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Ottumwa tri-weekly courier. [volume] (Ottumwa, Iowa) 1903-1916, April 02, 1908, Image 1

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VOLUME 60
NEW OFFICERS
OF THE NIB
TAKE UP REINS
FORMER VICE PRESIDENT LEWIS
SUCCEEDS MITCHELL AS HEAD
—JOHN P. WHITE OF lv.WA NOW
THE VICE PRESIDENT.
IDLE MEN NUMBER
QUARTER MILLION
MINERS OUT IN NEARLY ALL BI
TUMINOUS DISTRICTS AWAIT­
ING SETTLEMENT OF SCALE—
.15,000 OUT IN IOWA.
Indianapolis, Ind., April "L At the
'r. international headquarters of the
United Mine Workers of America to
day, Vice President Thomas L. Lewis
of Ohio, succeeded John Mitchell as
president of the organization, W. D.
Ryan of Illinois succeeded Lewis as
vice president and J. P. White of
Iowa succeeded W. B. WilBon of cen
tral Pennsylvania district as secre
tary-treasurer.
Quarter of a Million Idle.
A quarter of a million bituminous
miners are idle today cn account of
the failure of the United Mine Work
ers of America and the coal operators
to agree upon a wage scale to go into
effect today. District meetings are be
ing held in an effort to reach an agree
ment in the different states and it is
believed the strike will be of short du
ration. The central Pennsylvania and
Indiana mines are in operation, but
all the miners of western Pennsylva
nia, Ohio, trans-Mississippi and the
1 outlying districts have quit work.
South May Return to Work.
Kansas City, April 1.— It was be
Heved here today that 85,000 coal mln
1
TtfJesouri, Kansas,
.. ,-and Arkansas, who are enjoying a hol
't'^iday today, would return to vpork to
..fmorrow pending a settlement of the
difficulties of the southwestern inter
state coal operators' association. The
operators' and miners' conventions
met. separately this morning, each to
take steps looking to an early con
ference.
Illinois Miners Hopeful.
Chicago, April 1. The Chicago
coal mine operators were inclined
today to minimize the seriousness of
the situation growing out of the shut
ting down of the coal mines in Illi
nois and other states. The operators
as a rule expressed themselves as
confident that the cessation of work
will not last more than two or three
weeks at most.
Anthracite Men Busy.
Philadelphia, April 1.—Unlike the
situation in the soft cqal fields when*
thousands of men are idle because of
wage disagreements, conditions in the
anthracite field of eastern Pennsyl
vania so far as employment, is con
cerned is growing brighter than they
have been for six months. It is ex
pected the mines throughout these
regions will work a full blast all sum
mer.
Illinois Mines Closed.
Springfield, 111.. April 1.—All the
,coal mines of Illinois are closed to
day and will remain so until an agree
ment between the operators and min
ers is reached.
40,000 Idle in Pittsburg.
Pittsburg, April 1.—About forty
thousand miners in the Pittsburg dis
trict are idle today. An effort will be
made Thursday by the miners and
operators to amicably adjust their
slight differences.
15.000 Idle in Iowa.
Des Moines, April 1.—Every coii
mine in Iowa closed today. Fifteen
thousand men are idle.
HAT MONEY FOR CHURCH.
Women of a Missouri Town to Forego'
Easter Bonnets in Order to
Pay Church Debt.
Chillicothe. Mo., April tt Several
dozen women, members of the First
?'Tethodist Episcopal church in this
city, have shown their devotion to
their church in a unique manna-. Thev
have agreed to foreco that, article of
dress so dear to t.h° feminine heart, I
the Easter hat, in order that a church
debt of $700 mnv be naid.
A year aero the Ladies' Working so
ciety of this church took upon itself
p.
debt of #700 for the church. The
debt, is still in existence, and the
leaders of the society have been at
ibeir wits' mds as to 'the best means
for raisin^ it. Recently one of the so
cietv members hit upon th» plsn o*
asking the members to nut the money
thev expected to spend for Easter
honnets into a fund for paying off the
debt.
Kpen
S"?nt
A
fcr a "Men-"
^•ManAia
*.<p></p>Itnmtpa
^tt, ii.
One Time in pa 1 of
Schools Here, Was Mayor
For Several Terms and
DR. W. L, ORR. ONE OF OTTUMWA'S
PIONEERS, DIES IN BOSTON TODAY
Leader in Public
Life
WILL BRING BODY
BACK TO OTTUMWA
Dr. W. L. Orr, aged So, one of Ot
tumwa's oldest pioneers died this
morning at the home of nis son John
B. Orr, of Boston, Mass., where he with
his daughter, Mrs. Don A. Pool and
husband had gone last January to lo
cate permanently.
The passing of Dr. Orr, removes one
of the foremost citizens of Ottumwa,
who during his long term of residence
here was ever identified with many
matters of local interest in the city.
He was for a time principal of the
public schools of the city and in politt
cal life was prominent, being mayor,
alderman, clerk and justice of the
peace at different times during his
life in Ottumwa.
A Life Well Spent.
William L. Orr, was born at Wash
ington, Washington county, Pa., April
12, 1823. He received his classical edu
cation at Washington college Pennsyl
vania, and a 'medical education at
Jefferson medical college of Philadel
phia. In 1844 he moved to Fairfield,
Iowa, and began the practice of medi
cine. Coming to Ottumwa in 1852, "he
entered the drug business and contin
ued in that business for several years.
From 1856 until 1858 he was principal
of the public schools here, after which
be resumed the practice of medicine.
In 1860 he was elected mayor of the
city and was reelected three times.
Saw Army Service.
In March 1862 he entered the
service of his country as as
sistant surgeon of the Third
Iowa volunteer cavalry and in Decem
ber of the twine promoted to
"the office of surgeoti of th« Twemy
first Iowa volunteer infantry, from
GASOLINE IS
TBAGEDY CAUSE
FATHER JUMPS INTO BED TO EX
TINGUISH FLAMES AND
DAUGHTER CATOHES FIRE.
Chattanooga, Tenn., April 1.—Jas.
F. Barnes, representative for the
Chattanooga News, and his little three
year-old daughter, were so badly
burned as a result of a gasoline ex
plosion that both died late yesterday
afternoon in a hospital.
Barnes mistook a can of gasoline for
one of ooal oil, and was beginning to
light a fire in the stove when the ex
plosion occurred.
Barnes enveloped in flames, sprang
into a bed and tried to wrap himself in
the covers, but the pain was so in
tense he jumped out of a window and
ran into the yard screaming with
agony, where neighbors came to his
assistance.
The burns extended all over the
body, and when he was taken to a hos
pital portions of the flesh dropped off.
His daughter, who was in the bed into
which Barnes sprang, was badly
burned, the bed clothes having taken
lire.
Close Gambling Houses.
La Crosse, Wis., April 1. Every
gambling house in La Crosse was
closed today under orders of the
mayor. Houses of ill repute were giv
en two weeks to close. It is expected
the next step will be the closing of sa
loons on Sunday. La Crosse has had
a reputation of being one of the most
wide open cities in the country.
Drawfn:* up list pledrfne: ifs sign- yesterday of the grievance committee
ers to such a promise, she first signed of the engineers, firemen, conductors,
it and then took it to the other mem- trainmen and switchmen a committee
hers of the society. The proposition was appointed to call on the officials
was a severe t^st on he loyalty of of the Denver & Rio Grande immed
the women of the church, but they iatelv to protest against the nperat'on
were co.ual to th sarrilc^. Many of 1 of the equipment in its' present alieg
them signed the 1M and thus narreed ert state of dilapidation. 1'aiir.re io
to civf5 un the cas* thst would have comply with the request will result in
T,ridow
•he nirno^e of paying off that
standing debt.
iiiririrririiii'i IfeM
EMPYOYES SAY EQUIPMENT OF
ROAD IS DILAPIDATED AND
UNSAFE.
Denver, April 1.—At a meeting hera
for a' general r, rike of all the. employes
Ion? !on the system and the calling out af
''every shopman the Go ild lines.
FEDERAL
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DR. W. L. ORR,
Who Died at the Home of
in Boston Today.
JOHN W. CHASE OF BEACONFIELD
UP FOR ALLEGED BOOT
LEGGING.
A bootlegging case was taken up in
the federal court this morning, and
occupied all the forenoon and a short
time this afternoon.
The United States against Walter
W. Chase of Beasonsfleld, Ringgold
county, is the title of the case. Chase
claims that he always had government
licenses whenever he sold liquors.
Attorney Jo Jaques represented
Chase by the appointment of the
court. The defendant was most active
in his own behalf and not a word of
evidence came from witnesses' lips
but what he took it all in. He contin
ually explained the situation to At
torney Jaques and succeeded in mak
ing a good case for himself. Chase,
dressed in a common suit of clothes
and a blue flannel shirt, with a collar
rising above his coat, eye glasses on
the end of his nose, and his activity
in his own behalf, prompting the at
torney, and an occasional squirt at,
the cuspidore, made him rather an
amusing sight.
Grand Jury Discharged.
The gederal grand jury completed
its duties yesterday when the final re
port was made to the court. One ad
ditional indictment, making two in all,
was returned at this sitting of the
jury.
After thanking the jurors the court
dismissed them.
Among: the out of town peopde at-
Fairfield, Attorney L. W. Laughlin of
Mt. Ayr. Sheriff H. W. Terrell and
Deputy Sheriff M. W. Snethen of
Ringgold county.
Mississippi Bank Closes.
Jackson, Miss., April 1.—The Pike
county bank and Trust
OTTUMWA, WAPELLO COUNTY, IOWA, THURSDAY, APRIL 2,L?.T!S
MM
His Son,
which owing to ill health he resigned
in November 1864. He again engaged
in the drug business in 1876 continu
ing until 1878 when on October 8, he
was elected justice of the peace. At
an earlier date he had been alderman
and city clerk.
February 24, 1846 he was united in
marriage to Miss Ruth Baldwin, who
was born in Washington county, Pa.
To this union were born eight chil
dren, four of whom still survive him
as follows: Mrs. H. A. Kinnaman, of
Keokuk, Mrs. D. A. Pool, and John B.
Orr of Boston and Calvin McClintock
Orr, of Oakland, Cal.
Was a Presbyterian.
Dr. Orr was one of the first twenty
three members of the First Presby
terian church in this city and was
elected one of three ruling elders of
the church in this city in 1853. He
was ever a consistent member of this
church, being identified closely with
its history in the county since its
organization here.
The remains will be brought to this
city for burial and will arrive here
on Burlington No. 3 Saturday mornlug,
The funeral will be held from the First
Presbyterian church where a service
will b§ conducted by the pastor Rev.
•F. F. Stoltz at 3 p. m. Interrupt will
be in Ottumwa cemetery.
POPS GATHER
DELEGAtES ARRIVING TODAY FOR
QUESTION IS SIDESTEPPED.
tending the court today are the Cra.il Green, a colored tough. The
twins, attorneys, Crail ft Crail.
0
company
of
McComb City, capitalized at $100,000.
was placed in the hands of receivers
today. Depression in the lumber
trade and the curtailment of the work
ing sliors is assigned as the cause
of the failure.
Santa Fe Dividend.
New York, April 1.—The Santa Fe
railway company today declared its
semi-annual dividend of
21 Vx
per cent
on its common stock. This is a re
duction of a half of one per cent from
the last previous six months.
M. K. & T. chops Open.
Sedalia. Kas., A'jril i.—The Missou
ri, Kansas & Texas railway sbopy
here which were closed recently, re
opened today with a foroe of five hun
dred men.
nMltiWW-UiivAaw
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FIRST OF THE NATIONAL PAR­
TY MEETINGS PROHIBITION
GEN. COXEY WILL
BE THE CHAIRMAN
LEADER OF ARMY OF DISCON­
TENTED WILL CALL CONVEN­
TION TO ORDER—TOM WATSON
CHOICE FOR PRESIDENT.
St. Louis, April 1. Numerous del
egates to the populist national con
vention arrived today. It became evi
dent from expressions of the arrivals
that there small chance of the con
vention taking any stand against pro
hibition. The matter will certainly
come up hi the meeting of the commit
tee on resolutions and may be drag
ged into the debate on the floor of
the convention, but a considerable
number of the delegates are against
any plank in the platform touching
upon prohibition. The national com'
mittee of the people's party and var
ious organizations which are also to
take part in the convention met today
to complete arrangements for the
convention.
Plan Reorganized Party.
If the plans of its sponsors prevail
out of the convention in the name of
the people's party will come an organ
izat.ion its originators declare must be
reckoned with In the coming presiden
tial campaign.
It will stand for all represented by
the populist larty, will probably bear
that name and will receive new blood
from the affiliation of The Foderatted
People's party' clubs, the American
Monetary leajrue, the national pro
visional committee and other reform
organizations.
Delegates here are wearing little
white badges upon which are printed
"Delegate to the radical convention,"
and the assertion made that there
will be no affiliation with any political
body which does not accept the party
platform in full, nor will any condi
dates be indorsed save those nomi
nated in this week's convention.
Coxey for Temporary Chairman.
It was stated today that over 3.100
delegates will be present when
the convention assembles. J. S. Coxey.
organizer of "Coxey's army," is slated
for temporary chairman. Former Con
gressman M. W. Howard of Alabama
and Frank E. Richey of St. Louis are
mentioned for permanent chairman.
Unless present plans miscarry
Thomas E. Watson will'be nominated
for president. The Nebraska dele
gation is instructed for William J.
Bryan and the Alabama delegation
favors M. W. Howard but Watson ap
parently is far in the lead.
FRAUD CASE BEGUN
Conspiracy to Defraud Government in
Land Deals Alleged Against
Four.
Washington, D. C., April 1.—The
trial of the land fraud cases against
Frederick A. Hyde, John A. Benson,
Henry P. Dlmond and Joost H.
Schneider, involving an alleged con
spiracy to defraud the United States
out of valuable lands in several west
ern states was begun here today. Up
wards of two hundred witnesses from
fourteen western states are here for
the trial. It is believed the trial will
continue at least three months.
BLACKSMITH KILLED
Lewis Reitner, Struck by Companion
in a Des Moines Joint,
Dead.
Des Moines, April 1.—(Special)—
Lewis Rittner, a blacksmith aged 50
years, from Van-Meter was killed by
on the head from the flst of
affair occurred at 4 clock this morn-
ing in a tough joint on East Walnut
street.
FARSON.
Farson.—Rev. W. B. Smith will
preach here next Sunday morning and
evening.
George Green and wife, Clyde
Dickey and family and Enmet Orman
an'l wife spent. Sunday at the home of
G. W. Dickens and wife.
Mrs. Theo. Addison is still very
sick.
School will lr"Tin here'next Monday
with Miss Ava Shaw as teacher.
Mrs. S. E. Woodruff and daughters,
Icle and Aley. of Highland Center, at
tended church here last Sunday.
Dr. Henry and wife went to Ot
tumwa last Thursday.
Lee Scott went to Ottumwa Tuesday
evening On business.
Rev. Pettit and wife went to Des
Moines Monday.
Bryan on Way to Des Moines.
Lincoln. Neb.. April 1.—Williapi J.
Bryan leave.s today for Des Moines,
where he will deliver addressee to
morrow, following which he will trav
el through Kansas, Colorafio, and Ne
ibraska.
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American Marines
Land in Haiti to
Quell Rebellion
Pari6, April 1.—A dispatch
received here today from Port
au Prince, Haiti, says the situa
tion there is extremely grave,
that complete anarchy prevails
and that the American war
ships are preparing to land
troops.
Wben 6R. Greek laborer^, came to the
city on the 10:35 Milwaukee train
this morning and went to the Box
Car Loader and the Ottumwa Bridge
Co., works, learned of the condition
at the plants they immediately with
drew and refused to work.
The walkout of the Greeks followed
the efforts of a fellow Greek, residing
in Ottumwa who acted as interpreter
for the strikers. When informed that
a strike was in progress at the works
they immediately left the factories.
The men had come from points
along the Milwaukee mostly from
Davenport. On arriving at the factory,
the interpreter got busy and soon had
a small knot of men around him which
grew until the entire bunch were
listening to his talk.
As they filed down the Burlington
tracks toward the city a number of the
strikers were along the tracks and
shook hands with the men and patted
them on the back.
When seen today, President Phil
llps said that the men came of their
own free will looking for work and
that when they reached the works
they were dissatisfied with the ac
commodations. "The men didn't like
the accommodations and he.avy work,"
he said. "Five men went to work this
morning increasing the number to
about 30 men."
The companies had prepared cots
for the accommodation of workers.
These are placed in the works.
Guilty of Peonage, 7 Men Surrender.
St. Louis, Mo., April i.—Seven men
from southwest Missouri, who have
been convicted in federal court on the
charge of peonage surrendered to the
United States Marshal Horsey and
were taken by him today to the United
States prison at Leavenworth, Kas.,
to serve their terms.
Taft to Get Massachusetts.
Boston, April 1.—Returns of yester
day's state republican primaries today
show of the 1,550 delegates to the
state convention 901 are either pledg
ed or favorable to Taft and 649 are
unpledged.
Overcome by Gas.
South Omaha, Neb., April 1. Ten
men were overcome .by gas in the
Cudahy packing plant today when a
tank of ammonia gas exploded. Eight
were taken to the hospital in a ser
ious condition.
Brewery Workers Reach Settlement.
St. Louis, April 1.—In accordance
with the terms of settlement of the
Brewery workers strike agreed upon
last night the brewers today began
the reinstating of 3,500 striking work
men.
Admiral Evans at San Diego.
San Diego, Cal., April 1.—The bat
tleship Connecticut arrived off Coron
ado at 6 o'clock this morning. Ad
miral Evans is expected ashore soon.
The Connecticut will return to Magda
!ena Bay this afternoon.
Five Burglaries at Fairfield.
Fairfield, April 1.—Five burglaries
and attempted burglaries last night
bring the total to seventeen in three
w^eks. The robbers have made a suc
cessful get away in every case.
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ITS AN OLD TRICK BUT IT STILL WORKS
GREEKS AT PLANT FOOT OF SNOW
BUT WON'T STAY
OUT OF TOWN WORKERS RE
PLACE STRIKERS AT BOX CAR
LOADER THEN QUIT.
Senator Davis is
Fined $25 For
Disturbing Peace
Little Rock, Ark., April 1,—
As the result of yesterday's al
tercation on the street, Senator
Jefferson Davis was fined $25 In
police court today for disturbing
the peace. Deputy Prosecuting
Attorney Helm was fined $10
for assault.
Crookston, J&inn,, April 1.—^The en
tire Red River valley is in the grfp of
the worst blizzard-of. the winter. The
Great Northern and Northern Pacific
railroads, have taken down their snow
fences and trains are late as a re
sult. A foot of snow has fallen.
Floods in Kentucky.
Lexington, Ky., April 1.—The worst
flood in years prevails over central
and eastern Kentucky today. Heavy
rains have been falling almost contin
ually for 36 hours, and have caused
an overflow in all the streams. Many
families have been driven from their
homes. Traffic has been, greatly de
layed by landslides.
West Virginia Flood Bound.
Charleston, W. Va., April 1.—Fol
lowing heavy rains yesterday the
Kanawha, Guyandotte, Big Sandy riv
ers and their tributaries are at flood
stage. Considerable damage has been
reported but' no lives were lost. The
landslides are greatly interfering
with railroad traffic.
OPPOSE MISS ELKINS' WEDDING.
Italian Newspapers Are Against Mar
rlage to the Duke of the
Abruzzi.
London, April 1.—The Rome Corre
spondent of the Globe says the Italian
newspapers have initiated a violent
campaign against the proposed mar
riage between the duke of the Abruzzi
and Miss Elkins.
This change of attitude is duo to
the extravagances of American jour
nalism, against which a stream of in
dignation is poured out daily. Even
the Elkins family Is not spared.
Newspapers are taking the ground
that they should have taken steps to
shield the duke. The Globe's corre
spondent learns that provisional ar
rangements for the marriage have been
altered, .owing to the king's wish that
it should be celebrated in Ilatry. It
would be absolutely private and the
press would be excluded.
Gov. Guild Has Set Back.
Boston, April 1.—Governor Guild
suffered a setback during last night,
and is not in as good condition as
yesterday.
CHARGE AGAINST
DAY DISMISSED
ROOSEVELT'S ASSAILANT CHEER
ED WHEN CONFERENCE UP
HOLDS HIM.
New York, April 1.—The charges
preferred against Chancellor Day of
Syracuse university by the Rev.
George A. Cooke of Brandon, Vt., were
ruled out of court by Bishop Moore at
the opening of the 109th session of
the New York Methodist Episcopal
conference today. The bishop in dis
missing the charges said he regarded
the complaint against Day as an at
tack upon free speech and the de
cision was greeted with long contin
ued applause.
*Y«ws?
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rrr NUMBER 9*
IN MINNESOTA
NORTHWEST IS IN THE GRIP OF
THE WORST BLIZZARD OF
THE WINTER.
INDIANA SETS
FORTH CLAIMS
OF
AND INSTRUCTS FOR HIM.
TARIFF REVISION'
BROUGHTTO FORE
RESOLUTIONS FAVOR
#y
W
-Vts
The resolutions committee when it
went into se&rton'did not"e3Cpect"te be
able to read the platform before very
late this evening or tomorrow. At th)
opening of the convention this after
noon, Chairman Overstreet delivered
the keynote address, followed by
speeches by Senators Beveridge and
Hemenway and Governor Hanly, who
confined his talk to a discussion of
state issues.
Overstreet on the Tariff. a
Congressman Jesse Overstreet, thd
temporary chairman of the convention
made this reference to the tariff re
vision in his speech:
If the republican party was able
to take the reins of government after
the panic of 1893-1896, and rebutlfl
the prosperity of the country, that
party can be expected to restore busi
ness conditions which have suffered
from the recent panic. Indeed, it in
far better for the American people
to have six months of panic out of
eleven years of republican prosperity,
than to take the chances of six months
of prosperity out of eleven years ofi
democratic panic.
There will still be greater problems
to solve. The completion of the gen
eral scheme of corporate regulation ia
yet to be carried out. The purpose
is to possess a body of substantive law
under which just and proper regula
tion of great companies engaged in
interestate commerce will safeguard
the interest^ of great and small alike,
and guarantee equality of rights and
service to all. It Is of vital Import
ance that such legislation shall equal
ly safeguard the interests of the pub
lic, and avoid such extremes as may
cripple business, and obstruct the ex
tensions of the channels of commerce,
by making investments ursafe. The
completion of the Panama cai and
the work in respect to the Philippines,
are yet to be secured. If the schemes
of the general improvement of the
waterways of the country shall be en
tered upon it will require the same
Intelligence and care in the solution
of that problem as in the others which
have fallen to the lot of the republi
can party.
The republican party will make no
change in its general policies or its
general principles. It will continue to
stand unswervingly in Its position
relative to the gold standard of value
and whatever additional flnanoial leg
islation may be enacted will be in har
mony with that position. It will con
tinue its loyalty to and the protec
tion of American industries and Amer
ican labor and whatever changes It
may effect in tariff schedules will not
be out of harmony with the principle
of protection. Changed conditions
justify changes of scheduled, and tha
tariff will be revised. Certainly that
work cannot be left to the opposition.
Overstreet Lauds Fairbanks.
Congressman Overstreet voiced the""*
sentiment of Indiana for Fairbanks
when he said:
In the coming campaign, another
lustrious son of Indiana we hope may
be chosen to carry the banner of re-.^.
publican principles, and lead to Tio-'^
tory the hosts of the republican party,'' J|
in the person of Charles W. Fair-MI
banks. Cultured, trained, experienced^
In public affairs, honorable in pur
pose, upright In character, ambitious
for the success and happiness of all"
(Continued on page 8X.
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PLATFORM ADOPTED AT REPU»*
LICAN STATE CONVENTION
THERE ENDORSES FAIRBANKS
$
CALLING
SPECIAL SESSION OF
CONGRESS
IMMEDIATELY AFTER
TION TO FRAME
ELEC­
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Indianapolis, Ind., April 1.—
diana republicans went into state con
vention today to adopt a platform,
formally present to the country
Charles Warren Fairbanks, as their
choice for the presidency, instruct 80
Indiana delegates to the national eon
vent,ion to vote and persistently ^*ork
for his nomination, and to natna a
state ticket. Representative J«pq«
Overstreet was temporary chairman
and Representative J. O. Chaney was
made the permanent chairman.
Tariff and Liquor Questions Up.
The delegates at large to the nation*'
al convention will be Senators Beyer*
ldge and Hemenway, Governor Hanly
and James P. Goodrich, chairman, oil
the state committee.
It was agreed by a large majority
of the state leaders thai the most
prominent planks in the platform, in
addition to a strong resolution In
structing for Fairbanks, should be one
favoring local option for counties and
urging revision of the tariff by a spec
ial session of congress, to be called
immediately after election.
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