon the
invitation of State Deputy G. N. Frink
will go to the army post to witness the
drills and view the post. Thursday
ening degrees will be donferred
upon a number of candidates at the
hall of U. S. Grant camp. No. 108, M.
W. of A., to which all degrees teams
and neighbors are invited to attend
and take part. ,,
Correot,y
4j-t.-/3fx
mmm
ff if if
FOR SALE.
SEND 15C
waist set.
Muscatine Iowa,
FOR PEARL SHIRT
Economy Button Co*
MISSOURI LAND A GOOD INVPST
ment. Buy land In one of the' good
counties of Missouri while it is yet
cheap. Healthy climate, -finest fruit
country, good water, planty of out
side range, fine oak timber. Perfect
title. Advanc sure to come. Only
$6.00 per acta 160 acres. 240 acres
480 acres, unimproved. Easy terms.'
W. K. Royce, Rich Hill, Mo.
FOR SALE FIVE-ACRE TRACT"
with six room house, good cellar,
fine barn and other outtfiiildings
well fruited at northeast' corner
FOR SALE—OCEANA IS THE MOST,
productive county in Michigan.
Fruit, grain, clover, alfalfa, vege
tables, stock, poultry, fine climate.
Send for list. J. D. S. Hanson, Hart,/via
Mich. j*
fiM
WANTED.
WANTED LADY OR GENTLEMAN,
of fair education to travel for a firm
of $250,000.00 capital. Salary $1,072
per year and expenses paid weekly.
Address with stamp, J. A. Alexander,
Ottumwa, Iowa.
WANTED SHOATS ANY SIZE,
Geo. R. Glltner, R. F. D., No. 1, Ot«
tumwa, Iowa.
WANTED—ON NIGHT OF OCT. 17,.
1904, as the Wabash southbound*
train was entering Kirkvllle, Mo., a
man had an altercation with the
conductor. There were two passen
gers on the car platform who were^
witnesses to what happened. These
two men will confer a great favor
by addressing F. P., care Courier,
Ottumwa, Iowa.
WANTED—HORSE CLIPPERS TO
sharpen any kind sharpened on
short notice and satisfaction guar-,
anteed. G. G. Thomas.
Fitted-Store.
Office Over Culleo's
EGGS—BARRED PLYMOUTH
ROCKS.
Cockerel scoring
90 points, scored
by W. S. Russell,
mated to seven
choice pullets of
beautiful shape
and fine plumage,
procured from- the
yards of J. E.
C. J. H0PP & SON
The Old Reliable House Movers.
will raise or move your buildings, any
where, any distance, on short notice.
Twenty years' experience. Satisfaction
guaranteed. For estimates address
C. J. HOPP & SON, EDDYVILLE,
Iowa, or leave word with O. H. SEI-,
FERT, EDDYVILLE.
J. COLLINGWOOD, Violin Maker.
228 East Main. Ottumwa, lowy
BUY A FARM
We have the .best bargains In
Southeastern Missouri. We sold 28
men lands last month. We own and
control 100,000 acres, the finest farm
land in that country. Write today for
our maps and description. Address
JOHN P. APPLEQUIST, Mgr.
217-20 Manhattan Bldg., Dept. 8.
Chicago, III.
$100 A WEEK FOR DR. CHADWICK.
Husband of Convicted Woman to Play
Organ in New York.
Plainfleld, N. J., March 24.—Dr.
Chadwick, husband of Mrs. Cassie L.
Chadwick, recently convicted of con
spiracy at Cleveland, is soon to come
to New York as organist for Abram
Nelson, half brother of the late
Msi
il
Gray also eight
beautiful yearling
hens weighing 8
lbs.- This stock
was secured from the yards of S. V.
Latchum. Per thirteen $1.00, if ship
ped 50 cents If taken from yard. Sat
isfaction guaranteed. W. E. Arm
strong, Libertyville, Iowa.
Fine French
Iw.iJ
rWi
~"£'A
I O I N S
$10.00, $15.00 and $25.00. All
readjusted by myself. Ele
gant Bows and Cases. Finest
Italian Strings, finest goods obtainable
for the money. Artistic repairing!
A"
•at
G.
Mrs.
Charles L. Fair, who purchased lot
$25,000 all the belongings in
Mrs,
Chadwlck's handsome home on Euclid
avenue, Cleveland, included In the lot
was a magnificent-organ, for which
she paid $9,000. and which Nelson will
bring to New York and place on. exhi
bition. Dr. Chadwick, who Is
a
skilled
instrumentalist, has agreed for a, sal
ary of $100 per week to play the
while it remains on view.
ALABAMA WANTS WAR
IV frr V. |duced a resolution asking for .the .ra*
Read the Want Columns today. turn of the flag. fj'
brgau
FLAG.
Madison, Wis., March 24.—The gov
ernor of Alabama has asked the Wis
consin assembly for the battle flag oil
the First Alabama regiment, captured
by the Fiftieth Wisconsin regiment at
Island No. 10 April 7, 1862. ,em
blyman Norcross,
•u
department com­
mander of the Grand Army, has lntro-

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